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Lieutenant_OH7

Why is everyone so obsessed with MTT?

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I was wondering why most players choose to play MTT in poker, instead of other poker variants like Sitngo or cashgames...

Now I do have some kind of addiction or attraction to MTT often but once I play them I found out again how fucked up the variance and play is mostly.
I even wonder how people can enjoy that, be it if you're a pro or not...
For example a recent tournament I was in, my AK vs a guys A2 he catches a deuce and wins the pot. Bit later against same player, I raise on the flop with 2pair, A6, he raises all in with weak Ace 2 kicker, now when you see that you think he'draw dead right you win the hand, but turn & river both bring an 8 and pot splits up.. Wouldn't that make you crazy? In these tournaments I feel like a playing ball of the variance, and you have hardly control over the game. Then I wonder why all ppl still choose tournaments to play or make money.
Luck is such a big factor for me it gives minfucks, and I learned/believe that being able to have a strong mind and still play your best "A" game despite bad variance is an important aspect of a good MTT Player. But then again I start to like and appreciate cash games more cuz you actually can have some "control" over the variance, and it won't determine your whole result of a session like in a tournament, where once your stack is gone your money is gone too and you can't win it back...
Recently played a 7stud hi-lo tourney too and that can be fun too but you don't meet as much casual players I assume who will give you gifts as in NLHE tournaments. Oh and the "hi-low" variant I find really confusing, better just have the normal variant.
 
Let me know your thoughts...
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also the big cashes attract players. top 3 pay well usually. varience is a big factor but as CardTrucks said u have 2 find good spots to shove and spots to reshove. most ppl play more than 1 tournament at a time. after uve played a tournament for 5 hrs and u are the victim of a bad beat it usually takes u out of a tournie. so thats what alot of players concentrate on thats why playing a few tournies at a time is much more enjoyable to play. Getting taken out of a tournie is never fun but if u play well most times a bad beat is how your tournies end, just concentrate on picking good spots and if u do this u will eventually win a few.glgl

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for me it is having and end goal, something to aim at and a plan to get there. On top of which, taking down a big MTT is a real buzz, something to be proud of (and the money is nice too). I just don't get that from cash games, not having an end goal means that I will often lose motivation in a session. I enyjoy playing cash but mostly use it to practice deep stack play for MTTs. 

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SnGos reduce the luck factor quite earlier (after playing a rather smaller sample of tournaments) than the much higher fields of MTTs. This, combined with the much higher promising prizes of MTTs, makes SnGoes much less attractive to recreational players. That's why MTTs are nowadays much more profitable than SnGo's and all the regulars compromise with the variance involved, even including huge field size MTTs in their sessions. If you can't multi-table a lot, or play many-many days/month or year, then choose smaller field sized MTTs for your session and you'll make it to the profitable final table more often if you play solid poker.

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Just my thoughts but bum hunting software killed the cash games a few years ago and HUDs made sit and go's almost impossible for rec. players. On the other hand, Twitch streams made MTTs look really cool, and with the weaker fields now, you can late reg. last minute, double up and be in the money in an hour. 

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the reason is simple, you have a buy in, if you lose the buy in, that's all you lose,

 

if you hit the payouts, you have played, and had some fun, and even turned a small profit.

but if you get to run deep into the Tournament,

 

then you can turn a small buy in, into a huge profit.

 

it's all to easy to sit down at a cash table, build a good stack, and lose it all to a bad beat, then have to start over,

but in a MTT you can build a big stack, lose it late in the Tournament, and still leave with more than you started out with.

 

it's the (safe way) or the best way to gamble with low to little risk of losing a large amount..

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MTTs provide a much deeper and engaging experience for myself.

 

here are a couple exciting components of tournament poker!

 

-the context changes as a tournament expires

-the gratification of having a 'large' number of chips is rewarding (i.e. I started with 4,000 and now I have 300,000!)

- the 'survivor' mindset of outlasting a field of hundreds or thousands

- the adrenalized satisfaction of having ALL the chips when it's all said and done (whether by skill or luck) is rewarding!

- the mental and psychological challenge of building up a long run, taking a bad blow, but maintaining focus and understanding that the tournament is not won on a single hand but can be lost on any given hand.

 

I love both forms of poker but on a random day the hopes and prospects of a tournament are much more enticing than hand by hand nature of cash.

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