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See Where You Rank in Virginia

  1. We all like to look down and see AA when playing holdem. But, what is the best startiing hand in Omaha? One might think AAAA but it is hard for that hand to improve beyond a pair. Maybe it's AAKK? or KsQs3d4d, so you have two straights and two flushes working using aces that might flop? What is the strongest Omaha hand? What are the top five hands?
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  2. This question was answered right here :-)

    http://www.pocketfives.com/9F91590E-...E761FC188.aspx
    1
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  3. Thanks. I hate when I forget to search first. Bleh...damn newbs. This was even more than I was looking for because I did not even consider hi/lo. I was just thinking hi.
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  4. <SPAN>The above thread was for </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> Hi/ Lo. </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> hi is a different story...

    I'm going to restate that </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> and Hold’Em are very different despite the similarities in how the game plays. </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> doesn't emphasis starting hand requirements as much as Hold’Em and certainly not as much as stud. This makes limping-in more profitable strategy to see more flops in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> then in Hold’Em given that your starting hand has several profitable two card combinations. </SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>I’ll state again that there are six two card combinations with a four card hand.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>If you’re holding cards A B C D. Then your combinations are:</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>AB<SPAN> </SPAN>BC <SPAN> </SPAN>CD
    AC<SPAN> </SPAN>BD
    AD</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>So if you have a hand that has 3 or more strong starting hands it will probably become playable. Strong starting hand possibilities are Ax suited, bigger connectors (that still have the farthest reach), pairs, and three big cards that might have cavities, but can complete straights.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>Another important starting thing to remember when making hand selections in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> is can your hand make the NUTS. </SPAN><SPAN>It is very difficult for A2, A3, 23, 34, and cards with 5 or more cavities to make the nut hand, because bigger hands can beat them using the same straight draw, or pair, trip and boat potential. A lot of players when crossing over to Omaha from Hold'Em lose a lot of money playing second nut hands. Then they scream how the site is rigged. It's not. That's just the nature of Omaha.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>Suited cards go down in value unless they are matched up with the ace. It’s more frequent to have a flush to a flush in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> then it is in Hold’Em. Therefore, the Nut flush is the one you want to get involved with (You still occasionally run into straight-flushes with middle suited connectors, but the profit margin on the suited aspect of suited connectors isn’t has high as it is in Hold’Em).</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>Small and middle pairs go down in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> as well because htting a set in a ten handed </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> game is not as strong as in Hold’Em. I personally look at hitting the set in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> more like hitting a set with an under pair in stud, because of the surprise potential. When you make the bigger boat, say sevens full of deuces, it throws your opponent for a loop who was holding deuces full of kings.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>Marginal hands like KQ, KJ, QJ, go up in value in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha if you have more then one marginal hand combination in your hand</SPAN><SPAN>. So if your hand is contains three paint cards (including the ten and the ace) it’s a little stronger then just having two because you have more combinations. The domination factor isn’t quiet the same in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> as it is in Hold’Em. You’re really not looking to hit pairs and sets, you’re looking for nut straights and draws, you might just run into two pair, and trips along they way, and play accordingly. Having three cards close together means you should be looking for BIG straight draws. Look at example I used before (having A23 with a board of 4 5 9 is similar but there are even better draws when you take out the low) to see what a BIG straight draw is in Omaha. </SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>Now to the debate question, what is the best starting hand in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN>? There are two schools of thought with two similar hands. AKAK double suited on the aces, and AAJT double suited on the aces. Statistically speaking the AAKK has almost an insignificant edge (within tenths of a percent) on most other starting hands over the AAJT, but the AAJT has much better drawing potential while still maintaining the power of the Aces.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>This would probably be a good place to state that the power of AA in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN> is nothing even close to the power of AA in Hold’Em. AAxx were xx doesn’t match up with the aces or each other is a misleading garbage hand while at full table. My defense is that if you’re working with a hand that has one good combination, and I’m working with a hand that has six good combinations, I’m much more likely to hit and crack those aces leaving you without anything to bail yourself out. I’m also going to point out that XXXX of anything is the saddest and worst hand in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN>. It’s one of those hands where you should have been playing </SPAN><SPAN>Caribbean</SPAN><SPAN> stud, and provides nothing for you in </SPAN><SPAN>Omaha</SPAN><SPAN>.</SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>

    <SPAN>I’m going to throw in right here that it is pointless to debate between AAKK and AAJT. Pro players (yes, the ones everybody has heard of) sit down with pitchers of beer and discuss it. But I think it was Daniel Negreanu that made the point that you can only play one hand at a time at any given table, and that you don’t get to choose what hand you start with, therefore, because both hands are powerful starters, you’re going to play both AAKK and AAJT in most situations. Making the real importance not what hand is better, but how are they different, and what are their strengths and weaknesses. </SPAN>

    <SPAN> </SPAN>
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  5. This post was awesome. I'm speechless that you took this much time. Thanks :)
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  6. My Omaha IQ has gone up alont reading that one post..Thank you
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  7. Anytime a serious question that is NOT Hold'em related comes up, I'm all ears. I would like to see more people enjoy all the varieties of poker rather then be intimated to get in there and play.
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