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  1. So I made my doctor's appt at the campus health at UofA, so the guy I saw was just a general practicioner, but he knew some urologists, so they took a urine sample, and he did a physical exam and listened to all the stuff I wrote out on paper to ask him. The urine sample had pus in it, so they are gonna put me on more antibiotics which I have to pick up from the pharmacy tomorrow morning, or afternoon if I'm having an episode in the morning. I only had maybe 4 or 5 jolts of pain this whole entire day today, so today was a good day, though it kinda sucks, cuz so far usually I think if anything my worst days are usually the day right after a really good day.

    Anyway, so the doc says he isn't sure what I have, he was just about 100% sure I didn't have testicular torsion, as this would normally result in a permanent, not occasional jolts of pain, and I would have been dialing 911 on day 1, it wouldn't be at all like this, and my balls would be dead and rotting by now etc, which they aren't since they still have pain and sensation in them etc, so it can't be testicular torsion.

    He thinks prostatitis, kidney stones, orchitis, etc are still possibilities, and he thinks I probably didn't fuck my dick up, and its just either most likely a testicular or prostate infection of some kind, which antibiotics would hopeully cure, or maybe kidney stones or something else possibly he wasn't sure.

    He said he would talk to the uroligists he knows, and then email me when he figured more stuff out after talking to the urologists he knows about my stuff.

    Anyway, so hopefully I won't have too many really really bad days between now and Dec 15th, although this is being pretty optimistic considering how bad it got recently, other than today, so I dunno.

    I mentioned that I smoke weed, but just as I thought, he didn't think it was relevant at all to my case, which seems pretty obv to me/ anyone know knows about weed (it doesn't just randomly give you huge stabbing pains in your groin, there's nothing in it that could do that etc).

    Since my friend drove me to the doctor's appointment, and afterwards I was feeling okay today, I hung out afterwards till now at his place. I played guitar hero II there for like 2 hours lol, like 1 hour when we were alternating 1 song each, and then he had to go eat with his brother and his aunt and uncle for an hour at Pei Wei and I gave him a $10 for him to bring back a mongolian beef, so I practiced this Nirvana song on medium (this is my first day ever trying guitar hero lol) and I went from where in the first few times I played I was failing easy mode, to where when he got back an hour later I was able to get 95% accuracy and came super clsoe to getting 5 stars on medium that song, I think it was heart-shaped box,, and also the Come With Me Wayward Son song from the South Park Guitar Hero episode lol, so I thought it was pretty neat how fast you can get better at that game. My friend usually gets like 97-99% on most of the songs on medium mode, and has passed a couple songs on hard mode, but one of his friends can pass a bunch of songs on expert mode, or as they call it when he does it "Nathan mode" lol. Then me and my friend and his brother all watched Superbad on dvd, which I hadn't seen yet till then, so that was a lot of fun, and I smoked a bunch of weed there, and picked up a lil green to last me through my last week and a half here before I'm back off to l.a.

    So I guess still not sure what I have, but I'll probably know more once I get scanned when I get back to los angeles. Or if it gets way too extreme and crazy in the next few days or something I guess I'd just go to the emergency room and see what's up, but hopefully it won't get to that.

    I'm starting to wonder cuz of how many sypmtoms I have whether maybe I coul dpossibly have TWO different things at the same time, like maybe I coincidentally have BOTH prostatis AND like orchitis or kidney stones or something at the same time, I dunno.

    Well, that's pretty much it for now, gl me lolz
  2. GL again. I hope they figure out what is wrong soon.
  3. Your dick condition is in my prayers. Wait, wtf did i just say...
  4. glad your dick is okay and there is still potential for little bfactors running around
  5. lollllllllllllllllllllll @ "little bfactors" hahahahaha I dunno why that sounds so funny
    Thread Starter
  6. Ouch. Good luck, buddy.

    I hate going to the doctor. There were a few years there where I thought for sure I had testicular cancer, but didn't want to get it checked out. Now I'm pretty sure I don't have it, simply because it's been like seven years since I first thought I had it and I figure something would have happened with it by now. Anyway, good luck me as well.
  7. hmmm...i don't think i'd be content with your appt. bfactor. i would insist on the catscan immed. this isn't something you want to "hope" doesn't flare up over the next 10 days or so. if it's kidney stones, a simple ultra sound can diagnose it. it sounds to me like your doctor doesn't have a fucking clue and is hoping his collegue will provide some answers. he should have sent you directly to ultrasound, catscan, etc. i would either go back tomorrow, or go to the er and get some definate answers. just my thoughts.
  8. beki knows... trust me (O_-)

    if that were my piece id try the emergency room. imaginewalking around with just 2 legs... =[
  9. You got EVERYTHING!

    Dont die tho, that would suck.
  10. Your doctor is partially incorrect regarding testicular torsion.

    testicles can temporarily torse (twist) and untwist, which can cause temporary intermittent severe pain (see the cnn article linked below and the highlighted portion of article below). Its when they twist and stay twisted that causes the testicle to lose all blood supply and "rot".

    I'm not saying that's what you have, but i just wanted to point out that torsion can be temporary intermittent pain.

    Since your urine has "pus" in it, that makes a couple things more and less likely. He didn't mention "blood" in your urine, did he? Since he did not, that makes kidney stones very unlikely. Also kidney stones don't really result in "jolts" of pain. They result in severe pain that lasts until you pass the stone from your ureter into your bladder. The fact that it has pus in it makes the infectious processes (epididymitis, prostatitis, and orchitis) much more likely.

    I bet your urologist will recommend a scrotal ultrasound.

    I think most likely its prostatitis, epididymitis, or orchitis (in that order). Less likely torsion. Much less likely kidney stones.

    here's a good article talking about intermittent testicular torsion:

    <H1>Torsion: A cause of testicular pain</H1>
    October 15, 1999
    Web posted at: 11:43 AM EDT (1543 GMT)


    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=215 align=top border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><HR align=left width=170 SIZE=1> In this story:

    What is testicular torsion?

    Treatment for intermittent torsion

    RELATEDS

    <HR align=left width=170 SIZE=1> </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    By Steven Gange, M.D.

    (WebMD) -- At age 18, Josh began experiencing recurrent pain and swelling in his right testicle. Five years later, the symptoms have continued. The pain occurs spontaneously and usually lasts an hour before subsiding. When the pain is absent, the testicle feels smooth and soft -- like a normal testicle. What could be the cause?

    Testicular pain can stem from any number of sources, but in Josh's case, his symptoms and history suggest a condition known as intermittent testicular torsion, which can be confirmed in a physical examination.

    <A name=0>What is testicular torsion?</A>

    The testicle is attached to the body by the spermatic cord, which is made up of nerves, blood vessels, the vas deferens (the tubes that carry sperm) and muscle fibers. Torsion occurs when the cord twists, cutting off blood flow to the testicle. Most testicles are well supported in the scrotum and can't twist. Those that do twist tend to lack good scrotal support and hang free, like a bell clapper.

    Torsion occurs most commonly between the ages of 12 and 18, the years when testicles are growing rapidly. &quot;Acute torsion&quot; usually comes on suddenly and requires an operation within approximately six hours of onset in order to restore blood flow and ultimately save the testis.

    &quot;Intermittent torsion&quot; is a rare condition in which a patient experiences recurrent episodes of scrotal pain caused by temporary twisting of the spermatic cord.

    It's much more common for males to experience sudden, acute testicular torsion than years of intermittent torsion. It's believed that during episodes of intermittent torsion, the spermatic cords are becoming untwisted, or &quot;detorsed,&quot; either on their own or as the man manipulates his testicle to try to alleviate the pain. (Even in the case of acute torsion, doctors can manually untwist the testicle to restore blood flow as temporary relief prior to surgery.)

    Intermittent torsion is difficult to diagnose. It requires careful examination and often an ultrasound or special X-ray during an episode of pain to demonstrate diminished blood flow to the affected testis.

    <A name=1>Treatment for intermittent torsion</A>

    Anyone experiencing sudden testicular pain should seek immediate medical help. If a patient is experiencing recurrent testicular pain, he should see a urologist. If diagnosed with intermittent torsion, he can be treated with an orchiopexy (a procedure to fix the testicle more firmly to the wall of the scrotum).

    Since it is likely that this bell-clapper deformity exists on both sides, men with intermittent torsion should have both testicles fixed. This outpatient procedure takes less than an hour and is performed through a small incision in the scrotum while the patient is under general anesthesia.

    Ignoring the problem or choosing not to have surgery may result in the loss of a testicle.

    <CENTER>Copyright 1999 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved.

    fyi, here's a good article designed for health professionsals regarding testicular torsion:

    Background: Testicular torsion is a true urologic emergency and must be differentiated from other complaints of testicular pain because a delay in diagnosis and management can lead to loss of the testicle. In adolescent males, testicular torsion is the most frequent cause of testicle loss. </CENTER>

    Pathophysiology: The testicle is typically covered by the tunica vaginalis, a potential space that encompasses the anterior two thirds of the testicle and where fluid from a variety of sources may accumulate. The tunica vaginalis attaches to the posterolateral surface of the testicle and allows for little mobility of the testicle within the scrotum.
    In patients who have an inappropriately high attachment of the tunica vaginalis, the testicle can rotate freely on the spermatic cord within the tunica vaginalis (intravaginal testicular torsion). This congenital anomaly, called the bell clapper deformity, results in the long axis of the testicle to become oriented transversely rather than cephalocaudal. This congenital abnormality is present in approximately 12% of males, 40% of which have the abnormality in the contralateral testicle as well. The bell clapper deformity allows the testicle to twist spontaneously on the spermatic cord, causing venous occlusion and engorgement, with subsequent arterial ischemia causing infarction of the testicle. Experimental evidence indicates that 720° torsion is required to compromise flow through the testicular artery and result in ischemia.
    In the neonatal age group, the testicle frequently has not yet descended into the scrotum, where it becomes attached within the tunica vaginalis. This mobility of the testicle predisposes it to torsion (extravaginal testicular torsion). Inadequate fusion of the testicle to the scrotal wall, moreover, typically occurs within the first 7-10 days of life.

    Frequency:
    • <LI>In the US: Incidence of torsion in males younger than 25 years is approximately 1 in 4000. Torsion more often involves the left testicle.
      Of the cases of testicular torsion that occur in the neonatal population, 70% occur prenatally and 30% occur postnatally.
      </LI>
    Mortality/Morbidity: This urologic emergency requires prompt diagnosis, immediate urologic referral, and rapid definitive treatment for salvage of the testicle.
    A salvage rate of 100% is found in patients who undergo detorsion within 6 hours of pain; 20% viability rate if detorsion occurs after 12 hours; and 0% viability if detorsion is delayed greater than 24 hours.
    Sex: Testicular torsion affects males only.
    Age: Testicular torsion most often is observed in males younger than 30 years, with most aged 12-18 years. The peak age is 14 years, although a smaller peak also occurs during the first year of life.

    <script language=JavaScript1.2 type="text/javascript"><!-- var jstranid = getTranId();var jssite = getTopicSite();var jsaffiliate = getTopicAffiliate();var jsssp = getTopicSsp();var jsartid = getTopicArtid();var jscg = getTopicCg();var jspub = getTopicPub();var jspubs = getTopicPubs();var jsct = getuserct();var jspf = getuserpf();var jsusp = getuserusp();var jsstate = getuserst();var jsocc = getuserocc();var jstid = getusertid();document.writeln('<scr' + 'ipt language="JavaScript1.2" type="text/javascript" charset="ISO-8859-1"' +' src="http://as.emedicine.com/js.ng/transactionID=' + jstranid + '&amp;tile=' + jstranid +'&amp;site=' + jssite + '&amp;affiliate=' + jsaffiliate +'&amp;ssp=' + jsssp + '&amp;artid=' + jsartid +'&amp;cg=' + jscg + '&amp;pub=' + jspub +'&amp;pubs=' + jspubs +'&amp;ct=' + jsct + '&amp;pf=' + jspf +'&amp;usp=' + jsusp + '&amp;st=' + jsstate +'&amp;occ=' + jsocc + '&amp;tid=' + jstid + '&amp;pos=411"></scr' + 'ipt>');// --&gt;</script><script language=JavaScript1.2 type="text/javascript" charset="ISO-8859-1" src="http://as.emedicine.com/js.ng/transactionID=26793139&amp;tile=26793139&amp;site= 1&amp;affiliate=2&amp;ssp=45&amp;artid=10010573&am p;cg=ckb&amp;pub=410&amp;pubs=410&amp;ct=&amp;pf=0 &amp;usp=0&amp;st=&amp;occ=0&amp;tid=0&amp;pos=411 "></script>

    <A name=section~clinical> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="99%"><TBODY><TR bgColor=#333399><TD></TD><TD vAlign=center bgColor=#333399 height=24>CLINICAL </TD><TD align=right bgColor=#333399>Section 3 of 10 </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=3><TABLE class=11pxarial cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=1 width="99%"><TBODY><TR><TD>Author Information Introduction Clinical Differentials Workup Treatment Medication Follow-up Miscellaneous Bibliography
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    History:
    • <LI>History includes a sudden onset of severe unilateral scrotal pain.</LI>
    • <LI>As many as 50% of patients have a history of prior episodes of intermittent testicular pain that has resolved spontaneously (intermittent torsion and detorsion).</LI>
    • <LI>Onset of pain can occur more slowly, but this is an uncommon presentation of torsion.</LI>
    • <LI>Torsion can occur with activity, be related to trauma, or develop during sleep and includes the following:</LI>
      • <LI>Scrotal swelling</LI>
      • <LI>Nausea and vomiting (20-30%)</LI>
      • <LI>Abdominal pain (20-30%)</LI>
      • <LI>Fever (16%)</LI>
      • <LI>Urinary frequency (4%)</LI>
    Physical:
    • <LI>Involved testicle painful to palpation; frequently elevated in position when compared with the other side</LI>
    • <LI>Horizontal lie of the testicle</LI>
    • <LI>Enlargement and edema of the testicle; edema involving the entire scrotum</LI>
    • <LI>Scrotal erythema</LI>
    • <LI>Ipsilateral loss of the cremasteric reflex</LI>
    • <LI>Usually, no relief of pain upon elevation of scrotum (elevation may improve the pain in epididymitis [Prehn sign])</LI>
    • <LI>Fever (uncommon)</LI>
    Causes:
    • <LI>Congenital anomaly; bell clapper deformity</LI>
    • <LI>Undescended testicle</LI>
    • <LI>Sexual arousal and/or activity</LI>
    • <LI>Trauma</LI>
    • <LI>Exercise</LI>
    • <LI>Active cremasteric reflex</LI>
    • <LI>Cold weather</LI>
    <A name=section~differentials> <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="99%"><TBODY><TR bgColor=#333399><TD></TD><TD vAlign=center bgColor=#333399 height=24>DIFFERENTIALS </TD><TD align=right bgColor=#333399>Section 4 of 10 </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=3><TABLE class=11pxarial cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=1 width="99%"><TBODY><TR><TD>Author Information Introduction Clinical Differentials Workup Treatment Medication Follow-up Miscellaneous Bibliography
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    [/b]Appendicitis, Acute
    Epididymitis
    Fournier Gangrene
    Hernias
    Hydrocele
    Orchitis
    Pediatrics, Appendicitis

    Other Problems to be Considered:
    Traumatic rupture
    Traumatic hematoma
    Torsion of testicular appendage
  11. Anyway, yea Beki, I mean, there's a hospital very close to my appt, so worst case scenario if I have more major attacks tomorrow or the next day or something I'll probably just drive myself down to the E.R. or just call an ambulence if I'm too pwnt to drive. But basically, there's not really anything it could be where I would absolutely need immediate curing to prevent permanent damage, cuz we've already basically ruled out testicular torsion, and that would be the only thing where I'd need to get it taken care of IMMED to avoid permanent damage (he felt my balls obv during physical, and so even if I had some weird version of testicular torsion where it was only just occuring slightly at random points throughout the day, which is NOT how testicular torsion is supposed to be (it's supposed to be a CONSTANT pwnage for just hours on end, not something like what I have, he probably would've been able to easily diagnose it when he was messing with the balls just by twisting or poking them in a way where I'd be like OHHHH SHIIIIT OWWWWWWWWWWWW when he did it, etc, so really like 99.9% not testicular torsion)

    And then all the other stuff sucks, but isn't stuff that would need super immed treatment to avoid super bad longterm stuff happening, for example, for any of the infection type stuff possibilities, like orchitis or prostatitis, I am taking care of that first thing tomorrow morning, and then so I'm already on top of that, and then, if its something else, like kidney stones, or a hernia, or testicular or prostate cancer etc none of these would matter whether I immediately solved these tomorrow or 9 days from now if you see what I mean, other than just trying to get the pain shit done with asap which would be nice.

    So pretty much if it gets all insano bad I'll 911 it or something if necessary, but otherwise I'm just gonna see what happens with the antibiotics and see what happens, I guess.

    The fact that I still have full sensation in both balls and can get boners at will is a good sign though as far as me not having any permanent damage to the important shit it looks like, given that this has been going on for around 2 months now. So pretty much hopefully its not cancer which would be extremely unlikely, and its just orchitis or someething hopefully would I guess probably be the best of the possibilities.

    Also I told my parents all my symptoms, so my mom has been talking with docs in los angeles, and they also said theyd need to scan me, but it sounded like probably kidney stones/ prostatitis/ orchitis/ hernia/ something like that most likely, but not sure, but that obv seemed like good idea to put me on an antibiotic not similar to levaquin (since I've already tried and failed with levaquin) given that there was pus in my urine.

    I appreciate the concern beki, but I think I pretty much have it on lockdown no matter what happens, I should be able to react accordingly, we'll just have to see.

    Thanks everyone for the support etc, but to be honest there's probably lots of people who have it worse than me right now, despite all these random stabbing pains in my fuckin balls lol, I mean shit lol did you guys see that movie Planet Terror? In one scene they are in a doctor's office, and one of the docs is scrolling through a bunch of these horrible images of some guy who caught some crazy disease of in a remote country where his whole entire ass area, and balls were like a greyish white from rotting away, and his dick was swollen to the size of a softball, and the doc said when he tried to piss the piss would just squirt out of a bunch of the different abscesses that were all over his dick, so they just chopped it off. Guess what. That was REAL. That was fucking real, omg holy shit.... I watched the special features and the director of Planet Terror gave the inside story on that and those pics on the computer screen in the movie were ACTUAL case pictures from a real life guy who had this happen lol. So yea, I mean no matter how bad it gets, I can always say, at least I'm not that guy lolololz

    Gonna get high now and try to relax
    Thread Starter
  12. read below regarding intermittent torsion, plz
  13. Yea, just read it. Sounds like this could still be a possibility. I guess I am not really risking losing a testicle though by not being in the ER right now at this very moment already though, because in order to get to the point where you could lose a ball from this, it would have to be not jolts of pain, but the full-on constant pain mode would for sure happen during the part where my ball would die, if it got to that point, so as soon as it went into full-on constant pain mode (which has never happened yet, only these occasional 0.1 secocnd long jolts of pain) I would just have to call 911 as it would immediately be evident what was going on, and then they could save me in time etc if I understand all this correctly (given that some people have had intermittent torsion for years it says in some cases, meaning as long as its intermittent, and not constant, its "safe" to some extent at least temporarily or something.
    Thread Starter
  14. correct. i'm surprised your doc did not know of this possibility. like the 2nd article below says, 50% of people with acute torsion report prior intermittent episodes of testicular pain.

    I would just make sure to get an ultrasound, so it can be diagnosed, and be treated before it does become emergent.

    scrotal ultrasound can also diagnose things like epididymitis, orchitis, inguinal hernia, as well as other testicular abnormalities.
  15. okay, well i'm sure everything will be fine...i was more concerned with you having to deal with the pain. i really don't see it as anything that is going to cause permanent damage. it's probably just some sort of infection that the antibiotics will take care of, but i tend to lean on the side of caution. anyhoo, keep us updated k. gl.
  16. my guess is aids!
  17. Am I the only one who opens a bfactor thread chanting." Be long winded! Be logn winded!!!" Then when it is I do a woohoo kind of thing with a fist pump.

    When it isnt I get a bit sad.
  18. can we get an MSPaint?
  19. glad to hear that it was nothing really serious like lepracy of the groin. keep us abreast with your progress.

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