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  1. 2020 was a long year for many professional poker players. Back in March, live tournaments and cash games virtually disappeared overnight in Las Vegas, and around the world, and over the summer, the halls of the Rio, normally packed to the brim with Davipoker pros and amateurs alike, were empty. As two-time WSOP bracelet winner David 'ODB' Baker put it, "2020 was a terrible year for me and most poker players. The bills don’t stop, but the games did." Well, Baker and good friend and fellow poker pro Mark Gregorich ended the year on quite a high note, after a strong showing in two high-profile NFL betting contests in Las Vegas. The contests run the length of the NFL season and handicappers are betting five games each week against the spread. They finished first place in the $1,500 buy-in Westgate SuperContest, earning $435,623. In addition, they tied for second place in the $1,000 buy-in Circa Sports Millions contest, earning another $200,000. Tack on bonuses for their first quarter finishes in both contests, and the two ended up hauling in $785,623. Baker and Gregorich shot out to an early lead, and they never looked back from there. "We got off to a really hot start. After the first quarter, heading to Week 5, we knew we had a shot. We had an 18-2 start. It really started to feel real about the halfway point, and about Week 12, we really started adjusting strategies." The lead-up to the 2020 season was unlike any other. No preseason games for anyone, and limited training camps meant that teams came out of the gates rusty. For Baker and Gregorich, their strategy coming in was to bank on good quarterbacks who would be less affected by the upheaval of the usual preseason routine. "We went into the year thinking home field advantage was basically nullified. We also were quick to hypothesize and it became just a basic fact later that QBs had a huge advantage with empty stadiums. Early on we feasted with good QBs on the road laying small numbers. As the year went on, these spots became harder to exploit. Lines that early were 2-5 became 6-10," Baker told us. This was just the second year in the SuperContest for the duo, and their first time in the Circa Sports contest. However, their years of poker knowledge and game theory surely assisted them in their abilities to navigate the potential pitfalls of leading from the front in the beginning. "In the SuperContest, we had a decent lead, 2-4 points, and the field started to thin. At that point we went for more chalky plays and tried to block. Get good lines. At the same time in Circa we were falling back a bit," Baker said. "A few of the picks we made on both cards lost. We knew we needed to take some leverage spots and go against the grain. We successfully took the worst lines a few times and in turn gained leverage," Baker continued. Tournament poker players will often tell you that all they ultimately want at the end is a sweat. A shot at the crown. Well, Gregorich and Baker found themselves in about as good a spot as any heading into the final week of the season. They held a half-point lead in the Circa Sports contest, while their lead in the SuperContest was a more comfortable three-point advantage. Of course, the two sports bettors spent hours of time picking out what would likely be the five biggest sports bets of their lives. Baker gave us a peek behind the curtain of what these two discussed the most leading up to the final Sunday. "We went into Week 17 with many thoughts obviously. First thought was, try to play the Washington-Philly game if at all possible, and try to land on the team that was going to have the best line value at kickoff. Meaning Washington was -2 in the contest so if we thought the line would move up, play them, if down, play Philly." They ultimately settled on taking Washington (-2) and of course, the thought of hedging crossed the player’s minds, but in this specific scenario, that wasn’t going to be very easy. As it turns out, the two players had already made a decision that they would have put a hefty wager on the Eagles in order to ensure a bigger payday. "This was the only hedging spot we planned to take. If we needed the game we would be able to bet a nice chunk on philly with a middle. As it worked out if we needed Washington we would have made a lot by betting philly at 6.5-7 The rest of the cards we approached similarly to past weeks." Baker and Gregorich submitted three picks across both cards: Washington Football Team. Baltimore Ravens, and Carolina Panthers. They went 2-1 on those picks, and went different on their other two. On Circa Sports, they took the Packers and Seahawks, while the SuperContest card had the Cowboys and Steelers. Both ended up 1-1. "We had a pool of teams we liked. Carolina, Buffalo, Green Bay, Seattle, Dallas, Detroit became a late possibility. We pretty much were down to those six teams for three slots. Green Bay was our favorite but the line was -5/-5.5 in the contests and -4 in real life. We were committed, but the line movement caused us to only take them in Circa." Gregorich lobbied for his hometown Seahawks for one of the final picks, as he had done a few times already in the season. As is often the case in Seahawks games, the final quarter was wild, giving the poker pros a roller coaster of a ride that would put a major final table to shame. The Seahawks were -6 favorites, meaning that Baker and Gregorich needed Seattle to win by a full touchdown. However, the Seahawks offense struggled throughout the game, and all looked lost when the Niners took a 16-6 lead early in the fourth quarter. But then, back-to-back Seattle touchdowns put them up 20-16, and made it possible for a miracle cover. Then, a sack fumble gave the Hawks the ball back, and after another touchdown, Baker and Gregorich looked like they would still have a shot at the $1 million first place prize in the Circa contest. However, the 49ers put together a garbage time drive, and punched it in with 23 seconds left. The score was meaningless to the overall outcome of the game, but it changed everything in Las Vegas. Baker compared the emotions of the final two minutes of that game to a spot he's been in many times over the course of his poker career. "Imagine being at the final hand of a major tournament with $800,000 difference between first and second. You get it all in with AK vs KK. No biggie, you lose, it’s a cooler. That’s how it felt the whole game. We were on the wrong side. Clean flop, no sweat. We are going to lose," Baker said. "Then from out of nowhere the ace hits the turn. Now we are going to win! Then before you know it, the king on the river comes to beat you. That’s how it felt. Yes, we still needed Washington, but that line moved to -6.5, so we knew we had a nice middle to hedge and win a lot of money." The sweat was so large because of the very top heavy payouts in the Circa Sports contest. First place was $1,000,000, while second dropped all the way to $200,000. Normally, a poker player would like to have a top-heavy payout structure, but Baker didn’t pull any punches when criticizing the payouts. "I think the pay scale was pretty gross honestly. First was three times the amount of second place. But whatever, sometimes you’re on the good end of steep payouts, and sometimes not." Baker and his wife already had plans to move to Las Vegas before what they hope will be the 2021 WSOP, so Baker said that most of this prize money will go towards buying a new home there. For Baker, it is a bittersweet ending to a year that he and everyone else will never forget.
  2. Throughout the years, iconic sports moments have often been memorialized with the equally classic commentary that went with it. The Miracle on Ice will always be paired with Al Michaels and his unforgettable call of "Do you believe in miracles? Yes!" Every Premier League fan around the world will always remember Martin Tyler yelling "Balotelli…Agurerooooooo!" when the Manchester City striker scored the winning goal to give his team their first EPL title ever in 2012. The list goes on and on. While poker commentary isn’t necessarily known for its incredible calls, it is often an integral part in creating a highly entertaining and engaging product for the viewing audience. Someone who knows plenty about this, is none other than Kane Kalas, the man chosen to do the commentary for the highly anticipated Doug Polk vs. Daniel Negreanu heads up match. Kalas’s love of sports was ingrained in him from a young age by his father, legendary baseball commentator and MLB Hall of Famer Harry Kalas. "Growing up listening to my father broadcast NFL games weekly during the regular season and following his commentary with NFL Films turned me into an NFL fanatic," Kalas told us about his childhood. While Kalas made a name for himself in the poker world through his stellar play, he has channeled his father many times when he has stepped into the commentary booth, quickly becoming one of the most popular and talented poker commentators. When it came time to pick out who the voice would be for this matchup of two poker titans, his wealth of experience made the choice an obvious one for Polk and Negreanu. "I have worked with PokerCentral/PokerGo for years. Each summer I broadcast a number of WSOP events. I have also broadcast for the WPT, Poker Night in America, the Triton Super High Roller Series, the Patrick Antonius Poker Challenge, the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open, Live at the Bike, and the Borgata Poker Open," Kalas listed off. Kalas not only has plenty of experience playing high stakes poker, something not all poker commentators have, but even more important to this project specifically is the fact that Kalas first came up in poker by playing mostly heads up cash games. "Heads up NL Hold'em is my strongest game; I have played well over 1 million hands of that format in my career. I have played heads up NL Hold'em against both Daniel and Doug online. In addition, considering the nature of the feud between Daniel and Doug and the polarity it has caused in the poker community, my amicable relationship with both players was an asset," said Kalas. Heads up battles have been popular in 2020 with the lack of live poker options due to Covid-19 restrictions throughout the world. Phil Galfond has been playing high stakes heads up matches in his popular Galfond Challenges, but for Kalas, this grudge match is different. He says the reason is simple: this feud has years in the making, and for both players, it’s personal. "The main thing that makes this match different is the drama and personal vendetta between these two top pros. Doug has been relentlessly trolling Daniel for years, both on his channel and in the flesh. Daniel, for his part, largely assumed the posture of the bigger man, generally avoiding direct public criticism of Polk, until recently that is." Kalas continued on that note, discussing how quickly Negreanu agreed to a challenge where, on paper, he would be a heavy underdog against Polk, who was widely considered one of the best heads up players in the world during his poker prime. "Daniel barely hesitated to accept the challenge. In a blog post, he spoke directly to Polk, 'Attack me endlessly, bully me, mock me, in the hopes of getting me to agree to a high stakes poker match. If that’s the case, well played. You have your wish.'" Kalas continued, "The intense feud between Daniel and Doug is at the center of the storyline of this match and I am well-positioned to recap the drama, trolls, tirades, and escalation of this feud into a high-stakes grudge match in an entertaining yet fair manner." The drama seemed to kick up to a new level recently on Twitter, when Negreanu and Polk went back and forth on whether charts should be allowed to be used while the two are playing. Polk argues that charts that indicate the preflop raising tendencies of his opponent should be allowed because they are standard with online play, while Negreanu argues that this match should be played straight up with no outside assistance during hands. Kalas weighed in a bit on this recent controversy, saying that he can see both sides of the argument. "Ultimately, it should be determined by the players. To Daniel's point, it does make the match a bit less interesting if both players are employing the exact same preflop strategy by following a chart. To Doug's point, there is no precedent to ban the use of preflop charts during play and it is within the rules of the platform, WSOP.com." While Kalas’s poker commentary resume speaks for itself, his selection doesn’t come without its own bit of controversy, as is largely inevitable on Twitter and other online spaces. There have been some whispers that Kalas might be biased towards Polk considering that he runs a Short Deck Poker course on Upswing Poker, a coaching website run by Polk himself. Kalas was quick to address those critics, saying that anyone who knows him knows that he won’t pull any punches towards either player, regardless of his business considerations. "Everyone who knows me knows I am a guy who speaks my mind openly and honestly. Any 'filter' I may have is based on my ethics, not based on my business dealings. As an ex-professional poker player and current investor and hedge fund manager, I am in a privileged position of not needing to worry about getting 'fired.'" While Kalas no longer plays professionally full time, he plans to use his vast experience to his advantage with this job. However, he was quick to point out that poker experience alone does not make for a great poker commentator, making sure to recognize some of the biggest names in poker commentary who don’t play at the same levels as Polk or Negreanu. "David Tuchman, Lon McEachern, Norman Chad--these are just a few examples of my colleagues who have not competed on the felt at the level of Negreanu or Polk but are all indisputably top-tier commentators." Kalas did also point out that there are a few high-level aspects of the heads-up battle that he feels specifically suited to commentate on. "In-depth range analysis, while interesting on occasion, is not the cornerstone of a successful broadcast. I will say, however, that having played at the game's highest level allows me to more easily empathize with and explain the drama at the table as it unfolds." While Kalas has largely switched from playing poker to focusing on hedge funding, he did say that he uses several aspects of his poker playing in his new career, and vice versa. "One thing that I took away from my poker career is the value of data and quantitative analysis. When I got into poker, the number of good professionals was pretty much split 50/50 between 'feel players' and 'data geeks' like me. Today, most of the feel players have gone broke and the data guys are the best players in the world. The same thing is happening in the world of finance," said Kalas. Kalas went on to discuss in more detail what he has been up to the past few years. "Since 2015, I have spent less time at the poker tables and more time in the securities and digital assets markets. This year I launched Crystal Oak Capital which manages Crystal Oak Partners, a stocks fund, and Crystal Oak Digital Assets, a digital assets fund. I'm really excited about the future of finance and the opportunities that lie ahead." The future in the financial world surely looks bright for Kalas, but for the upcoming week, he will be going back to the past. He will be drawing from his years of poker playing and commentating, and digging even further back to the days of listening to his father’s famous radio calls. For Kalas, he hopes that his voice will forever be associated with a poker battle that could ultimately go down as one of the most memorable moments in recent poker memory.
  3. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s {As}{Kd} was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with {Ad}{6s} but was well behind the {7s}{7d} of Nugent. The board came down [5h8c5d9dJc], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with {7h}{7d}. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with {As}{Js}, and he shot out to the lead after a flop of {Qd}{Jh}{9c}. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s {Ad}{8h} was ahead of the {Js}{6d} of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the {Qh}{Jc}, but would receive no help on the {Kc}{Kd}{3h}{9h}{7c} runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with {Ad}{2c} to the {5c}{4d} of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking upa payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with {As}{Kh}, and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [6sJd4h8dTh], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [9h7s2d]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [Kd8d], but Dvoress had him dominated with [KhQs]. The flop of [6c5d3c] left Almeida slip, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  4. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s {As}{Kd} was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with {Ad}{6s} but was well behind the {7s}{7d} of Nugent. The board came down [5h8c5d9dJc], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with {7h}{7d}. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with {As}{Js}, and he shot out to the lead after a flop of {Qd}{Jh}{9c}. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s {Ad}{8h} was ahead of the {Js}{6d} of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the {Qh}{Jc}, but would receive no help on the {Kc}{Kd}{3h}{9h}{7c} runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with {Ad}{2c} to the {5c}{4d} of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking upa payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with {As}{Kh}, and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [6sJd4h8dTh], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [9h7s2d]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [Kd8d], but Dvoress had him dominated with [KhQs]. The flop of [6c5d3c] left Almeida slip, and while the [7h] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [3h]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  5. It took just over 14 hours to complete the most recent one day WSOP bracelet event on GG Poker, and the latest player to take home some hardware was Anatoly Suvarov. For defeating the massive player pool of 9,835, Suvarov will take home a career best $183,526. Let’s take a closer look at the final table action to see how all of the chips ended up in Suvarov’s stack. William Overmire was the first casualty of the final table. He would get it all in after the flop came down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"][poker card="4c"] holding [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"], and he was ahead of the [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"] flush draw held by Jean-Francois Alexandre. Alexandre would complete his flush on the river, sending Overmire to the rail in ninth for $10,195. The next player out the door was Andre Grohnert. He would shove from the small blind with [poker card="Js"][poker card="3h"], but David Edelstein picked up [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6s"] in the big blind. Edelstein would flop trip sixes, and the hand was over by the turn. Seventh place would eventually go to Adam Cader. He moved all in from the cutoff for 5,800,000 with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] , but unfortunately for him, Amine Hamza called from the big blind with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] The board ran down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Tc"], and Cader would take home $21,000 for his showing. Six handed play would last over an hour before Hector Caldero bowed out. He would get his final chips in ahead, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"] to the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5s"] of Edelstein. A five would come right on the flop to change the script, sending Caldero to the rail in sixth, good for $30,140. Edelstein would make it back-to-back eliminations, after busting Jean-Francois Alexandre next. Alexandre would get his final 6,200,000 in from the button with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9c"], and Edelstein called with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Js"]. Neither player improved on the five card runout, meaning the ace high was good enough to score the elimination. Alexandre took home $43,256 for his efforts. The rapid fire eliminations continued, as not long after, Amine Hamza would bow out in fourth. The money would go into the middle after the flop came down [poker card="Ts"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4d"]. Hamza was in good shape, holding [poker card="Tc"][poker card="6d"] to the [poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"] of Anatoly Suvarov. However, a seven would come right on the turn, leaving Hamza drawing dead to a chop. That wouldn’t happen on the river, and Hamza would have to settle for $62,081. Three handed play would drag for a bit before Tom Hoseth busted out after a big race preflop. He would get his final chips in holding pocket nines, and he was flipping against the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] of Anatoly Suvarov. The Russian would catch two clubs on the flop, and was able to river a flush to secure the knockout. Heads up play looked like it would last a while, as both players had about 50 big blinds, and the chip lead would pass back and forth for over an hour before Suvarov sealed the deal. On the final hand, David Edelstein raised to 3,200,000, Suvarov three bet to 9,384,000. Edelstein shoved for 42,500,000 and Suvarov called it off with [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Td"]. He was flipping against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qh"], and a jack on the flop was the only face card that would come, brining no help to Edelstein. Edelstein will have to settle for turning $150 into $127,872 for 2nd place, while Anatoly Survarov earns his first WSOP bracelet, along with $183,526. This win along is worth more than all of Suvarov’s live earnings to this point. Final Table Payouts Anatoly Suvarov – $183,526 David Edelstein– $127,872 Tom Hoseth – $89,098 Amine Hamza – $62,081 Jean-Francois Alexandre – $43,256 Hector Caldero – $30,140 Adam Cader – $21,000 Andre Grohnert – $14,632 William Overmire – $10,195  
  6. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s [As][Kd] was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with {Ad}{6s} but was well behind the {7s}{7d} of Nugent. The board came down [5h8c5d9dJc], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with {7h}{7d}. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with {As}{Js}, and he shot out to the lead after a flop of {Qd}{Jh}{9c}. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s {Ad}{8h} was ahead of the {Js}{6d} of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the {Qh}{Jc}, but would receive no help on the {Kc}{Kd}{3h}{9h}{7c} runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with {Ad}{2c} to the {5c}{4d} of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking upa payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with {As}{Kh}, and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [6sJd4h8dTh], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [9h7s2d]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [Kd8d], but Dvoress had him dominated with [KhQs]. The flop of [6c5d3c] left Almeida slip, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  7. It took just over 14 hours to complete the most recent one day WSOP bracelet event on GGPoker, and the latest player to take home some hardware was Anatoly Suvarov. For defeating the massive player pool of 9,835, Suvarov will take home a career-best $183,526. Let’s take a closer look at the final table action to see how all of the chips ended up in Suvarov’s stack. William Overmire was the first casualty of the final table. He would get it all in after the flop came down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"][poker card="4c"] holding [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"], and he was ahead of the [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"] flush draw held by Jean-Francois Alexandre. Alexandre would complete his flush on the river, sending Overmire to the rail in ninth for $10,195. The next player out the door was Andre Grohnert. He would shove from the small blind with [poker card="Js"][poker card="3h"], but David Edelstein picked up [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6s"] in the big blind. Edelstein would flop trip sixes, and the hand was over by the turn. Seventh place would eventually go to Adam Cader. He moved all-in from the cutoff for 5,800,000 with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] , but unfortunately for him, Amine Hamza called from the big blind with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] The board ran down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Tc"], and Cader would take home $21,000 for his showing. Six handed play would last over an hour before Hector Caldero bowed out. He would get his final chips in ahead, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"] to the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5s"] of Edelstein. A five would come right on the flop to change the script, sending Caldero to the rail in sixth, good for $30,140. Edelstein would make it back-to-back eliminations, after busting Jean-Francois Alexandre next. Alexandre would get his final 6,200,000 in from the button with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9c"], and Edelstein called with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Js"]. Neither player improved on the five-card runout, meaning the ace-high was good enough to score the elimination. Alexandre took home $43,256 for his efforts. The rapid-fire eliminations continued, as not long after, Amine Hamza would bow out in fourth. The money would go into the middle after the flop came down [poker card="Ts"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4d"]. Hamza was in good shape, holding [poker card="Tc"][poker card="6d"] to the [poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"] of Anatoly Suvarov. However, a seven would come right on the turn, leaving Hamza drawing dead to a chop. That wouldn’t happen on the river, and Hamza would have to settle for $62,081. Three-handed play would drag for a bit before Tom Hoseth busted out after a big race preflop. He would get his final chips in holding pocket nines, and he was flipping against the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] of Suvarov. The Russian would catch two clubs on the flop and was able to river a flush to secure the knockout. Heads up play looked like it would last a while, as both players had about 50 big blinds, and the chip lead would pass back and forth for over an hour before Suvarov sealed the deal. On the final hand, David Edelstein raised to 3,200,000, Suvarov three-bet to 9,384,000. Edelstein shoved for 42,500,000 and Suvarov called it off with [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Td"]. He was flipping against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qh"], and a jack on the flop was the only face card that would come, bringing no help to Edelstein. Edelstein will have to settle for turning $150 into $127,872 for 2nd place, while Anatoly Survarov earns his first WSOP bracelet, along with $183,526. This win alone is worth more than all of Suvarov’s live earnings to this point. Final Table Payouts Anatoly Suvarov – $183,526 David Edelstein– $127,872 Tom Hoseth – $89,098 Amine Hamza – $62,081 Jean-Francois Alexandre – $43,256 Hector Caldero – $30,140 Adam Cader – $21,000 Andre Grohnert – $14,632 William Overmire – $10,195  
  8. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"] was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten-high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his ninth place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who bowed out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6s"] but was well behind the [poker card="7s"][poker card="7d"] of Nugent. The board came down [poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Jc"], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"], and he shot out to the lead after a flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"]. No two outer for Kaiser on the turn or river, and he had to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8h"] was ahead of the [poker card="Js"][poker card="6d"] of Dvoress, but Dvoress hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double-ups left and right. Dvoress briefly dipped below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty-winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad open-shoved all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"], but received no help on the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="3h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2c"] to the [poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"] of Dvoress, but the latter flopped two pair, and hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably one of the two biggest names at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking up a payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov got it in on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [poker card="Jd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="Th"], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida. Dvoress carried a massive chip lead into the battle, which lasted just two hands before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [poker card="9h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2d"]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25,568,368 in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8d"], but Dvoress had him dominated with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qs"]. The flop of [poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"] left Almeida drawing slim, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but took home a seven-figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, went to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  9. It took just over 14 hours to complete the most recent one day WSOP bracelet event on GG Poker, and the latest player to take home some hardware was Anatoly Suvarov. For defeating the massive player pool of 9,835, Suvarov will take home a career best $183,526. Let’s take a closer look at the final table action to see how all of the chips ended up in Suvarov’s stack. William Overmire was the first casualty of the final table. He would get it all in after the flop came down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"][poker card="4c"] holding [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"], and he was ahead of the [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"] flush draw held by Jean-Francois Alexandre. Alexandre would complete his flush on the river, sending Overmire to the rail in ninth for $10,195. The next player out the door was Andre Grohnert. He would shove from the small blind with [poker card="Js"][poker card="3h"], but David Edelstein picked up [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6s"] in the big blind. Edelstein would flop trip sixes, and the hand was over by the turn. Seventh place would eventually go to Adam Cader. He moved all in from the cutoff for 5,800,000 with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] , but unfortunately for him, Amine Hamza called from the big blind with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] The board ran down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Tc"], and Cader would take home $21,000 for his showing. Six handed play would last over an hour before Hector Caldero bowed out. He would get his final chips in ahead, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"] to the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5s"] of Edelstein. A five would come right on the flop to change the script, sending Caldero to the rail in sixth, good for $30,140. Edelstein would make it back-to-back eliminations, after busting Jean-Francois Alexandre next. Alexandre would get his final 6,200,000 in from the button with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9c"], and Edelstein called with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Js"]. Neither player improved on the five card runout, meaning the ace high was good enough to score the elimination. Alexandre took home $43,256 for his efforts. The rapid fire eliminations continued, as not long after, Amine Hamza would bow out in fourth. The money would go into the middle after the flop came down [poker card="Ts"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4d"]. Hamza was in good shape, holding [poker card="Tc"][poker card="6d"] to the [poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"] of Anatoly Suvarov. However, a seven would come right on the turn, leaving Hamza drawing dead to a chop. That wouldn’t happen on the river, and Hamza would have to settle for $62,081. Three handed play would drag for a bit before Tom Hoseth busted out after a big race preflop. He would get his final chips in holding pocket nines, and he was flipping against the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] of Anatoly Suvarov. The Russian would catch two clubs on the flop, and was able to river a flush to secure the knockout. Heads up play looked like it would last a while, as both players had about 50 big blinds, and the chip lead would pass back and forth for over an hour before Suvarov sealed the deal. On the final hand, David Edelstein raised to 3,200,000, Suvarov three bet to 9,384,000. Edelstein shoved for 42,500,000 and Suvarov called it off with [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Td"]. He was flipping against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qh"], and a jack on the flop was the only face card that would come, brining no help to Edelstein. Edelstein will have to settle for turning $150 into $127,872 for 2nd place, while Anatoly Survarov earns his first WSOP bracelet, along with $183,526. This win alone is worth more than all of Suvarov’s live earnings to this point. Final Table Payouts Anatoly Suvarov – $183,526 David Edelstein– $127,872 Tom Hoseth – $89,098 Amine Hamza – $62,081 Jean-Francois Alexandre – $43,256 Hector Caldero – $30,140 Adam Cader – $21,000 Andre Grohnert – $14,632 William Overmire – $10,195  
  10. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"] was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6s"] but was well behind the [poker card="7s"][poker card="7d"] of Nugent. The board came down [poker card="5h"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Jc"], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"], and he shot out to the lead after a flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"]. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8h"] was ahead of the [poker card="Js"][poker card="6d"] of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"], but would receive no help on the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="3h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2c"] to the [poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"] of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking up a payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [poker card="6sJd4h8dTh"]. [6sJd4h8dTh], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [9h7s2d]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [Kd8d], but Dvoress had him dominated with [KhQs]. The flop of [6c5d3c] left Almeida slip, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  11. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"] was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with {Ad}{6s} but was well behind the {7s}{7d} of Nugent. The board came down [5h8c5d9dJc], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with {7h}{7d}. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with {As}{Js}, and he shot out to the lead after a flop of {Qd}{Jh}{9c}. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s {Ad}{8h} was ahead of the {Js}{6d} of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the {Qh}{Jc}, but would receive no help on the {Kc}{Kd}{3h}{9h}{7c} runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with {Ad}{2c} to the {5c}{4d} of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking upa payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with {As}{Kh}, and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [6sJd4h8dTh], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [9h7s2d]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [Kd8d], but Dvoress had him dominated with [KhQs]. The flop of [6c5d3c] left Almeida slip, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  12. The final table of the $1,500 WSOP Millionaire Maker looked to be Daniel Dvoress’s to lose when it started. He began with over 92 million chips, 31 big blinds at the time, while his closest competitor, Alejandro Caridad, had 64 million. Dvoress slowly extended his lead throughout the final table, going start to finish with the lead to lock up a score of over $1.5 million, along with his first WSOP bracelet. After a few short stack double ups, Aneris Adomkevicius was the first player eliminated from the final table. He shoved all in for 15,152,228 from early position, and he was called by Alejandro Caridad in the big blind. Adomkevicius’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"] was flipping against the pocket nines of Caridad. After a ten high flop, a third nine on the turn sealed the hand. Adomkevicius took home $107,671 for his 9th place showing. Not long after that, it was Tomasz Cybulski who would bow out in eighth. He had most of his stack already in from the big blind, and called off his final 2,704,909 after Michael Nugent raised to 8,000,000. Cybulski called it off with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6s"] but was well behind the [poker card="7s"][poker card="7d"] of Nugent. The board came down [poker card="5h"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Jc"], and the sevens held strong. Cybulski took home just under $150,000 for his efforts. It took just a few more minutes before Ronny Kaiser shoved all in for 6,259,994 with [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Anatoly Filatov moved all in over the top on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"], and he shot out to the lead after a flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"]. No two outer for Kaiser, and he would have to settle for $207,644. Then, it was time for massive chip leader Daniel Dvoress to get in on the knockouts, when he busted Neville Endo Costa in sixth place. Endo Costa raised to 8,000,000 from early position, leaving less than a big blind behind. Daniel Dvoress forced those chips into the middle with a raise, and the cards were flipped. Endo Costa’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8h"] was ahead of the [poker card="Js"][poker card="6d"] of Dvoress, but Dvoress would hit a jack on the flop, and another on the turn to leave Endo Costa drawing dead. There was a lengthy break between eliminations at this point, as Dvoress was handing out double ups left and right. Dvoress would briefly dip below 100,000,000, before getting back to his bounty winning ways with the massive elimination of Alejandro Caridad. Caridad would open shove all in for 64,536,778 from the cutoff. Daniel Dvoress was the only player with more chips than Caridad, and he called it off with pocket eights. Caridad was racing with the [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"], but would receive no help on the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="3h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] runout. Caridad still earned over $400,000 for his finish. On the very next hand, Dvoress shoved all in from the small blind, and Michael Nugent called all in from the big blind for 26 million and change. Nugent had the lead with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2c"] to the [poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"] of Dvoress, but the latter would flop two pair, and would hit a full house on the river, to eliminate Nugent in fourth. He took home $556,095 for his efforts. Next to bow out was arguably the biggest name at the final table, Anatoly Filatov. The Russian pro hung around long enough to get to third place, locking up a payday of over $772,000. On his final hand, Filatov would get it in on the button with [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], and he was racing against the pocket fives of Dvoress. The board ran down [poker card="6s"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="Th"], and the fives held to get Dvoress heads up with Caio De Almeida Dvoress carries a massive chip lead into the battle, which would last just two hands, before the Canadian sealed the deal. In the penultimate hand, Dvoress and De Almeida went heads up to a flop of [poker card="9h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2d"]. De Almeida checked, Dvoress bet 5,000,000, and De Almeida check-raised to 13,000,000. Dvoress moved and the Brazilian folded. Next, De Almeida got his final 25 million in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8d"], but Dvoress had him dominated with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qs"]. The flop of [poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"]left Almeida drawing slim, and while the [poker card="7h"] turn gave him some straight outs, the river card was the [poker card="3h"]. De Almeida fell just short in second place, but would take home a seven figure consolation prize of $1,072,428. However, the first place prize of $1,489,289, goes to Canadian pro Daniel Dvoress. Final Table Payouts Daniel Dvoress – $1,489,289 Caio De Almeida – $1,072,428 Anatoly Filatov – $556,095 Michael Nugent – $566,095 Alejandro Caridad– $400,412 Neville Endo Costa– $288,356 Ronny Kaiser – $207,644 Tomasz Cybulski – $149,523 Aneris Adomkevicius – $107,671  
  13. Bradley Ruben has had a successful WSOP so far this summer, with six cashes, and one final table before this in the $1,050 PLO Bounty Event. He finished fourth in that event for nearly $40,000, but this time, he was able to get to the top, taking home his first WSOP bracelet, and over $220,000 to boot. The final table ended up starting short handed with eight players, as there was a double elimination with ten players left. At virtually the same time, Simon Mason busted in 10th place, while Adam Hendrix quickly followed him out the door in ninth place. This left Canadian Patrick Serda holding the lead eight handed. After shipping a double up over to another opponent, a short-stacked Tal Peretz got his final 360,000 and change in the middle, and Sami Kelopuro three-bet the pot to get everyone else out of the hand. Peretz held [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"], and he was trailing the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="10s"] of Kelopuro. The flop of [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"] gave Kelopuro top set, but also gave Peretz a flush draw. However, two hearts closed out the board, and Peretz busted in eight place, earning $17,858. Despite starting the final table as the chip leader, Patrick Serda was the next person out, busting in a huge pot against Dorel Eldabach. Eldabach raised to 280,000 from late position, and Serda defended his big blind. The flop of [poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] saw Serda check call bet of 215,151, and the [poker card="Ts"] hit the turn. Serda checked again, and Eldabach fired 310,000. Serda check raised to 910,000, and Eldabach called. The [poker card="Td"] river saw Serda move all-in for 1,868,679, and Eldabach put him at risk, showing [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3s"] for the best flush possible. Serda showed [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4d"] for a complete bluff, and he'd have to settle for $33,910 in seventh. Next out the door was Sami Kelopuro. He made it 560,000 to go from the hijack, and Blaz Zerjav three-bet to 1,920,000, a pot sized bet. It folded back to Kelopuro, and he moved all in for another 1,344,671 on top of his raise. Zerjav called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="8d"], and he was well in front of the [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"]. Zerjav flopped top set, and Kelopuro was drawing dead by the turn. He earned $46,727.14 for his finish. Despite picking up that elimination, it was Zerjav who bowed out next in fifth. He raised it up under the gun, and Bradley Ruben three-bet to 1,500,000 on the button. Zerjav made the call, and the flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"]. Zerjav check, then called all-in for 2,500,000 and change after Ruben shoved. Zerjav showed [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"], which was drawing very live against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Td"] of Ruben. However, the [poker card="Qc"] turn and [poker card="Jc"] river provided no further help. The Slovenian took home $64,389 for his efforts. Ruben made it back-to-back eliminations after taking out Naman Madan in fourth. Ruben started by raising to 420,000 in the cutoff, and Madan three-bet to 1,560,000. Ruben made the call, and the flop came down [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. Ruben checked, and Madan bet the pot, 3,420,000. Ruben moved all in for the one million Madan had left, and the cards were shown. Madan: [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="8d"] Ruben: [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] Ruben had flopped top set, leaving Madan drawing rather thin. No further help came, and Madan settled for $88,727 in fourth. Jens Lakemeier just missed out on heads up play, bowing out in third. In his final hand, he made it 504,000 to go from the button. Ruben three-bet the pot to 1,752,000 and that was called by Lakemeier. The flop came down [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], and Ruben bet the pot, setting Lakemeier all-in. He called with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"], and had a ton of outs against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"] of Ruben. The [poker card="Kc"] gave Ruben top set, and the [poker card="Ac"] river changed nothing. Lakemeier bowed out in 3rd place, taking home $122,264.05. Heads-up didn’t last very long, as Ruben was simply unstoppable towards the end. On the final hand, Dorel Eldabach three bet after a raise from Ruben. Ruben called, and after the flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"] flop, he called the all-in from Eldabach. Ruben: [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6h"] Eldabach: [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"] Eldabach’s kings were in the lead, and the kings held on the [poker card="7d"] turn. However, the [poker card="Qh"] river gave Ruben the nut flush, ending the tournament. Eldabach will take home $168,477.54 for his runner up spot, while Ruben earned his first WSOP bracelet, and $220,159 to boot! Final Table Payouts Bradley Ruben – $220,160 Dorel Eldabach– $168,478 Jens Lakemeier – $122,264 Naman Madan – $88,727 Blaz Zerjav – $64,389 Sami Kelopuro – $46,727 Patrick Serda – $33,910 Tal Peretz – $24,608 Adam Hendrix – $17,858
  14. The latest WSOP bracelet of the summer has found a new home, and it belongs to Alexander Stacey, who beat a tough final table to earn over $127,000! After playing six-handed throughout the tournament, the final table was formed with nine players left. The biggest name at the final table, Steve O’Dwyer, had the chip lead, but he shipped out an early double up, and his stack continued to fall from there. The first player to leave the final table was Tal Herzog. He shoved under the gun for just under seven million, and was called by Sami Koivuneva. Herzog’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] was flipping against the pocket tens of Koivuneva, and Herzog shot out to the lead on the ace high flop. However, a third ten slapped down on the turn, leaving Herzog suddenly drawing dead. He took home $9,311 for his final table finish. Wai Ching Cheang was next to bow out not long after. He got his short stack in the middle on the button, and Koivuneva called to try to go two-for-two on eliminations. Cheang’s [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Jh"] was in good shape against the [poker card="8h"] [poker card="3c"] of Koivuneva, but the flop brought plenty of action, coming down [poker card="Jc"] [poker card="7c"] [poker card="2c"]. That gave Cheang top pair, but also gave Koivuneva a flush draw, and he hit that flush with the [poker card="Qc"] river. The aforementioned O’Dwyer was the next player to bust in seventh. He shoved his final 13 blinds from the cutoff, but unfortunately for him, Michael Schwartz woke up with pocket kings in the small blind. He was well out in front of the [poker card="Ah"] [poker card="9h"] of O’Dwyer, and Schwartz flopped top set to leave O’Dwyer drawing virtually dead. For his efforts, O’Dwyer takes home $18,323. The eliminations kept coming, as Hui Wang busted next in sixth place. His last hand was a battle of the blinds with Alexander Stacey. After a flop of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], Stacey fired 1,360,000. Wang called, and the [poker card="Qs"] hit the turn. This time, Stacey bet 2,420,000, but Wang wanted to play for more, raising to 7,560,000. Stacey called, and the [poker card="Jh"] completed the board. Stacey checked, and Wang pulled the trigger for all of it, over 14,000,000. Stackey called with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="5h"] for top pair, and Wang showed just [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2d"] for a bluff. Michael Schwartz busted out in fifth after he raised from under the gun to 9,657,965. Arnaud Enselme shoved from the big blind, and Schwartz called for what little he had behind. Schwartz held [poker card="Kh"] [poker card="Jc"], but he was dominated by the Ace-King of Enselme. An ace came right on the flop, and Schwartz was drawing dead by the turn. Unfortunately for Enselme, he couldn’t keep that momentum going, as he busted out in fourth. Arnaud Enselme shoved from under the gun for 17,777,266, and Alexander Stacey called in the big blind. It was another classic race, as Enselme held pocket eights, while Stacey showed [poker card="As"] [poker card="Qd"]. The flop came down [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="5d"] [poker card="4d"], and Enselme wasn’t able to catch up from there. A few hands later, Sami Koivuneva shoved from the button for five million and change, and he was called by Craig Lecompte in the small blind. Stacey three-bet shoved for more, and Lecompte folded. Koivunea showed [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Ks"], and was dominating the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3h"] of Stacey. However, a three came right on the flop, and that would get us to heads up. It only took 11 hands for Stacey to finish off Lecompte. Lecompte raised to 4,000,000 on the button, and Stacey shoved, having Lecompte covered. He called off his final 32 million, and the hands were flipped. Lecompte: [poker card="Kd"] [poker card="Qc"] Stacey: [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="9c"] The ace high would hold true on the runout of [poker card="Jd"] [poker card="Js"] [poker card="4d"] [poker card="5h"] [poker card="7s"], and the title was secured. For his efforts, Criag Lecompte took home $99,552, but the first place prize of $127,660, and the bracelet, will be going home with Alexander Stacey! Check out a full breakdown of the payouts below. Final Table Payouts Alexander Stacey – $127,660 Craig Lecompte– $99,552 Sami Koivuneva – $70,964 Arnaud Enselme – $50,586 Michael Schwartz – $36,059 Hui Wang – $25,704 Steve O’Dwyer, – $18,323 Wai Ching Cheang– $13,061 Tal Herzog – $9,311  
  15. The latest WSOP bracelet of the summer has found a new home, and it belongs to Alexander Stacey, who beat a tough final table to earn over $127,000! After playing six-handed throughout the tournament, the final table was formed with nine players left. The biggest name at the final table, Steve O’Dwyer, had the chip lead, but he shipped out an early double up, and his stack continued to fall from there. The first player to leave the final table was Tal Herzog. He shoved under the gun for just under seven million, and was called by Sami Koivuneva. Herzog’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] was flipping against the pocket tens of Koivuneva, and Herzog shot out to the lead on the ace high flop. However, a third ten slapped down on the turn, leaving Herzog suddenly drawing dead. He took home $9,311 for his final table finish. Wai Ching Cheang was next to bow out not long after. He got his short stack in the middle on the button, and Koivuneva called to try to go two-for-two on eliminations. Cheang’s [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Jh"] was in good shape against the [poker card="8h"] [poker card="3c"] of Koivuneva, but the flop brought plenty of action, coming down [poker card="Jc"] [poker card="7c"] [poker card="2c"]. That gave Cheang top pair, but also gave Koivuneva a flush draw, and he hit that flush with the [poker card="Qc"] river. The aforementioned O’Dwyer was the next player to bust in seventh. He shoved his final 13 blinds from the cutoff, but unfortunately for him, Michael Schwartz woke up with pocket kings in the small blind. He was well out in front of the [poker card="Ah"] [poker card="9h"] of O’Dwyer, and Schwartz flopped top set to leave O’Dwyer drawing virtually dead. For his efforts, O’Dwyer takes home $18,323. The eliminations kept coming, as Hui Wang busted next in sixth place. His last hand was a battle of the blinds with Alexander Stacey. After a flop of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], Stacey fired 1,360,000. Wang called, and the [poker card="Qs"] hit the turn. This time, Stacey bet 2,420,000, but Wang wanted to play for more, raising to 7,560,000. Stacey called, and the [poker card="Jh"] completed the board. Stacey checked, and Wang pulled the trigger for all of it, over 14,000,000. Stackey called with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="5h"] for top pair, and Wang showed just [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2d"] for a bluff. Michael Schwartz busted out in fifth after he raised from under the gun to 9,657,965. Arnaud Enselme shoved from the big blind, and Schwartz called for what little he had behind. Schwartz held [poker card="Kh"] [poker card="Jc"], but he was dominated by the Ace-King of Enselme. An ace came right on the flop, and Schwartz was drawing dead by the turn. Unfortunately for Enselme, he couldn’t keep that momentum going, as he busted out in fourth. Arnaud Enselme shoved from under the gun for 17,777,266, and Alexander Stacey called in the big blind. It was another classic race, as Enselme held pocket eights, while Stacey showed [poker card="As"] [poker card="Qd"]. The flop came down [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="5d"] [poker card="4d"], and Enselme wasn’t able to catch up from there. A few hands later, Sami Koivuneva shoved from the button for five million and change, and he was called by Craig Lecompte in the small blind. Stacey three-bet shoved for more, and Lecompte folded. Koivunea showed [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Ks"], and was dominating the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3h"] of Stacey. However, a three came right on the flop, and that would get us to heads up. It only took 11 hands for Stacey to finish off Lecompte. Lecompte raised to 4,000,000 on the button, and Stacey shoved, having Lecompte covered. He called off his final 32 million, and the hands were flipped. Lecompte: [poker card="Kd"] [poker card="Qc"] Stacey: [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="9c"] The ace high would hold true on the runout of [poker card="Jd"] [poker card="Js"] [poker card="4d"] [poker card="5h"] [poker card="7s"], and the title was secured. For his efforts, Criag Lecompte took home $99,552, but the first place prize of $127,660, and the bracelet, will be going home with Alexander Stacey! Check out a full breakdown of the payouts below. Final Table Payouts Alexander Stacey – $127,660 Craig Lecompte– $99,552 Sami Koivuneva – $70,964 Arnaud Enselme – $50,586 Michael Schwartz – $36,059 Hui Wang – $25,704 Steve O’Dwyer, – $18,323 Wai Ching Cheang– $13,061 Tal Herzog – $9,311  
  16. Bradley Ruben has had a successful WSOP so far this summer, with six cashes, and one final table before this in the $1,050 PLO Bounty Event. He finished fourth in that event for nearly $40,000, but this time, he was able to get to the top, taking home his first WSOP bracelet, and over $220,000 to boot. The final table ended up starting short handed with eight players, as there was a double elimination with ten players left. At virtually the same time, Simon Mason busted in 10th place, while Adam Hendrix quickly followed him out the door in ninth place. This left Canadian Patrick Serda holding the lead eight handed. After shipping a double up over to another opponent, a short-stacked Tal Peretz got his final 360,000 and change in the middle, and Sami Kelopuro three-bet the pot to get everyone else out of the hand. Peretz held [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"], and he was trailing the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="10s"] of Kelopuro. The flop of [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"] gave Kelopuro top set, but also gave Peretz a flush draw. However, two hearts closed out the board, and Peretz busted in eight place, earning $17,858. Despite starting the final table as the chip leader, Patrick Serda was the next person out, busting in a huge pot against Dorel Eldabach. Eldabach raised to 280,000 from late position, and Serda defended his big blind. The flop of [poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] saw Serda check call bet of 215,151, and the [poker card="Ts"] hit the turn. Serda checked again, and Eldabach fired 310,000. Serda check raised to 910,000, and Eldabach called. The [poker card="Td"] river saw Serda move all-in for 1,868,679, and Eldabach put him at risk, showing [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3s"] for the best flush possible. Serda showed [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4d"] for a complete bluff, and he'd have to settle for $33,910 in seventh. Next out the door was Sami Kelopuro. He made it 560,000 to go from the hijack, and Blaz Zerjav three-bet to 1,920,000, a pot sized bet. It folded back to Kelopuro, and he moved all in for another 1,344,671 on top of his raise. Zerjav called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="8d"], and he was well in front of the [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"]. Zerjav flopped top set, and Kelopuro was drawing dead by the turn. He earned $46,727.14 for his finish. Despite picking up that elimination, it was Zerjav who bowed out next in fifth. He raised it up under the gun, and Bradley Ruben three-bet to 1,500,000 on the button. Zerjav made the call, and the flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"]. Zerjav check, then called all-in for 2,500,000 and change after Ruben shoved. Zerjav showed [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"], which was drawing very live against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Td"] of Ruben. However, the [poker card="Qc"] turn and [poker card="Jc"] river provided no further help. The Slovenian took home $64,389 for his efforts. Ruben made it back-to-back eliminations after taking out Naman Madan in fourth. Ruben started by raising to 420,000 in the cutoff, and Madan three-bet to 1,560,000. Ruben made the call, and the flop came down [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. Ruben checked, and Madan bet the pot, 3,420,000. Ruben moved all in for the one million Madan had left, and the cards were shown. Madan: [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="8d"] [KsKd10c8d] Ruben: [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] [QdQs7d6s] Ruben had flopped top set, leaving Madan drawing rather thin. No further help came, and Madan settled for $88,727 in fourth. Jens Lakemeier just missed out on heads up play, bowing out in third. In his final hand, he made it 504,000 to go from the button. Ruben three-bet the pot to 1,752,000 and that was called by Lakemeier. The flop came down [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], and Ruben bet the pot, setting Lakemeier all-in. He called with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"], and had a ton of outs against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"] of Ruben. The [poker card="Kc"] gave Ruben top set, and the [poker card="Ac"] river changed nothing. Lakemeier bowed out in 3rd place, taking home $122,264.05. Heads-up didn’t last very long, as Ruben was simply unstoppable towards the end. On the final hand, Dorel Eldabach three bet after a raise from Ruben. Ruben called, and after the flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"] flop, he called the all-in from Eldabach. Ruben: [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6h"][Ah9s6s6h] Eldabach: [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"] Eldabach’s kings were in the lead, and the kings held on the [poker card="7d"] turn. However, the [poker card="Qh"] river gave Ruben the nut flush, ending the tournament. Eldabach will take home $168,477.54 for his runner up spot, while Ruben earned his first WSOP bracelet, and $220,159 to boot! Final Table Payouts Bradley Ruben – $220,160 Dorel Eldabach– $168,478 Jens Lakemeier – $122,264 Naman Madan – $88,727 Blaz Zerjav – $64,389 Sami Kelopuro – $46,727 Patrick Serda – $33,910 Tal Peretz – $24,608 Adam Hendrix – $17,858
  17. Another WSOP bracelet of the summer has found a new home, and it belongs to Alexander Stacey, who beat a tough final table to earn over $127,000. The final table included Steve O’Dwyer, who brought the chip lead to the final table but he shipped out an early double up, and his stack continued to fall from there. The first player to leave the final table was Tal Herzog. He shoved under the gun for just under seven million, and was called by Sami Koivuneva. Herzog’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] was flipping against the pocket tens of Koivuneva, and Herzog shot out to the lead on the ace-high flop. However, a third ten slapped down on the turn, leaving Herzog suddenly drawing dead. He took home $9,311 for his final table finish. Wai Ching Cheang was next to bow out not long after. He got his short stack in the middle on the button, and Koivuneva called to try to go two-for-two on eliminations. Cheang’s [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Jh"] was in good shape against the [poker card="8h"] [poker card="3c"] of Koivuneva, but the flop brought plenty of action, coming down [poker card="Jc"] [poker card="7c"] [poker card="2c"]. That gave Cheang top pair, but also gave Koivuneva a flush draw, and he hit that flush with the [poker card="Qc"] river. The aforementioned O’Dwyer was the next player to bust in seventh. He shoved his final 13 blinds from the cutoff, but unfortunately for him, Michael Schwartz woke up with pocket kings in the small blind. He was well out in front of the [poker card="Ah"] [poker card="9h"] of O’Dwyer, and Schwartz flopped top set to leave O’Dwyer drawing virtually dead. For his efforts, O’Dwyer pocketed $18,323. The eliminations kept coming, as Hui Wang busted next in sixth place. His last hand was a battle of the blinds with Stacey. After a flop of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], Stacey fired 1,360,000. Wang called, and the [poker card="Qs"] hit the turn. This time, Stacey bet 2,420,000, but Wang wanted to play for more, raising to 7,560,000. Stacey called, and the [poker card="Jh"] completed the board. Stacey checked, and Wang pulled the trigger for all of it, over 14,000,000. Stacey called with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="5h"] for top pair, and Wang showed just [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2d"] for a failed bluff. Schwartz busted out in fifth after he raised from under the gun to 9,657,965. Arnaud Enselme shoved from the big blind, and Schwartz called for what little he had behind. Schwartz held [poker card="Kh"] [poker card="Jc"], but he was dominated by the Ace-King of Enselme. An ace came right on the flop, and Schwartz was drawing dead by the turn. Unfortunately for Enselme, he couldn’t keep that momentum going, as he busted out in fourth. Enselme shoved from under the gun for 17,777,266, and Stacey called in the big blind. It was another classic race, as Enselme held pocket eights, while Stacey showed [poker card="As"] [poker card="Qd"]. The flop came down [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="5d"] [poker card="4d"], and Enselme wasn’t able to catch up from there. A few hands later, Sami Koivuneva shoved from the button for five million and change, and he was called by Craig Lecompte in the small blind. Stacey three-bet shoved for more, and Lecompte folded. Koivunea showed [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="Ks"], and was dominating the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3h"] of Stacey. However, a three came right on the flop, and that would sent the tournament to heads up. It only took 11 hands for Stacey to finish off Lecompte. Lecompte raised to 4,000,000 on the button, and Stacey shoved, having Lecompte covered. He called off his final 32 million, and the hands were flipped. Lecompte: [poker card="Kd"] [poker card="Qc"] Stacey: [poker card="Ad"] [poker card="9c"] The ace high would hold true on the runout of [poker card="Jd"] [poker card="Js"] [poker card="4d"] [poker card="5h"] [poker card="7s"], and the title was secured. For his efforts, Lecompte took home $99,552, but the first place prize of $127,660, and the bracelet, belonged with Alexander Stacey. Final Table Payouts Alexander Stacey – $127,660 Craig Lecompte– $99,552 Sami Koivuneva – $70,964 Arnaud Enselme – $50,586 Michael Schwartz – $36,059 Hui Wang – $25,704 Steve O’Dwyer, – $18,323 Wai Ching Cheang– $13,061 Tal Herzog – $9,311
  18. Bradley Ruben has had a successful World Series of Poker Online so far this summer, with six cashes, including the final table of Event #27 ($1,050 PLO Bounty). He finished fourth in that event for nearly $40,000, but on Sunday he was able to get to the top, taking home his first WSOP bracelet, and over $220,000 for winning Event #62 ($1,500 PLO). The final table ended up starting short-handed with eight players, as there was a double elimination with ten players left. At virtually the same time, Simon Mason busted in 10th place, while Adam Hendrix quickly followed him out the door in ninth place. This left Canadian Patrick Serda holding the lead eight-handed. After shipping a double up over to another opponent, a short-stacked Tal Peretz got his final 360,000 and change in the middle, and Sami Kelopuro three-bet the pot to get everyone else out of the hand. Peretz held [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"], and he was trailing the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="10s"] of Kelopuro. The flop of [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"] gave Kelopuro top set, but also gave Peretz a flush draw. However, two hearts closed out the board, and Peretz busted in eight place, earning $17,858. Despite starting the final table as the chip leader, Serda was the next person out, busting in a huge pot against Dorel Eldabach. Eldabach raised to 280,000 from late position, and Serda defended his big blind. The flop of [poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] saw Serda check call bet of 215,151, and the [poker card="Ts"] hit the turn. Serda checked again, and Eldabach fired 310,000. Serda check-raised to 910,000, and Eldabach called. The [poker card="Td"] river saw Serda move all-in for 1,868,679, and Eldabach put him at risk, showing [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3s"] for the best flush possible. Serda showed [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4d"] for a complete bluff, and he'd had to settle for $33,910 in seventh. Next out the door was Sami Kelopuro. He made it 560,000 to go from the hijack, and Blaz Zerjav three-bet to 1,920,000, a pot sized bet. It folded back to Kelopuro, and he moved all in for another 1,344,671 on top of his raise. Zerjav called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="8d"], and he was well in front of the [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"]. Zerjav flopped top set, and Kelopuro was drawing dead by the turn. He earned $46,727.14 for his finish. Despite picking up that elimination, it was Zerjav who bowed out next in fifth. He raised it up under the gun, and Ruben three-bet to 1,500,000 on the button. Zerjav made the call, and the flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"]. Zerjav check, then called all-in for 2,500,000 and change after Ruben shoved. Zerjav showed [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"], which was drawing very live against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Td"] of Ruben. However, the [poker card="Qc"] turn and [poker card="Jc"] river provided no further help. The Slovenian took home $64,389 for his efforts. Ruben made it back-to-back eliminations after taking out Naman Madan in fourth. Ruben started by raising to 420,000 in the cutoff, and Madan three-bet to 1,560,000. Ruben made the call, and the flop came down [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. Ruben checked, and Madan bet the pot, 3,420,000. Ruben moved all in for the one million Madan had left, and the cards were shown. Madan: [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="8d"] Ruben: [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] Ruben had flopped top set, leaving Madan drawing rather thin. No further help came, and Madan settled for $88,727 in fourth. Jens Lakemeier just missed out on heads up play, bowing out in third. In his final hand, he made it 504,000 to go from the button. Ruben three-bet the pot to 1,752,000 and that was called by Lakemeier. The flop came down [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], and Ruben bet the pot, setting Lakemeier all-in. He called with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"], and had a ton of outs against the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"] of Ruben. The [poker card="Kc"] gave Ruben top set, and the [poker card="Ac"] river changed nothing. Lakemeier bowed out in 3rd place, taking home $122,264.05. Heads-up didn’t last very long, as Ruben was simply unstoppable towards the end. On the final hand, Dorel Eldabach three bet after a raise from Ruben. Ruben called, and after the flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"] flop, he called the all-in from Eldabach. Ruben: [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6h"] Eldabach: [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"] Eldabach’s kings were in the lead, and the kings held on the [poker card="7d"] turn. However, the [poker card="Qh"] river gave Ruben the nut flush, ending the tournament. Eldabach will take home $168,477.54 for his runner up spot, while Ruben earned his first WSOP bracelet and $220,159. Final Table Payouts Bradley Ruben – $220,160 Dorel Eldabach– $168,478 Jens Lakemeier – $122,264 Naman Madan – $88,727 Blaz Zerjav – $64,389 Sami Kelopuro – $46,727 Patrick Serda – $33,910 Tal Peretz – $24,608 Adam Hendrix – $17,858
  19. Adnan Hacialioglu needed just seven hours to go from cards in the air to bracelet winner as the Finnish pro made quick work of the final table in Sunday's World Series of Poker Online action. Hacialioglu finished on top of the field that saw almost 2,000 players come out and for his efforts, he earned his first WSOP bracelet, $259,872, and a WSOP Europe Package. The final table was supposed to be nine-handed, but after eliminations at both of the final two tables, the final table saw just eight players featured. Tuen Bui was the first of the eight to bow out. He moved all in from the button for over 2,800,000 with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"], but in the big blind, Jargo Alavali woke up with pocket aces. The flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] left Bui drawing thin. No miracles came for Bui, who took home $28,800 and change for his efforts. On the next knockout hand, the action kicked off with Hacialioglu raising, and one of the big stacks at the time, Niko Koop, three-bet to 1,601,000. Soo Jo Kim moved all in for 3,232,456 next to act. Hacialioglu folded, but Koop called with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7c"]. He was in rough shape against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"]of Kim, but Koop got new life after the [poker card="9c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] flop. The [poker card="Td"] turn gave Koop the straight, and Kim wasn't able to catch up on the river. It was at this point that Hacialioglu took over, knocking out every player remaining from there. First, Andriy Lyubovetskiy bounced in sixth place. He moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"], and in the big blind, Hacialioglu called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"]The flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] left Lyubovetskiy drawing thin, and Hacialioglu hit a full house on the turn to seal the hand. Lyubovetskiy took home for $54,713.88 for his efforts. Jargo Alavali looked like he was going to double up next, getting his money in with pocket aces versus the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Th"] of Hacialioglu. However, Hacialioglu hit the flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"], giving him top pair and a straight draw. The[poker card="7h"] didn't help, but the[poker card="Kc"] river did. Alavali busts in fifth, taking home over $75,000. Koop saw his stack slowly dwindle throughout the final table, and he eventually bowed out in fourth. He got his chips in ahead, with his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] up against the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] of Hacialioglu. Both players missed the flop, but the [poker card="Ks"] on the turn shot Hacialioglu into the lead. He held that lead on the river, getting play down to just three handed. Tim West started the final table as the short stack, but thanks to a number of double ups, he was able to get all the way up to third before busting. He lost a classic coin flip, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] against the [poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3h"] gave West outs for a broadway straight, but a five and two finished the board, giving Hacialioglu a straight he didn't even need. Heads up play didn’t last long, as Hacialioglu started with a 3:1 chip lead over Robin Berggren. The last hand was another coin flip, as Berggren held [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"], versus the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="3c"], shot Hacialioglu the lead, and he never gave that lead up. For his dominating performance, Hacialioglu earned $259,842, and his first WSOP bracelet. Final Table Payouts Adnan Hacialioglu – $259,842 Robin Berggren – $197,274 Tim West – $$143,162 Niko Koop – $103,893 Jargo Alavali – $79,395 Andriy Lyubovetskiy – $54,714 Soo Jo Kim – $39,706 Tuen Bui – $28,814 Johan Haugen – $20,911
  20. Another WSOP Online Event has finished, and this one took less time than usual, as only seven hours passed between the first and last hand of the event. When the dust settled, it was Adnan Hacialioglu who finished on top of the field that saw almost 2,000 players come out. For his efforts, Hacialioglu took home his first WSOP bracelet, along with $259,872, and a WSOP Europe Package. The final table was supposed to be nine-handed, but after eliminations at both of the final two tables, the final table saw just eight players featured. Tuen Bui would be next to bow out. He moved all in from the button for over 2,800,000 with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"], but in the big blind, Jargo Alavali woke up with pocket aces. The flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] left Bui drawing thin. No miracles came for Bui, who took home $28,800 and change for his efforts. On the next knockout hand, the action kicked off with Hacialioglu raising, and one of the big stacks at the time, Niko Koop, three bet to 1,601,000. Soo Jo Kim moved all in for 3,232,456 next to act. Hacialioglu folded, but Koop called with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7c"]. He was in rough shape against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"]of Kim, but Koop got new life after the [poker card="9c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] flop. The [poker card="Td"] turn gave Koop the straight, and Kim wasn't able to catch up on the river. It was at this point that Hacialioglu would take over, knocking out every player remaining from there. First, Andriy Lyubovetskiy would bounce in sixth place. He moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"], and in the big blind, Hacialioglu called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"]The flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] left Lyubovetskiy drawing thin, and Hacialioglu hit a full house on the turn to seal the hand. Lyubovetskiy took home for $54,713.88 for his efforts. Jargo Alavali looked like he would double up next, getting his money in with pocket aces versus the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Th"] of Hacialioglu. However, Hacialioglu hit the flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"], giving him top pair and a straight draw. The[poker card="7h"] didn't help, but the[poker card="Kc"] river did. Alavali busts in fifth, taking home over $75,000. Koop saw his stack slowly dwindle throughout the final table, and he eventually bowed out in fourth. He got his chips in ahead, with his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] up against the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] of Hacialioglu. Both players missed the flop, but the [poker card="Ks"] on the turn shot Hacialioglu into the lead. He held that lead on the river, getting play down to just three handed. Tim West started the final table as the short stack, but thanks to a number of double ups, he was able to get all the way up to third before busting. He lost a classic coin flip, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] against the [poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3h"] gave West outs for a broadway straight, but a five and two finished the board, giving Hacialioglu a straight he didn't even need. Heads up play didn’t last long, as Hacialioglu started with a 3:1 chip lead over Robin Berggren. The last hand was another coin flip, as Berggren held [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"], versus the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="3c"], shot Hacialioglu the lead, and he would never give that lead up. For his dominating performance, Hacialioglu earned $259,842, and his first WSOP Congratulations to Adnan on his incredible performance! Final Table Payouts Adnan Hacialioglu – $259,842 Robin Berggren – $197,274 Tim West – $$143,162 Niko Koop – $103,893 Jargo Alavali – $79,395 Andriy Lyubovetskiy – $54,714 Soo Jo Kim – $39,706 Tuen Bui – $28,814 Johan Haugen – $20,911
  21. Another WSOP Online Event has finished, and this one took less time than usual, as only seven hours passed between the first and last hand of the event. When the dust settled, it was Adnan Hacialioglu who finished on top of the field that saw almost 2,000 players come out. For his efforts,Hacialioglu took home his first WSOP bracelet, along with $259,872, and a WSOP Europe Package. The final table was supposed to be nine-handed, but after eliminations at both of the final two tables, the final table saw just eight players featured. Tuen Bui would be next to bow out. He moved all in from the button for over 2,800,000 with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"], but in the big blind, Jargo Alavali woke up with pocket aces. The flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] left Bui drawing thin. No miracles came for Bui, who took home $28,800 and change for his efforts. On the next knockout hand, the action kicked off with Hacialioglu raising, and one of the big stacks at the time, Niko Koop, three bet to 1,601,000. Soo Jo Kim moved all in for 3,232,456 next to act. Hacialioglu folded, but Koop called with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7c"]. He was in rough shape against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"]of Kim, but Koop got new life after the [poker card="9c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] flop. The [poker card="Td"] turn gave Koop the straight, and Kim wasn't able to catch up on the river. It was at this point that Hacialioglu would take over, knocking out every player remaining from there. First, Andriy Lyubovetskiy would bounce in sixth place. He moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"], and in the big blind, Hacialioglu called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"]The flop of {Kd}{4h}{4s} left Lyubovetskiy drawing thin, and Hacialioglu hit a full house on the turn to seal the hand. Lyubovetskiy took home for $54,713.88 for his efforts. Jargo Alavali looked like he would double up next, getting his money in with pocket aces versus the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Th"] Hacialioglu. However, Hacialioglu hit the flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"], giving him top pair and a straight draw. The[poker card="7h"] didn't help, but the[poker card="Kc"] river did. Alavali busts in fifth, taking home over $75,000. Koop saw his stack slowly dwindle throughout the final table, and he eventually bowed out in fourth. He got his chips in ahead, with his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] up against the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] of Hacialioglu.Both players missed the flop, but the [poker card="Ks"] on the turn shot Hacialioglu into the lead. He held that lead on the river, getting play down to just three handed. Tim West started the final table as the short stack, but thanks to a number of double ups, he was able to get all the way up to third before busting. He lost a classic coin flip, holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] against the [poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3h"]gave West outs for a broadway straight, but a five and two finished the board, giving Hacialioglu a straight. Heads up play didn’t last long, as Hacialioglu started with a 3:1 chip lead over Robin Berggren. The last hand was another coin flip, as Berggren held [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"], versus the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] of Hacialioglu. The flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="3c"], shot Hacialioglu the lead, and he would never give that lead up. For his dominating performance, Hacialioglu earned $259,842, and his first WSOP Congratulations to Adnan on his incredible performance! Final Table Payouts Adnan Hacialioglu – $259,842 Robin Berggren – |$197,274 Tim West – $$143,162 Niko Koop – $103,893 Jargo Alavali – $79,395 Andriy Lyubovetskiy – $54,714 Soo Jo Kim – $39,706 Tuen Bui – $28,814 Johan Haugen – $20,911
  22. Its at 3 and I'm supposed to head to Vegas at 6:30. I wanted to see if it would be done by then. I know its a double stack, but I know the mini ftops only takes about 3 and a half and that gets like 5 times the players this gets. Plus its 4 max. Any help would be appreciated thanks guys!
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