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  1. Hey ot, dont post here much but here goes. I'm a young guy looking for my first real job. I'd imagine there's a lot of that around here, so I'll try to start a thread about it where you more experienced ot'ers can help out us younger people find and land jobs. Obviously a job search involves a lot of leg work that we have to do on our own, but I've noticed there are many more subtle aspects to it that people who've had to find a few jobs (or better yet, employers) will know much more about than someone like me.

    My question: I am 21 y.o. seeking my first "real" job. Iye, what is sop regarding professional references? Should I call my former supervisor/co-worker before-hand to inform them before I actually list them as a reference? Is it ok to ask them what they'll say about me? In my case, I've been working as a "temp" (tho full time) for 9 months for this company. Would it be acceptable to list current co-workers as references?
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  2. I live in Hollywood. Only way to get into show business is to offer sexual favors to old rich Jewish men. How I got where I am at least

    I'd imagine George Carlin's rules of the road apply most places
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  3. If you're having BigEarn problems i feel bad for you son, i got 99 problems but a job ain't one.
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  4. Also, why would you waste year 21 by getting a real job? Planning to get married by 23 too?
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  5. I wouldn't put anyone down as a reference before giving the person a heads up 1st.
    Don't lie on your application, with today's economy employers can be picky, and if you put down you have a degree from School X, they're gonnna check. Plus you don't want to end up like the Yahoo CEO that said he had a Computer Science degree which wasn't even offered when he graduated.
    Polish up your resume. Read, re-read, give it to a friend to read, google resumes that get you hired, compare good resumes to yours and update yours accordingly.
    When you're interviewing pause for a few seconds after the interviewer asks their question, give it some thought then answer.
    Get a business card from every person that interviews you, after you're done interviewing send thank you notes thanking them for their time, reiterating why you're a good fit for the job and the perspective company.
    Wear a suit and tie!!
    Edited By: rebelfd May 11th, 2012 at 02:44 AM
    Reason: you're vs your ftw
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  6. Aim low.

    Sounds like a smart ass answer, but the reality is that there are a lot more people looking for jobs these days. People with more experience and better resumes.

    When I say aim low, it means that you have to accept positions that offer opportunity for growth that may be below your level of ability. The best chances for getting that first good job is to get promoted from that crappy job. Do that crappy job well. Do extra stuff (without neglecting your crappy job). Make it so that they want to keep you around and give you better opportunities.

    By doing this, you will eventually end up with being that guy with more experience and a better resume for when you go after your next job.

    Oh - clean up your facebook. Seriously.
     
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  7. - Did you graduate from college? If so, your college should have a place they post job listings. I went through that and scored a ton of interviews.

    - Take pretty much any interview for practice even if there is a 10% chance you might want the job. Listen to what they have to say and the more interviews you do, the better you will be.

    - Talk to the interviewer as though they are your friend. I always found asking interviewers how they ended up in their position, etc build a bond with them and we always hit it off. Obviously don't ask personal questions but there is nothing wrong with asking them questions. One I love to use is give me a example of a typical day in the position of the job I am interviewing for.

    - Don't underestimate low level positions at companies. The first gig I got I was technically a person in a "flex pool" which was a full time employee, but you are working in a bunch of different areas until you settled into a permanent position. Just getting a foot in the door is always a good thing and you can easily work your way into a good position through a bit of hard work.

    - Don't be the guy holding out for a 60-70k starting job. You can take a 35k starting job and use it to get a 45-50k job in 6 months or so as long as you actively keep looking for a new job. There is nothing wrong with using a job to get a better job, especially when you are new to working and young.

    - Dress like you own the place. Shirt/tie/suit jacket/shiny shoes, the whole deal. Have swag.
    Edited By: TheBigEarn May 11th, 2012 at 02:52 AM
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  8. Derk a derb!
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  9. I interview people daily - some for $10.00 an hour jobs and some for 150K plus. It is amazing how poorly some people prepare for an interview and how well others prepare.

    Example - today I asked a guy why he left his last job - his answer - "I was always late...(so they fired me)" How do you think that one went?

    I think the biggest thing for me is to be prepared. I ask people "Do you know anything about this company?" If they say no, I just saw the sign and came in, that my alter my decision from someone that actually took the time to learn a few things about us.

    Like someone before me said, ask questions. When I ask someone "what questions do you have for me?" and they ask either "Am I hired?" or "Nothing really..." that leave an impression.
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  10. dont put your resume on the toilet and shit on it
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  11. Definitely don't use someone as a reference unless you ask them if you can. I would only use people that were your managers, not coworkers. I'm sure your resume is probably pretty bare right now but when you start applying for higher paying jobs I would recommend using a resume service. I used one and the guy completely revamped my resume and I got a couple of calls within a few weeks.
     
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  12. There's some solid advice ITT.

    I just wanted to agree with the guys saying to take whatever position you can get if there's potential for growth.

    A good friend of mine is making a killing right now, and he started out at the very bottom not too long ago. He was just willing to do everything that nobody wanted to do, and people notice that. He basically learned every job in his office by helping lazy people out with their busy work, and went from low-level employee to pretty damn valuable in a short amount of time.

    Just take whatever job you can get, work hard and move up fast.
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  13.  
    Originally Posted by mdshack14 View Post

    Definitely don't use someone as a reference unless you ask them if you can. I would only use people that were your managers, not coworkers. I'm sure your resume is probably pretty bare right now but when you start applying for higher paying jobs I would recommend using a resume service. I used one and the guy completely revamped my resume and I got a couple of calls within a few weeks.

    How does this work when you are interviewing when you have a job (and don't really want them to know) and your previous employers have policies where all they can say is yes you worked there
     
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  14. I don't know where you worked before but try to have a resume that looks somewhat professional.

    Don't worry about the references. A lot of employers don't even ask or call them.

    What kind of experience do you have? If you don't have a college degree then you can probably still get an entry level position doing sales. Like jtown said, you start at the bottom but you can work your way up and make a killing.

    Don't just take the first job that comes your way. Try to get some info about the company, see if you like the atmosphere, find out if there's growth/advancement potential. But most of all its your first real job so don't worry too much and just get your foot in the door cause you'll have a ton of other opportunities in the future. GL
    Edited By: QuEeNsKeD May 11th, 2012 at 04:20 PM
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  15.  
    Originally Posted by jtown1010 View Post

    There's some solid advice ITT.

    I just wanted to agree with the guys saying to take whatever position you can get if there's potential for growth.

    A good friend of mine is making a killing right now, and he started out at the very bottom not too long ago. He was just willing to do everything that nobody wanted to do, and people notice that. He basically learned every job in his office by helping lazy people out with their busy work, and went from low-level employee to pretty damn valuable in a short amount of time.

    Just take whatever job you can get, work hard and move up fast.


    I do like this advice, but I'd say to make sure to evaluate growth potential and the quality of company.

    Don't take a job that (you feel) you are overqualified for with a shitty company. Make sure that if you are going to go this route that it is with a company where you can see plenty of growth opportunity.

    Study up on behavioral interview questions and make sure that you have 4-5 really good situations the display leadership, organization, conflict, technical aptitude etc and be sure you can somehow tie each one of these situations back to every interview question you have read about.

    Do not be vague in your interview answers. When the interviewer asks you a question, take a moment, find your example and follow a very detailed answer structure.
    1. What was the situation? How did you approach it? How did you do it?
    2. Explain your thinking - why you selected that approach. Why did you choose to do it that way?
    3. What was the result? What was the impact?
    4. What did you take away from that experience?

    Don't give them the opportunity to ask for you to expand on what, why and how.

    I always like leading in by saying something like "I know my perceived weakness is going to be my experience, but I have done this, this this and this to give me this skill set that will really allow me to adapt, blah blah blah" I like taking all the weakness and leadership questions away from them before they even get a chance to ask them.

    Aside from interview advice, to be honest you just have to get lucky, study about any company you are applying for and send out a shit load of quality resumes,
    Edited By: Admiral May 11th, 2012 at 05:07 PM
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  16. All the answers you seek are in Doyle Brunson's Super system. Give it a read
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  17. When I interview people I always make sure they have yellow stained teeth from coffee. I'm impressed by candidates whom rock a hot cup of business before getting their day started.
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  18.  
    Originally Posted by vote4arealclown View Post

    All the answers you seek are in Doyle Brunson's Super system. Give it a read

    Lol, tried that path for a bit. Ramen noodles and spam get old suprisingly quick.

    A lot of great insight itt, ty all. No, I did not go to college but I recently got a CDL and have had a forklift cert, so I'm not completely useless lol. I'm definitely going to start interviewing for basically anything and everything I can just to get good at interviews, because I have gotten nervous in the few interviews I've had and it cripples my ability to express myself.

    Another question: the company I'm currently temping for is looking into hiring me. As part of that, they're doing a criminal history and credit history check. I have no criminal history, but my credit is shit. For those of you who may know, is that a big problem for employers? I want this job, and that's the only thing I'm worried about. I don't even get the point of a credit check.
    Edited By: Wild_Will May 12th, 2012 at 02:35 AM
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  19. I fell for that Certified Dentist License once, not again. f u el burro!
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  20. I'd say share with them your situation, the one thing you have going for you is they have already allowed you to work for them albeit in a temporary capacity.

    http://www.job-hunt.org/recruiters/h...t-issues.shtml
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  21. Add Milo to Rail
  22. ^^im a smoker and IMO that's reasonable. in a $+/- way it makes sense.
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  23. If you have a CDL and forklift certificate.

    Apply for a lumberyard piggyback / Spyder operator


    you are more "qualified" than normal drivers w/o forklift experience.
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