NUMBER CRUNCH: The End of the European Poker Tour

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The EPT wraps up its 13th season this week (Image c/o PokerStars)

It is hard to believe thirteen seasons of the European Poker Tour have passed. It is harder to believe the tour is no longer going to exist. Thankfully for the European poker scene, the newly created PokerStars Festival series will continue to deliver poker to the masses, just under a different moniker. With the EPT wrapping up its final season in Prague this week, we decided to look back at the highlights of more than a decade of tournaments in this edition of Number Crunch:

1 – Number of two-time EPT champions. It took until the tail end of Season 10 to crown the first two-time champion. Victoria Coren won EPT London in Season 3 and in seven seasons later took down EPT San Remo to become the first and, to date, only repeat winner. By contrast, the World Poker Tour had two repeat winners the first season it was on tour.

7 – Number of final tables for Luca Pagano, the all-time leader in that category of EPT stats. Pagano has not made a final table on the tour since 2012, he was one of the original big names on the EPT, final tabling the very first EPT event in Barcelona in 2005. In 2009, Pagano final tabled three EPT Main Events. He has also finished in-the-money of 21 EPT Main Events.

23 – Number of different cities which have hosted an EPT over the years. Only Barcelona has been a stop on all 13 of the seasons, while others like Loutraki were one-and-done stops. Germany is the most popular country for the tour with Baden, Dortmund, and Berlin all playing host to events.

23 – Number of Super High Roller events in EPT history. First introduced at Season 7’s PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, the tour slowly added them to the largest stops on the tour with $50,000 and $100,000 buy-in price points (the exact amounts vary slightly based on the local currency). The list of champions reads like a who’s who of the poker circuit, but Steve O’Dwyer leads the pack with three separate Super High Roller titles.

27 – Number of countries which can lay claim to an EPT Champion. They come from every continent, save Antarctica and Australia. Champs have come from surprising places like Iran and Venezuela. The most successful countries are Great Britain and the United States. Both countries have 17 EPT titles to their credit, but you might consider giving a slight edge to the States, as John Juanda is credited as Indonesian, but has lived in the States since he was 19.

76 – Number of months Ibrahim Al Mousa was sentenced to prison for his role as the mastermind behind the 2010 EPT Berlin robbery. Al Mousa and four other men stormed the tournament area of the EPT Berlin Main Event brandishing guns and machetes. Scary, yes, but thankfully no one was hurt in the altercation. Eventually the tournament staff managed to reconstruct the tournament and play down to a winner. Kevin ‘ImALuckSac‘ MacPhee won the tournament, but admitted in interviews he would have rather they did not play it out after the crime.

216 – Number of times EPT Live host Joe Stapleton estimates he and fellow host James Hartigan have sung their popular line “Everyone loves a chop pot!” The duo have worked together for the livestream and televised episodes of the tour for six years and have a number of running gags that have won over fans from all over the world.

1,785 – Number of entries in the largest-field EPT Main Event in history. That tournament, Season 13’s EPT Barcelona Main Event, featured a €5,300 buy-in and generated a prize pool in excess of €8.6 million. A hefty €1.1 million went to eventual champ Sebastian Malec of Poland, who bested the record field to take down the last-ever EPT Barcelona Main Event.

9,314,495– Dollars won by the EPT’s number-one earner Steve O’Dwyer. The American pro is $2.5 million ahead of his next-closest competitor, Ole Schemion. It is hard to single out just one accomplishment on O’Dwyer’s extensive EPT resume, but his biggest win is probably from Season 9, where he took down the Grand Final Main Event in Monaco for over $1.6 million. He actually earned more money for defeating a smaller field in the 2015 PCA Super High Roller for over $1.8 million in 2015 though. He has won two Super High Roller events, also taking down the one in Prague in Season 12. He has also final tabled the EPT London Main Event twice. Like we said, it is tough to pick just one accomplishment for this guy.

15,132,000 – Largest single prize pool in EPT history. Thanks to a turnout of 1,560 runners in Season 7’s PCA Main Event, the tour generated the eight-figure prize pool. While other events have generated bigger fields, the $10,000 buy-in resulted in a record-breaking sum. A cool $2.3 million went to winner Galen Hall, but the top four spots all netted seven-figure paydays.