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  1. It took just 55 minutes on Friday morning for 'MacDaddy15' to go from middle of the final table pack to World Series of Poker bracelet winner in Event #9 ($1,000 NLHE Six Max) and in the process earn the single biggest score of the 2020 WSOP to date. A total of 1,026 entries from 658 unique players created a $974,700 prize pool with the eventual champion getting to take home $188,214 and the bracelet. When the final table began, Ruth 'crazeeelf666' Ruffman held a comfortable chip lead with 'WillowG23' in second and 'MacDaddy15' not far behind in third. Ian 'apokerjoker2' Steinman was the first player sent packing by 'MacDaddy15'. From the button, 'MacDaddy15' raised to 332,500 with [poker card="2d"][poker card="2s"] before Steinman moved all in for 1,365,109 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9d"]. 'MacDaddy15' called and then had to sweat all the way through a [poker card="kd"][poker card="qd"][poker card="5s"][poker card="js"][poker card="jc"] runout to eliminate Steinman in sixth. Five-handed play lasted another 15 minutes before the next elimination hand occurred. 'Im.Sorry' raised to 250,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="kh"][poker card="jd"] before 'moodeez' re-raised all in for 890,486 from the small blind with [poker card="jh"][poker card="th"] and 'Im.Sorry' called. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"][poker card="4d"] flop gave 'Im.Sorry' second pair and the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="5h"] river failed to save 'moodeez' from a fifth place finish. A few moments later, 'Im.Sorry' raised to 254,000 from the hijack with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"] only to have Ruth 'crazeelf666' re-raise to 806,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"]. 'Im.sorry' continued betting, moving all in for 4,489,926 and Ruffman called all in. Ruffman was unable to improve on the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"] runout and was eliminated in fourth. 'Im.Sorry' continued to be the aggressor and ended another player's run five minutes later. 'Im.Sorry' called from the button and 'WillowG23' checked their big blind. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"] and 'WillowG23' checked and then called after 'Im.Sorry' threw in a bit of 160,000. The turn was the [poker card="jc"] and 'WillowG23' check-called after 'Im.Sorry' bet 225,000. The river was the [poker card="5c"], 'WillowG23' checked and 'Im.Sorry' moved all-in for 10,070,712 . 'WillowG23' called all in for 1,614,568 and showed [poker card="ks"][poker card="9c"] for top pair but 'Im.Sorry' turned over [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"] for a flush to send 'WillowG23' home in third position. That both gave 'Im.Sorry' 62.8% of the chips at the start of heads up play. The play played for nearly 15 minutes before 'MacDaddy15' took over the lead thanks to winning an all in preflop hand with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] against the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] of 'Im.Sorry'. Two minutes later, the tournament was over. Down to 10 big blinds, 'Im.Sorry' open-shoved for 1,752,560 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="4c"] and 'MacDaddy15' called with [poker card="td"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6h"] flop gave 'MacDaddy15' a flush draw and gave 'Im.Sorry' to pair. The [poker card="qd"] turn filled that flush draw and eliminated 'Im.Sorry' as the runner-up as the [poker card="2c"] completed the board to officially crown 'MacDaddy15' as the winner. Final Table Payouts MacDaddy15 - $188,214 Im.Sorry - $116,379 WillowG23 - $81,972 Ruth 'crazeelf666' Ruffman - $58,482 mooodeez - $43,301 Ian 'apokerjoker2' Steinman - $30,995 Faces in the Crowd The #1-ranked player in the United States, Yong 'LuckySpewy1' Kwon, came in 56th for $2,729.16 and was one of a handful of notable names to make it into the money. Daniel Negreanu picked up another cash, his fourth, coming in 96th for $1,851.93 and Event #1 champion Jonathan 'Art.Vandelay' Dokler snuck into the top 100, finishing 99th for $1,851.93. A pair of former #1 PocketFivers also had a winning day. Ari 'philivey' Engel finished 105th for $1,754.46 and Chris 'Robotbob47' Moorman was behind him, coming in 141st to take home $1,656.99. Anthony 'heheh' Zinno (22nd - $5,360.25), Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (37th - $3,703.86), Nick 'cashUSklay' Schulman (43rd - $3,703.86), and Kevin 'ImaLuckSac' MacPhee (95th - $1,851.93) also cashed.
  2. For almost two decades, poker fans have been pestering Brian Koppelman and David Levien to write a sequel to Rounders. In the final scene Mike McDermott jumps in a taxi in New York City and tells the driver to take him to the airport. "So where you headed?" "I'm going to Vegas." "Vegas, huh?" "Yup." "Good luck man." The cab drives off into the distance and the credits roll as Counting Crows' Baby, I'm a Big Star Now plays, but what happens after Mike gets to Las Vegas? Well, Kopelman and Levien are busy with their hit show Billions, and a sequel seems highly unlikely, but 2020 World Series of Poker Online Event #1 winner Jonathan Dokler might just be writing it on his own. Six months ago, the 27-year-old had a good-paying job at a trading firm in New York City. "I decided it wasn't the life for me. I quit my job, moved out to Vegas," Dokler said. He didn't take a cab to Kennedy though - he took a train to Newark and then flew to Las Vegas. Everything started coming together about a month earlier though. Still working his 9-5, Dokler went to Atlantic City to play in some Borgata Winter Poker Open events. "I took a Greyhound from New York to Atlantic City for a quick trip, a couple of days before I had to get back to work. I hadn't even quit my job yet but I was planning to very soon," Dokler said. Dokler, with all of four live cashes to his credit totalling a little more than $21,000 in earnigns, beat out 76 other entries to win a $5,000 High Roller event for $100,829. Some of the players that he outlasted included former #1-ranked PocketFiver Paul Volpe, Faraz Jaka, Ian O’Hara, Jerry Wong, Christian Harder, and Jake Schwartz. "It was a small field, only 77 people, so it's nothing crazy, but it was cool to play that event, against that class of field and have a good result," Dokler said. Having picked up the game in college in 2013, Dokler's competitive side fueled his desire to get better at the game. He began playing more, watching Run It Once videos, and talking over hands with friends. As time went by, Dokler grew more and more passionate about the game and he kept flirting with the idea of playing professionally. The bus ride back to New York City gave Dokler time to think and the Borgata win made it crystal clear to him that he needed to follow his gut. In early March, Dokler packed up his stuff and left for Las Vegas. His original plan was to use Las Vegas as a home base of sorts as he travelled the world playing poker. "I was actually planning on travelling for a lot of tournaments. I was going to be in South America for some of the big PokerStars stuff, and I wanted to play the Irish Poker Open, WPT Amsterdam," Dokler said. That’s when Dokler's 2020 story - and everybody else's - really lost the narrative. "I got out here, I had an Airbnb for a couple of days and one of the places I went to go eat after finishing a session, they'd shut down. That's how I found out about the shut down in Vegas," Dokler said, referring to the coronavirus pandemic that shuttered casinos and many Las Vegas businesses. He did not bring many personal belongings with him to Las Vegas, so he quickly ditched the Airbnb and found an apartment to rent and began getting set up to play as much online poker as possible. He had the necessities though, even if he didn't have the essentials. "I didn't have toilet paper for the first month or so, but I had a computer and an internet connection, enough to keep me happy," Dokler said. Happy indeed. In late March, Dokler earned $77,910 and a Circuit ring for winning WSOP Circuit Super Series Event #9 ($500 NLHE Monster Stack) on WSOP.com. That was really just a pre-cursor to last Wednesday when Dokler kicked off the WSOP Online by beating 1,714 other entries to win Event #1 ($500 NLHE Kickoff) for $130,425.75 and a WSOP bracelet. But even as Dokler was grinding his way towards the win, he was multi-tabling events across multiple sites and didn't think anything would come of it. "I was playing a lot of tables so I wasn't even paying super close attention to the bracelet event until it was actually getting kind of close," Dokler said. "I had some more interesting spots that didn't really pan out and I was able to run up a bunch of chips in the bracelet event and make that happen." So inside of six months, Dokler won six figures in a live event, quit his job, moved across the country, quarantined himself in a new apartment, won a WSOP Circuit ring and then became the first WSOP bracelet winner of 2020. He might be relatively new to the scene, but he understands his recent run is thanks to a combination of his skill and some luck. "I have friends who are much better at poker than me that don't have any bracelets and there are also players that are worse than me that have multiple bracelets," Dokler said. "I'm glad I won but the bracelet itself I don't attach any particular significance to it." With three weeks of events left, Dokler plans to continue to grind as much of the WSOP.com schedule as possible and hasn't yet made up his mind about leaving the country to play the GGPoker bracelet events. "I actually haven't decided yet. It's tough because you've gotta get set up in a different country and all that," Dokler said. "And I'm not sure if the borders are going to be open yet. We'll see."
  3. Some 21 years ago, Alan Goehring finished runner-up to Noel Furlong in the 1999 World Series of Poker Main Event. He hadn't made a WSOP final table since - until Wednesday. Early Thursday morning, Goehring conquered a final table that had two WSOP bracelet winners - including the current top player on the WSOP leaderboard - to finally earn his first career WSOP bracelet. Goehring topped the 1,479-player field in Event #8 ($500 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 WSOP Online to win $119,399.67 and that bracelet. He adds that bracelet to a resume that includes a pair of World Poker Tour titles, including the inaugural WPT Championship from 2003. Not long after the double elimination of Steve 'gborooo' Gross and Matthew 'MartyCohen' Weiss in 10th and 11th place respectively, a classic race situation led to the first elimination of the final table. Ross 'BlueTang' Gottlieb raised to 360,000 from UTG with [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"] before Louis 'xILoUieIx' Torres re-raised all in to 1,625,444 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] and Gottlieb called. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="jc"][poker card="jh"] to eliminate Torres in ninth. Five minutes later, Event #3 winner and the current #1-player on the WSOP leaderboard, Robert Kuhn began an ascension to the chip lead after sending a player to the rail. From middle position, Kuhn raised to 400,000 with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] and Scott 'miamicane' Davies moved all in for 2,062,092 with [poker card="as"][poker card="qh"] and Kuhn called. The [poker card="jd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"] flop gave Davies no help and neither did the [poker card="5s"] turn or [poker card="th"] river and he was out in eighth place. A battle of the blinds led to the next elimination. Kuhn moved all in from the small blind with [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"] and 'aceviper' called off their last 1,111,520 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"] flop gave 'aceviper' top pair but gave Kuhn four outs to a straight. The [poker card="4s"] turn gave Kuhn a flush draw. The [poker card="jd"] river completed Kuhn's straight draw and eliminated 'aceviper' in seventh. Just four minutes passed before yet another blind versus blind spot produced another elimination. Goehring called from the small blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] and 'dudeguydrew' shoved for 3,803,270 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"] and Goehring called. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="th"] to give Goehring the pot and end 'dudeguydrew''s run in sixth place. Kuhn then clashed with Gottlieb in a pot that changed the complexion of the final table. Kuhn lost more than 90% of his stack with pocket threes against Gottlieb's pocket queens and was the table short stack with just 3.5 big blinds. Kuhn was a spectator a few hands later when 'clembutt' moved all in for 2,802,760 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"] before Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel moved all in for 5,505,426 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5d"] runout secured the pot for Ohel and send 'clembutt' out in fifth. Throughout the 20 minutes of four-handed play, Goehring continued to accumulate chips and Kuhn's chip stack rode a roller coaster of ups and downs before finally hitting a hard stop. From the button, Kuhn put his last 2,753,022 at risk with [poker card="qs"][poker card="jc"] and Gottlieb re-raised all in for 8,084,752 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"]. Kuhn wasn't able to improve through the [poker card="9h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="7h"][poker card="ac"] runout and was done in fourth place. Three-handed play lasted just five minutes before the last remaining bracelet winner was eliminated. Ohel, who earned a bracelet in 2012 ($,500 Triple Draw 2-7), raised to 560,000 from the button and Goehring and Gottlieb defended the small and big blinds respectively. After the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"][poker card="3c"] flop, Goehring and Gottlieb checked, allowing Ohel to bet 800,000. Goehring clicked back with a check-raise to 2,160,000, Gottlieb folded, and Ohel moved all in for 4,083,186 and Goehring called. Ohel turned over [poker card="kd"][poker card="8c"] but was outpipped when Goehring showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="th"]. The [poker card="ah"] turn kept Goehring in front and he completed a Broadway straight on the [poker card="qc"] to earn the pot and eliminate Ohel in third. Goehring started heads-up play with 61.3% of the chips in play and it took less than five minutes for him to capture the rest. Gottlieb raised to 680,000 and Goehring called. The flop came [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and Gottlieb bet 860,000. Goehring responded by raising to 1,720,000 and Gottlieb moved all in for 7,996,774. Goehring called and showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="3c"] for a nut flush draw while Gottlieb showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="9c"] for a flopped straight. The [poker card="6c"] turn completed Goehring's flush and Gottlieb could only watch as the [poker card="jd"] completed the board to make his runner-up finish official and award Goehring the first WSOP bracelet of his career. Final Table Payouts Alan 'GladiusIII' Goehring - $119,399 Ross 'BlueTang' Gottlieb - $73,942 Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel - $52,511 Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn - $37,803 clembutt - $27,620 dudeguydrew - $20,365 aceviper - $15,307 Scott 'miamicane' Davies - $11,580 xILoUieIx - $8,918 Faces in the Crowd Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Steve 'gborooo' Gross's final table bubble finish came with a $6,921.72 payday. He was the only well-known player who finished in the money on Wednesday. Jeff 'NerdrudRelyt' Madsen (14th - $5,457.51), Daniel 'centrfieldr' Lupo (62nd - $1,730.43), Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels (77th - $1,331.10), Kevin 'ImaLuckSac' MacPhee (93rd - $1,064.88) and veterans Phil Hellmuth (109th - $931.77) and Mike Matusow (118th - $931.77) all added to their bankroll.
  4. When the final table of 2020 WSOP Online Event #7 ($800 NLHE Knockout Deepstack Freezeout) started, Joon 'jykpoker' Kim sat atop a group of four players bunched up together all chasing chip leader Jeff Platt. Over the next 90 minutes, Kim picked off four of his eight opponents, including Platt, to capture his first WSOP bracelet and $106,127. The tournament, the second freezeout on the schedule, drew 989 players to create a $534,060 prize pool. From late position, 'smallmytable' shoved for 1,896,108 with [poker card="jc"][poker card="jh"] and 'thehoffx' called from the button with [poker card="ah"]kd]. The board ran out [poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="qs"] to miss multiple draws for 'thehoffx' and eliminate them in ninth place. Two minutes later, action folded to Eric 'CircleBall' Baldwin in the cutoff and he moved all in for 2,716,220 with [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"] before 'fan_sawyer21' called all in from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"] flop gave Baldwin extra outs but the [poker card="9d"] turn moved him ahead with a pair and 'fan_sawyer21' was unable to work his way back into the hand after the [poker card="5c"] river and was out in eighth. Seven-handed play lasted another 15 minutes before Platt saw his run end in a blind versus blind battle. Action folded to Kim in the small blind and he moved all in for 8,110,424 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9c"] and Platt tank-called off his last 3,312,484 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="2h"]. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="8c"] flop moved Kim ahead and Platt could only watch as the [poker card="3s"] turn and [poker card="4s"] river completed the board with no help to cement his seventh place finish. That hand gave Kim more than 30% of the chips in play and he continued to use that stack to apply pressure. Twenty minutes after busting Platt, Kim found another victim. From the button, 'smallmytable' moved all in for 2,782,004 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"] and Kim called from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3d"] runout missed both players but left Kim in front with ace-high and eliminated 'smallmytable' in sixth. Three minutes later, Ian 'APokerJoker' Steinman moved all in from the cutoff for 2,997,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"] before 'bunsamllion' called from the big blind with [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"][poker card="6s"] flop gave 'bunsamillion' top set but left Steinman looking for a ten for a straight. The turn was the [poker card="8h"] and the river was the [poker card="2d"] to miss Steinman's draw and eliminate him in fifth. Baldwin earned another elimination five minutes later. As the first to act, Jason 'Gunnger_Q10' Gunn moved all in for 2,078,846 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and Baldwin moved all in for 6,475,798 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Gunn was unable to find any relief on the [poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="qc"] runout and was eliminated in fourth place. Four minutes later, Baldwin and Kim met in a preflop all in confrontation. From the button, Kim raised to 640,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"] and Baldwin shoved for 10,394,644 from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"]. 'bunsamillion' folded the big blind before Kim called. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="4c"] flop changed nothing and neither did the [poker card="5c"] turn or [poker card="5d"] river and Baldwin was out in third. That pot propelled Kim to a massive heads-up chip lead over 'bunsamillion'. It took Kim 11 minutes to finish off his final opponent. Kim moved all in from the button with [poker card="kc"][poker card="9h"] and 'bunsamillion' called with [poker card="qh"][poker card="7h"]. The board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="ah"] runout gave Kim the pot to eliminate 'bunsamillion' in second and give Kim his first career wsop bracelet. Final Table Payouts Joon 'jykpoker' Kim - $103,127 + $3,000 in bounties bunsamillion - $63,767 + $2,000 in bounties Eric 'Circle' Baldwin - $44,914 + $1,600 in bounties Jason 'Gunner_Q10' Gunn - $32,044 + $1,800 in bounties Ian 'APokerJoker2' Steinman - $23,178 + $1,400 in bounties smallmytable - $16,983 + $1,400 in bounties Jeff 'mavsusc' Platt - $12,657 + $2,400 in bounties fan_sawyer21 - $9,560 + $1,200 in bounties thehofffx - $7,316 + $1,400 in bounties Faces in the Crowd Frank 'spaghettiii' Marasco continued his strong play, posting a 12th place finish to pick $5,661.03 and another $1,600 from bounties. Other recognizable names that ended up in the money on Tuesday were Ryan 'bitc0in' Riess (33rd - $2,403.27 + $600), David 'bewater' Goodman (44th - $2,029.42 + $1,800), Matt 'RubberFist' Stout (80th - $1,228.33 + $600), and Brian 'JackBogle' Altman (86th - $1,121.52).
  5. Starting the final table with the biggest stack, Allen 'Acnyc718' Chang eliminated five of his eight opponents to take down Event #5 ($1,000 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online to win his first bracelet and a $161,286 payday. The tournament was the first freezeout on the schedule and attracted 854 runners to create an $811,300 prize pool, the second largest of through the first five events, trailing only Event #2 ($1,000 NLHE). The win was the 12th career WSOP cash for Yang and his first final table. Starting the final table with the second shortest stack at just 8.5 big blinds, Quintin 'AA_QTiP_KK' Trammell moved all-in from the cutoff for 699,132 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"] after 'iseefoodtuna' opened to 120,000 from middle position with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"]. 'iseefoodtuna' called and then sweated through a [poker card="js"][poker card="9c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"] runout to eliminate Trammell in ninth. Two minutes later, Chang put his big stack to work to end the other short stack home. Action folded to 'charliefrog' in the cutoff and they moved all in for 532,132 with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] and Chang called from the small blind with [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7c"] flop gave 'charliefrog' top pair and left Chang drawing to Broadway. The [poker card="5h"] turn changed nothing but the [poker card="kd"] river filled Chang's straight draw and eliminated 'charliefrog' in eighth. Alexander 'ShadowFiend' Condon raised to 200,000 with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"] from late position before John 'Slapshot1085' Forlenza moved all in for 790,158 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qs"] from the cutoff. The board ran out [poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="qs"][poker card="kc"] to give Condon middle set and eliminate Forlenza in seventh place. Condon got into another all-in preflop situation 15 minutes later that had a very different outcome. Condon raised to 240,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] from late position and Chang moved all in for 6,353,967 from the button with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] and Condon called. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="7d"] runout gave Condon no help and he was eliminated in sixth. Chang found another victim just a few minutes later. Down to just 12 big blinds, 'married' moved all in from UTG with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2s"] and action folded to Chang in the big blind who called with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6s"] flop kept Chang in front and 'married' was unable to pick up one of their two remaining outs through the [poker card="7s"] turn and [poker card="jd"] river and busted in fifth place. Four-handed play lasted a full 30 minutes. From UTG, 'iseefoodtuna' moved all in for 2,278,039 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"]. Philip 'tomte' Yeh moved all in for 3,305,205 from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="as"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="td"][poker card="2d"] flop gave 'iseefoodtuna' some hope but the [poker card="ks"] turn and [poker card="5c"] river couldn't save them from a fourth place result. Chang continued to use his big stack in optimal spots and earned yet another elimination. Action folded to Chang on the button and he raised to 360,000 and Felipe 'McBain' Leme called from the big blind. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5c"], Leme checked, Chang bet 350,000 and Leme called. The turn was the [poker card="7h"] and Leme moved all in for 2,342,150 and Chang called. Leme showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="9h"] for second pair and the nut flush draw while Chang turned over [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] for top pair. The [poker card="2d"] river was a blank and Leme was eliminated in third. Chang started heads-up play with a 2.5-1 chip lead over Yeh. It took 25 minutes before the pair clashed in a hand the resulted in Chang's victory. Yeh moved all in for 2,900,000 with [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"] and Chang called with [poker card="qh"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"] to give Chang top pair and eliminate Yeh in second place. Final Table Payouts Allen 'Acnyc718' Chang - $161,286 Philip 'tomte' Yeh - $99,709 Felipe 'McBain' Leme - $69,772 iseefoodtuna - $49,570 married - $35,697 Alex 'ShadowFiend1' Condon - $26,124 John 'Slapshot1085' Forlenza - $19,390 charliefrog - $14,603 Quintin 'AA_QTiP_KK' Trammell - $11,196 Faces in the Crowd Ryan 'Protential' Laplante just missed out on the final table, finishing in 11th place for $8,680.91. He wasn't the only familiar face who worked their way into the money. A few well known online grinders and players who have found success early on in the Series also cashed including Michael 'itwasthator0' Gagliano (12th - $8,680.91), Event #2 winner Louis 'PokeThese' Lynch (50th - $2,758.42), Daniel 'redsoxnets5' Sewnig (94th - $1,703.73), Jed 'jchak' Hoffman (110th - $1,622.60), Katie 'katelin' Lindsay (113th - $1,622.60), and fresh off of his fourth place finish in Event #4 on Saturday, Frank 'spaghettiii' snuck into the money with 124th finish worth $1,622.60.
  6. When the 2020 World Series of Poker Online schedule came out it was clear that Event #4 was designed with fireworks in mind in more ways than one. Event #4 ($500 Super Turbo NLHE) was designed to finish quickly so players could get outside on July 4th in Las Vegas and the quick pace of the event meant things moved along quickly. Those July 4th celebrations didn't seem to stop the players from turning out. There were 828 unique entries who fired a total of 351 rebuys to create a $530,550 prize pool. The event took just five hours and 48 minutes to play down to winner. The final table started with an average stack of just 10 big blinds. Holding nine big blinds, Jason 'Daluxxx' Luxenberg shoved for 3,554,584 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"] from UTG+1. Action folded to Brian 'XcrazylegsX' Frasca who moved all-in for 5,081,808 on the button with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2h"][poker card="4d"] to give Frasca top set and eliminate Luxenberg in ninth place. Just five minutes later, Kevin 'ImALuckSac' MacPhee lived up to his screenname and it led to the elimination of Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels. MacPhee moved all in for 2,833,565 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"] only to have Daniels call all in for 1,652,932 from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The [k][q][t] flop gave MacPhee top two pair but left Daniels drawing live to an ace or a jack. The [poker card="5h"] turn and [poker card="2s"] river were both bricks and Daniels was sent to the rail in eighth place. This was the second final table of the 2020 WSOP for Daniels after he finished fourth in Event #1 ($500 No Limit Hold’em Kickoff) for $42,060. Ryan 'Whosyourdodd' Dodd got to stick around for another six minutes before he was exiting stage right. Dodd moved all in from the button for 3,591,334 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"] and Frank 'spaghettiii' Marasco called from the big blind with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"]. The board ran out [poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="th"] to miss Dodd entirely and give Marasco a rivered top set. Dodd was out in seventh place. Down to just over two big blinds, Bode move all in for 2,129,268 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"]. Marasco then shoved for 13,068,178 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"], and 'DrJayTrotter' called all in for his last 1,048,964 wiht [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2d"] flop gave Bode top pair. The [poker card="2s"] turn and [poker card="as"] river were both bricks for 'DrJayTrotter' and they were eliminated in sixth place. Bode then picked up another victim. Down to 1.5 big blinds, MacPhee moved all in from UTG for 1,776,726 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"] Bode called from the small blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] flop gave Bode top pair and MacPhee was unable to get any relief through the [poker card="3d"] turn and [poker card="9s"] river and was denied a third WSOP bracelet with a fifth place result. The fast pace of eliminations continued and Bode was more than happy to be the one doing the work. Bode moved all in from the small blind for 12,342,242 with [poker card="ts"][poker card="7d"] and Marasco called all in for his last 5,213,910 from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="6h"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"] flop left Marasco needing a hail mary to stay alive but the [poker card="kd"] turn and [poker card="jd"] river were no help. Marasco was eliminated in fourth place. A few minutes later, Frasca sent the tournament to heads-up. Frasco moved all in from the small blind for 20,135,952 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="2s"] and 'KTUUUH' called all in for 1,745,872 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="8s"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2h"] flop gave Frasco bottom pair and that held up through the [poker card="9h"] turn and [poker card="as"] river and 'KTUUUH' was eliminated in third. Frasca had a 2-1 chip lead when heads-up play began but over the course of eight hands, Bode found himself holding all of the chips. On the final hand of the night, Frasca moved all in for 13,593,648 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and Bode called with [poker card="qd"][poker card="7d"]. The board ran out [poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"] to give Bode trip sevens to eliminate Frasca and capture his first career WSOP bracelet and $97,091. Final Table Payouts Matt Bode - $97,091 Brian Frasca - $59,952 'KTUUUH' - $42,603 Frank Marasco - $30,772 Kevin MacPhee - $22,389 'DrJayTrotter' - $16,500 Ryan Dodd - $12,362 Shawn 'Saygoodnight' Daniels - $9,338 Jason 'Daluxxx' Luxenberg - $7,162 Hellmuth Cashes Again Phil Hellmuth finished in 37th place finish for $1,963.03 to go along with 11th place finish for $7,872 from Event #1. He wasn't the only familiar face to wind up in the money on Saturday night. Ryan 'KOVID19' Ko (14th - $4,403.56), Ari Engel (16th - $3,501.63), Tim 'unorth0dox' Reilly (17th - $3,501.63), Bryan 'Pellepelle' Piccioli, Event #3 champion Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn (33rd - $2,334.42), and Yong 'LuckySpewy1' Kwon ($75th - $1,061.10) were just a handful of players who earned a positive result.
  7. The third time was definitely the charm as far as field sizes go in the 2020 World Series of Poker Online. On Friday, Event #3 ($400 No Limit Hold'em), the lowest buy-in event on the schedule to date, drew the largest turnout to date with 2,091 total entries creating a $752,760 prize pool. After a little more than 12 hours of play, Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn emerged victorious to win his first WSOP bracelet and $115,849.76. The win came just a few hours after he picked up another victory on WSOP.com to bring his daily earnings just north of $136,000. Starting the final table with just six big blinds, 'AndrewFreund' needed to find a spot to double up. After action folded to 'AndrewFreund' in late position, he moved all-in for 658,052 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"] and the second shortest remaining, Max 'ndirish50' Huster, moved all-in over the top with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3s"] flop put a quick end to any drama and 'AndrewFreund' was officially eliminated in ninth place following the [poker card="9s"] turn and [poker card="jh"] river. Kuhn and Roland 'prngls12' Israelashvili then engaged in a pre-flop raising war that saw the six-time WSOP Circuit ring winner sent packing. Holding [poker card="td"][poker card="th"], Israelshvili raised to 240,000 from UTG before Kuhn re-raised to 705,000 from the hijack with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. Israelshvili then moved all-in for 3,257,635 and Kuhn called. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"] flop changed nothing and the [poker card="3s"] turn and [poker card="6c"] river sealed Israelshvili's eighth place finish. Ten minutes later 'pokeher2014' moved all-in for 1,641,622 from middle position with [poker card="ah"][poker card="7h"] and 'kulbot' called from the small blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2s"] runout failed to give 'pokeher2014' any assistance and they were eliminated in seventh place. A multi-way pot led to the next elimination just five minutes later. Keren opened to 320,000 from UTG, Kuhn called from UTG+1, 'Doc33' called from the button, and Evan 'Escott121181' Scott defended his big blind. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3s"] and Scott moved all-in for 2,671,929. Keren and Kuhn both folded but 'Doc33' called. Scott showed [poker card="td"][poker card="8h"] but found himself outpipped when 'Doc33' tabled [poker card="tc"][poker card="9c"]. The [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="jd"] river both kept 'Doc33' in front and Scott was eliminated in sixth. The momentum continued for 'Doc33' a few minutes later and he turned it into another elimination and the chip lead. Kuhn raised to 320,000 as the first to act, Max 'ndirish50' Huster shoved for 1,451,606, and 'Doc33' called from the button. Kuhn folded. 'Doc33' flipped over [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"] and he once again had his opponent dominated as Huster showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3h"] flop gave both players top pair, the [poker card="2h"] turn gave Huster the nut flush draw and chop outs, but the [poker card="qd"] river gave 'Doc33' two pair and the pot to eliminate Huster in fifth place. 'Doc33' continued to steamroll and a few minutes after ending Huster's bracelet run, they did the same thing to another player. From UTG, 'klubot' moved all-in for 2,259,071 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"] and 'Doc33' called with [poker card="ah"][poker card="7c"] in the big blind. The [poker card="jd"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"] flop gave 'klubot' the lead and the [poker card="tc"] turn changed nothing. The [poker card="ac"] river, however, gave 'Doc33' yet another pot and sent 'klubot' out in fourth. Three-handed play carried on for 25 minutes and despite starting with the chip lead, 'Doc33' was the next one out the door. Kuhn raised to 810,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"] from the small blind and 'Doc33' clicked back to 2,332,500 from the big blind holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"]. Kuhn responded by shoving all in for 15,444,620 and 'Doc33' called all in for 10,045,975. The board ran out [poker card="js"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="td"] to eliminate 'Doc33' in third. Heads-up play began with Kuhn holding a 5-1 chip lead over Keren and through 45 minutes of play, Keren battled back to hold the lead himself only to see it fall back into Kuhn's hands one final time. Down to just five big blinds, Keren three-bet shoved for 2,075,000 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"] after Kuhn opened to 800,000 with [poker card="8h"][poker card="8s"]. The [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"][poker card="7s"] flop gave Keren all kinds of outs but neither the [poker card="4c"] nor the [poker card="2d"] river was any help and Kuhn eliminated him to win his first WSOP bracelet and $115,850. Final Table Payouts Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn - $115,850 Ronald 'rlksaces' Keren - $71,587 Doc33 - $52,242 klubot - $38,466 Max 'ndirish50' Huster - $28,605 Evan 'Escott121181' Scott - $21,454 pokerher2014 - $16,184 Roland 'prngls12' Israelshvili - $12,345 AndrewFreund - $9,560 Faces in the Crowd The huge field all but guaranteed there would be some familiar names making their way into the money. Joey 'JOEYdaMUSH' Galazzo (41st - $2,408.83), Ari 'philivey' Engel (76th - $1,279.69), Daniel Negreanu (210th - $677.48), and Dan 'centrfieldr' Lupo (229th - $677.48) were some of the more recognizable names who picked up a score on Friday. Negreanu has now cashed in back-to-back events.
  8. Over the course of the 2020 World Series of Poker, PocketFives will be checking in with Chris Moorman and Katie Lindsay as they chase down WSOP glory. Normally at this time of year, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Chris Moorman and his wife Katie Lindsay are busy making daily runs to and from the Rio Hotel as they grind the World Series of Poker and various other tournaments around town. With the 2020 WSOP postponed and 31 bracelet events available on WSOP.com, the couple is bunkered down inside their Las Vegas home ready to win a bracelet - or two - from the comfort of their kitchen, or bedroom, or sure, even the pool. The No Limit Hold’em-heavy schedule plays into the strong suits of Katie and Chris and they’ll be playing almost daily, save for maybe the Omaha 8-or-better event. While the city was shut down for a while, the pair continued to find ways to keep busy. Along with putting more volume on the virtual felt, Katie has developed an at-home workout routine and Chris has been spending as much time as possible in their backyard with their dog. They’ve also recently started spending time with their newest neighbor, another crusher who moved into the neighborhood. “We are lucky to have a house on a lake so we can go kayaking or hang out by the pool,” Katie says. “We actually started playing the first event from the pool with our neighbor Connor Drinan before eventually moving inside.” The opening day of the WSOP events on WSOP.com couldn’t have gone much better for both players. Chris made two final tables before WSOP Event #1 ($500 NLHE) even started. Katie shined brightest though. She navigated her way through a 371-runner field in the $215 WSOP Summer Special $75,000 Guaranteed event to take home $20,485.80. Then she worked her way into the money of Event #1, finishing 149th for $1,003.27. Chris wasn’t so fortunate in the bracelet event, busting before the money. Not that anybody’s actually keeping score, but that’s Katie 1, Chris 0. The Day 2 narrative felt a lot like the Day 1 narrative. Chris made one final table in a mid-afternoon event while Katie binked a satellite into that night’s bracelet event, Event #2 ($1,000 No Limit Hold’em) and, like she did on Wednesday, worked her way into the money, finishing 122nd for $1,571. Chris bricked again. Katie 2, Chris 0. And yeah, they’re keeping score. They’re both hyper-competitive and have had plenty of run-ins at the tables over the years. They’re not going to take it easy with each other, the pride at stake is too much. “People that think couples might soft-play against each other have never been at a table with Chris and I,” Katie says. “Anybody who has ever played with us knows we’re super competitive.” “She loves to try and bubble me,” Chris jokes. The competition won’t end when the 31 bracelet events do. They’ll be joining a handful of other pros heading down to Mexico the second that last event wraps up and will be immediately jumping into action on GGPoker to play the remainder of that schedule. “I think the first event we’ll play is the Millionaire Maker,” Chris says. “We have to miss a few events that I’d like to play, like the Colossus, because of the overlap.” The Mexico plans include a house with a number of other pros and on on-site chef and concierge so they can focus all of their attention on the poker. That won’t quite me the modus operandi on Saturday, however. The couple will be celebrating July 4th at their house. A few cocktails, some button clicking in the Super Turbo bracelet event on the schedule, and there are lobster rolls on the menu. And maybe, Chris will get rid of the goose egg.
  9. The second event of the 2020 World Series of Poker played out similarly to the first. One of poker's brightest shining stars made a deep run, the final table included a well-respected player who originally cut their teeth in the online arena before finding live success and the eventual winner was a bit of mystery to the audience watching at home. Louis 'PokeThese' Lynch emerged victorious from a field of 919 runners in Event #2 ($1,000 No Limit Hold'em) to win $168,585.85 while Daniel Negreanu busted in 18th place and Jason Somerville made the final table. It took nearly 10 minutes before the first elimination of the final table. Sean 'bahbababa' Prendiville moved all-in for 1,409,873 from the button with [poker card="kc"][poker card="9h"] and Matthew 'Michmeister' Mich called off his tournament life from the small blind with [aj][poker card="jd"]. The flop came [poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2c"] to keep Mich in control. The [poker card="kh"] turn flipped the script and gave Prendiville top pair. The [poker card="8h"] was no help for Mich and he was eliminated in eighth. A few hands later, a standard race gave Prendiville his second victim. Jon 'jonnyg93' Gisler shoved his stack of 2,200,981 all-in from early position with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"] and Prendiville called from the big blind with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="5s"] flop gave Prendiville middle set but left Gisler with nine outs for the nut flush. Neither the [poker card="7d"] turn nor the [poker card="6c"] river were of any help, however, and he was sent to the rail in seventh place. Six-handed play lasted 15 full minutes before Somerville's run at a second bracelet came to a screeching halt. From UTG, Lynch bet 1,000,000 with [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"] before Somerville re-raised all-in for 2,831,970 from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"] and Lynch called. The [poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"] board offered Somerville no relief and he was out in sixth place and Lynch had his first victim. Almost 30 full minutes of five-handed ended when Prendiville clashed with Kevin 'GoneBananas' Garosshen. From the button, Prendiville shoved for 2,390,863 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="9h"] and Garosshen re-shoved from the small blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"] flop kept Garaosshen in front but increased Prendiville's outs. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Garosshen a set and Prendiville was unable to hit any one of the four remaining tens to make a straight after the [poker card="5s"] river completed the board and filled Garosshen's boat. Despite picking up two eliminations early, Prendiville was eliminated in fifth. Daniel 'IntoTheRiver' Fischer was the next to go. Fischer shoved all-in for 2,813,832 from the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="td"] only to have 'KOVID19' call from the big blind with [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2h"] flop gave 'KOVID19' a few extra outs. The [poker card="9s"] turn was one of them and 'KOVID19' turned an unbeatable straight and all Fischer could do was watch the meaningless, if not cruel, [poker card="kc"] complete the river to officially end his tournament with a fourth place result. Twenty minutes later, 'KOVID19' sent play from three-handed to heads-up. 'KOVID19' bet 816,000 from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7d"], Lynch folded the small blind, but Garosshen moved all-in from the big blind for 837,631 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] flop ended all hope for Garosshen. The [poker card="jh"] turn was meaningless and the [poker card="7h"] river gave 'KOVID19' quads to officially end Garosshen's run in third. Thanks to a 3.5-1 chip lead, Lynch needed just a few hands to finish off his final opponent. From the button, 'KOVID19' bet their final 2,246,570 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="6c"] and 'PokeThese' called with [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"]. The board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="8d"] to completely miss 'KOVID19' and give 'PokeThese' the bracelet and $168,585.95 payday. Final Table Payouts Louis 'PokeThese' Lynch - $168,585.95 KOVID19 - $104,242.17 Kevin 'GoneBananas' Garosshen - $73,423.50 Daniel 'IntoTheRiver' Fischer - $52,383 Sean 'bahbababa' Prendiville - $37,890.37 Jason 'haderade' Somerville - $27,762.99 Jon 'jonnyg93' Gisler - $20,691.28 Matthew 'Michmeister' Mich - $15,627.59 Notable Finishes Negreanu and Somerville weren't the only familiar faces to make the money in Event #2. Three of New Jersey's top online grinders, Michael 'itwasthator0' Gagliano (13th - $7,333.62), Daniel 'redsoxnets5' Sewnig (24th - $4,801.77) and David 'dehhhhh' Coleman (86th - $1,833.40) each cashed on Friday morning. One of Nevada's top-ranked players, David 'bewater' Goodman (52nd - $2,881.06), also earned a positive result. Katie 'katelin' Lindsey (122nd - $1,571.49), and Jon 'havuuuuuc' Turner (135th - $1,484.18) each made managed to pick up their second cash of the Series while Ryan 'protential' Laplante (106th - $1,571.49) earned his first.  
  10. The opening event of the 2020 World Series of Poker Online events had a little bit everything that makes the WSOP so special. A huge field, a deep run by none other than Mr. WSOP himself, Phil Hellmuth, and a final table that saw a new member, Jonathan Dokler, join the bracelet winner club. Event #1 ($500 No Limit Hold'em Kickoff) drew 1,715 total entries from 1,195 unique players to create a $771,750 prize pool. Dokler's eventual first place prize of $130,426 is the largest single prize on WSOP.com this year, beating the $130,410 score that Champie Douglas earned in the $525 Main Event of the Super Circuit Series earlier this year. As the field dwindled down to two tables, the field included Hellmuth gunning for a 16th bracelet, former World Poker Tour champ Taylor von Kriegenberg looking to add a WSOP bracelet to his resume, and WPT commentator and WSOP bracelet winner Tony Dunst hoping for a second bracelet. Hellmuth was the only one of those three to not make the final table. Taylor von Kriegenbergh moved all-in from the hijack for 751,580 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="ts"] only to have Justin 'MadTitan' Turner call from the cutoff with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"]. The board ran out [poker card="tc"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="jh"] to give von Kriegenbergh top pair on the flop before Turner made the nut flush on the turn to pick up the first elimination of the night. A few minutes later, Jonathan 'Art.Vandelay' Dokler picked up his first victim of the final table. Action folded to Mark 'NostraDonkus' Liedtke on the button and he moved all-in for 1,017,824 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="7s"]. Dokler called from the big blind with [poker card="9h"]][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2d"] flop missed Liedtke and he could do nothing but watch as the [poker card="2h"] turn and [poker card="9c"] river gave Dokler a full house to send Liedtke out in eighth place. The fast pace of eliminations continued as a blind versus blind battle two hands later ended one player's tournament. Michael 'DDSpade' Balan opened to 390,000 from the small blind and 'djp1006' defended his big blind. The flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"] and Balan bet 460,000. 'djp1006' moved all-in behind him for 1,470,536. Balan called and tabled [poker card="th"][poker card="7d"] for middle pair while while 'djp1006' was ahead with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"]. The turn was the [poker card="jh"] but the river was the [poker card="td"] to give Balan trip tens to bust 'djp1006' in seventh. No one player was able to seize control of the final table to this point with the fourth elimination of the night coming at the hands of a fourth unique player ten minutes later. 'ChefShap' moved all-in from the cutoff with [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] with Shawn 'SayGoodNight' Daniels calling from the big blind with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. Daniels stayed in control through the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="8h"] run out to send 'ChefShap' to the rail in sixth place. The final five players battled for 20 minutes with Dunst holding the chip lead despite not having been responsible for a single final table elimination. Two other players who had sent players packing battled in the next bustout. From the small blind, Balan raised to 555,000 and Dokler re-raised to 1,200,000 from the big blind. Balan called and the two players saw a flop of [poker card="kh"][poker card="td"][poker card="4d"]. Balan checked, Dokler bet 680,000 and Balan called. The turn was the [poker card="2d"] and Balan shoved his last 2,840,000 into the middle and Dokler called. Balan showed [poker card="qd"][poker card="ts"] for second pair and the third nut flush draw only to be shown [poker card="kd"][poker card="4h"] by Dokler for two pair and a better flush draw. The [poker card="3c"] river offered Balan no help and he was sent packing in fifth. Down to four players, Dunst finally found himself a victim. From the button, Dunst raised to 560,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. Daniels moved all-in for 1,538,586 from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] and Dunst called. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"] flop gave Daniels all kinds of outs. The [poker card="6h"] turn was not one of them and neither was the [poker card="jc"] river to send him home in fourth place. Unfortunately for Dunst, his run didn't last much longer after an all-in preflop flip didn't go his way. Dunst bet 560,000 from the button with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"] and Dokler responded by three-betting to 1,800,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Dunst moved all-in for 9,450,881 and Dokler called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2s"] flop was a safe one for Dunst and the [poker card="th"] turn kept him in control. The [poker card="kh"] river however gave Dokler top pair and eliminated Dunst in third place. Heads-up play lasted just 20 minutes thanks largely to Dokler holding a better-than 3-1 lead over Turner after Dunst's elimination. On the final hand Turner bet his last 4,765,824 with [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"] and Dokler called with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"]. The [poker card="6c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop gave Turner top pair but Dokler was now drawing to an open-ended straight. The [poker card="2h"] turn completed that draw and all Dokler could do was watch as the meaningless [poker card="5d"] river completed the hand to eliminate him and award Dokler the win and his first career WSOP bracelet. The win comes three months after Dokler picked up a WSOP Circuit Ring in the Super Circuit Series on WSOP.com and five months after his win in the Borgata Winter Poker Open High Roller for $100,829. Final Table Payouts Jonathan 'Art.Vandelay' Dokler - $130,426 Justin 'MadTitan' Turner - $80,416 Tony 'Panoramic' Dunst - $57,881 Shawn 'SayGoodNight' Daniels - $42,060 Michael 'DDSpade' Balan - $30,947 'ChefShap' - $22,998 'djp1006' - $17,287 Mark 'NostraDonkus' Liedtke - $13,120 Taylor 'ZeroTo100' Von Kriegenbergh - $10,110 Notable Finishes Hellmuth was certainly the biggest name to make the money on opening day but not the only familiar face starting off the Series with a cash. Jonathan 'havuuuuuc' Turner (12th - $7,782), Ryan 'Toosick' Tosoc (25th - $3,935.92), Dan 'feeltheflow' Sindelar (29th - $3,164.17), Mike 'mouth123' Matusow (44th - $2,623.95), Jesse 'MrJesseJames' Sylvia (137th - $1,003.27), Katie 'katelin' Lindsay (149th - $1,003.27), Napun 'javatini' Java (159th - $926.10), and Daniel 'centrfieldr' Lupo (247th - $771.75) and managed to work their way into the money on Wednesday night.
  11. The opening week of the 2020 World Series of Poker is now in the books with five new bracelet winners crowned. As the schedule heads into Week 2, attention will continue to be on No Limit Hold'em players while fans of Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-Better will get a chance to stretch their legs and chase down a gold bracelet of their own. 2020 WSOP Week 2 Schedule Those PLO8 wizards get their only chance Monday night with Event #6 ($600 Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better) Players can reenter up to three times and late registration runs for three hours and 45 minutes. The biggest field is likely to come on Sunday, July 12 with Event #12 ($500 The Big 500 NLHE). Once again, players can reenter up the three times and will have three hours and 55 minutes of late registration available. [table id=74 /] Pinot, Poker, Platt If you're jonesing for poker coverage as the WSOP tournaments play down to a winner, you have to check out the coverage being provided by Jeff Platt. Streaming on his own Twitch channel, Platt floats through the remaining tables looking for key players starting each night at 1 AM ET - assuming he's not running deep on his own quest for a WSOP bracelet. Final Table Coverage Platt gets you through the middle stages of each tournament and PokerGO takes over once the event reaches the final table. Anchored by the dulcet tones of David Tuchman, the PokerGO coverage is free to watch on three different platforms: Poker Central YouTube channel Poker Central Facebook page WSOP on Twitch Tuchman is joined each night by various professional poker players offering insight and analysis as the event plays down to a champion.
  12. After five straight days of No Limit Hold'em action in the 2020 World Series of Poker Online, the four-card wizards got their first chance to shine with on Monday night with a Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better event and Nathan Gamble emerged to win his second career WSOP bracelet in this variant. Event #6 ($600 Pot Limit Omaha 8-or-better) drew 833 runners for a $449,820 prize pool and when the final table began, Gamble sat right in the middle of the chip counts with a less-than-average stack. Ten minutes into the final table, action folded to Simon 'bagelbites' Lam in the cutoff and he raised to 350,000 and 'danish01' called from the button. After the [poker card="qd"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"] flop, Lam shoved for 576,136 and 'danish01' called. Lam showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"] for a pair of kings while 'danish01' turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] for a wrap and the only low draw. The [poker card="ad"] turn actually gave 'danish01' top pair and that held up through the [poker card="4h"] river which gave both players two pair to bust Lam in sixth. From the button, 'rainman3817' raised to 350,000 and 'hansdigalo' and 'SSJTimmy' defended the small and big blinds respectively. After the [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"] flop, 'hansdigalo' bet 120,000, 'SSJTimmy' called all in for 43,644, and 'rainman3817' called. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] and 'hansdigalo' bet 771,822 and 'rainman3817' called. The [poker card="9c"] river completed the board and 'hansdigalo' and 'rainman3817' both checked. 'rainman3817' showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2h"] for missed flush and low draws, 'SSJTimmy' turned over [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"] for jacks and eights, while 'hansdigalo' showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"][poker card="js"][poker card="8s"] for trip eights to eliminate 'SSJTimmy' in fifth place. Twenty minutes later Gamble picked up his first elimination of the night on his way to the title. Gamble opened to 320,000 as first to act and 'hansdigalo' replied with a three-bet to 1,120,000 from the small blind. Gamble called to see a [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"] flop. 'hansdigalo' moved all in for 1,799,668 and Gamble called. Gamble showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="2s"] for two pair with multiple straight draws while 'hansdigalo' was behind with [poker card="as"][poker card="ah"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5c"]. The turn was the [poker card="5s"] and the river was the [poker card="7d"] to give Gamble the pot and eliminate 'hansdigalo' in fourth. Just five minutes passed before Gamble went back to work. 'rainman3817' opened to 320,000 and Gamble called. The flop came [poker card="td"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4c"] and Gamble bet 720,000 and 'rainman3817' called. The turn was the [poker card="9d"] and Gamble fired 1,520,000 into the pot and 'rainman3817' called for his last 1,257,760. Gamble showed [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2d"] while 'rainman3817' showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="3d"] river changed nothing and Gamble's flush was good enough to take down the pot and eliminate 'rainman3817' in third. Gamble held a commanding 87% of the chips in play but still needed another 20 minutes to eliminate his final opponent. 'danish01' battled back during heads-up play to face only a 2-1 deficit but wasn't able to build upon that. On the final hand, 'danish01' raised to 600,000, Gamble re-raised to 1,800,000, and 'danish01' moved all in for 3,368,864 and Gamble called. 'danish01' turned over [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] and Gamble showed [poker card="as"][poker card="td"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3h"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] flop kept 'danish01' ahead but left Gamble with a straight draw and multiple low draws. The [poker card="5d"] turn assured Gamble of at least half of the pot but the [poker card="4d"] river gave him a straight to take the high and low pots to eliminate 'danish01' in second place and give Gamble another PLO8 bracelet. Gamble's first bracelet came in 2017 when he beat 829 other entries to win the $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better. Final Table Payouts Nathan 'surfbum' Gamble - $89,424 danish01 - $55,283 rainman3817 - $38,865 hansdigalo - $27,484 SSJTimmy - $19,792 Simon 'bagelbites' Lam - $14,484 Faces in the Crowd One day after making threats against another player on his YouTube live stream, Mike Matusow played his way into the money before going out in 37th for $1,754.29. Other notables who cashed include Jeremy 'Chipchecka' Ausmus (8th - $9,096.76), Max 'MaxSparrow' Pescatori (10th - $4,813.07), Randy 'StayAlive' Ohel (12th - $4,813.07), Shaun 'ddtgg' Deeb (21st - $2,518.99) Robert 'bustinballs' Kuhn (53rd - $1,529.38), and Daniel Negreanu picked up his third cash of the Series, finishing in 59th place for $1,304.47. WSOP commentator Norman Chad drove from Los Angeles to Nevada specifically to play this event and finished 112th for $899.64.
  13. Mike Matusow will not face any discipline from the World Series of Poker after he threatened to assault another player following his elimination from Event #5 ($1,000 NLHE Freezeout) of the 2020 WSOP Online on Sunday night. Matusow, a four-time bracelet winner, was eliminated after playing just two hands of the online tournament and began berating the player who won a key-hand against him leading to his eventual elimination. "We take prevention of abusive behavior at WSOP tournaments or on the WSOP.COM platform extremely seriously. We have a number of preventive measures online including recently disabling our chat entirely," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the WSOP. "But the regulation of content on our customer's personal streams and social media accounts is a slippery slope, particularly as each of these third-party platforms have their own escalation procedures. We reserve the right to suspend the account of any individual going forward, but in this case, it appears the player had the perfect response to resolve the situation herself." Matusow's rant included threats of physical and sexual assault and the eventual doxxing of the player in question. "This motherfucker, 'wolverine17', I'm gonna fuck him right in his fucking ass man, right in his fucking ass. Mark that name down, 'wolverine17'," Matusow told those watching his YouTube stream, not realizing the player was a female. Matusow then complained that chat has been turned off in the WSOP.com client, preventing him from telling "these scumbags what you really think of them." Before the 2020 WSOP Online began, tournament organizers made an "operational decision" to turn chat within the game client off for the duration of the series. Asked for comment before the Series began, the personal safety of players was given as a key reason behind that decision. "Chat is currently disabled for everyone," said Danielle Barille, Director for WSOP Online Poker. "We have decided to permanently disable chat, in order to create a safe gaming experience for players." He continued to deride the player and threatened to assault them when they meet in person. "I've got this guy's name written down. I'm going to find out who he is. I'll see him in person, I'll fucking knock him the fuck out. Think I won't? Watch," Matusow said. "I am going to find out who this motherfucker is and I swear to you I'm going to throw him up against the fucking wall and tell him, 'you fucking ever slow roll me again, I'm going to beat your fucking ass'." Speaking directly to those in his YouTube stream chat, Matusow then offered a monetary reward for anybody who could provide him with the real name of 'wolverine17'. "If anybody in here right now can find the name of this guy and the actual truth of this guy, you guys will get an extra $50 bonus if you sign up in my homegame," Matusow said. One user eventually provided Matusow with the name Megan Milburn and Matusow then tweeted directly at her. In a since-deleted tweet, Matusow used a derogatory term when tweeting directly at Milburn. "do you enjoy acting like a fucking c-----t by slowrolling people online where nobody can see you? Learn poker etiquette or your poker career won't last long! Sincerely Mike". Milburn replied to Matusow and appeared to hold no ill-will towards him. Matusow has claimed to have apologized via social media. Note: this story was updated to reflect the streaming platform Matusow uses.
  14. The 2020 World Series of Poker on GGPoker is less than two weeks away and on Sunday some of the game's brightest stars appeared more than ready to get after a bracelet a two. Stephen Chidwick dominated on partypoker, earning wins in the High Roller Club The Big Game and $10,300 High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance beating 165 and 44 players respectively to win a total of $367,727.71. Chidwick wasn't the only high stakes regular who picked up a pair of wins on Sunday. Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian beat out 99 other entries in the PokerStars $5,200 High Roller to win $88,459.85 and then another 39 in the PokerStars $2,100 High Roller Club Sunday High Roller to earn $34,653.40. In both events, fellow Russian 'hello_totti' finished runner-up and was left to console himself with $110,606.71. The biggest single score on the day belonged to Ali Imsirovic. Beating 37 other entries in the partypoker High Roller Club Main Event, Imisorovic banked $387,125. Runner-up Rob Yong walked away with $251,750 while Martirosian added another $156,750 to his Sunday haul after coming in third place. 'mathouse' defeated 'Martin Pineiro' heads-up to win the GGPoker GGMasters outright for $71,947.50. The event had a $35,768 overlay on the $500,000 guarantee after drawing 3,364 players. PokerStars High Roller Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 100 Prize pool: $500,000 Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian - $115,217.45 hello_totti - $88,459.85 Malaka$tyle - $67,916.35 PokerStars High Roller Club Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $2,100 Entries: 40 Prize pool: $80,000 Artur 'mararthur1' Martirosian - $34,653.40 hello_totti - $22,146.86 WATnlos - $14,153.98 PokerStars Bounty Builder Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,051 Prize pool: $305,100 exitonlyKK - $18,791.21 + $10,649.42 in bounties yAAwn - $18,787.99 + $5,191.15 in bounties Marto115 - $11,005.78 + $3,499.16 in bounties partypoker High Roller Club Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 38 Prize pool: $950,000 Ali Imsirovic - $387,125 Rob Yong - $251,750 Artur Martirosian - $156,750 partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 44 Prize pool: $440,000 Stephen Chidwick - $176,000 Dan Shak - $112,615.80 Jake Schindler - $57,200 partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 165 Prize pool: $866,370 Stephen Chidwick - $191,727.71 Thomas Boivin - $137,752.83 Michael Watson - $100,498.92 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,364 Prize pool: $500,000 ($35,768 overlay) mathouse - $71,947.50 Martin Pineiro - $50,874.60 eggt8rt - $35,973.80 GGPoker Global MILLION$ Buy-in: $100 Entries: 1,639 Prize pool: $1,000,000 1kkwinner - $82,359.39* BigToeJoeBeiso - $78,579.86* Drupada - $109,484.08* Raisetwice1994 - $70,795.17* GGPoker Bounty Hunters Main Event Buy-in: $210 Entries: 1,910 Prize pool: $382,000 michael79 - $43,612.13* + $21,133.19 in bounties BanBang! - $23,522.92* + $3,888.28 in bounties NocturnalSagitario - $27,957.93* + $6,619.84 in bounties
  15. The 2020 World Series of Poker Online Main Event was always going to be a big deal. Now it's official - it will have the largest prize pool in the history of online poker. GGPoker released its entire 2020 WSOP online schedule on Friday and the $5,000 Main Event comes with a $25 million guarantee. "We knew GGPoker would go BIG on the WSOP Online Series, but this is ridiculous," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the World Series of Poker. "The single biggest guarantee in the history of online poker is exactly what this once-in-a-lifetime event deserves." The Main Event is clearly the highlight of the 54-event schedule, but there is also a $5,000 Pot Limit Omaha, $10,000 Heads-Up No Limit Hold'em event, a $10,000 Short Deck event, and the $25,000 NLHE Players Championship to make up the rest of the marquee events. The Main Event The $25 million guarantee on the Main Event makes it the largest online poker tournament prize pool ever. The previous high was the 2018 partypoker MILLIONS which guaranteed $20 million and ended up at $21,780,000. There are multiple starting flights, each one a freezeout, for the $5,000 buy-in Main Event beginning on August 16. Day 2 runs on August 30 and the final table will be played out on September 6. Players start with 50,000 chips and the event will be played eight-handed throughout. Two Other Eight Figure Guarantees Along with the Main Event, there are two more eight-figure guarantees, one belonging to the $10,000 buy-in WSOP Super MILLION$ and the other is the $25,000 buy-in NLHE Poker Players Championship coming in at $10 million each. The other events with guarantees are the $100 buy-in The Opener ($2 million), $400 Colossus ($3 million), $400 PLOssus ($1 million), $1,500 Millionaire Maker ($5 million - $1 million to first), HK$8,000 NLHE Asia Championship (HK$8 million), $150 GGMasters WSOP Edition ($1 million), $500 Mini Main Event ($5 million), $50 BIG50 ($1 million), and the $100 WSOP Millions ($2 million). Asian Market Focus Taking advantage of GGPoker's strong following in Asia, there are 11 events with a start time that puts it in prime time in most of that market. These events all begin at 8 am ET which puts them at 8 PM in Beijing, China, and 9 PM in Seoul, Korea, and Tokyo, Japan. The highlight of that group is the HK$8,000 buy-in Asia Championship. The No Limit Hold'em event has an HK$8 million guarantee. [table id=66 /] The Great Game of Pot Limit Omaha While Hold'em makes up a bulk of the schedule, there are nine Pot Limit Omaha events on the schedule including the $5,000 buy-in Pot Limit Omaha Championship on July 21. The biggest PLO field is likely to come from the $400 PLOssus. There are 15 starting flights beginning July 19. Players can reenter each flight one time and the event has a $1 million guarantee. There are no Omaha 8-or-better events on the schedule. Familiar Events Throughout It just wouldn't be the WSOP without some of the nicknamed events on the schedule. The 2020 WSOP Online schedule includes the Millionaire Maker, the Marathon, Colossus, PLOssus, and the Monster Stack. The Millionaire Maker has a $1,500 buy-in with $1 million going to the eventual champion. Players can enter the event through the 15 starting flights that begin on July 26 and players can reenter each flight once. Players start that event with 50,000 chips and levels will be 13 minutes long. The $400 buy-in Colossus has a total of 14 starting flights beginning July 20 and players can reenter one time per flight. People's Choice One unique element of the schedule includes four events at the tail-end of the schedule that will be decided by the players through one of three methods. There are two events dubbed "People's Choice - Most Popular", a "People's Choice - Spin the Wheel" event, and a "People's Choice - Pros Vote" event. The manner in which this tournament formats and structures will be determined was not announced. Streaming Schedule Seven final tables, including the Main Event, will be streamed on PokerGO. Other PokerGO events include Event #2 ($1,111 Every 1 for Covid Relief), Event #10 ($400 Colossus), Event #11 ($300 PLOssus), Event #17 ($1,500 Millionaire Maker), Event #25 ($10,000 Heads Up NLHE), and Event #38 ($25,000 NLHE Poker Players Championship). Each of these seven events will be stopped once they reach the final table and broadcast on PokerGO the following Saturday, The remaining 47 final tables will be streamed on GGPoker's Twitch channel GGPoker.TV. 2020 WSOP ONLINE SCHEDULE - GGPOKER [table id=73 /] Note: An earlier version of this article listed the number of Main Event flights. PocketFives is working to confirm this number.
  16. Had this been any other summer under a normal set of circumstances, the poker world would be in the midst of the World Series of Poker at the Rio in Las Vegas. That madness would surely have included some of poker's brightest stars owning the stage for their victories, but it also would have featured a number of lesser-known players finding a way to claim their first gold bracelet and thrusting themselves into poker's biggest and brightest spotlight. As everybody is well aware, there isn't really anything normal about this summer. Wednesday marks the beginning of the 31 2020 World Series of Poker online bracelet events on WSOP.com. The big names will all be battling for bracelets and their share of the glory that comes with yet another title. This year, maybe more than any other in the 51-year history of the WSOP, players who have been flying below the radar will have plenty of opportunities to join the exclusive club of bracelet winners. Here are five American players who could put on a show worthy of a little slice of the poker world's attention over the next 31 days. David Coleman David Coleman gets the advantage of starting off the 2020 WSOP with a marquee win fresh in his rearview. On Sunday, Coleman topped the 868-entry field in the World Poker Tour Online Poker Open on the partypoker US Network for a $56,585.70 score. He's not some kid on a heater though. In January, the 27-year-old Livingston, New Jersey resident took over the #1 spot in the USA Rankings for the first time in his career. In April, he earned a New Jersey Spring Championship of Online Poker title by beating 242 other entries in the $350 Sunday Special SE. Coleman has won the PokerStars NJ Sunday Special a staggering eight times since November 2016. All told, Coleman has earned over $3 million playing online in New Jersey and has picked up 257 wins and a 180 second-place finishes. Coleman has had only a small sampling of WSOP success thanks to nine total cashes with just five of them coming on the live felt. In 2017, he picked up a 726th place finish in the Main Event for $18,693. His next best live result came last summer when he finished 27th out of 1,083 players in the $2,620 Marathon event for $13,780 WSOP.com Screenname: 'dehhhhh' Tenzin Chakdor The #19-ranked player in the United States, Tenzin Chakdor was a relatively well-kept secret on the New Jersey online scene until October when he topped the 373-runner field in the PokerStars NJ New Jersey Championship of Online Poker Main Event to win $19,111.88. He's also managed to pick up three cashes in June that rank in his top five all-time scores. He won the WSOP.com $40,000 Weekly Tuesday and the WSOP.com $50,000 Tuesday Showdown for nearly $30,000. Sandwich in between those was a third-place finish in the WSOP.com Online Finale Circuit High Roller for $25,011. He has one previous WSOP.com online bracelet event result, finishing 141st in Event #46 ($500 Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Deep Stack) in 2019. By choice, Chakdor remains a real mystery on the live scene. The New Jersey grinder has had some live success, most notably at Parx Casino in Pennsylvania, but has chosen to keep his live results private. WSOP.com Screenname: 'tc_ownz' Jed Hoffman Jed Hoffman may be one of the most accomplished online grinders in the state of Nevada and very few casual poker fans have ever heard of him. Hoffman has spent a good chunk of the last four years as the #1-ranked online poker player in Nevada and has over $1.1 million in earnings on WSOP.com alone. On June 1, Hoffman beat 483 of the best online players in Nevada and New Jersey when he won the WSOP.com $100,000 Guaranteed Sunday event for $55,198.50. In 2019, Hoffman won a WSOP Circuit ring online - his fourth ring overall - for $22,170. The Reno native is limited to a single online poker site but has 99 wins from 1,346 cashes on WSOP.com. His three previous WSOP Circuit wins all came in the live arena. His first two came in 2013 (Choctaw and Lake Tahoe) and his third 2019 (Thunder Valley). He has 22 WSOP cashes to his credit and in 2013 made the final table of a $1,500 No Limit Hold'em event where he finished in seventh place. WSOP.com Screename: 'jchak' Ryan Dodd Sitting just outside of the top five ranked players in the country, Ryan Dodd has been piling up online results throughout 2020. Seven of his top eight lifetime online scores have come in the last six months, all of them coming on WSOP.com. In January, he won the WSOP.com $100,000 Guaranteed Sunday event for $29,574. He followed that up with a third-place finish the New Years Kick-off Series Main Event on WSOP.com for $16,368. He won a $20,000 Weekly Monday in March before crushing in April. Dodd picked up three big wins; $20,000 Weekly Monday, WSOP.com Spring Online Championships event #28, and the $40,000 Weekly Tuesday for $45,000 total. He also won the $30,000 Weekly Saturday in early June for $10,765. The Runnemede, New Jersey native has never cashed in a live WSOP event but does have $141,552 live cashes on his Hendon Mob profile. Almost all of his live results are from events in Atlantic City including a pair of wins at the Borgata in the summer of 2019. His biggest live cashes also come from the Borgata. He finished second in a $1,090 Borgata Summer Poker Open event for $24,500 in 2019 and in a WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open in 2020 for $17,431. WSOP.com Screename: 'Whosyourdodd' Tyler Sumrall The #2-ranked player in Nevada, Tyler Sumrall has put in an incredible amount of volume on WSOP.com over the past three months. In June alone, Sumrall has cashed 35 times with four of them being victories. In May he cashed 52 times with two wins. On April 9, the Texas native won a WSOP.com Spring Online Championship and earned $10,870.81 for the largest single cash on the regulated site. His total winnings on WSOP.com of $262,086 might pale in comparison to some of his New Jersey-based colleagues, but most of that has come over the past 12 months alone. He's also eight live cashes at the WSOP including two in the Main Event. In 2011, he finished 304th for $35,492 and last summer he bested that, coming in 280th place for $43,935. His other live WSOP cashes all been in lower buy-in, bigger field No Limit Hold'em events. His only live result that paid more than the Main Event cashes came in 2009 when he finished 11th in the WinStar $2,100 Main Event for $48,000. WSOP.com Screename: 'TIPnTimeBOMB'
  17. Seven days ago, Michael Addamo was sitting on top of the world after winning over $600,000 and a pair of partypoker High Roller Club titles. On Sunday, Addamo had a chance to pick up a second consecutive partypoker High Roller Club Main Event title before he ran into Nick Petrangelo. Petrangelo outlasted 29 other runners and then beat Addamo heads-up to win the Main Event and earned $356,500. Addamo had to settle for the runner-up score of $217,000. Isaac Haxton defeated former #1-ranked Niklas Astedt in the partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance event to bank $184,000. Astedt, who has over $20,000,000 in online poker earnings, added $117,734.70 to that total for his second-place result. The PokerStars Sunday Million was up to 12,860 runners this week, an increase of 1,315 over last week, to build a total prize pool of $1,286,000. The final two players chopped up a little more than $220,000. Eventual champ 'c0rl30n3_89' took home $118,981.31 while runner-up 'fcb-serv' squeaked out a six-figure score, earning $101,074.92. Third place went to 'eValiukas' for $67,153.11. Ivan 'Negriin' Luca defeated Simon 'IgorKarkarof' Rønnow heads-up in the PokerStars $5,200 High Roller event. Luca added $134,799.35 to his bankroll for the win while Rønnow earned $104,441.26. Rønnow had a bigger six-figure score after winning the partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game for $181,357.65. Daniel Dvoress finished in the silver medal position in that event for $130,302.04. The GGPoker GGMasters had 3,367 entries to fall $35,354 short of making the $500,000 guarantee. Swiss grinder 'Gogac1' outlasted all of them to win $71,947.50. Finishing one spot behind them, 'TeuCu' banked $50,874.60 and 'spicypigeon' rounded out the podium finishers to earn $35,973.80. PokerStars Sunday Million Buy-in: $109 Entries: 12,860 Prize pool: $1,286,000 c0rl30n3_89 - $118,981.31* fcb-serv - $101,074.92* eValiukas - $67,153.11 PokerStars High Roller Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 123 Prize pool: $615,00 Ivan 'Negriin' Luca - $134,799.35 IgorKarkarof - $104,441.26 needdollarz - $80,920.16 PokerStars Bounty Builder Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,439 Prize pool: $343,900 IceStream - $20,998.57 + $12,186.45 in bounties woody1234321 - $20,995.62 + $6,553.83 in bounties Skammes - $12,151.99 + $2,652.67 in bounties partypoker High Roller Club Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 31 Prize pool: $775,000 Nick Petrangelo - $356,500 Michael Addamo - $217,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $139,500 partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 46 Prize pool: $460,000 Isaac Haxton - $184,000 Niklas Astedt - $117,734.70 Juan Pardo Dominguez - $59,800 partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 161 Prize pool: $819,509.70 Simon Rønnow Pedersen - $181,357.65 Daniel Dvoress - $130,302.04 Bujtás László - $95,063.12 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,367 Prize pool: $500,000 ($35,354 overlay) Gogac1 - $71,947.50 TeuCu - $50,874.60 spicypigeon - $35,973.80 GGPoker High Roller Blade Mulligan Buy-in: $5,000 Entries: 119 Prize pool: $565,250 IAmZeCaptainNow - $123,894.89 Corey Burbick - $94,245.09 PascalHartmann - $71,690.99
  18. The Summer of 2020 will go down in online poker's history books as the craziest ever. With the 2020 World Series of Poker live events postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, online operators have stepped up to fill the void. On Monday, PokerStars threw their hat into the ring with the Stadium Series, a four-week series guaranteeing $50 million. Running July 5 – August 2, the Stadium Series includes 102 events across three buy-in levels; Low, Medium, and High. These dates give PokerStars a two-week headstart on the competition. The GGPoker World Series of Poker Online Bracelet events begin July 17 and the partypoker World Poker Tour World Online Championships get underway on July 18. The Stadium Series buy-ins and guarantees will increase each week throughout the series culminating in the $5,200 buy-in Grand Final with a $5 million guarantee on August 2. Buy-ins across the three tiers will range from $5.50 up to $10,300. Poker enthusiasts around the world will be able to watch cards up coverage of the Stadium Series beginning on July 13 with the familiar faces of James Hartigan and Joe Stapleton hosting the coverage. This marks the first time that PokerStars has offered players at home the chance to watch online events with each player's hole cards visible. “It’s a unique summer and we know many of our players like ourselves miss live poker. So we wanted to bring the entertainment and flair of a live event with our cards-up coverage and really put our players at the heart of all the action. There’s truly something for everyone with Stadium Series: big opportunities, mega thrills, and incredible value. We’re very excited about seeing this one unfold," said Severin Rasset, Managing Director & Commercial Officer, Poker, Product and Innovation. PokerStars will award more than $2 million in free Stadium Series entries throughout the summer across all events. For each of the three buy-in levels, players can play in a special Heat tournament that will have Sunday Final tickets add to those prize pools. The Sunday Final will have Grand Final tickets, valued at $5,200, added to their prize pool. Players will also be able to win free Grand Final entries via a Fast Track promotion in conjunction with special Stars Rewards Spin & Go's or daily freerolls. PokerStars.it and PokerStars.eu will each have their own Stadium Series running concurrent to the PokerStars.com series. Each schedule runs July 5-26 with €3 million guaranteed in Italy and €5 million for PokerStars.eu, which serves the combined player pools of Portugal, France, and Spain. For those events, buy-ins will go from €5 on the low end to €250 on the high end and there will be €250,000 in free tournament entries awarded to players in each market. The Grand Final on PokerStars.it will guarantee €500,000 with a €250 buy-in while the PokerStars.eu version has the same buy-in with €1 million guaranteed. A full Stadium Series schedule is expected to be released soon.
  19. When you first look down at your hole cards after the dealer pitches your cards, you immediately begin to formulate a plan on how to play that specific hand. In most cases, you’re simply waiting for your turn to fold, but in those instances where the poker gods have blessed you, you look down and see a great starting hand - a premium pair perhaps - and you instantly picture yourself raking in a huge pot at the conclusion of the hand after cleverly outplaying your opponent. Things don’t always follow the initial narrative you create though. Maria Konnikova spent the last three years learning exactly that, but not just via the hands she played live and online as she wrote her latest book The Biggest Bluff, which followed her journey from total poker newb to a Hendon Mob profile with over $300,000 in winnings and a marquee victory to her credit. It was 2016 and Konnikova, a New York Times bestselling author, had just launched her second book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time into the universe and was searching for her next project. Her first few ideas were met with polite resistance from her publisher and she folded to wait for something better. That’s when her idea to take a year learning the game of poker - really learning it - before playing in the World Series of Poker Main Event came to her like a premium hand on the button. Konnikova envisioned tracking down a top-flight poker pro to be her coach and guide through the journey. She knew nothing about the game, including the rules, and put together a well-thought-out pitch that detailed how the 12-month journey was going to play out. “Proposals take a lot of time and a lot of research. You don't just bang out a book proposal. It took me about six months to do my book proposal,” Konnikova says. “I had to do a bunch of research so that I could make the proposal really meaty and have some sort of idea about what was going to happen.” As she dug into the research part of the pitch, Konnikova zoned in on one player to be her coach, Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. She tracked down Seidel and did her best sales job on convincing the eight-time WSOP bracelet winner to take her on as a student. “When I reached out to Erik, the first time I met him, the book hadn't been sold and I was very open about that. I said, ‘Look I have this idea, but we don't know what's actually going to happen’,” Konnikova remembers. Seidel agreed to be part of the project but Konnikova had one more thing she had to do. She played a little bit online and then headed to Las Vegas to get her first taste of the poker world. “I just wanted to make sure that I wasn't going to hate poker,” Konnikova admits. After getting enough of a taste of the online and live scene to know she was going to enjoy the process, Konnikova signed a book deal with her publisher to spend a year in the poker world before using the 2017 WSOP Main Event as the exclamation point on her journey. That’s not how the hand played itself out though. Premium pairs be damned. “I had no idea how the journey was going to go. I didn't know what was going to happen and I really did envision it as being like one year and as ending with the World Series of Poker. That's just kind of the grand hurrah,” Konnikova says. “And none of that was the case and the outline, the proposal that I gave is totally different from what ended up happening.” The book, which hit bookshelves Tuesday, features Seidel extensively. When Konnikova first met with him she didn’t have an alternate choice as her coach in case Seidel declined but admits now that the student-sensei relationship with Seidel helped frame her poker journey and the book. “My experience with poker would have been totally different. I think with some players even, players who are considered great, I mean I'm not naming any names or anything like that, I would have just hated the game and not been able to get good at it because their attitude is so different from mine and we really would not have I think meshed on a personal level,” Konnikova says. “I think sometimes things just work out and this was one of those things where I just had no idea how good my first choice was. No idea. I could never have predicted it.” Learning that cash games and tournaments were totally different pursuits was a revelation for her and the more she learned about each one, the clearer the necessary path became. “Erik kind of told me, ‘Look, you have to focus. You have to pick one if you are going to do this quickly because it is a different animal. Eventually, you can play both but at the beginning, you have to focus on one game and one style because you are going to learn to play very differently if I'm teaching you to play cash versus tournaments’,” Konnikova says. Konnikova evaluated both options and elected to focus her poker education solely on tournaments. She saw them serving as a great vehicle to talk about decision making in a way that made sense for how people live their lives on a daily basis. “I was looking for something that was going to provide me with a good way into life. Tournaments are much more dynamic. They have a beginning, middle, and an end. They have an ark. They have a story. They have changing priorities at different depths of the game and to me that is much more reminiscent of how life is,” Konnikova says. “Life is not a cash game. It's not something where you can constantly add-on and re-buy and walk away from the table whenever you want and leave when you are up or when you are down.” So Konnikova was off and running with her poker journey but the calendar intervened and like a check-raise on the turn from the tightest player at the table, forced Konnikova to re-evaluate her options. “My year timeline got completely screwed from the very beginning. I met Erik in the summer and kind of conceived it as ‘oh, this is going to be like a year thing’,” Konnikova recalls. “But by the time that I was ready to play my first hand online, it was already fall. And by the time I played my first live tournament, it was already winter. And so, that timeline had gotten completely shifted.” Konnikova plowed onward. The next few months included playing online and multiple trips to Las Vegas to play small buy-in tournaments before finding some tougher events with bigger buy-ins on the East Coast of the United States. The 2017 WSOP Main Event was fast approaching and Seidel wasn’t sure she was ready for it. Playing that event was a key component of the book pitch and there was suddenly a real possibility she wouldn’t even be ready to play it. Skipping it to wait for a better spot seemed like a bad play at the time to Konnikova. “I was like, ‘No, this is my proposal. This is what I sold. This is the book I sold. I am going to play the damn thing’,” Konnikova says. She played the Main Event that year and looking back now admits it wasn’t her best decision. “It was a lot of money for me. So that was something I probably shouldn't have done. Hindsight tells me that and I should have known it in the moment and I didn't really want to know it. I think it tells us a lot about how the human mind works. When we really don't want to acknowledge something we often don't. We find excuses.” When she busted early on Day 2, Konnikova knew that was meant to be when she was supposed to begin writing the book. Reviewing everything up to that point, she quickly realized that she had to keep going if she wanted to write the book she had envisioned, even if it was not the one she had pitched. “I didn't have a book at that point. I did not have enough. I hadn't spent enough time in the poker world,” Konnikova says. “I hadn't met enough people. I hadn't. I mean sure, I could have written some book, but it would have been a different book and I think it would have been a much worse book.” Her first phone call was to her editor, Scott Moyers at Penguin Press. She explained to him that she needed to keep going and found him to be very supportive of the sudden shift. Not long after that, the book’s trajectory - and deadline - changed again. [caption id="attachment_631383" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Maria Konnikova and her poker coach/mentor Erik Seidel after Konnikova shipped the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure National Championship (PokerStars photo)[/caption] At the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, Konnikova beat out 279 other entries in the $1,650 PCA National Championship to win $84,600. While that victory could have served as the final chapter of a successful journey through poker, Konnikova wanted to do more research and continue to play. Her editor was receptive and supportive. “I told him, ‘Look, I need you to just leave me alone and give me time and when I'm ready I'm going to write the book’ and he said, ‘Yeah, sure. Go for it. No one is going to scoop you. This is your life story’,” Konnikova says. Like a premium hand and the narrative built in your head on how to maximize the value on each street, Konnikova turned that one-year plan into a 3.5-year-long education not only on how to play poker but how to handle the potential derailments along the way.
  20. Michael Addamo dominated two of the biggest events on Sunday's MTT schedule to secure a mid-six-figure score while Fedor Holz, Ole Schemion, and Jon Van Fleet also found their way into the winner's circle. Addamo topped the 39-entry field to take down the $25,500 buy-in partypoker High Roller Club Main Event and then denied 50 other players a shot at redemption in the $10,300 buy-in High Roller Club Mix-Max 2nd Chance event. All told, the Australian earned $611,500 for the two victories. Rok Gostisa finished runner-up in the Main Event for $265,000 while Sergi Reixach won $130,531 as the second-place finisher in the 2nd Chance event. Jon Van Fleet beat 220 other entries in the partypoker High Roller Club The Big Game to win $211,552. The Poker Masters PLO Series kicked off Sunday on partypoker with only one of the two events playing down to a winner. Andras Nemeth beat Viktor Blom heads-up to win Event #2 ($5,200 buy-in) for a $126,686.43 score. Blom had to settle for a $78,975 payday while fellow Swede Alexander Holmberg Nordén took third for $48,600. Former #1-ranked Fedor Holz was the biggest winner on PokerStars after taking down the Summer Series Event #167 ($5,200 NLHE High Roller) for $156,377. Runner-up Joao 'Naza114' Vieira had to settle for $121,057 while 'WATnlos' narrowly missed out on a six-figure win after finishing third for $93,714. The PokerStars Sunday Million had 11,545 runners with 'wazaahun' beating all of them to win $117,425.03. 'MickeyM' won the GGPoker High Roller Million$ to turn their $500 buy-in into a $285,986 return. 'GoJiGo' had an even bigger ROI after winning the $100 buy-in GGPoker Global Million$ event for $132,092.20. The GGPoker GGMasters had a $46,118 overlay on the $500,000 guarantee. 'BleyBley' outlasted the 3,288 other players in the freezeout event to win $71,947.50. partypoker High Roller Club: Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 39 Prize Pool: $1,000,000 ($25,000 overlay) Michael Addamo - $407,500 Rok Gostisa - $265,000 Pascal Lefrancois - $165,000 partypoker High Roller Club: Mix-Max 2nd Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 51 Prize Pool: $510,000 Michael Addamo - $204,000 Sergi Reixach - $130,531 Vyacheslav Buldygin - $66,300 partypoker High Roller Club: The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 221 Prize pool: $1,037,530 Jon Van Fleet - $211,552 Laszlo Bujtas - $153,554 Kristen Bicknell - $109,459 partypoker Poker Masters PLO Event #2 Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 81 Prize pool: $405,000 Andras Nemeth - $126,686.43 Viktor Blom - $78,975 Alexander Holmberg Nordén - $48,600 PokerStars Summer Series Event #167: NLHE High Roller Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 149 Prize pool: $745,000 Fedor 'CrownUpGuy' Holz - $156,377 Joao 'Naza114' Vieira - $121,057 WATnlos - $93,714 PokerStars Summer Series Event #142: Sunday Warm-Up SE Buy-in: $109 Entries: 4,129 $412,900 Prize pool: $412,900 vasiokkk91 - $48,217.12* bambo0bear - $41,979.92* Jeffin_DF - $39,941.62* PokerStars High Roller Club: $2,100 Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $2,100 Entries: 49 Prize pool: $100,000 ($2,000 overlay) giftmyra - $39,235.30 master888888 - $25,696.01 Str8$$$Homey - $16,828.86 PokerStars Sunday Million Buy-in: $109 Entries: 11,545 Prize pool: $1,154,500 Wazaahun - $117,425.03 oardnasol - $85,209.25 mitch85 - $61,836.28 GGPoker Global Million$ Buy-in: $100 Entries: 1,638 Prize pool: $1,000,000 GoJiGo - $132,092.20 Rodrigo74 - $94,159.90 12u55 - $67,120.50 GGPoker High Roller Million$ Buy-in: $500 Entries: 674 (Day 2) Prize pool: $2,000,0000 MickeyM - $285.986 Cirquit - $145,319 SACKMAN69 - $203,861 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,289 Prize pool: $500,000 ($46,118 overlay) BleyBley - $71,947.50 Guohua - $50,874.60 Trondheim - $35,973.80 888 Poker Sunday Mega Deep Buy-in: $109 Entries: 608 + 225 rebuys Prize pool: $100,000 ($16,700 overlay) BeeTheBeagle - $18,890 cl0wn888 - $13,700 AVR26 - $10,100
  21. When World Series of Poker officials announced in mid-April that the 2020 WSOP was being postponed due to the uncertainty over the coronavirus pandemic, they promised that players would be playing for "WSOP glory from their homes" this summer. That promise was met last week when the WSOP announced a total of 85 online bracelet events with 31 set for WSOP.com for players in Nevada and New Jersey, and another 54 for players outside of the United States to be battled for on GGPoker.com. The response from some of the poker community wasn't all that positive with a large number of complaints focused on the fact that these events will award each winner a WSOP bracelet. "My reasoning is likely separate from many others as I was indifferent to holding (a bracelet) until I learned of the significance it has with friends I love who love the game," said Brandon Shack-Harris, who won a bracelet in 2014 and another in 2016. "I realized that some people go their whole lives dreaming of realizing what I was lucky to stumble onto, and had been taking for granted." Shack-Harris took to Twitter to tell the story of how Chad Brown being awarded an honorary WSOP bracelet before his passing in 2014 and subsequently learning how much the bracelet meant to Brown forced to him to better recognize and appreciate the personal significance of the award. The history behind and prestige of the bracelet is front of mind for Shack-Harris and others who fear that WSOP executives aren't keeping that in mind as they make decisions. "The WSOP does a fantastic job with some things like holding tournaments for an inordinate number of participants and incorporating all types of game formats," said Shack-Harris. "I don't think the entity itself cares much about poker overall, and there are frequently sloppy executions of various aspects of the series that have demonstrated this assumption." Shack-Harris lists the increasing number of reentry events, smaller buy-in events, and WSOP Europe and WSOP Asia-Pacific as evidence that the WSOP has sacrificed the value of a bracelet. He believes the WSOP should follow examples from major sporting championships like tennis' Wimbledon or golf's The Masters in regards to the exclusivity of the titles. "Not every player is going to agree with every business decision you make. But we are guided by the simple principle that we want the WSOP to mean as much as it can to as many people around the world as possible not the same as it once did to a few," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the WSOP. "Our mission and our opportunity is to present the poker world to the rest of the world and paint the game in a positive light." Not all players believe the decision to turn to online poker in light of the unprecedented circumstances created by the pandemic is a bad direction. Mike Leah, who won a WSOP bracelet in 2014 at WSOP APAC, thinks the pandemic provided a catalyst for Series officials to expand their offering. "The thing that it really did for them is it gave them an urgency to find a partner outside of the US which I think is amazing because instead of being forced to play on WSOP.com, there's another avenue for WSOP prize pools and bracelets and that's probably the biggest positive that came out of this," said Leah. The postponement of the 2020 WSOP live series came with a caveat that organizers were targeting the fall to host some form a live event in 2020. Shack-Harris believes that adding 85 bracelet events without solidifying plans for the live series sets a dangerous precedent. "I think there will likely still be a live series later in the year, and offering up 85 online events for a bracelet with no transparency regarding the potential of a live format going or not going bothers me more than anything else," said Shack-Harris. "If people make arrangements to play online because they feel this is their only shot at a bracelet this year, and then a postponed series shows up out of the blue, I think it's somewhat deceitful, but probably great business." Despite their intentions to hold a live event in Las Vegas this year, Stewart isn't sure how that can happen as the coronavirus situation changes frequently. Current Nevada gaming regulations limit the number of players at a table to no more than six and not all poker rooms are even open. Travel restrictions in place would also significantly limit the number of players who could attend from outside of the United States. "We have no concrete pathway to the offline event. We have a partner who is absolutely all-in. We have the opportunity to organize massive prize pools, deliver buzz and energy for the industry, and perhaps most of all, engage an entirely new segment of players," Stewart argued. "I’m looking at WSOP Online as the biggest ever marketing vehicle for international players and the only failure will be if we can’t convert many of them to playing WSOP Las Vegas when we’re back in session." The online series puts the lack of online poker regulation in the United States into the spotlight once again. Only players physically located in Nevada or New Jersey will be able to play the bracelet events on WSOP.com and GGPoker does not accept players from the United States. Pennsylvania has had regulated gaming, including poker, available since last summer, but Stewart indicated the company is still in the development process of getting up and running in that state and was unable to give a timeline for their launch there. This leaves a large percentage of the United States on the outside, unable to play without traveling and Leah believes a high number of the complaints are coming from players who simply can't play. "I think if you went through the people that have negative feedback or complaints about this, probably at least 80% of them are from people who are not in New Jersey or Nevada or the rest of the world or somewhere where they can play," said Leah. "I'd be disappointed as well, but people have been disappointed about unregulated poker in the US for a long time so this is just something that brings it to the forefront again." The complete GGPoker event schedule has not been posted, but it is expected to include only Hold'em and Omaha event. The 31-event schedule from WSOP.com also includes only those two games. The lack of mixed games - traditionally a staple of the WSOP schedule - has also upset many players that feel the online product isn't a proper reflection of the history of the Series. "I'm disappointed too and you best believe you may see even more mixed games at the next live WSOP," said Stewart. "But while much of the summer schedule will feel familiar to the spirit of WSOP at the Rio, this is WSOP Online, and online is dominated by flop games. If we gave GGPoker a little more time to develop, who knows. But we are not going to ask them to rush a new unproven derivative to the market in time for the summer." Some in the industry have made the suggestion that the bracelets awarded this summer shouldn't be held in the same regard as events won in a live tournament. The argument is similar to the one that people made when Caesars expanded the tournament offering to Europe with bracelet events in 2007 and Asia-Pacific in 2013. Rob Yong, owner of the Dusk Till Dawn cardroom in England and partypoker partner, floated the idea of awarding silver bracelets for events not held in Las Vegas. "I understand the argument, the sentiment of it, but I also know that a lot fewer people would play," said Leah. "With bracelets, they'll be even bigger but if you take them away you're going to lose some of the interest and obviously the prize pools will be smaller and make people not want to play as much. I think a lot fewer people will play. If it's a bracelet event I know I'm going to do my best to play every single event." Leah, who lives in Canada, has already begun the search for full-time childcare for his one-year-old son to ensure he can play as many of the 54 events as possible. Stewart thinks any attempt to diminish any bracelet win is going to be difficult given the expected turnout for the online events and feels comparison of various events and eras isn't worth the headache. "The relative value of bracelets is not up to me to determine; large fields vs high rollers, Europe fields vs 1990’s Binion’s," Stewart said while indicating the bracelet design for these 85 events is a differentiating factor. "But I have my strong point of view on this series. Based upon the numbers we project for most of the events, these will statistically be some of the hardest bracelets to win, ever. And the prize pools will be such that it will be very difficult to try and diminish the accomplishment." The original 2020 WSOP schedule had a total of 101 events, with 14 of them being played exclusively on WSOP.com. A sevenfold increase in the number of online events is a gigantic leap with huge revenue opportunities for the WSOP. Leah doesn't think the online events will ever be able to replace or replicate the summer camp, bucket list feel that the live tournament series is famous for. "I don't think anything's ever going to change the annual WSOP in Vegas every summer because that's everyone's favorite thing of the year. But adding to it, maybe an online bracelet series at some point in the year on WSOP.com and GG ends up being an annual thing and I could see that as being a pretty positive thing." Going from 85 online events this year to a smaller number next year goes against the WSOP's previous expansion online. Since launching online events in 2015, the total number of them on the schedule has gone from one (2015, 2016) to three (2017) to four (2018), to nine (2019) with 14 originally scheduled for 2020. Stewart believes the unique set of circumstances presented to them this year doesn't mean they'll end up with a similar schedule once a full schedule can be played live in Las Vegas. "I don’t foresee we’ll have this number of online events again. But there certainly is a place for online bracelets on an every year basis," Stewart said. "I am optimistic this year will be huge, and then we can evaluate. Everything we do is on a year to year basis to test the reception. The same players against the idea of a vast online series now may be demanding it in the future."
  22. Team partypoker's own Isaac Haxton is widely regarded as one of the best poker players on the planet. On Sunday he added to that reputation by outlasting 45 other players in the partypoker High Roller Club Main Event. The $25,500 buy-in event had many of the best poker players in the world vying for the eventual six-figure score. Haxton beat all of them to walk away with $437,000. Spaniard Sergi Reixach had to settle for a $287,500 payday after being the final player to fall to Haxton. Pascal Lefrancois picked up yet another six-figure score after winning $184,000 for coming in third place. Many of the players that Haxton dispatched also took a shot in the partypoker High Roller Club Mix-Max Second Chance event. The $10,300 event had 65 total entries with Austria's Thomas Muehloecker outlasting all of them to win $224,840.20. Belarussian Mikita Badziakouski finished as the runner-up for $146,250. Dan Shak, playing from Poland, took the final podium spot and added $78,000 to his bankroll. Brazil's Pablo Brito Silva won the $5,200 buy-in partypoker High Roller club The Big Game to earn $216,635.69. Canada's Andrew Pantling just missed out on yet another victory, finishing second for $157,244.08. Nick Schulman rounded out the top three for $112,089.53. Lester 'mon$terDad' Edoc earned $285,646 for an outright victory in the GGPoker High Roller MILLION$. The $500 buy-in event had 1,832 to entries for a prize pool of $1,129,800. Runner-up 'Lucky_Luke1' walked away with $203,618 for their efforts and third-place finisher 'supermoustache' earned $145,146. While the PokerStars Sunday Million and partypoker MILLION will both play down to a winner on Monday, the GGPoker GGMasters fell 118 players short of the $500,000 guarantee. 'BadReligion' entered the land of competition and proved to be a worthy 21st century boy (or girl) by outlasting all 3,504 of their competitors to win $71,750.75. Coming in one spot short of the title gave 'Langdon' a $50,352.45 score while 'gambelo' earned $35,335.85 as the third place finisher. partypoker High Roller club Main Event Buy-in: $25,500 Entries: 46 Prize pool $1,150,000 Isaac Haxton - $437,000 Sergi Reixach - $287,500 Pascal Lefrancois - $184,000 partypoker High Roller club Mix-Max Second Chance Buy-in: $10,300 Entries: 65 Prize pool $650,000 Thomas Muehloecker - $224,840.20 Mikita Badziakouski - $146,250 Dan Shak - $78,000 partypoker High Roller club The Big Game Buy-in: $5,200 Entries: 229 Prize pool $1,062,460 Pablo Brito Silva - $216,635.69 Andrew Pantling - $157,244.08 Nick Schulman - $112,089.53 partypoker High Roller club Knockout Buy-in: $2,100 Entries: 99 Prize pool: $200,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - $19,015.55 + $23,406.25 in bounties Christian Jeppsson - $18,995.27 + $15,406.25 in bounties Luc Greenwood - $13,575.26 + $2,500 in bounties PokerStars Bounty Builder Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,249 Prize pool: $324,800 Escapemissio - $17,272.29 + $17,357.30 in bounties ciaca21 - $17,991.41 + $1,350.77 in bounties caiocalmon - $16,315.24 + $835.96 in bounties PokerStars Summer Series Event #80 NLHE Turbo PKO Buy-in: $109 Entries: 3,486 Prize pool: $348,600 SupaFlyGeek - $21,427.84 + $17,231.64 in bounties 777acenace77 - $21,424.67 + $1,633.00 in bounties gkamei09 - $12,711.76 + $1,628.70 in bounties PokerStars Sunday High Roller Buy-in: $2,100 Entries: 64 Prize pool: $128,000 C. Darwin2 - $39,772.71 Anjeyyy - $28,661.67 Str8$$$Homey - $20,654.65 888poker Sunday Mega Deep Buy-in: $109 Entries: 640 + 273 reentries Prize pool: $100,000 ($8,700 overlay) 9saymon - $18,890.00 pow_indacage - $13,700 R2Rka - $10,100 GGPoker High Roller MILLION$ Buy-in: $500 Entries: 1,832 Prize pool: $1,129,800 Lester 'mon$terDad' Edoc - $285,646 Lucky_Luke1 - $203,618 supermoustache - $145,146 GGPoker Global MILLION$ Buy-in: $100 Entries: Prize pool: COMMENEIGEAUSOLEIL - $134,065 MessiBarcelona - $95,556 Justin 'noclue_just' Chan - $68,123 GGPoker GGMasters Buy-in: $150 Entries: 3,505 Prize pool: $500,000 ($16,310 overlay) BadReligion - $71,750.75 Langdon - $50,352.45 gambelo - $35,335.85
  23. Over the past few years, there hasn't been a more dominant player in the New Jersey online scene than Yong 'LuckySpewy1' Kwon. He's won a World Series of Poker bracelet, a pair of PokerStars New Jersey Championship of Online Poker titles, and a PokerStars New Jersey Spring Championship of Online Poker title and accumulated more than $3.2 million in earnings. And throughout most of that, he's been the #1-ranked online poker player in the United States. Kwon sits atop the USA rankings again after picking up eight qualifying cashes - four of them wins - in May and then kicking off June with a five-figure win. Kwon's biggest May score came after defeating Chris Moorman heads-up in the $500 buy-in WSOP.com $50,000 Weekly Sunday on May 11 for $22,752 and 285.06 PLB points. He also won the WSOP.com $10,000 daily twice and had three qualifying cashes from the late states of the Spring Online Championships. Trailing Kwon by 283 points, Mike 'Lav519' Lavenburg also had eight qualifying cashes in May including a win the WSOP.com Money May Series Event #92 ($500 Six Max PLO High Roller) where he banked $11,462 and boosted his PLB points total by 217.18. He had a pair of Spring Online Championship final tables as well as another May Series final table. On June 1 he finished 27th in the WSOP.com $100,000 Guaranteed. Rounding out the top three is yet another New Jersey grinder. Jon 'itsmejon' Borenstein is 212 points behind Lavenburg and 495 points behind Kwon. Borenstein started out May on fire adding 659.2 PLB points to his total thanks to four cashes between May 4 and May 6. On May 4 he finished sixth and ninth in a pair of WSOP.com Spring OC events and runner-up in the WSOP.com $50,000 Weekly Sunday. His biggest score of the month came on May 6 when he earned $21,561 and 275.05 PLB points for outlasting 91 other players to ship the $500 Tuesday Showdown. While the rest of the top 10 is populated by players from the Garden State, the top-ranked player from Nevada is James 'prdawg420' Vales. Coming in at #13, Vales is 1,805 points behind Kwon and is only able to collect points on WSOP.com. Vales had 13 qualifying cashes in May, highlighted by a runner-up result from the WSOP.com Tuesday Showdown on May 27 where he added $15,206 to his career earnings and 202.13 PLB points to his total. [table id=54 /]
  24. After having to postpone the 2020 World Series of Poker due to the Coronavirus Pandemic, WSOP officials promised poker players they would soon have a solution so that would "allow players to chase WSOP glory from their homes." On Monday, the WSOP took the first step towards fulfilling that promise. The WSOP has announced 31 events for players in the regulated American markets served by WSOP.com and 54 events on GGPoker for players located outside of the United States. Before being postponed, the 2020 WSOP was scheduled to award 101 bracelets including 14 that were going to be played on WSOP.com for players in New Jersey and Nevada. "It wouldn't be summer without WSOP," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the WSOP. "While we are thrilled to be reopening our venues and optimistic about future offline events, we couldn't be more excited about deepening our relationship with GGPoker and watching some history unfold online this summer." This marks the first time that players located outside of the United States have been able to compete for a WSOP bracelet online. Players inside Nevada borders first played for a WSOP bracelet in 2015. In 2018, players in New Jersey played in bracelet events alongside their Nevada-based colleagues following the intra-state merger of player pools in New Jersey, Nevada, and Delaware. "There's nothing in the world like winning a WSOP bracelet," said Daniel Negreanu, who joined GGPoker as an ambassador earlier this year. "Bringing this experience online will open the door for a new generation of poker players to feel the rush of competing for the game's biggest prize." WSOP.com is currently not available in Pennsylvania. Stewart also indicated that PokerCentral, owner of PokerGO and the official streaming partner of the WSOP, will also be involved in creating content including live streams, highlight packages as well as "virtual bracelet ceremonies" with interviews with each winner. The decision to partner with GGPoker for the WSOP bracelet events just weeks after the conclusion of the WSOP Super Circuit Online Series on the growing online poker site which awarded $6,728,197.80 over 18 ring events and nearly $128 million over 498 events scheduled around those ring events. WSOP.com Online Bracelet Events 2020 The WSOP.com online bracelet events kick-off on July 1 with one event each day through the month of July culminating with the $1,000 buy-in Championship event on Friday, July 31. There are six other events with a $1,000 buy-in as well as a $1,500 and a $3,200 High Roller event. According to a press release, WSOP.com players will also be able to win their share of $100,000 to be awarded to top performers in July's bracelet events. [table id=49 /] GGPoker Online WSOP Bracelet Events 2020 Players who are able to play on GGPoker will begin chasing bracelets on July 19. The event schedule for the WSOP bracelet events on GGPoker has not been announced but the company indicated they plan to "unveil its bracelet schedule on a rolling basis". The final event concludes on September 6. "With over $100M in guarantees during the WSOPC Super Series in May, it's clear that GGPoker and the WSOP make a good pair," said Steve Preiss, GGPoker's head of Poker Operations. "We're excited to create bracelet events that the community will embrace, as well as innovative programming with PokerGO." Buy-ins are expected to be similar to those offered by GGPoker in the WSOP Super Circuit Online where buy-ins ranged from $50 up to $25,000.
  25. Jargo Alaväli is on a plane halfway to Croatia from his native Estonia and he’s pissed off. The 29-year-old poker pro isn’t dwelling on some bad beat or a hand he misplayed, but rather a coaching seminar that he had to miss because of the flight he’s on. It’s the first time he’s had to not attend the daily seminar and it breaks a promise he made to himself when he committed to getting better at the game over a year ago. Alaväli started playing poker for fun while in university long before he considered making a career out of it. It was just him and his college buddies playing with nothing but pride on the line. Eventually one of those buddies promised to transfer him $10 on an online poker site and he ran that up quickly after winning a $2.20 tournament for a little more than $1,000. This isn’t some amazing fairytale where he never deposited again and built a career off of that first $10. The $1,000 disappeared as quickly as it had arrived and he was still focused on his studies. That didn’t stop his friends from encouraging him to play more though. Randar 'LilBigKahuna' Sikk, a lifelong friend who was already a regular winner in the 180-man sit-n-gos on PokerStars, told him he had talent and if he wanted to put in the work to get better it could turn out to be a better-paying career than the IT one he was studying for. “He basically told me, ‘You have to start playing if you like the game because you can make a lot of money out of it,” Alaväli remembers. “He asked me once a year if I wanted to get started … I was like, ‘Yeah, I’m first going to finish up school and then I’m going to start. Then I gave it a shot.” Not exactly. Alaväli didn’t get his degree. He finished the semester before jumping into playing and learning full time. Sikk took him under his wing as a student and Alaväli deposited €100 of his own money to start the grind. It was a lot of money to him at the time, but he’s never looked back and built himself a bankroll since that allows him to make a good living playing mid-stakes MTTs. Just over three years ago, Alaväli wanted to take his poker learning to a new level and was struggling with what the logical and correct next step was for him as he continued to develop as a player. “Should I use more solvers? Should I not use solvers? I got lost in terms of direction where I should be going with my own game and how I should look at the game,” Alaväli admits. While doing his due diligence, Alaväli landed on BBZ Staking, which along with the staking, also offered coaching led by one of their co-founders Jordan Drummond. “It took off pretty fast, but it was basically because I was just working so hard. All I did was wake up, study, play for eight to 12 hours and then I’d study for another hour or two, running sims, answering hands, and posting hands (in the BBZ forum). Did everything I can to just get better every day,” Alaväli said. And that’s when the promise was made. Drummond was hosting live coaching seminars every single day and Alaväli promised himself that he wasn’t going to miss one - no excuses. “It just seemed the only way to do it at that point. ‘You're going to attend every day’. It's free for stable players. I just figured I cannot miss any of these as long as there is so much value. For one year there was just so much value in those because Jordan was doing most of them,” Alaväli said. “I just didn't see it being an excuse for anybody to miss it. Because you can watch the coachings on the phone. As long as you have internet you can manage to just set yourself into a position where you can always watch it. Back then we didn't have replays.” Results continued to come for Alaväli and the student eventually became the teacher. In mid-2018, Alaväli started thinking about creating a course of his own. He wanted to put together something that he felt wasn’t being properly addressed in the poker education marketplace. "There wasn't any solver-based content out there and everything was opinion-based. There was no multiway solver to even know what your opening ranges should look like at final tables," "The idea came to me basically because all the money is in the final table yet nobody really knew how to correctly play at final tables. Now there is MonkerSolver you can solve game for three-handed, six-handed, nine-handed strategies and that's what I did; got six-handed MonkerSolver solutions, studied them, and created a course based on solver solutions." Coming up with the idea was one thing, actually executing on it was another. Alaväli wasn’t quite sure how to structure the course and present the content in an easy-to-digest way. “Basically, the first plan was let's get the solutions, let's hardcore study the solutions and see from there how we can come up with the most simple logics and ideas for anybody to apply to their game,” Alaväli said. “It was October, November last year. We said, ‘Okay, let’s get it done and see how we can market it because the marketing and selling of the product is another big problem for us.” Around the same time, Drummond reached out to Alaväli about some other ideas. The conversation eventually turned to the ICM pre-flop course Alaväli was working on and Drummond expressed interest in bringing it inside the BBZ website. Over the next four months, Alaväli put the finishing touches on the content while helping integrate it into a re-designed BBZ website. The ICM Pre-Flop Masterclass officially launched in March and since then Alaväli has been focused mostly on coaching and improving the course while still finding the time to play as many MTTs as his schedule will allow. “It just drives me to know more about the game and just try and solve the game,” Alaväli said.”But playing is also fun. You have to be playing as well to understand what's going on in the games in general. I still need to play enough and be at the top of the game because I'm coaching so many players and I just need to be able to coach them. If I didn't play, it would be in a weird situation where I'm not playing, but I'm only studying.”
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