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    Lieutenant_OH7
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    I've got a serious dilemma...
    I have been into poker cashgames and MTTs since a few months, I used to play hold'em with playchips, but that was years ago. I wasn't taking it very serious, but the game suited me well, and I wanted to try it with real money at some point... Took a few years until I really got back into poker, and 4months ago I finally started...

    I was succesful in some MTTs, and won 8 of those in a pretty short time. I mainly focused on cashgames though, which seem to suit me a lot more, I realised some time later... Started playing cashgames on a bitcoin poker site (Betcoin), read a good review about it and gave it a try with my very first deposit. Quite some gamblers/fish on there so that helped to make some profit already... I played on 2 other poker providers, one of the few sites only that are legal in my country (Belgium). I got better and more refined in the game as I played cashgames. Since some time I also multi-table which worked well too.
    I did loose some money, but got better along the way, more insight into the game etc, so that motivated me to continue...

    But now my problem:
    I was able to make really nice profits in a short time, like I started with 10$ buy-in in a room, and in the same room I went up to almost 100$, playing some hours. That convinced me I could really make good money with poker, and the possibilities had to be even much better than this, since I was still playing at really low stakes... But the problem was I seemed to loose a lot of that money in the end... Did I play too loose or overconfident when I got a big stack? Was I lucky and did I think I was already that great because I made great profit, and kept on making mistakes, after those upswings?
    I think it's a combination of all those things...

    But the surprising (or not surprising) thing was that this pattern seemed to repeat itself later on, in a very similar way. I won a lot in a period like a day, but lost it again sooner or later, and offcourse that frustrated me...
    AT some point I made more than 300euros in a day, and that really gave me wings... I was convinced that I could be a professional poker player, and the possibilities had to be much greater than this, in the end...
    But even then I couldn't continue and keep those good results day after day... I didn't want to give up and I started again on the bitcoin site, playing up to 3 tables at a time, and they offer a nice VIP system with rakeback.
    It did seem to going better than before, even with some downswings.
    At times I did get mad and frustrated on bad beats and bad luck, cuz I thought I was so unlucky at times (I do have similar problems in life in general). But I still wanted to continue, thinking I also learned out of the hands that went wrong...

    But so to cut my story short: I would love to be a professional poker player, I really like the game... For example the strategic thinking, the learning and evolving, the fact that you can play it from wherever you live, at any time. That you are not dependant on other people or a boss, etc... I feel like I really need it, to give me the (financial) freedom I'm looking for in life. I do have an income now, so in theory I don't need the money... I don't have a job though, and a "regular job" is just not an option for me (anymore). I was so euphoric when my earnings began to be really good playing cash games, and at another time when it went bad, I cried of pure sadness...
    I don't want to give up that dream yet, thinking I really have the talent for this game, and already proven that I can do it, despite the losses...
    But I can't deny that it's not really good for me if bad beats do get me mad, and my play might suffer under that too. Or the financial losses if I couldn't get my earnings and positive balance stable... In my opinion it's easier to find that balance though when you play games, rather than tournaments. I also feel that there is more luck involved in tournaments...

    I do think the only way to find out for sure is maybe to give it once last chance, and do my very best to get it going... I gave myself a period of at least a few weeks now to consider, what the best thing is to do, because this is really a difficult situation for me. So I stopped playing for now...
    It's quite important to me because if I could be a poker pro, it could really give me the life I want... That I can live independent (now living with my parents still), build something up and have the money in life to make plans etc... (Now I just have a limited income). Thats why I don't want to give up that quickly, but maybe you guys have a different opinion. At this moment I just wouldn't know what else to do if I had to forget about poker. So only if I'd see it really is not for me, or does not work out, I'd stop...
    I'm also thinking, if poker is not for me, what do these pros have or can do what I could not? That might sound a bit arrogant, but I really believe I have all the skills to be a great player... I might not have nerves of steel, and I do have my flaws, but so does everyone, I think.

    All ideas, advice or inspiration is appreciated!
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  2. It is common for beginners to be overly confident about their skill in poker due to short-term results. Poker is a long ass marathon. You need to get used to losing often, that is how the game goes. Professionals lose constantly, I play for a living and also adhere to this, I lose all the time. When you enter a poker tournament you have to already realize that money invested is already gone and you just have to play for the love of the game and not for money.

    Don't expect rapid results to last forever. You will have downswings, everyone does. Phil Ivey was a losing player for the first 3 years of his career, in the 4th year he broke even. And he is considered a cash game genius. And that was when poker was easy and most people had no clue what were they doing. Poker now is much tougher and there is less money around, however, you can still make money if you put in the hours of studying the game. If you don't study, you don't win. Simple.

    Surely poker is an attractive way of making money and living out of it but it is mentally tough. Your mindset has to be very strong to stay afloat and not to get discouraged by another downswing.

    If you want to truly want to become a professional then forget about the money. Play for the love of the game. Study for the love of the game. Win hands/tournaments for the love of the game. Money is just a little nice bonus once you do well. If you will play for the money it will be tough to come by the losing days (I can assure you there will be plenty of them).

    If you plan to play poker and win money all the time I am here to disappoint you. That is just not how variance works. It is possible to play great poker for a year and not make money, mostly applies to tournaments. If you think you are doing well in cash games maybe you should stick to them as they have less variance. I used to play cash games for a living but I didn't enjoy it as I do when playing MTTs. Cash games for me over time became monotone and boring. But people must choose the format they enjoy the most.

    Before even considering going pro you need to work on your game a lot, perhaps purchase training materials, e.g. webinars. Or maybe get a coach that could work with you and that is more expensive but may speed up the process. You need to prove first that you are capable of winning and sustaining this for months, then save up money for living expenses (typical rule of a thumb is 6 months ahead) and then you can give a shot.

    But before then GL.

    EDIT: About the talent part - forget about having a talent in poker. That is desperately overemphasized topic by many professionals. The best professionals in poker are the least talented people. The only reason they succeed is because put an enormous amount of time studying the game. I recommend buying a book written by my coach "The Myth of Poker Talent" by Alex Fitzgerald. The book clearly explains how over-rated talent is and how you can build your poker career by your own hands without needing any talent.
    Edited By: Rihard4a Mar 6th, 2017 at 04:01 PM
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  3.  
    Originally Posted by Rihard4a View Post

    It is common for beginners to be overly confident about their skill in poker due to short-term results. Poker is a long ass marathon. You need to get used to losing often, that is how the game goes. Professionals lose constantly, I play for a living and also adhere to this, I lose all the time. When you enter a poker tournament you have to already realize that money invested is already gone and you just have to play for the love of the game and not for money.

    Don't expect rapid results to last forever. You will have downswings, everyone does. Phil Ivey was a losing player for the first 3 years of his career, in the 4th year he broke even. And he is considered a cash game genius. And that was when poker was easy and most people had no clue what were they doing. Poker now is much tougher and there is less money around, however, you can still make money if you put in the hours of studying the game. If you don't study, you don't win. Simple.

    Surely poker is an attractive way of making money and living out of it but it is mentally tough. Your mindset has to be very strong to stay afloat and not to get discouraged by another downswing.

    If you want to truly want to become a professional then forget about the money. Play for the love of the game. Study for the love of the game. Win hands/tournaments for the love of the game. Money is just a little nice bonus once you do well. If you will play for the money it will be tough to come by the losing days (I can assure you there will be plenty of them).

    If you plan to play poker and win money all the time I am here to disappoint you. That is just not how variance works. It is possible to play great poker for a year and not make money, mostly applies to tournaments. If you think you are doing well in cash games maybe you should stick to them as they have less variance. I used to play cash games for a living but I didn't enjoy it as I do when playing MTTs. Cash games for me over time became monotone and boring. But people must choose the format they enjoy the most.

    Before even considering going pro you need to work on your game a lot, perhaps purchase training materials, e.g. webinars. Or maybe get a coach that could work with you and that is more expensive but may speed up the process. You need to prove first that you are capable of winning and sustaining this for months, then save up money for living expenses (typical rule of a thumb is 6 months ahead) and then you can give a shot.

    But before then GL.

    EDIT: About the talent part - forget about having a talent in poker. That is desperately overemphasized topic by many professionals. The best professionals in poker are the least talented people. The only reason they succeed is because put an enormous amount of time studying the game. I recommend buying a book written by my coach "The Myth of Poker Talent" by Alex Fitzgerald. The book clearly explains how over-rated talent is and how you can build your poker career by your own hands without needing any talent.


    Thanks, i really appreciate your post, I have made this story of mine on multiple forums, and this is a 1000 times better than what some morrons have to say...I understand that a life of poker and trying to be a professional is quite hard, en I'm not that sure anymore if I really want that kind of life. But these responses do help me to gather different opinions, and then make the best decisions! Thanks!
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  4. I have been playing poker on and off for many years, both online and live, cash and MTT. Since losing my job towards the end of last year I have taken the opportunity to play poker full-time. I have always taken the game seriously despite 'playing for fun' in the past, so have done a lot of study reading books, watching videos, hand history reviews, had coaches ect ect

    I enjoy the game, love the game, and hate the game. Its can be a very cruel mistress for long stretches, then out of nowhere and awesome result. I am still undecided about my long-term prospects as a full-time poker player. To give you some insight to the roller coaster it can be I will share a couple of charts with you. These are 'year to date' the first being my results across all sites I play on. The second is from my database and shows Total Winnings v All-in Equity Value in big blinds for the same period as my results.





    Edit: really sorry but for whatever reason I cant get the pictures to work.

    As you can see, I have had one hell of a roller coaster results wise so far this year. With several big downswings eating all my profit everytime I started to get ahead. The second graph goes some way to explaining why. For the last 30,000 hands I have been running between 1,000 and 3,000 bbs behind all-in EV. Despite variance hitting me in the face with a big club repeatedly I am still managing to scrape out results. But I can tell you that it is seriously hard work and can be mentally straining.

    I wish you all the best whatever you do.
    Edited By: turbulence Mar 8th, 2017 at 04:48 PM
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  5.  
    Originally Posted by turbulence View Post

    I have been playing poker on and off for many years, both online and live, cash and MTT. Since losing my job towards the end of last year I have taken the opportunity to play poker full-time. I have always taken the game seriously despite 'playing for fun' in the past, so have done a lot of study reading books, watching videos, hand history reviews, had coaches ect ect

    I enjoy the game, love the game, and hate the game. Its can be a very cruel mistress for long stretches, then out of nowhere and awesome result. I am still undecided about my long-term prospects as a full-time poker player. To give you some insight to the roller coaster it can be I will share a couple of charts with you. These are 'year to date' the first being my results across all sites I play on. The second is from my database and shows Total Winnings v All-in Equity Value in big blinds for the same period as my results.





    Edit: really sorry but for whatever reason I cant get the pictures to work.

    As you can see, I have had one hell of a roller coaster results wise so far this year. With several big downswings eating all my profit everytime I started to get ahead. The second graph goes some way to explaining why. For the last 30,000 hands I have been running between 1,000 and 3,000 bbs behind all-in EV. Despite variance hitting me in the face with a big club repeatedly I am still managing to scrape out results. But I can tell you that it is seriously hard work and can be mentally straining.

    I wish you all the best whatever you do.


    Thanks for ur reply, I do believe however that in cash games it's easier to find (financially) balance (correct me if I'm wrong), so the variance doesn't hit you that hard... For me I've seen it went downhill when I got too loose and lost some big pots, not exactly variance "hitting me". I think it's the art of recognizing when variance is negative and loosing as less chips as possible then... Sometime you got bad luck however that you cannot really avoid, what we would call a "bad beat".

    What I don't get yet however is how these pros of poker manage to make those tons of money... People are telling me poker is dead, it's really hard to make a living out of it, it's a hard life etc, but some of those are millionaires already and all seems to go their way easily... Are those guys really geniuses, or did they get lucky? Did they study the game so much and became really great at the game? Or do they have a special talent they were born with? It's something I'm really wondering about...
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  6.  
    Originally Posted by Lieutenant_OH7 View Post

    Thanks for ur reply, I do believe however that in cash games it's easier to find (financially) balance (correct me if I'm wrong), so the variance doesn't hit you that hard... For me I've seen it went downhill when I got too loose and lost some big pots, not exactly variance "hitting me". I think it's the art of recognizing when variance is negative and loosing as less chips as possible then... Sometime you got bad luck however that you cannot really avoid, what we would call a "bad beat".

    What I don't get yet however is how these pros of poker manage to make those tons of money... People are telling me poker is dead, it's really hard to make a living out of it, it's a hard life etc, but some of those are millionaires already and all seems to go their way easily... Are those guys really geniuses, or did they get lucky? Did they study the game so much and became really great at the game? Or do they have a special talent they were born with? It's something I'm really wondering about...

    Those poker millionaires made their millions when poker was the softest game you can imagine. This is not the case now. Also, when it comes to tournaments, the structures and payouts were much better. Even if you take Sunday Million, for example, a number of people that this tournament averages every week is still the same as 4-5 years ago and the first place currently pays about 140k. Back in the day, I remember it would reach close or sometimes over 200k for first. That is a massive reduction in payout because the payouts now are flatter to benefit the weaker player. And this applies to every tournament. Other sites are slowly following the same path PokerStars took, flatter payouts and lesser GTDs resulting smaller paycheck for someone who is actually playing professionally. If you also count the fact that average player every year is getting better then it is not a pretty situation as you have to play better for lesser.

    Hope that clears something for you.
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  7.  
    Originally Posted by Rihard4a View Post

    Those poker millionaires made their millions when poker was the softest game you can imagine. This is not the case now. Also, when it comes to tournaments, the structures and payouts were much better. Even if you take Sunday Million, for example, a number of people that this tournament averages every week is still the same as 4-5 years ago and the first place currently pays about 140k. Back in the day, I remember it would reach close or sometimes over 200k for first. That is a massive reduction in payout because the payouts now are flatter to benefit the weaker player. And this applies to every tournament. Other sites are slowly following the same path PokerStars took, flatter payouts and lesser GTDs resulting smaller paycheck for someone who is actually playing professionally. If you also count the fact that average player every year is getting better then it is not a pretty situation as you have to play better for lesser.

    Hope that clears something for you.


    Yeah, I've had similar responses... I think it's a quite negative look at things though, a bit of like people explain why they wouldn't want to try to go pro... :p

    But those poker millionaires I referred to are actually those of today's poker world... Not of the past.
    So if it is so hard these days (I do agree however that there are a lot of strong players ONLINE), I wonder how all those pros manage to become so filthy rich with playing the big live tournaments (WSOP, EPT etc)??
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  8.  
    Originally Posted by Lieutenant_OH7 View Post

    Yeah, I've had similar responses... I think it's a quite negative look at things though, a bit of like people explain why they wouldn't want to try to go pro... :p

    But those poker millionaires I referred to are actually those of today's poker world... Not of the past.
    So if it is so hard these days (I do agree however that there are a lot of strong players ONLINE), I wonder how all those pros manage to become so filthy rich with playing the big live tournaments (WSOP, EPT etc)??


    The todays "poker millionaires" are still the guys that have been grinding for the past decade and most of the money they made was 5-6 years ago.

    Most of the guys playing those huge live events are backed by one way or another. Almost nobody has 100% of their share in those.
    Edited By: Rihard4a Mar 12th, 2017 at 03:13 AM
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  9. Yep, poker is great. A lot of recreational players believe that they don't need to study the game to be great at it...They think it's a matter of whether you are intelligent or not, and often like to think they are intelligent so no need to study the game.

    So they play 100 tournaments over a few months, win a few of them, and instantly their beliefs (that they are intelligent and don't need to study the game to beat other players) are confirmed. They then continue to feed buy ins into the tournament prize pools, and as variance catches up with them, many become angry and start blaming "the stupid donks" for why they aren't winning anymore. Once their balance goes below zero, they begin to make justifications, and even have quite selective memories, to retain the belief in themselves and others that they are such a great player.

    Most people that fall for this are idiots...But you don't have to be an idiot. I fell for it probably 6 times before I realized what was actually going on, and studied the game hard and put the hours in to fix it.

    I know very good mid stakes players, personally, that make not far off $1500 per week on average grinding an average buy in of around $30. If you saved half of that profit, for one year, you would have around $40,000. You'd then be bankrolled for $200+ buy ins...Mind you, people that earn bigger tend to spend bigger as well.

    How good are you, and how much do you spend? And how badly do you want to increase the bankroll, and at what pace? Those are the questions I would be asking.
     
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  10.  
    Originally Posted by CheapTorque View Post

    I know very good mid stakes players, personally, that make not far off $1500 per week on average grinding an average buy in of around $30. If you saved half of that profit, for one year, you would have around $40,000. You'd then be bankrolled for $200+ buy ins...

    Good post... By the sound of this kind of thing, it's only something young single people can take a shot at, or independently wealthy people. You just can't live off $40k for a year when you've got a family to worry about, but I could've lived off probably $15-20k when I was right out of college. Of course, there are plenty of factors about professional poker that make it tough on the family people
     
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  11.  
    Originally Posted by Adam View Post

    Good post... By the sound of this kind of thing, it's only something young single people can take a shot at, or independently wealthy people. You just can't live off $40k for a year when you've got a family to worry about, but I could've lived off probably $15-20k when I was right out of college. Of course, there are plenty of factors about professional poker that make it tough on the family people

    Yeah I don't even know if I would play poker if I had a family...Not because of the money, but just because of all the other things as you've mentioned here.

    That aside, I suppose as with many things, it depends what sacrifices you are willing to make (or how badly you want to achieve that goal).

    Depends where you live, and what your lifestyle is like, I guess. In New Zealand the average yearly income, after tax, is around USD$31,000. That translates to an hourly pay rate of around USD$15 per hour, working a 40 hour week. The minimum wage here, by comparison, is around USD$9 per hour (less than USD$19000 per year for full time workers). God knows how people get by on the US minimum wage...Isn't it like USD$7 an hour?

    So the vast majority of working adults, including those with families, are on yearly incomes significantly lower than USD$40,000 per annum.

    I've noticed that many professional players move to places like Thailand, where living costs are cheaper, so that they can save more of their yearly winnings. If you were keen enough to save up $40,000, I'd say moving to a cheaper place while you save that bankroll would be the best bet...Then if you so wish you can return back to the US or where ever after that.

    Depends how badly you want to be that person I guess lol.
     
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  12.  
    Originally Posted by CheapTorque View Post

    Yeah I don't even know if I would play poker if I had a family...Not because of the money, but just because of all the other things as you've mentioned here.

    That aside, I suppose as with many things, it depends what sacrifices you are willing to make (or how badly you want to achieve that goal).

    Depends where you live, and what your lifestyle is like, I guess. In New Zealand the average yearly income, after tax, is around USD$31,000. That translates to an hourly pay rate of around USD$15 per hour, working a 40 hour week. The minimum wage here, by comparison, is around USD$9 per hour (less than USD$19000 per year for full time workers). God knows how people get by on the US minimum wage...Isn't it like USD$7 an hour?

    So the vast majority of working adults, including those with families, are on yearly incomes significantly lower than USD$40,000 per annum.

    I've noticed that many professional players move to places like Thailand, where living costs are cheaper, so that they can save more of their yearly winnings. If you were keen enough to save up $40,000, I'd say moving to a cheaper place while you save that bankroll would be the best bet...Then if you so wish you can return back to the US or where ever after that.

    Depends how badly you want to be that person I guess lol.


    Yes, i've heard Malta is also a place where some poker pros move to, or England... Also laws on taxes are important regarding this, however most countries won't charge you on earnings you get from gambling. I've always dreamed about moving to another (maybe exotic) country, and be financially free... But I'm thinking now it's not as great as it looks... Cuz you would be pretty isolated out there, except if you have and move with your own family... That's the advantage of playing online, you could play off any place where there is internet... Advantage of playing live games in casinos is that the level is quite lower in general, I wouldn't enjoy however to play with gambler on a daily basis. And yes it all depends on how much money you do need to live, what are your monthly expenses etc... For me I don't need the money, and already have income to live, as you could read in my story. However I want to get somewhere in my life where I'm not dependant on other persons or government etc, anymore. It gives you 'financially" freedom to do whatever you want to go do or buy in your life... I think that's a lot harder with a normal job where you won't really be able to build up your earnings that good, or you'll need a very high position, or your own company that would be growing quickly, but which will suck up all your time and energy, along with some possible risks...

    So best thing you can do is take the necessary actions and decisions, to be able to achieve anything that YOU want to achieve in your life :) Go confidently the way of your dreams, live the life you imagine!
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  13.  
    Originally Posted by Rihard4a View Post

    The todays "poker millionaires" are still the guys that have been grinding for the past decade and most of the money they made was 5-6 years ago.

    Most of the guys playing those huge live events are backed by one way or another. Almost nobody has 100% of their share in those.

    You're still avoiding what I'm pointing at ;). I really mean the succesful poker pros of today... And really some young kids in there already. I'm wondering if there is a big aspect of luck related to that, or if some of those are really "geniuses", trying to find out...

    Also it's hard to believe for me that poker would have been so easy in the past... I do think there are a lot more players active these days and the level online always increases... However great players with a good poker mind will have always existed, only some more information and techniques might be available these days to make anyone who wants to study, a better player...

    And yes those guys playing the big live events mostly do have sponsors, that probably pay them a vast amount of money I'm not sure, or could be in the way of buying their buy-ins and other advantages they get. However they only got that sponsorship after they were succesful in those big poker tournaments, after they got into the spotlights, not the other way around... So you can't just get a sponsor and then go play in those live tourneys, and also if you see the paydays those succesful players get, it will be a lot more than what they get from the sponsorship, which will just be a nice little extra to their income...
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  14.  
    Originally Posted by Lieutenant_OH7 View Post

    You're still avoiding what I'm pointing at ;). I really mean the succesful poker pros of today... And really some young kids in there already. I'm wondering if there is a big aspect of luck related to that, or if some of those are really "geniuses", trying to find out...

    Also it's hard to believe for me that poker would have been so easy in the past... I do think there are a lot more players active these days and the level online always increases... However great players with a good poker mind will have always existed, only some more information and techniques might be available these days to make anyone who wants to study, a better player...

    And yes those guys playing the big live events mostly do have sponsors, that probably pay them a vast amount of money I'm not sure, or could be in the way of buying their buy-ins and other advantages they get. However they only got that sponsorship after they were succesful in those big poker tournaments, after they got into the spotlights, not the other way around... So you can't just get a sponsor and then go play in those live tourneys, and also if you see the paydays those succesful players get, it will be a lot more than what they get from the sponsorship, which will just be a nice little extra to their income...

    There are not that many pro's of today if you mean like someone who started grinding 2 years ago and made millions? I cannot even name a single person who did that. On average, every successful poker player is a losing player for the first 3 years of their career. There will be maybe one individual out of thousands maybe who was lucky enough and avoid this. Even Tom Dwan and Isildur1 where donking money away when they started. Phil Ivey was losing lots of money when he started. As I said before there is no talent in poker. If you want to be successful you have to do what others do - STUDY THE FUCK OUT THIS GAME!

    I wasn't talking about Sponsors. Most people, regs in particular, who play big live events like $5ks etc, they are selling % of their action. Not many of them buyin for full 100%. In general, people tend to sell 50% of their action to reduce variance. I'm not talking about guys that are sponsored by PokerStars or PartyPoker, or even 888 (although even the guys who are sponsored are selling % of their buyins because they are playing above their bankroll!).
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  15.  
    Originally Posted by Adam View Post

    Good post... By the sound of this kind of thing, it's only something young single people can take a shot at, or independently wealthy people. You just can't live off $40k for a year when you've got a family to worry about, but I could've lived off probably $15-20k when I was right out of college. Of course, there are plenty of factors about professional poker that make it tough on the family people


    It will highly depend on the country you live in. Saying that you cannot support a family by making $40k a year is quite ridiculous. Maybe if you are in the US you can't because you have to pay taxes. In most EU countries poker is not taxed and $40k a year is a lot of money when in the majority of Eastern European countries most people make $7k per year. You can live a luxurious life in EU even by making $20k per year if you leverage the currency right. Of course in countries where the average cost of living in EU is higher it will be different, but still, in the UK, I cannot earn more in a highly qualified job than I make in poker. For me to make equivalent what I make in poker I need 10 years of experience in IT field. Is it really worth it for me waste 10 years of my life slaving for someone when I have my opportunities now? I don't think so.
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  16.  
    Originally Posted by Rihard4a View Post

    It will highly depend on the country you live in. Saying that you cannot support a family by making $40k a year is quite ridiculous. Maybe if you are in the US you can't because you have to pay taxes. In most EU countries poker is not taxed and $40k a year is a lot of money when in the majority of Eastern European countries most people make $7k per year. You can live a luxurious life in EU even by making $20k per year if you leverage the currency right. Of course in countries where the average cost of living in EU is higher it will be different, but still, in the UK, I cannot earn more in a highly qualified job than I make in poker. For me to make equivalent what I make in poker I need 10 years of experience in IT field. Is it really worth it for me waste 10 years of my life slaving for someone when I have my opportunities now? I don't think so.


    Yeah I agree... Even if that "normal job" will give you a steady and stable income, you probably won't have any fun doing it... And if you can earn 1500$ a week that's already an enormous amount of money... Here in Belgium that's about the payday you will get a in month, with a starting job :o
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