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Rovdyr1

How to become a good online tournament player?

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Hi,

I'm new at the forum so i would like to start with introducing myself, i'm 22 years old and live in Norway, i have played poker for a few years but nothing serious.

Now i would like to change that, but i simply just don't know how to improve my game!

I would like to improve my NLH MTT game, i play micro/small stake and i pretty much try to play a few tourney everyday. I have read some books like, Harrington on Holdem, Theroy of poker, The poker mindset and Winning NLH small stake. I also watched a few coahing videos, but i don't think i'm doing it right, i just get stuck at a level and get tired of poker, then i take a few months of and start playing again :s

I hope someone out there can help a lost soul, thanks!

Best regard

Rov

Edited by wackyJaxon
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if u get tired of it now ..it might be hard too stay in it..most players that want too win keep at it,i will admit i force myself too play sometimes because i have too at times for money reasons, but i have been playing for quite sometime,but at 22 and u stop for awhile says a lot too me ,that your mindset needs too be stronger, in wanting too improve your game and not quitting mentally,i guess try a coach bro i'm not familiar with coaches but u might want too consider this route

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if u get tired of it now ..it might be hard too stay in it..most players that want too win keep at it,i will admit i force myself too play sometimes because i have too at times for money reasons, but i have been playing for quite sometime,but at 22 and u stop for awhile says a lot too me ,that your mindset needs too be stronger, in wanting too improve your game and not quitting mentally,i guess try a coach bro i'm not familiar with coaches but u might want too consider this route

Thanks for fast answer mate,

The problem is that i cant afford a tournament coach atm, but ill keep that in mind when i get some cash rolling in.

Is there any good books you would recommend? coach videos? And what kind of tournament is good for building bankroll and increasing experience?

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Thanks for fast answer mate,

The problem is that i cant afford a tournament coach atm, but ill keep that in mind when i get some cash rolling in.

Is there any good books you would recommend? coach videos? And what kind of tournament is good for building bankroll and increasing experience?

180 mans used to be a decent bankroll builder.. Not really sure anymore.

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Im not even kidding when I say this......... you need to be the most STRONGEST mental player EVER.

You will experience ups and downs like crazy and you need to remember to keep balance in poker and life.

Theres a chance you will win 5k one day and lose a few thousand back if your not managing properly.

There is no shortcut, its all practice. Don't be a super multi-tabler... just play 3-4 tables.

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Im not even kidding when I say this......... you need to be the most STRONGEST mental player EVER.

You will experience ups and downs like crazy and you need to remember to keep balance in poker and life.

Theres a chance you will win 5k one day and lose a few thousand back if your not managing properly.

There is no shortcut, its all practice. Don't be a super multi-tabler... just play 3-4 tables.

Pretty sure he feels STONGLY about this ^

To get good at anything you need the will & drive to do so. If you don't have it, nobody else can give it to you. You won't find it in a book. You won't find it in a video, a coach, or a training site. You'll find it in your heart & soul! If you're not into it, doubt you'll get very good at it. (seems pretty obvious.... no?)

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do not read gus hansens book itll confuse a new player and make him play way too many hands . i like dan harringtons for beginners but u read tht,honestlu u need hand experience play play and play start with freerolls and/or small money . the big key is after each hand that either u didnt get enough chips from a win or that u lost u have too go over these hands and think of different scenario's,always try too put opponents on hands,play 1 tbl at a time and when ur not in a hand watch the tbl and try to guess wht there hands are, experiment here and there with bluffing too tht way u can learn how too develop these situations thru experience,do not be afraid too raise som1 , avoid being mr limp caller guy. gl man ............................................................... i disagree with playn more thn 1 table u need too dominate 1 table before u can just start playn 3-4 tables there are so many variables in poker that 1 table needs too be mastered in the forms of position,WHAT EXACTLY DOES POSITION MEAN, knowing stack sizes ,blinds, value of hands ,how much too raise ,ooops i raised kk and ss went all in and if i raised less i could jam the 2 flatters but now they get too join the flop,simple bets can pull pots on 3-4 way action but how do i knw when too make this bet ,learn how too c-bet,learn too know how too call a c-bet,learn how too 3 bet,and blah blah blah ONE TABLE BRO, LEARN MORE THAN THE BASICS, learn it ALL AND SOME this game is constantly changing and u can do it if u really want too

Edited by double_kyan
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Avoid 9 man sit n gos. I wish someone had told me this a long time ago. They're really not that profitable anymore. I've played thousands of them. Trying all sorts of styles, I've only truly started dominating them playing a looser style because everyone is so damn tight. I think that is the new glitch in 9mans now.

If you want to get good at tournaments you need very solid game plans for each tournament you enter. Such as adjusting your bet amounts at certain levels etc. Tbh I would suggest just playing cash games first as your income and playing tournaments on the side with the money you make from that. Cash games are extremely profitable and if you can't beat them consistantly you will really bloom as a player so learning as you keep learning as you play instead of just playing.

Edited by djdoodoo
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being confident in your abilities does not only help you play your game, but helps you understand other people's game. if you can understand the standards, it will help you interpret other peoples play. so watch lots of videos if you can, and rail players you feel are solid players, paying attention to how often they play hands, the lines they take, etc. once you get a good idea of what people in general do in any given spot, you'll begin to improve.

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being confident in your abilities does not only help you play your game, but helps you understand other people's game. if you can understand the standards, it will help you interpret other peoples play. .

Agree with this. Getting a better feel for what the standard play is in a certain situation or what standard opening/calling/re-raising ranges are was a big breakthrough for my game. It's such a big slice of the information you are using to make decisions. It's not only good for your game in the immediate sense, but it lays a foundation for you to tweak things and improve.

Getting there takes a combination of things but the two essentials are really study and practice. Study can be anything from posting hands on forums, reading books, watching training videos, etc. and practice means playing in actual tournaments. The important thing is you do these things in conjunction and really focus on observing/applying the things you learn through study in actual games. There will be lots of trial and error, but don't get too dejected if things don't go your way at first. Review your decisions and if you think you made a mistake, then try to avoid making that same mistake next time. And if you played it well, then keep doing what you're doing and wait for the luck to come your way.

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Lucky 7:

1 - Starting Hands, Position, Pot-Odds: First, you need to develop a thorough and keen understanding of how these relate. Not just what they are, but how they relate.

2 - Push/Fold: Next, you need to master push/fold scenarios with a high degree of accuracy. Print charts if you need to, post hands, read the forums, but you need to master this. Understand the difference between your shoving range and your calling range.

3 - Aggression: You need to understand how aggression is important in poker over-all, but specifically why it's important in tournaments. It's important in poker over-all because it puts pressure on your opponents, and gives you two ways to win (showdown or fold equity) and without aggression, you can only win by showing the better hand. Aggression is specifically important in tournaments because of the rising blinds and the need to keep pace with the field, and also because the prize pool is so heavily weighted at the top. In tournaments, a move can be -chipEV but +cashEV, mathematically, and at the cash tables a negEV move can only be plusEV in terms of the value of a loose table image. In tournaments, you need to be aggressive on a "hand-by-hand" basis to keep them calling you wide and betting into you, but you also need to "shift gears dramatically," making risky moves at certain points in the tournament to ensure you never get too small and always have a chance to win. You also need to shift gears on a "hand-by-hand" basis, going from LAG to TAG constantly. Loosen them up with LAG, cash in by busting them TAG, now it's your table, go back to LAG, when they notice, go back to TAG, until you've shipped it.

4 - Count Your Blinds/Have A Plan/Play The Streets: If you count your blinds pre-flop, evaluate your opponent(s) stack size, and analyze the stage of the tournament, there is really no need to punt away your stack on an overpair to the board, or to get yourself pot-committed on the turn with a moderate holding. You have 4 rounds of betting (pre-flop, flop, turn, river), so you can either use them to get information and extract value from your winning hands, or you can use them chase away value when your strong or to pot commit yourself or to show weakness when you are not strong. The reason we all play Texas Hold Em isn't because it's fun. Omaha is fun. We play Hold Em because the unique structure (2 hole cards and 3 flop cards during the first two rounds of betting, and two more rounds of betting with just two more cards) which allows us to manipulate the pot odds in our favor. That is what we are doing in NL Hold Em, manipulating the pot odds in our favor.

5 - Exercise Good BRM: Splash around, bluff all-in, mix it up, learn. You can't do that under rolled. You have to put in a quantity of hands to learn and it's ok to make some mistakes. Don't wast your run-good on small tournies, and don't risk 1/2 of what you just won on a big tourney. Be pretty consistent in your buy-in and move up and down as needed.

6 - Play Games Where You Have an Edge, or the Ones That Best Fit Your Schedule: Are you patient enough to play a 20 minute level 5,000 chip DeepStack event? Are you aggressive enough to build a stack during a rebuy? Do you really have an edge late regging the forty-sixth minute at the 75/150 level and a 1,500 stack? prolly not....

7 - Read Players: You have to do it. It gets easier. You have to do it. It does get easier. Honestly for my first 3000 tournaments, i barely ever attempted to read a player or a table until it got deep and I didn't have many tables and the stakes were high. Now I'm getting more involved in remember the names of the player who raised into me, played back at me, etc. I never even paid attention to this stuff, mostly because the other stuff toke too much of my mental energy, and I wouldn't make as many good decisions with any info i did pick up. When other parts of the game become automatic, and you are confident you know what to do with the info you pick up, then early level and more thorough reading skills become a bigger part of your game.

Edited by gjallen1975
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simple playing more is the best way to learn you get your self into spots make mistakes and when those spots come up again dont make the same mistake again learn to do the basics well and rest will follow/ learn to walk before you can run kind of thing perfect ur abc game bye simpley playing

Edited by ronnieb122
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Agree with this. Getting a better feel for what the standard play is in a certain situation or what standard opening/calling/re-raising ranges are was a big breakthrough for my game. It's such a big slice of the information you are using to make decisions. It's not only good for your game in the immediate sense, but it lays a foundation for you to tweak things and improve.

Getting there takes a combination of things but the two essentials are really study and practice. Study can be anything from posting hands on forums, reading books, watching training videos, etc. and practice means playing in actual tournaments. The important thing is you do these things in conjunction and really focus on observing/applying the things you learn through study in actual games. There will be lots of trial and error, but don't get too dejected if things don't go your way at first. Review your decisions and if you think you made a mistake, then try to avoid making that same mistake next time. And if you played it well, then keep doing what you're doing and wait for the luck to come your way.

def this

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* Books: Winning Poker Tournaments one hand at a time (Vols 1&2) - Awesome books which give insight from top players about actual hands in tourneys

* Training sites (P5's & other training sites are excellent)

* Coaches - See coaching directory (1 on 1 coaching has helped me enormously)

* Network of poker friends to talk with

Good luck!

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Just play. Forget the books, huds, study groups etc. Until you start to get a feel for the game, all the other stuff is pretty much useless because you will develop a base on your own and learn why something is wrong instead of a book telling you why. Review your hands and ask questions is the best way to start

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Pretty sure he feels STONGLY about this ^

To get good at anything you need the will & drive to do so. If you don't have it, nobody else can give it to you. You won't find it in a book. You won't find it in a video, a coach, or a training site. You'll find it in your heart & soul! If you're not into it, doubt you'll get very good at it. (seems pretty obvious.... no?)

Well said!

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Learn, understand, and embrace the swings you are going to expose yourself to.

Don't get tilted too easily or at all (or at least minimize it's effect on your play).

Experience really is extremely valuable. Playing as much as you can will build this experience faster.

Do LOTS of studying/homework. I cannot stress this enough. Staying ahead of the curve is key. Chatting with other successful players is a huge help too, but just make sure you don't take too much different advice or you will just confuse yourself. As you gain experience you will get better at taking advice and etc from others and discarding the useless stuff.

Most importantly, you MUST be extremely disciplined with your bankroll management. It doesn't matter how good you are, if you are playing games you can't afford the swings for - you WILL go broke if you do it consistently.

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