Jump to content
advertisement_alt

JWalsh

Administrators
  • Posts

    87
  • Joined

  • Last visited

 Content Type 

Profiles

Forums

Gallery

Blogs

Calendar

module__cms_records

Local Walls

Downloads

Everything posted by JWalsh

  1. The 2021 Poker Masters schedule may be heavy on the No Limit Hold’em, but on Monday the schedule took a break from the standard fare to allow some of the high stakes mixed game players to enjoy some of the action. It was Maxx Coleman who enjoyed it the most, taking down Event #6 ($10,000 8-Game) to the tune of $120,000. In addition to No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha, the two most popular poker variants, the 8-Game Mixed rotation included Limit Hold’em, Seven Card Stud, Seven Card Stud Eight or Better, 2-7 Triple Draw, Omaha Eight and Razz. The event drew 30 entries but only five who returned on Day 2 made the money. The first elimination took place during Pot Limit Omaha when Jeremy Ausmus, who had started the day as the short stack, found himself with just 35,000 in chips. With the blinds at 10,000/20,000 (20,000 bb ante), Ausmus stuck his stack in holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"][poker card="td"][poker card="9d"]. Coleman in the big blind committed the few chips necessary for a call with his [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"] keeping Coleman’s pair of nines in the lead but leaving outs for Ausmus. The [poker card="2c"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="jh"] completed the board Ausmus was out in fifth for $21,000. Playing Omaha 8 with blinds at 25,000/50,000 a short-stacked Erik Sagstrom raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3s"]. Stephen Chidwick, also very short but covering Sagstrom, made the call holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2h"] giving Chidwick top pair on the high and a wheel draw for the low while Sagstrom had a wrap straight draw plus possible lows as well. Chidwick checked and Sagstrom bet. Chidwick raised and Sagstrom called. The [poker card="qh"] came on the turn, improving Chidwick’s high hand to trips and he bet again (100,000) and Sagstrom put the rest of his chips in the middle needing help on the river. It didn’t come as the [poker card="7s"] hit the river, allowing Chidwick to scoop the pot and ending Sagstrom’s run in fourth for $33,000. Even after the elimination, Chidwick was still short-stacked when No Limit Hold’em came around. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 ante) Chidwick moved all-in from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"]. He ran into Coleman who made the call in the small blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"] leaving the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion drawing thin. The [poker card="7c"] on the turn left Chidwick drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Chidwick collected his belongings and headed to the cage to collect his $48,000 third-place prize. Coleman and Chad Eveslage battle across the 8-Game landscape for the better part of an hour-and-a-half with Coleman eventually assuming a commanding chip lead. He sealed the tournament playing a hand of Razz. The game where the lowest hand wins determined the player who would take home the biggest payday. With the blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Eveslage found himself all-in with one card to come holding [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] while Coleman held the slightly better [poker card="qc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"][poker card="ac"]. Eveslage’s needed some help but he didn’t get it when the [poker card="qs"] came on seventh street and Coleman’s final card - the [poker card="8h"] - was irrelevant. Eveslage said “I don’t want to go play No Limit now” as he finished in second place for $78,000. Maxx Coleman is the Poker Masters 8-Game champion and earned $120,000 Poker Masters Event #6 Final Table Results Maxx Coleman - $120,000 Chad Eveslage - $78,000 Stephen Chidwick - $48,000 Erik Sagstrom - $33,000 Jeremy Ausmus - $21,000
  2. If it wasn’t over with his PokerGO Cup title, the narrative that Daniel Negreanu cannot close is officially done as he took down Event #5 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2021 Poker Masters for $178,200, his second victory in the past 60 days. Just two months ago, articles were written and videos were made about how Negreanu had a multi-year long streak of finishing as the runner-up (rather than the winner) in big-time tournaments and heads-up battles. But almost as soon as the conversation hit its high point, Negreanu broke that streak in Event #7 of the 2021 PokerGO cup, a $50K in which he walked away with the win and $700,000. Now it appears he’s in no hurry to going back to runner-up status as he locked up his second victory of the year in the PokerGO studio for another six-figure score. Entering the final table as the short stack, Jeff Trudeau was going to need to make something happen early in order to stick around. With just five players returning for Day 2, everything seemed to take place a little faster, giving him less time to find a spot. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Trudeau had just six big blinds. Negreanu, who started the day with a healthy chip lead, opened to 125,000 from the cutoff with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"]. On the button, Trudeau found his spot and moved all-in for 300,000 holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"]. The action folded back to Negreanu and he made the call. Negreanu jumped out to the lead with the [poker card="td"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] flop. His pair of tens held through the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="7s"] river and Trudeau was eliminated in fifth place for $52,800. Twenty minutes later it was Jake Daniels' turn to try and double. With just over ten big blinds, Daniels moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"] and Nick Petrangelo looked down at [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"] in the small blind. Petrangelo made the call and after Negreanu folded his big blind, the cards were on their backs. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="th"][poker card="7d"] keeping Petrangelo’s pocket kings in the lead and leaving Daniels looking to spike an ace or one of the last two kings in the deck. The turn came the [poker card="9s"], giving Daniels some additional outs. However, the river came the [poker card="qh"] and Daniels exited in fourth place for $66,000, his second cash of the series. After the knockout, Petrangelo took over the chip lead and had nearly ten times the amount of chips as Vikenty Shegal, the short stack at three-handed. Forty-five minutes later, with the blinds up to 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Shegal looked like he was on the cusp of a critical double. Petrangelo, holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"], folded the button. Negreanu, holding the same hand, [poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"], applied max pressure to Shegal by moving all-in. With 10 big blinds left, Shegal decided to make the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="td"]. Dominated with the ten and with a seven in the muck, the flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5c"] giving Negreanu the lead. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Shegal was left looking for a king. The river came the [poker card="jc"] leaving Shegal to say his goodbyes before he went to collect his $85,800 for third place. Heads-up play started with Petrangelo holding a 1.5-to-1 chip lead however both players had plenty of play with the shorter stack of Negreanu being 50 big blinds deep. Even so, the match didn’t take long. After a short break, Negreanu dragged a pot that put him in the chip lead and five minutes later, the pair played the most critical hand of the final table. At 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), Petrangelo raised the button to 180,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="7c"] and Negreanu quickly three-bet to 610,000 with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. Petrangelo called and the pair took a flop of [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"][poker card="jh"] giving Negreanu two pair but giving Petrangelo top pair as well. Negreanu led out for 725,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The pot swelled to more than 2.7 million, slightly more than Petrangelo had left in his stack. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and Negreanu opted to check it over to Petrangelo who checked it back. The river came the [poker card="4s"] and Negreanu took a few moments and made it 1.8 million to go. Petrangelo didn’t take much time to make the call and was shown the winner by Negreanu. Petrangelo was left with just under 10 big blinds and the very next hand Negreanu picked up [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] and made the call on the button. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"] and moved all-in. Negreanu snap-called and the board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="kc"], providing little drama for Negreanu’s aces. Petrangelo finished as the runner-up for 132,000 and Daniel Negreanu scored his first Poker Masters win of his career and the $178,200 first-place prize. 2021 Poker Mastrers Event #5 Final Table Results Daniel Negreanu - $178,200 Nick Petrangelo - $132,000 Vikenty Shegal - $85,800 Jake Daniels - $66,000 Jeffrey Trudeau - $52,800
  3. After calling his shot, 28-year old Russian Aleksei Vandyshev was the last person standing in the $20 million guaranteed GGPoker 2021 World Series of Poker Online Main Event. He entered the final table, second in chips, and left with a $2,543,073 payday and his first career gold bracelet. Prior to the playing of the final table, Vandyshev recorded a short interview in which he expressed supreme confidence that, in the end, it would be he who was this year’s Main Event champ. “I think my strength as a poker player is that I have a built-in crystal ball, so I see it when people try to trick me,” Vandyshev said. “I think I can win because I don’t care at all about ICM. I will always find a way to bring home the bacon. I want the bracelet and I want it really badly. Other players should think twice because if they fight me, they will only prolong the suffering - the magic is with me.” The magic was with him indeed. An active part of the final table, Vandyshev both took over the chip lead and found himself at the bottom of the chip counts several times. But he leaned on his nine years of experience as a professional poker player (and coach) to let the game come to him. When it did, he was able to close it out and lock up a career-defining victory. It took no time at all for the first player to fall. In fact, it happened on the second hand of the final table. With the blinds at 300k/600k, U.S.-based pro Joe Serock moved all-in for more than 45 million on the button with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"] and, in the small blind, a short-stacked Dimitrios Farmakoulis called putting his tournament life on the line. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4c"] runout was clean for Serock’s pocket sixes sending Greece’s Farmakoulis out in ninth for $254,308. Forty-five minutes later the blinds were at 350k/700k when Vandyshev opened from the cutoff to 1.4 million holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"] and Poland’s Dawid Smolka defended from the big blind off his stack of just over 8 million with a dominated [poker card="kd"][poker card="7h"]. The flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4h"] giving both top pair but keeping kickers in play. Smolka checked it to Vandyshev, who continued for just over 1.2 million. Smolka then check-raised all-in for roughly 7 million and Vandyshev quickly called. The [poker card="6s"] came off on the turn, giving Smolka additional straight outs. But the river came the [poker card="9h"], improving Vandyshev to two pair and eliminating Smolka in eighth place for a $339,124 payout. The two Brazilians at the table clashed during the same level. Start of the day chip leader, Edson Tsutsumi opened the action from the button to 1.47 million with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"] and his countryman, Renan Meneguetti three-bet shoved from the big blind holding [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"]. Tsutsumi made the call and the flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"][poker card="7c"], giving Meneguetti open-ended straight outs to go along with his pair outs. However, the [poker card="5s"] turn and the [poker card="5h"] river both missed him and Tsutsumi’s ace-high took the hand. Meneguetti bowed out in seventh place, good for $452,229. With the elimination of Meneguetti, Norway's Espen Jorstad took over the role of the table short stack. The blinds had climbed to 400k/800k when Jorstad fell victim to a brutal cooler. From the cutoff, Russian Nikita Kuznetsov raised to 1.6 million and was immediately called by Vandyshev on the button holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"]. When it was Jorstad’s turn in the big blind he looked down at [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"] and three-bet to just over 5 million, leaving himself with 11 million behind. Kuznetsov four-bet shoved and when Vandyshev folded, Jorstad clicked call. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="js"] flop looked good for the Norwegian, giving him top set and better than 85% to win the hand. But the [poker card="th"] hit the turn and with Kuznetsov improving to a straight, Jorstad needed the board to pair to survive. The river was the [poker card="4d"] and rather than double up with his kings, he was out in sixth for $603,058. Thirty minutes passed and Serock, who came into the day third in chips, had slipped down the chip count due to plenty of earlier tough spots. Now, the well-traveled pro was sitting at the bottom of the chip counts. He opened from under the gun to 1.76 million holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"] and when it folded to Tsutsumi, who was holding a commanding chip lead, the Brazilian three-bet shipped his [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"]. Serock called it off with his “big slick” and the board ran out [poker card="7c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5d"] keeping Tsutsumi’s pocket eights ahead the entire time. Serock finished up in fifth place and collected a career-high cash of $804,191. For the better part of the next hour, Vandyshev battled back from a short stack to not only pull even with Tsutsumi but re-take the chip lead. With the blinds at 700k/1.4m, Vandyshev put in a raise from the button to 2.8 million with his [poker card="9c"][poker card="3c"]. From the small blind, Tsutsumi flatted holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"]. From the big blind, Canadian Christine Do had 17 big blinds left and she moved them all-in holding [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"]. Vandyshev folded and Tsutsumi made the call with the dominating hand. There was no real drama as the flop came [poker card="td"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3d"] giving Tsutsumi top set. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and Do was drawing dead to the [poker card="8h"] river. Do was the first player to walk with a seven-figure score, earning $1,072,405 for fourth place. Less than ten hands later, during the same level, Kuznetsov opened the button to 2.8 million holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"]. After Vandyshev let go of the small blind, Tsutsumi three-bet shipped a chip leading 120 million with the inferior [poker card="as"][poker card="td"]. Kuznetsov quickly called for the remainder of his stack and found himself in great shape to double up and get back into the hunt for the bracelet. However, the flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2h"], bringing two pair to Tsutsumi and leaving Kuznetsov needing help. The [poker card="4s"] turn and [poker card="6d"] river was no good for the Russian and Kuznetsov grabbed the Main Event bronze and $1,430,073 for the deep run. Heads-up play began with the two players who entered the day one-two in chips. Tsutsumi and Vandyshev battled for the better part of an hour with the Russian slowly chipping up and eventually taking the chip lead, once again. The back-and-forth kept on, with both players assuming the chip lead multiple times. At 1.25m/2.5m blinds, both players still had plenty of play, both with more than 100 million in chips, but a heads-up cooler came along and ended it all. From the button, Tsutsumi raised to 5.2 million holding [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"]. As the big blind, Vandyshev put in a huge three-bet to nearly 25 million. Tsutsumi decided to go with it and shoved with Vandyshev sticking his chips in as well. No drama for Vandyshev’s pocket tens as the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="js"][poker card="2h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="jc"], eliminating Tsutsumi as the runner-up, good for a healthy $1,907,035 payday. And, as he predicted before the final table, Vandyshev is the 2021 WSOP Online Main Event champion and took home the $2,543,073 first-place prize and gold bracelet. [caption id="attachment_636203" align="aligncenter" width="750"] The final hand of the 2021 WSOP Online Main Event.[/caption] 2021 WSOP Online Main Event Final Table Results Total Entries: 4,092 Prize pool: $20,000,000 Aleksei Vandyshev - $2,543,073 Edson Tsutsumi Jr - $1,907,035 Nikita Kuznetsov - $1,430,073 Christine Do - $1,072,405 Joe Serock - $804,191 Espen Jorstad - $603,058 Renan Meneguetti - $452,229 Dawid Smolka - $339,124 Dimitrios Farmakoulis - $254,308
  4. For the second time in three events of the 2021 Poker Masters, the winner was forced to endure an extended, hard-fought heads-up battle before taking down the title. This time it was Adam Hendrix facing off against Matthew Wantman in Event #3 ($10,000 Pot Limit Omaha) and only after 125 hands and nearly 3 hours of heads-up play did Hendrix finally took out his final opponent to lock up the $186,300 first-place prize for his first Poker Masters win. The victory, which Hendrix said was “sort of emotional” was his first in the PokerGO Studio. He came extremely close during the 2021 U.S. Poker Open, holding a massive chip lead against Joey Weissman, however, Weissman mounted an improbable comeback to take the win away from Hendrix. The score pushes the Alaska native over $2 million in career recorded live earnings and currently sits as the second-largest cash of his tournament career. Traditionally, the Poker Master final tables play pretty quickly. However, in Event #3, it took more than two hours for the first of the final six to make their way to the exit. But once players started to fall, they began to fall fast. First up was Chris Brewer. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) Brewer, with seven big blinds total, completed from the small blind to 100,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"]. In the big blind Hendrix, who had built his stack to second in chips, three-bet to 420,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="3s"]. Brewer took some time but eventually moved all-in and Hendrix made the call. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"][poker card="4d"] giving Hendrix top two pair, as well as a flush draw and Brewer, was left looking for help in the form of a straight draw or running card. The turn came the [poker card="5h"], bringing Brewer a little hope. But the river was the [poker card="9c"], ending the six-person stalemate and sending Brewer home in sixth for $41,400. Moments later, with the chip lead, Wantman raised from the button to 130,000 holding the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"][poker card="td"][poker card="7h"]. A short-stacked Jake Schindler defended from the big blind with his [poker card="7s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4d"]. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6c"] flop brought Schindler straight but it also gave Wantman a straight - a higher one. Schindler checked it over to Wantman who put out a tiny bet of 75,000. Schindler then check-raised all-in and Wantman made the quick call. The [poker card="kh"] came off on the turn, leaving Schindler drawing dead to the [poker card="4h"] river. Schindler, who finished fourth in Event #2 for $86,000, wrapped up in fifth place for $55,200. Jake Daniels and Brent Roberts were each sitting on ten big blind when Hendrix, first to act, put in a raise to 150,000 holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"] and when it folded to Roberts in the big blind, he defended with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"]. The pair took a flop of [poker card="kd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"] and when Roberts checked it over to Hendrix checked it back. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] bringing a set for Hendrix a set of nines and offering Roberts a flush draw and straight draw to go with his bottom pair. Roberts wasted no time and moved all-in for 340,000 and Hendrix put out calling chips. “Damn, that sucks,” Roberts said as the [poker card="6h"] hit the river sending him home in fourth place for $69,000. Three hands later, and with fewer than 10 big blinds left, it was Daniels' turn to get it all in. Hendrix made it 210,000 with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8c"] and Daniels, from the big blind, called with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"]. The flop came [poker card="9h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3c"] giving Hendrix top pair and Daniels middle pair, wheel draw, and nut flush draw. Daniels snap moved all-in and Hendrix called. Daniels was better than 60% with 19 outs twice. The turn was the [poker card="3s"], leaving Daniels looking for any number of cards in half the deck to survive. However, the river was the [poker card="6h"] missing Daniels and ending his run in third place for $89,700. After the final two players took a quick break, Wantman started heads-up play with a nearly two-to-one chip advantage over Hendrix. The two battled for nearly half an hour while Hendrix chipped away at Wantman’s lead. Eventually, Hendrix wrestled the lead away from Wantman for the first time in the tournament. From that point, a bit of back and forth took place as the heads-up match turned into a grind. After more than two-and-a-half hours of play, with the blinds up to 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante), the final hand took place. With a better than two-to-one chip lead, Hendrix raised the button to 600,000 with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2c"] and Wantman defended his big blind holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"]. The flop came out [poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2d"] bringing Hendrix bottom pair and a king-high flush draw while Wantman hit middle pair and a gutshot straight draw. Wantman led out for pot, 1.4 million, and Hendrix raised all-in. Wantman made the call and the turn came the [poker card="3s"], keeping Wantman ahead and giving Hendrix just one more card to hit his 17 outs. The [poker card="ad"] spiked on the river, giving Hendrix the best hand and the Event #3 title. Wantman took home $138,000 as the runner-up and Adam Hendrix picked up $186,300 and his first career Poker Masters event victory. Poker Masters Event #3 Final Table Results Adam Hendrix - $186,300 Matthew Wantman - $138,000 Jake Daniels - $89,700 Brent Roberts - $69,000 Jake Schindler - $55,200 Chris Brewer - $41,400
  5. Shaun Deeb is known as a master of mixed games. He’s won four World Series of Poker bracelets, each of them in a different variant. His first was in Pot Limit Hold’em, his next came in Seven Card Stud. In 2018, when he won WSOP player of the year, he took home two titles - one in PLO and another in No Limit Hold’em. It doesn’t matter the game, Deeb loves it: 5-Card Draw, Triple Stud, H.O.R.S.E… …"Contra." "Contra." Not a poker variant, but the popular run-and-gun shooter first produced by Konami in the late 80’s during the quarter arcade boom. The game was an early success but really took off in popularity when it was then brought over to Nintendo Entertainment Systems in 1988. For Deeb, playing "Contra" on his NES eventually became one of his early video game go-to's and helped open him up to the world of gaming. “I always loved video games,” Deeb said. “When ‘Fortnite’ got big there was a whole poker contingency [that played]. We had a group, about 10-15 guys from poker - a couple who had never played video games - we got on every morning, it was fun. Bunch of shit talking, played props and stuff…I mean, I love gambling and video games, it’s a great combination for me.” Enter Nelson Laffey, careerist collector of all things “nerdy” from video games to "Magic the Gathering" to "Pokémon" cards. Deeb and Laffey first met while playing poker in New York. They quickly bonded and discovered that they have more in common than just poker. Deeb heaps praise on the “really, really sharp” Laffey calling him “pretty much the most knowledgable guy” in the collectibles sector. [caption id="attachment_636114" align="aligncenter" width="618"] World Series of Poker 2018 Player of the Year Shaun Deeb.[/caption] “I just happened to run into him at a casino, he’d just gotten into poker and we became friends right away. Now, we hang out all the time and he’s one of my closest friends,” Deeb said. “He has always been big into Magic [the Gathering] and Pokémon and stuff and he approached me a couple of years ago. He said ‘hey listen, I’m buying these games, you should give me some cash, we should be partners, and I’m going to buy us a bunch of stuff.’” That “bunch of stuff” turned out to be vintage, factory-sealed video games. Convinced, Deeb cut Laffey a proverbial check, and off Laffey went, determined to succeed in his quest. They scooped up all the titles they could find that kids from the ’80s and '90s obsessed over: “Final Fantasy”, “Double Dragon”, “Deja Vu”, “Street Fighter II” and, of course, “Contra.” In total, according to Deeb, the investment brought in roughly 100 pieces. But the crowning piece, that title that brings their whole collection together, is a top-graded, third-print copy of the Nintendo classic “The Legend of Zelda.” “It is arguably my favorite piece in my collection,” Laffey said. “It’s arguably going to be - if not is - the most coveted piece throughout the entire lot. I don’t think I’ve ever met somebody that says I don’t like ‘Zelda.’” Laffey’s suspicions are easily confirmed. A recent post on TMZ.com shows that a factory-sealed copy of “The Legend of Zelda”, donated to Goodwill in Connecticut (very similar to the graded copy in Deeb and Laffey’s collection), recently sold for a record $411,278. Deeb explains that after building up the collection over the past few years, a message from end boss Cliff Josephy connected him with Ken Goldin. Goldin, a former online grinder and PocketFiver who played under the name ‘isuck123’, is the founder of Goldin Auctions, an online auction house specifically tailored for collectibles, sports cards, and memorabilia. Goldin says that the red hot video game collectibles market which has “really popped in the last 12 months” is a product of when a portion of “hundreds of millions of video game players became nostalgic...it set up a new collectibles market.” Titles like “The Legend of Zelda” along with “Pokémon”, “Super Mario Bros.” and “Sonic the Hedgehog” are currently sitting at the top of the heap for investors. A look at Goldin Auctions sees a top-graded copy of “Zelda” currently sitting with a bid of $75,000 - with roughly two weeks left to bid. [caption id="attachment_636109" align="alignleft" width="279"] In April 2021, a factory-sealed edition of "Super Mario Bros." sold at auction for $660,000.[/caption] An early edition, factory-sealed copy of the original “Super Mario Bros.” for NES has a bid of $400,000, while a near-pristine copy of “Sonic the Hedgehog” is sitting with a bid of $120,000. Deeb and Laffey’s lot is being sold as individual pieces, some this month (September 18 is the final chance to bid) and others in November, to allow investors and collectors to pick and choose what they’d like to add to their own collection. Deeb is excited to see what the collection fetches, however, investing in video games has become more than just a transaction for him. He’s discovered an investment of passion, one that connects him to his childhood and something he plans on continuing to pursue. “I love the games, it sucks to get rid of them but I know that the market’s really hot and so we’re going to unload our games and try to buy more. We’re trying to make a profit, but we love the games. I remember as a kid playing Contra and my wife used to play Zelda so it’s been really cool to have them in our collection.” Deeb enjoys video games, and clearly enjoys gaming in general but when it comes to what’s next for the investment, he insists that will be his partner’s call. “It’s a booming industry and with so much inflation going on, I’m so happy that I had part of my net worth tied into these games. And, you know, if we make money that’s cool. If we lose a little, no big deal…,” he said. “But I think we’re going to make a lot of money.”
  6. Sean Perry was never really in any danger of elimination during the final table of the 2021 Poker Masters Event #2 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em). He started the day with the chip lead, held on to it by taking out four of his final five opponents, and, in under three hours, walked out of the PokerGO studio with $206,400 for the win. The tournament was slightly larger than Event #1, as 86-entries created an $860,000 prize pool. For Perry, the victory, plus his eighth-place finish in the first event for $32,800, has made him the early points leader for the Purple Jacket something he said, “would mean the world to me.” Just six players returned to the PokerGO studio to battle for the Event #2 title, including John Riordan, fresh off his sixth-place finish in Event #1 for $49,200. Roughly 30 minutes into play, with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Riordan found himself on the short stack with just eight big blinds. From the hijack, he moved all-in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] and Jake Schindler, next to act, made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair watched as the board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"] giving Schindler a straight and, for the second tournament in a row, ending Riordan’s day in sixth place for $51,600. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) Sam Soverel clashed in a big pot against Daniel Negreanu. All-in before the flop, Negreanu held the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"], and Soverel, with the slightly larger stack, had the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"], keeping Negreanu in good shape. It got even better for "Kid Poker" when the [poker card="kd"] hit the turn leaving Soverel drawing dead to the [poker card="8d"] river. After the hand, Soverel was left with roughly two big blinds. Although he hung around for fifteen minutes, Soverel could build it back up when his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] eventually lost to Perry’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] run out. Soverel, who won the Poker Masters Purple Jacket back in 2019, finished in fifth place for $68,800. Perry grabbed a commanding chip lead with four players left and began to apply the pressure. From the button, Perry made it 160,000 to go with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="4h"]. Negreanu bowed out in the small blind and then Schindler, with seven big blinds left, three-bet all-in holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2s"]. Perry took some time to consider and ended up making the call. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Perry bottom pair which held through the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river. Schindler fell in fourth place and picked up $86,000 on the day. The final three then went to break. On the first hand back, with blinds up to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), there was only one big blind due to the prior elimination. First to act, Perry made it 225,000 holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Negreanu quickly moved all-in on the button for 1.425 million with his [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. Jeremy Ausmus folded the single big blind and Perry wasted no time in calling. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] keeping Perry’s sixes ahead, but not the favorite to Negreanu’s over cards, flush outs, and back door straight outs. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] giving Negreanu 16 outs one time. But that was simply too many outs, as Negreanu missed them all when the [poker card="ad"] completed the board. “He had half the deck and missed somehow,” Perry shouted as Negreanu collected his things and went to collect his $103,200 prize for third place. Unlike in Event #1, the heads-up match between Perry and Ausmus didn’t take very long. With a two-to-one chip lead, Perry kept control for the roughly 25-minute match. On the final hand, Ausmus raised to 200,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"] and Perry raised it to 825,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus called and the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Perry led for 400,000. In position, Ausmus opted for a call and the turn came the [poker card="kh"]. Perry checked it to Ausmus and Ausmus bet 800,000. After taking some time, Perry made the call. The [poker card="6d"] hit the river and Perry once again checked to Ausmus. Having missed all his outs, Ausmus moved all-in for just over 2 million. Perry went into the tank and eventually called the bluff with his pair of kings and ended the tournament. Ausmus was eliminated as the runner-up for $146,200 and Sean Perry took home the win and $206,400. Poker Masters Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $206,400 Jeremy Ausmus - $146,200 Daniel Negreanu - $103,200 Jake Schindler - $86,000 Sam Soverel - $68,800 John Riordan - $51,600
  7. The record books will reflect that there was an official winner in Event #1 of PokerGO’s 2021 Poker Masters ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em), but it was hardly a definitive one as Shannon Shorr and David Peters effectively “played to a tie” on Wednesday night. After a lengthy, see-saw heads-up battle that lasted nearly two hours, the duo agreed that, in order to play the next event (Event #2), that they would simply split up the remaining prize pool and flip for leaderboard points. In the end, all the chips ended on Shorr’s side of the table and he was crowned the winner of the tournament and given 1st place points. The 12-event Poker Masters kicked off with 82 entries of Event #1 pushing the prize pool to $820,000. After a full day of play, the final seven returned for Day 2 to crown a winner and try to award a $205,000 first-place prize. Coming into the final table with fewer than ten big blinds, Ben Yu wasn’t long for the final table busting in the day’s opening moments when he got all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] against Shorr’s [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"]. When the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"], Yu tapped the table and exited in seventh place for $41,000. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Shorr opened to 100,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"]. In the small blind, Brock Wilson looked down at [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and made the call. Then from the big blind, John Riordan who started the day as the second shortest stack moved all-in for his final 10 big blinds with [poker card="as"][poker card="8h"]. With the action on Shorr, he four-bet shipped all-in having Wilson covered. Wilson quickly released and the cards were put on their backs. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"], giving Riordan top pair and putting him in a good spot to double up. However, the [poker card="qh"] turn quickly put Shorr back in charge as Riordan was left looking for one of just two outs. The [poker card="qc"] river ended Riordan’s day in sixth place, good for $49,200. The final five battled for nearly two hours until the next player made their exit. The blinds had climbed to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and Jonathan Jaffe found himself on the short stack with roughly ten big blinds. When it folded to him in the cutoff with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"], Jaffe moved all-in. It folded through to Wilson in the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and he quickly made the call. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Wilson top pair and a commanding lead in the hand. The turn came the [poker card="5d"] bringing some additional gutshot straight outs for Jaffe. But the [poker card="ad"][ spiked on the river and Jaffe moved his chips into the middle, collected his belonging, and headed to the cage to collect $65,500 for fifth place. After losing a big hand against Peters, one in which Wilson was all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] against Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], Wilson moved to the bottom of the chip counts. At the 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) level, Wilson and Peters clashed again. Peters put in a raise on the button to 225,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Wilson, in the big blind with just under 10 big blinds remaining, defended holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"], giving both players top pair but keeping kickers in play. Wilson checked it over to Peters who bet the minimum, 100,000. Wilson then check-raised all-in and Peters made the call. The turn was the [poker card="ac"], bringing Wilson some chop outs. But the [poker card="3s"] ended Wilson’s run in fourth place, adding $82,600 to his bankroll. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment At three-handed, the chip stacks evened out until at 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) Shorr crept out to a small lead, while Peters and Dylan DeStefano remained neck and neck. On the button, Peters looked down at [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"] and put in a raise to 250,000. After Shorr folded his small blind, action was on DeStefano in the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"] and just under 20 big blinds. He took a long look at Peters and then announced he was all-in and Peters, with the bigger stack, snap-called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"] brought DeStefano a whole host of outs including potential flush, pair and backdoor straight outs. The turn was was the [poker card="ks"], leaving DeStefano with one more chance to his 10 outs. It didn’t come, the river was the [poker card="7c"] and DeStefano wrapped up in third place for $98,400. After taking out DeStefano, Peters started head-up play with a slight chip lead but Shorr was quick to even the stacks. Then the pair went to battle. Shorr built a considerable chip lead of roughly four-to-one and then Peters doubled. Shorr built it back up and Peters continued to hang around and then he took the lead. The pair bounced back and forth each taking turns trying to eliminate the other. All the while, registration for Event #2 was coming to a close and both players were eager to make sure they registered. Peters held a 7.6 million to 2.6 million chip lead over Shorr, at the 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante) level, when he open shipped the big stack holding [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"]. Shorr made the call holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] and it looked like Peters might finally lock up the win. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"] flop gave Shorr a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="9c"] turn. Peters needed a nine on the river to take the hand, but instead the river came the [poker card="qh"] and the pair were back to even with a quarter of an ante difference between them. At that point, they agreed to a deal (that may have been agreed to earlier) and then flipped for leaderboard points. “We’re effectively calling this a draw,” said PokerGO commentator Jeff Platt. “We can do an adjusted chop,” Shorr said, indicating that what little difference there was would be split in the aftermath. They both shipped all-in blind with Shorr winning the hand and being declared the official winner, claiming first-place leaderboard points. Poker Masters Event #1 Final Table Results Shannon Shorr - $205,000 officially* David Peters - $147,600 officially* Dylan DeStefano - $98,400 Brock Wilson - $82,000 Jonathan Jaffe - $65,600 John Riordan - $49,200 Ben Yu - $41,000 * Specific details of the deal were not made public but were discussed in the broadcast.
  8. The 2021 World Series of Poker is less than a month away and while there are plenty of reasons to look forward to the return of one of live poker’s premier events, there are also plenty of questions that hang in the air. Specifically, questions surrounding COVID, the Delta variant, vaccinations, and the health and safety of both players and staff. Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the World Series of Poker, as well as his staff, have been working on preparing the series for the unique challenges that will likely come with holding a major poker event in the current COVID climate as well as updating policies as real-time changes occur. Stewart made himself available to answer some questions, above and beyond what’s stated on the WSOP’s website, regarding the WSOP’s policy decisions and plans moving forward - including, that in light of Governor Sisolak’s Emergency Directive 050 - masks will no longer be required for players while seated at the table. - The topic of vaccinations is a touchy one, can you talk a little about why the WSOP opted for a vaccine mandate? Stewart: For the WSOP, it’s not about politics. It’s not about claiming to be experts in science. It’s about protecting the integrity of the tournament competition. Whatever your sentiments on COVID-19 vaccination, whatever personal choice you make, the CDC has clear guidelines on the impact of that choice. If you’re fully vaccinated, you may generally go on with your daily life following a COVID-19 exposure, unless you exhibit symptoms. If you’re not fully vaccinated, you’re required to go home and quarantine and your activities will be interrupted. As a Nevada Gaming licensee, we strive to fully follow the applicable CDC guidelines. The current CDC guidance is clear there should be an incubation period after exposure before testing. Following that guidance, there were no viable alternatives to keep unvaccinated players chips in a tournament once we became aware they were a close contact. Those unvaccinated players would be required to leave our premises to quarantine. We didn’t feel it was right to withhold information about very real scenarios leading to disqualification should players remain unvaccinated. We saw the outrage when we published Rule 115 and knew we needed to go further. With that in mind, amidst a rising number of cases and the Delta variant we saw only two viable options: Cancel the WSOP outright again, or have a full vaccination mandate which under current CDC guidelines generally removes contact tracing and the need to disqualify any player for close contact so long as they remain asymptomatic. With a fully vaccinated field, we hope the number of interruptions to the tournaments are very minimal.   Can you talk about the Close Contact Rule and what that could mean for players? Stewart: A close contact is anyone having been within six feet for a period of 15 minutes or more within the past 24 hours of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. As you might imagine, in large poker tournaments with thousands of entrants, as tables break and consolidate, it would not be uncommon for a single player to have close contact with 100 or more players in a given session. If unvaccinated players come into contact with any person who tested positive for COVID-19, they must leave the premises to quarantine. This is what unvaccinated players should know and understand before they sit down to play at any casino in Nevada. This is not a World Series of Poker issue. We’re all following CDC guidelines, which for the unvaccinated is a serious gamble in a multi-day poker tournament.   You say it would be a serious gamble for the unvaccinated, what could have happened? Stewart: This could have been a very real scenario. A final table is set for 2 pm shooting on CBS. But at 9 am in the morning, we get a call from the chip leader, who is unvaccinated, telling us he felt fine but has tested positive. Can he still play? Or can we have everyone stay and move the taping of the event to a week later? Or will he get ICM? After we have the knowledge of the positive COVID-19 case, we would have to go to everyone who was a close contact at the final table and break their hearts. Those of you who are vaccinated, can stay and play as long as you’re asymptomatic. Those of you who are not, we’ll blind off your chips and you can pick up your prize money, if any, when the tournament is finished, but come back after you’ve completed the appropriate quarantine and/or testing recommended by the CDC. You can imagine how many will want to leave voluntarily. But it’s not just the final table. Any other unvaccinated player who was determined to be a close contact of the person who tested positive and has now entered new events will also need to be disqualified to quarantine. It just becomes untenable. You can imagine in the Main Event, with its extended duration and large field size. Just a handful of positive cases amongst a field of thousands could completely destroy the integrity of the tournament should the unvaccinated players be exposed to any person who tests positive for COVID-19. That’s why we felt it important to have tournament fields that would avoid those situations.   So from your point of view, this is about both following guidelines and tournament integrity? Stewart: That’s the thing that’s gutted me the past two weeks - poker players thinking we’re choosing sides or somehow trying to penalize them for making a personal choice. Or that we have the power to dictate medical policy. We’re following the same CDC guidelines as everyone else. We’re just the first ones to call it out in poker. We all can read the sports pages, in the NFL Carson Wentz had a close exposure to a team staffer and was out for five days on the COVID list until he could return following a negative test. The NBA just came out and said any of their unvaccinated players will be out for seven days following an exposure. In those leagues, the players are also paid. Here, our customers pay for their travel and post their buy-ins. Given the scale of our event, we felt strongly it was the most responsible decision to make to avoid asking unvaccinated players to completely gamble with their tournament life.   Why aren’t you requiring staff to be vaccinated? Stewart: We’re doing all we can to encourage and incentivize our staffers to become vaccinated. Much of the staff will be existing Caesars employees subject to its policies, which include comprehensive health screening already. Our dealers, even those fully vaccinated, will wear masks at the tables. As I said earlier, the primary reason for the vaccination requirement is to eliminate the prospect of disqualifying an unvaccinated player through contact tracing. Because you must be fully vaccinated to participate in the 2021 WSOP, under current CDC guidelines, an exposure to COVID-19 will not force you into disqualification so long as you remain asymptomatic.   Earlier today you announced that in accordance with Governor Sisolak’s Emergency Directive 050, no masks will be required at the table? Stewart: Yes, it’s true. Given all participants are required to be fully vaccinated, they will be able to remove their masks while seated at a poker table during a WSOP event in the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino Convention Center for our “poker convention.” As permitted under Governor Sisolak’s Directive 050 announced on September 2, we are moving forward with this masking exception option. Such directives are always subject to change, but that’s a very positive development for the 2021 WSOP. Of course, masks are permitted at the poker tables should a player feel more comfortable using one this fall, but it appears we’ll be the only live poker played in Las Vegas where you can see a poker face.   Finally, just for clarity, this means that masks are optional while seated at the table. Are masks required in the convention area when you stand up, say to take a break, or use the restroom? Stewart: Correct, masks are optional while seated at the poker tables, but masks are used in all other areas of the building as we are currently under a mask mandate. - The 2021 World Series of Poker begins September 30 and runs through November 23. For additional information on registration, as well as the event’s current COVID-19 policy, visit their website at WSOP.com.
  9. It looked like Michael Addamo was going to cruise to his fifth GGPoker Super MILLION$ title in record time. However, after dominating the bulk of the final table, Addamo clashed with satellite winner ‘Hightroler’ in an hour-long heads-up match that saw the Super MILLION$ newcomer battle back from multiple massive chip deficits to take out the poker superstar and take home the title and the $420,536 first-place prize. It helped that ‘Hightroler’ started the final table with a healthy chip lead. But as is customary at Super MILLION$ final tables, no one makes it to the end without going through some top-tier talent. This week, joining ‘Hightroler’ and Addamo was Russia’s Anatoly Filatov, Samuel Vousden, and two-time Super MILLION$ champ Joakim Andersson. It was an early exit for Belarusian grinder Dmitry Yurasov, who started the day on the short stack. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (6,000 ante), Yurasov opened to 100,000 from middle position with [poker card="td"][poker card="th"]. The action folded to Joakim Andersson in the big blind, who defended with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8h"] and just barely had Yurasov covered. When the flop came [poker card="qh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"], there was no getting away for either player. Andersson checked his nut flush draw over to Yurasov who put out a tiny bet with his set of tens. Andersson countered with a shove and Yurasov snap-called. The turn was the [poker card="js"], bringing Andersson a straight. The [poker card="ad"] on the river sent Yurasov home in ninth place for $52,567. A few hands later, ‘AreYouAhead’ had his question answered by Andersson, and they didn’t like what it was. From middle position, ‘AreYouAhead’ opened to 110,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"] and was called by Anatoly Filatov in the cutoff with [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"]. When it folded to Andersson, once again in the big blind, he raised it up to 435,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"]. After a short tank, ‘AreYouAhead’ moved all-in for another 1.5 million and after Filatov folded, Andersson called for slightly less. The board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="2c"][poker card="th"][poker card="4d"] shipping the pot to Andersson and leaving ‘AreYouAhead’ with two big blinds. Two hands later, they were out in eighth for $68,171. The final seven players settled in as nearly two levels passed without an elimination. With the blinds at 35,000/70,000 (8,500 ante) Addamo, who had surged into the chip lead, opened from the cutoff to 140,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. In the big blind, Samuel Vousden looked down at [poker card="ah"][poker card="4d"] and with 20 big blinds remaining, moved all-in. Addamo quickly called with the dominating hand and hit top pair on the [poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2c"] flop. Vousden was looking for a three to hit the gutshot straight, but the turn came [poker card="8d"] and the river the [poker card="4s"] sending Vousden out in seventh for $88,407. A few hands later, Andersson found himself short and moved all-in from under the gun with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"]. It folded to Filatov in the small blind and he made the call with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3d"] flop put Filatov in control and when the turn came the [poker card="7s"], Andersson was drawing dead to the [poker card="9d"] river. Andersson’s sixth place finish and latest Super MILLION$ cash was good for $114,649. By this point, Addamo’s chip lead was enormous, having four times that of his next competitor. Raising with impunity, with the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (10,000 ante) Addamo made it 160,000 with the worst hand in poker, [poker card="7d"][poker card="2c"]. In the small blind ‘d7777’, three-bet shoved his final four big blind with [poker card="jh"][poker card="td"] and when it got back to Addamo he called with the seven-duece. The flop came [poker card="7s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"], giving Addamo the lead and ‘d7777’ never caught up as the turn came the [poker card="8h"] and the river [poker card="7h"]. ‘d7777’, eliminated in fifth place, earned $148,682 for the deep run. Addamo kept up the aggression, in the next level with blinds 50,000/100,000, he opened to 200,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="4h"]. When the action hit Chris Frank in the small blind with just six big blinds left, he shipped his stack holding the [poker card="ah"][poker card="3s"]. With it being just four more big blinds, Addamo made the call. The [poker card="js"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop kept Frank ahead, and the [poker card="ks"] turn had it looking like Addamo might actually lose a hand. But Addamo spiked the [poker card="qs"] on the river and Frank was felted in fourth for $192,817. At this point, FIlatov had 3 million, ‘Hightroler’ had 2.5 million and Addamo had more than 14 million. Addamo was continuing his aggressive ways and when ‘Hightroler’ folded their button, Addamo open-shipped on Filatov with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="5s"]. Filatov didn’t waste any time snap-calling with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"]. But as had been the theme of the day, Addamo caught his card on the [poker card="kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2h"] flop. The [poker card="2s"] turn and the [poker card="8d"] river changed nothing and Filatov ended up in third place for $250,052. While Addamo seemingly wrecked the rest of the final table, ‘Hightroler’ was determined to put up a fight. The heads-up battle wore on, and 45 minutes in, ‘Hightroler’ wrestled the chip lead away from Addamo building a three-to-one lead. But Addamo mounted a comeback of his own, doubling and doubling again. With the stack effectively even, the most important hand of the tournament took place. With the blinds up to 100,000/200,000 (25,000) ’Hightroler’ raised from button to 400,000 with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"], with a small chip lead, Addamo three-bet to 1.5 million with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. ‘Hightroler’ four-bet shipped his stack and Addamo called for the win. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"], giving Addamo top pair but bringing a set for ‘Hightroler’, the turn was the [poker card="3c"] and the river was the [poker card="8h"], giving ‘Hightroler’ quads for good measure. After the hand, Addamo was down to six big blinds and ‘Hightroler’ had the biggest chip lead of the tournament. Two hands later, it was all over, the pair were all in preflop. Addamo with the [poker card="jh"][poker card="8h"] and ‘Hightroler’ holding [poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"]. The board ran out [poker card="qc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3h"] shipping ‘Hightroler’ the pot and the win. Addamo just missed out on his fifth Super MILLION$ victory, instead settling for second place and $324,278. ‘Hightroler’ turned his $525 satellite victory into his first Super MILLION title and the $420,536 first-place prize. Super MILLION$ Final Table Results (9/7) ‘Hightroler’ - $420,536 Michael Addamo - $324,278 Anatoly Filatov - $250,052 Chris Frank - $192,817 ‘d7777’ - $148,682 Joakim Andersson - $114649 Samuel Vousden - $88,407 ‘AreYouAhead’ - $68,171 Dmitry Yurasov - $52,567
  10. Well, 15-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth didn’t get to the top of the heap by giving up, and apparently, he’s not going to start now. Hellmuth announced over the weekend that he was going to ignore our well-intentioned advice and challenge Tom Dwan to a rematch in High Stakes Duel. The decision sets up High Stakes Duel III Round 3, where this time both players will pony up $200,000 for a seat at the table. When you rattle off seven wins in a row, it’s understandable that you can bend the rules a little. Originally, when past players have been ousted in the Duel, they have traditionally had 72-hours to decide if they will call for a rematch (provided they haven’t been beaten three times in a row). For “The Poker Brat” it appears that PokerGO gave him a little more time to figure out his next move. Dwan originally dethroned Hellmuth in a five-and-a-half-hour battle back on August 26 and now, eight days later, just when you thought he was out…Hellmuth pulls you back in. It’s too early to know the details of exactly when Dwan and Hellmuth will face off again but it will for sure take place at the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas and when it does, for anyone who follows poker, there will simply be no escaping knowing about it. And why not run it back? Sure, some poker pundits may have predicted that Hellmuth would bow out but that doesn’t mean that seeing these two go at it again isn’t great for poker. There are simply too many unanswered questions that need to be resolved: How will Hellmuth handle entering the arena as the challenger as opposed to the champion? What adjustments might each player make with their experience in the first match? What memes will be created around whatever foods Hellmuth devours tableside? This is what makes this show fun. The stakes are higher with the buy-in doubled to $200,000 (a level Hellmuth hit with both Esfandiari and Negreanu) but arguably so is the entertainment value. And everyone involved seems to know that. So, with the High Stakes Poker belt back up for grabs, prepare yourself for a second helping of Dwan vs. Hellmuth - coming soon (presumably).
  11. It was late in London. The early morning actually, and Erik Seidel, one of poker’s most iconic figures, was back on the grind. Already in the United Kingdom to celebrate his youngest daughter’s wedding, the poker legend decided to extend his stay in the UK’s capital to take care of some business. Specifically, the business of high-stakes poker. And at this moment, his deep run in GGPoker WSOP Online Event #11 ($10,000 Super MILLION$ High Roller) was taking him back to the beginning of his career. “I haven’t stayed up that late for poker since I was in my 20’s,” Seidel said, referring to the overnight hours of Day 1 of the gold bracelet event. “London isn’t ideal for me because I’m a morning person and Day One lasted ’til the next morning.” Even casual fans are familiar with Seidel’s impact on poker and his history that took him from the early days of Mayfair Club in New York to the Poker Hall of Fame in Las Vegas. His career has spanned 40 years and in that time he’s earned nearly $38 million in recorded live earnings. He’s a World Poker Tour champion and, prior to the online high roller he was playing in, had previously won eight WSOP bracelets, making him one of the most prolific players in WSOP history. Seidel didn’t know it at the time but after that sleepless night, he was just days away from adding to his legacy with WSOP bracelet #9. For a player who has experienced just about everything there is to experience in the game of poker, Seidel admits he still feels “out of [his] element online”, making his victory one of the most unique moments of his career. [caption id="attachment_636078" align="alignleft" width="300"] Seidel's online winning moment.[/caption] “I’m just never that comfortable online,” he said. “I like it, it’s nice to be able to play a tourney in bed, but I make mistakes. I had two misclicks at the final table. It’s easier for me to get distracted and there’s always that concern that I’ll lose connection.” In fact, he did lose connection at one point while playing in his hotel on spotty Wi-Fi. But, obviously, the man they call Seiborg recovered nicely. He navigated his way through the field of 624 entries, made the final table, and bested a final nine that included Rui Ferreira, Isaac Baron, Thomas Muehloecker, and eventual runner-up, Francisco Benitez. When it was all over, Seidel won more than $977,000 and made WSOP history. He earned that ninth bracelet and moved into a tie with poker legend Johnny Moss for fifth (third-most) in all-time WSOP bracelets. “Winning any WSOP event is special,” Seidel said when asked where his online bracelet ranks. “This one was extra great for me because it was so unexpected. Getting through 600+ players and then the prize was close to one million, which I think is my biggest WSOP cash, felt really amazing. Might be my favorite.” [caption id="attachment_636079" align="alignright" width="219"] 2007 WSOP victory in NL 2-7 Lowball for bracelet #8.[/caption] That said, as special as winning another bracelet is for him, 14 years after winning #8, Seidel hasn’t been consumed with the bracelet chase as, perhaps, some other pre-poker boom prominent players. “I can’t say I really get caught up in bracelet fever,” he said. “My focus has been much more on higher buy-in No Limit events. If you really want to rack up bracelets, you’ve got to play the high buy-in limit events at the WSOP, the No Limit fields are way too big. I play a limited amount of events at the WSOP, and I love playing them, but I’m not trying to maximize my chances by playing every event.” It would be tough for anyone to not want to push if given the chance to break into double-digit bracelets. It’s well-known that there are currently only four players with 10 or more. Phil Hellmuth is the all-time leader with 15. And then, tied for second, all with 10, are Doyle Brunson, Johnny Chan, and Phil Ivey - a club that’s hasn’t admitted a new member since 2014. Now, Seidel is knocking on the door. At 61, he says he has no intentions of slowing down and has set his sights on playing a healthy schedule at this year’s WSOP. “I love playing, I hope I can continue competing for a while. I expect to play 20-something events at the WSOP although I’m really disappointed in the WSOP schedule this year, the big NL events that I’d love to play in are all very close to Thanksgiving. I’ll have to see if I can play them.”
  12. High-stakes online professional Wiktor ‘Limitless’ Malinowski captured a resume-topping live score after taking down the Super High Roller Bowl Europe $250,000 Main Event for his first SHRB ring and the $3,690,000 first-place prize. The quarter-million-dollar tournament attracted an elite field of 41 entries and created a prize pool of more than $10.2 million. Poker superstars including Phil Ivey, Michael Addamo, Bryn Kenney, and Ali Imsirovic all made their way to Merit Royal Hotel & Casino in Cyprus to take their shot at a seven-figure score but it was Poland’s Malinowski who topped them all. In the end, ‘Limitless’ was able to lean on his expertise in heads-up play in what turned out to be a lengthy heads-up match against Malaysian tournament specialist Ivan Leow in order to win his career-best cash. It didn’t take long for the first player to fall. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) Viacheslav Buldygin, who started the day with just eight big blinds, was all the way down to fewer than two big blinds. Holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="2s"], he called the 50,000 big blind, leaving himself just 40,000. Right behind him, Leow also called holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"] and Ruan Zhuang checked his big blind option with [poker card="6d"][poker card="4s"]. The three players saw a flop of [poker card="qh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"]. It checked through to Leow who put in a bet of 90,000. Zhuang quickly folded and Buldygin committed the rest of his chips. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] giving Buldygin some additional outs, however, the [poker card="6s"] river was not one of them and the Russian exited in sixth place for $512,500. It was an up and down day for David Peters who, early at the final table found a critical double up and then, not long after provided a double-up of his own to Leow when Leow’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] flopped a set on Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"]. With just ten big blinds left, Peters moved all-in from under the gun holding [poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"]. Right behind him, Leow leveraged some of those chips he took off Peters and made the call with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"], keeping Peters ahead. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Leow a pair and left Peters looking for one of the final fours in the deck. The river came the [poker card="jc"] and Peters headed for the exit to collect his $820,000 fifth-place prize as Leow took over the chip lead. It was just ten minutes later when Malinowski picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="as"] and put in a raise to 125,000. It folded to Timothy Adams who, in the big blind with [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"], moved all-in for his final 25 big blinds. Malinowski snap-called putting Adams at risk. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"] flop brought open-ended straight outs for Adams but kept Malinowski as a three-to-one favorite. The [poker card="3d"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="6h"] hit the river, Adams was eliminated in fourth place for $1,127,500. With three left, Malinowski and Leow were nearly even in chips with Zhuang looking up with just over 15 big blinds. After the first break, on the first hand of 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Zhuang raised to 120,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="ac"]. Leow made the call, defending his big blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="7s"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"] and when Leow checked it over to Zhuang put out a bet of 200,000, which Leow quickly called. The turn came the [poker card="9d"], keeping Zhuang ahead but offering Leow additional outs to a gutshot straight. Leow checked again, and with a little more than a pot-sized bet left, Zhuang moved all-in for 755,000. This time, Leow took his time and got a complete count. Deep in the tank, he used multiple time bank extensions before eventually making the call. With only nine outs in the deck, the river came the [poker card="tc"], giving Leow the straight and cracking the aces of Zhuang. Zhuang fell in third place and picked up a career-high score of $1,640,000. As heads-up play got underway, Leow held a 15 big blind chip lead over Malinowski. However, it only took one hand for Malinowski to bring the chip stacks to even. After that, the grind began. Malinowski and Leow embarked on a heads-up battle that lasted over five hours with grabbing and losing momentum and the chip lead being passed back and forth. The early hours of heads up belonged to Malinowski and eventually, Leow clawed his way back to the chip lead. As the blinds increased to 100,000/200,000 (200,000 ante) the stacks were within four big blinds of each other when the penultimate hand of the match had the biggest swing of the tournament. Malinowski raised to 400,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"] and, with the larger stack, Leow moved all-in with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="4h"]. Malinowski call, putting himself at risk. Both players stood and watched as the flop came [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] keeping Malinowski ahead but offering Leow some extra outs. The turn was the [poker card="8h"], bringing some additional chop outs. But the river was the [poker card="9s"] and Malinowski picked up the biggest pot of the tournament, leaving Leow’s stack crippled to just three big blinds. It was all over the next hand when Malinowski moved all-in holding [poker card="9s"][poker card="8d"] and Leow stuck it in as well with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="4c"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5d"], but it was the [poker card="8s"] turn that paired Malinowski and there was no help for Leow with the [poker card="4h"] river. After a hard-fought heads-up match, Leow took home $2,460,000 as the runner-up and Wiktor ‘Limitless’ Malinowski captured his first Super High Roller Bowl Main Event ring and the $3,690,000 first-place prize, far and away a career-high live score. Super High Roller Bowl Europe Main Event Final Table Results Wiktor Malinowski - $3,690,000 Ivan Leow - $2,460,000 Ruan Zhuang - $1,640,000 Timothy Adams - $1,127,500 David Peters - $820,000 Viacheslav Buldygin - $512,500
  13. It’s been a career week for Russian nosebleed tournament crusher Artur Martirosian who, after winning the Super High Roller Bowl Europe’s $100K SHR for a career-best score of $1.4 million earlier this week, proceeded to take down this week’s GGPoker Super MILLION$ for the second time in his career, earning another $325,957. Martirosian continued to make a name for himself by battling against the best, and the Super MILLION$ final table was no exception. New Zealand’s David Yan held the chip lead at the start of the day and joining him in the final nine was Aleks Ponakovs, Pascal Hartmann, Aram Zobian, and eventual runner-up, Samuel ‘€urop€an’ Vousden. It all got started with Philadelphia online poker legend Mark Herm as he was enjoying just his second career Super MILLION$ final table. Unfortunately for the longtime PocketFiver, his stay didn’t last terribly long. Although he started day third in chips he was first out when he lost the bulk of his stack five-betting [poker card="qs"][poker card="5c"] against David Yan’s [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"] and was forced to fold when Yan six-bet moved all-in. After that, Herm found himself short-stacked. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (5,000 ante) Yan raised to 80,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="kc"][poker card="js"] and Herm moved all-in for just under 20 big blinds. In the small blind Wei Zhao reshoved all-in for more than 1.3 million and the rest of the field folded. The flop came [poker card="td"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"] giving Herm open-ended straight draw outs. But the [poker card="6h"] turn and [poker card="8h"] turn didn’t help him and Herm hit the rail in ninth place for $45,100. Less than ten minutes later, Mario Mosboeck opened from under the gun to 200,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] and when it folded to Yan on the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"], he just flat called. The blinds folded and the duo took a flop of [poker card="jc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"]. Mosboeck pushed his final 206,000 in the middle and Yan snap-called. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and the river came the [poker card="8s"] eliminating Mosboeck in eighth for $57,750. Seven-handed play last until the blinds reached 40,000/80,000 (10,000) when ’Pusha T’ (Aram Zobian), with just five big blinds, moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="5h"] and Samuel Vousden made the call from the small blind with his [poker card="as"][poker card="td"]. The board ran out [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="3h"][poker card="qs"][poker card="2s"] keeping Vousden’s ace-high ahead the whole time and bringing him some much needed breathing room. ‘Pusha T’, who started the day eighth in chips, laddered into seventh place and walked away with $73,948. Four hands later, Aleks Ponakovs, who had been grinding fewer than five big blinds, opened from middle position with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"] to 192,000, leaving himself less than a small blind behind. Martirosian, the new chip leader, moved all-in for more than 7.7 million with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"] and when everyone folded, Ponakovs made the call. The [poker card="5d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="qh"] flop brought a set for Ponakovs and put him at greater than 90% to win the hand. The [poker card="8d"] turn however brought Martirosian both straight and flush outs. The [poker card="3d"] river brought in the runner-runner flush and Ponakovs settled for sixth place and $94,689. During the same level, Zhao quickly saw his 2.2 million chip stack crumble. First he moved all-in from the small blind with [poker card="js"][poker card="4s"] into Vousden in the big blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"]. The pocket eights held and as Vousden doubled, Zhao was quickly the short stack. Two hands later Zhao moved all-in for 1.1 million with [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and Pascal Hartmann in the small blind woke up with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qc"] and quickly called. Hartmann was at risk when the flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"], bringing Zhao a straight flush draw. The turn was the [poker card="kc"] and Zhao scored the jack-high flush. But the river was [poker card="4c"], shipping the pot to Hartmann’s queen-high flush and Zhao was left with one small blind. Zhao busted two hands later and finished up in fifth place for $121,247. Again, it took only one hand after a bustout for another to occur. At 50,000/100,000 (12,500 ante) Martirosian opened from the cutoff to 200,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"]. Vousden called in the small blind with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] and when it reached Hartmann in the big blind, he made it 1.9 million to go, leaving himself 300,000 behind. Martirosian shipped the big stack, Vousden folded his sixes and Hartmann committed the rest of his stack. The board ran out [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5s"][poker card="jh"][poker card="ad"], allowing Martirosian’s kicker to play and ending Hartmann’s tournament in fourth place, good for $155,254. On the last hand of the level, Vousden raised the button to 200,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] and, after Martirosian folded his small blind, Yan, sitting on the short stack shipped for more than 1 million with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"]. Vousden called and was out ahead on the [poker card="ac"][poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"] flop. The turn was [poker card="8h"], leaving Yan drawing dead to the [poker card="js"] river. Yan’s third-place results earned him $198,800. Heads-up play started with Martirosian having roughly a two-to-one chip lead over Vousden. However, play was still plenty deep with Vousden holding more than 30 big blinds. After an extensive heads-up battle, Martirosian grinded Vousden down to a six-to-one deficit as the blinds went up to 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante). On the final hand, Vousden limped the button with [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and Martirosian checked his option with his [poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5h"] flop provided all the necessary fireworks. Martirosian checked to Vousden who put in a bet of 240,000. Martirosian check-raised to 608,000 and when the action returned to Vousden he moved all-in. Martirosian called and needed some help. That help arrived when the [poker card="9d"] gave Martirosian two pair and then it was Vousden looking for one of his many outs. The [poker card="3s"] was not one of them and Vousden ended up as the runner-up, collecting $254,559. Artur Martirosian scored his second career Super MILLION$ title and collected the $325,957 first-place prize. GGPoker Super MILLION$ Final Table (8/31) Artur Martirosian - $325,957 Samuel Vousden - $254,559 David Yan - $198,800 Pascal Hartmann - $155,254 Wei Zhao - $121,247 Aleks Ponakovs - $94,689 ‘Pusha T’ - $73,948 Mario Mosboeck - $57,750 Mark Herm - $45,100
  14. “What he has now is real problems,” Ali Nejad said as he called the action on PokerGO's High Stakes Duel III. “Dwan binks the nine on the turn, a demoralizing development…and now, Hellmuth has twelve outs, or the streak is over.” The river was a brick for the defending champion and as soon as Phil Hellmuth and Tom Dwan rose from their seats to share a friendly handshake in the center of the frame, the headlines were already being written: Tom Dwan Dethrones Phil Hellmuth in Round 2 of High Stakes Duel III The entertaining five-and-a-half-hour match gave fans just about everything they could have wanted. There was Dwan back in the poker spotlight, public closure over the duo’s famous 2008 feud, and, of course, peak Hellmuth - jovial and steaming, cursing and eating. (Oh, the eating!) That’s a big part of what makes High Stakes Duel work. Of course, for die-hard fans, the poker is critical. But, for many, it’s the dynamics between the players that make HSD good TV. And sure, by the end of the broadcast the big question of "who will win?" is always answered, but the show is more than just a point tally on a scoreboard. Emerging from this match were plenty of other storylines that were fun to see play out and could also play a big part in the future of the show. That was ‘Durrrr’, this is Dwan. You know the story: Dr. Bruce Banner infused himself with high doses of gamma rays while in the lab altering his DNA so when he becomes angry he transforms into…the Incredible Hulk! Banner is always trying to control his temper, but when the rage comes out the Hulk gets loose, and he destroys everything in his path. Perhaps Tom Dwan is a little like Dr. Banner. In the late 2000s, at the height of the online poker boom, Dwan exposed himself high doses of understanding ranges (before most people understood ranges) while “in the lab” and when he appeared on TV he transformed into “Durrrr”, the incredible online wunderkind who destroyed every bankroll in his path. That was then. His amazing, creative style of play is what Dwan built his reputation on. It's why still today fans are attracted to watching him play, despite him spending the better part of a decade grinding private ultra-stakes behind closed doors. But this is now: “The thing about high stakes poker back then was…a lot of people were missing some pretty core concepts and it gave me a lot of flexibility,” he said on PokerGO’s HSD “Weigh-In” show. “I just played this WPT show a week ago and I couldn’t really get that out of line, everyone’s studied No Limit a ton. I had a lot more options ten years ago.” That showed during his High Stakes Duel with Hellmuth as Dwan played a measured game, never really getting out of line, never really putting Hellmuth to the test with a less than adequate hand. Instead, he settled into the match, taking it seriously (when many thought he wouldn’t), and let the match come to him. Additionally, Dwan had an answer to Hellmuth's antics. Nothing. Whereas all of Hellmuth's previous opponents had a tendency to jaw back-and-forth with "The Poker Brat", Dwan never flinched. He never seemed compelled to answer back. Instead, Dwan kept his cool rather than responding with taunts like he did in his 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship. He soldiered on, a wry smirk or left-looking glance here or there, but in general, he simply took care of business. Certainly, ‘Durrrr’ will emerge at some point in the future, but right now Tom Dwan looked like he was in complete control. Did Hellmuth actually...win? No doubt about it, the streak is over. Hellmuth’s reign as the undisputed king of High Stakes Duel has come to an end. But, honestly, is that a bad thing for Hellmuth? At the time of this writing, Hellmuth has yet to accept a rematch against Dwan and, if he doesn’t, who can blame him? He can credibly claim he has nothing left to prove in the format. He bested Antonio Esfandiari three times. He came back from a 19:1 deficit against Daniel Negreanu and ended up sweeping him in three straight. Finally, he played an experienced amateur in Nick Wright (something Dwan called him one of the best at) and took care of business. Plus, every sponsor of Hellmuth - from energy drinks to altcoins - must be happy with the amount of exposure he’s given them (far more than 24 total hours of screen time) on this show. Whenever the opportunity presented itself Hellmuth (is “shilling” too harsh a word?) took the opportunity to promote those who support him. A loss to Dwan marks the perfect time to exit stage left. Hellmuth, almost notoriously, is averse to stakes that climb too high. Yes, he played the 2012 Big One For One Drop with its $1 million buy-in, but for a player who sometimes has extended stays at the Aria Resort & Casino he’s notably absent in the regularly running $10Ks that take place in the Aria poker room. When it comes to bankroll management and game selection, super high-stakes tournaments are not traditionally where Hellmuth has found his success. So with the next High Stakes Duel, should PokerGO continue down the road they have established, be Round 3 would have a buy-in of $200,000. Win or lose, Hellmuth’s next option would be a $400,000 match. If Hellmuth were to win, he would be forced to defend a title at $400,000 and, in order to walk away, play and win a Round 5 that comes with a $800,000 price tag - legitimately making it among the biggest buy-in tournaments of all time. Losing to Dwan makes it the perfect time for Hellmuth to step aside under the notion that all his focus needs to be on his first love - the World Series of Poker. No one would blame Hellmuth for saving all his #WhiteMagic for chasing bracelet #16. Plus, by saving a $200K buy-in, Hellmuth could play just about every event on the WSOP schedule if he wanted to (provided he can pull himself away from his new bestie Mr. Beast.) All in all, a Round 2 loss to Dwan could end up being an easy exit and the real win for Hellmuth. Will PokerGO push Dwan (and the show) into deep waters? “If no one challenges a winner within 30 days of the previous match, that last winner declares victory.” The original High Stakes Duel rules have the stakes doubling through Round 8 “resulting in a potential prize pool of $12,800,000” and a player needing to win three straight matches before Round Six (or two in a row from Round Five) in order to cash out and win. If that stays true (it’s a TV show so producers can change the rules at will), there could be some incredibly high stakes to fight for in the next few months. As mentioned earlier, Dwan would play again at $200,000 and whoever wins that would need to battle at twice that with only Dwan having the potential to walk away with a victory and an $800,000 prize pool. That seems to be the minimum. So, all eyes will be on how far can the show go and how big is the player pool to help them get there. By the time Round 4 takes place, a $400,000 buy-in is bigger than PokerGO’s marquee event, the Super High Roller Bowl and it’s unlikely that there’s a massive player pool willing to play at those stakes in such a shallow format. Phil Ivey is a natural fit, and fans would love to see it. A rehashing of the “Durrrr Challenge” debate could take place if Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates were to answer the call. Maybe it would be a nosebleed tournament pro like Justin Bonomo, Dan Smith, Andrew Robl or All-Time Money List leader Bryn Kenney. As the rounds go higher, would the wealthiest of businessmen in the poker space need to courted? Players like Paul Phua, Rick Solomon, or perhaps even PokerGO founder Cary Katz himself. This is what is on the horizon for the show itself. It looks like either the initial premise is about to pay off on the promise of astronomical heads-up stakes or a hard reset is right around the corner with two new combatants creating new storylines (in anticipation of a Phil Hellmuth return.) More on the conversation on High Stakes Duel can be heard on The FIVES Poker Podcast below:
  15. Greek high-stakes pro Alexandros Theologis took down one of arguably the toughest fields of the 2021 GGPoker WSOP Online when he bested the 255-entry field of Event #21 ($25,000 Super High Roller Championship) to claim the $1,212,033 first-place prize and his first career World Series of Poker gold bracelet. Theologis, currently ranked #40 in the world (#1 in Greece), put on an impressive final table performance en route to a career-high online score. He entered the day third in chips but amassed a formidable chip lead that kept his tough competition, including Kahle Burns, Adrian Mateos, and Anatoly Filatov, from ever really closing the gap. The first elimination of the day arrived quickly when, with the blinds at 35,000/70,000, Timothy Nuter put in put in a raise of over 680,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"], leaving himself just two big blind behind. Kahle Burns called from late position with the [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"]. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"][poker card="2d"] flop gave Nuter top pair, but it also brought Burns middle set. So, when Nuter open jammed for his final 140,000, Burns quickly called and his set held through the [poker card="9c"] turn and [poker card="jc"] river. Nuter ended in ninth place and picked up $151,503. The early bustouts continued when, with the blinds at 40,000/80,000 a short-stacked Adrian Mateos moved all-in from the button for just over 10 big blinds with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="th"] and Theologis, in the big blind, snap-called holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="qs"]. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3c"] keeping pocket queens well ahead, but offering Mateos some back door outs. The turn was the [poker card="ts"], bringing Mateos a pair, however the [poker card="7h"] river was no help to the three-time WSOP bracelet winner and Mateos was eliminated in eighth place for $196,476. On the very next hand, Rui Ferreira shipped his final 840,000 all-in from under the gun with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"]. He was immediately called by next-to-act Wenjie Huang holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the flop came down [poker card="as"][poker card="th"][poker card="7c"], bringing both top pair, but leaving Ferriera dominated. The turn was the [poker card="qc"], giving the top-10 ranked Ferriera three outs to the gutshot straight, but the [poker card="3h"] was a miss and he bowed out in seventh place which was good for a $254,798 payday. During the same level, Huang opened his [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"] from under the gun to 168,000, and Burns flat-called with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"]. Then, on the button, Brazilian Eduardo Silva three-bet shoved his final nine big blind with the [poker card="as"][poker card="th"]. When the action returned to Huang, he called and Burns came along as well. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3h"], and both Huang and Burns checked. The turn came the [poker card="9s"], and Huang led for 600,000 and Burns called. The [poker card="qs"] hit Burns, giving him top pair and when the action checked through, he dragged the pot and sent Silva to the rail in sixth place for $330,432. It took nearly thirty minutes of five-handed play for the next elimination. With the blind up to 60,000/120,000 Anatoly Filatov opened to 240,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"]. After Theologis folded the small blind, Mark Radoja shipped all-in with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. Filatov made the call and after the flop came [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"], Radoja was drawing dead. A meaningless [poker card="2d"] and [poker card="jd"] came on the turn and river respectively and Radjoa finished up in fifth place for $428,518. Although he picked up some momentum from the knockout of Radoja, Filatov’s fortunes turned when play got to four-handed. With the blinds up to 70,000/140,000 Filatov was on the short stack when he moved all in from the small blind holding [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and was called by the chip leading Theologis in the big blind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"]. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="js"][poker card="2h"], giving Filatov a pair, but leaving Theologis with both pair and straight outs. The turn was the [poker card="5s"] but the [poker card="ks"] river gave Theologis the best hand and sent Filatov out in fourth for $555,719, the second-highest score of his online career. Five hands later, a critical pot took place when Theologis put in a small raise from the small blind holding [poker card="8h"][poker card="8c"] and with more than 34 big blind in his stack, Huang pushed all-in with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"]. Theologis essentially snap-called which build a pot of nearly 10 million. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"], leaving Huang looking for the [poker card="5s"], the only card that would save him. But the [poker card="jd"] hit the turn and the [poker card="jh"] completed the board, ending Huang’s run in third place for $720,678 and giving Theologis a massive chip lead. Theologis started his heads-up battle with Burns with a nearly seven-to-one advantage and while Burns held his ground for the roughly 20-minute match, Theologis was able to use his stack to take it down. On the final hand, the pair found themselves all-in preflop, Burns holding a dominating [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] to Theologis’ [poker card="ad"][poker card="6d"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="4h"] flop looked good for Burns. When the [poker card="qs"] came on the turn, Burns looked like he was in good shape to double. But one of Theologis’ three outs, the [poker card="6c"] spiked on the river, giving him the hand. Burns settled for second place and a $934,604 payday while Alexandros Theologis earned the $1,212,032 first-place prize and his first WSOP gold bracelet. WSOP Online $25,000 Super High Roller Final Table Alexandros Theologis - $1,212,033 Kahle Burns - $934,604 Wenjie Huang - $720,679 Anatoly Filatov - $555,720 Mark Radoja - $428,518 Eduardo Silva - $330,433 Rui Ferreira - $254,798 Adrian Mateos - $196,476 Timothy Nuter - $151,504
  16. Phil Hellmuth’s High Stakes Duel seven-match winning streak came to an end Wednesday night after nosebleed cash game savant Tom Dwan defeated the reigning champion in an entertaining five-and-a-half-hour, hard-fought heads-up battle for $200,000. Those hoping for Phil Hellmuth and Tom Dwan to reignite their 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship feud may have been disappointed when the pair sat down with commentator Ali Nejad for the High Stakes Duel III (Round 2) “Weigh-In” show. Whereas in boxing or MMA, the combatants posture as to who will have the upper hand, this pre-game hype show saw a pair of players who seemed to genuinely enjoy and respect each other as people, if not each other's poker game. As Nejad peppered both with questions about their past encounters on the felt and their evolution (both as players and people) over the past 13 years, he received mostly replies of the duo slinging compliments at each other. Dwan, adamant that Hellmuth is one of the best at playing against amateurs (even better than Daniel [Negreanu]), while Hellmuth reminisced about how he and Dwan have recently palled around, smoking cigars and talking crypto. Hellmuth even called Dwan at age 35, “already a legend.” The good vibes continued once the cards were in the air. Dwan and Hellmuth kept the conversation going in the early moments with “Durrrr” asking “The Poker Brat” some probing questions about his prior matches and Hellmuth doing his promotional duties for his many sponsors. Dwan got off to a quick start, flopping a flush on the very first hand holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"] on the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"] flop. But with little to continue with, Hellmuth folded his [poker card="ad"][poker card="2c"] and just two hands later Hellmuth took over a chip lead that he didn’t surrender for the better part of two hours. The first important hand of the match took place in the first hour with Dwan raising the button to 1,200 holding [poker card="9h"][poker card="7d"] and Hellmuth defending his big blind with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"]. Hellmuth checked in the dark as the dealer spread the [poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"] flop, giving Hellmuth two pair and Dwan an open-ended straight draw. Dwan continued for 1,500 and Hellmuth made the call. The turn came the [poker card="2s"] and Hellmuth checked again. Dwan fired 4,400 and Hellmuth made the call. The river came the [poker card="ac"] and after Hellmuth checked, Dwan bluffed for 11,000 with nine-high, and Hellmuth snap-called dragging more than 36,000 chips in the middle. As Dwan began climbing back from his lows, Hellmuth picked up another important early pot. From the button, Hellmuth called the 500 chip big blind with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="2d"]. Dwan made it 1,500 more to go holding the [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"] and Hellmuth came along. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"] flop kept Dwan in the lead and he led for 1,600 which Hellmuth called. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] and the action checked through. The [poker card="kh"] hit the river and Dwan led again, this time for 3,000. Hellmuth took a moment and announce a bet of 7,200 and after taking some time, Dwan paid him off, giving Hellmuth a 40,000 chip lead. Despite the things not going his way early, Dwan never showed any real frustration. He chipped away at Hellmuth and took over the chip lead for the first time since the first few minutes. From the button, Hellmuth made the call to 800 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="9s"] and Dwan checked his option in the big blind holding [poker card="qc"][poker card="th"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="td"][poker card="5s"] brought Dwan top two pair and Hellmuth both a flush and straight draw. Dwan checked it over to Hellmuth who bet 800 and Dwan promptly check-raised to 3,000, which Hellmuth called. The turn was the [poker card="6h"] and Dwan bet 4,800 and Hellmuth snap-called. The [poker card="3d"] came on the river and Dwan bet 13,300 and Hellmuth started talking to himself before finally letting it go. By the end of the third hour, Dwan had extended his chip lead and was looking for opportunities to take Hellmuth out. It almost came when Hellmuth, with 72k behind, called 1,000 from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="4h"]. Dwan raised it up to 4,000 from the big blind and Hellmuth made the call. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] flop brought an open-ended straight draw for Dwan and he led for 5,000. Hellmuth clicked it back, raising to 10,000 with his ace-high hand. Dwan made the call and the turn came the [poker card="jh"], bringing Dwan a straight. Dwan checked it over to Hellmuth, who bet another 14,000 drawing dead. Dwan considered his options and decided to shove. Hellmuth made the quick fold and Dwan’s lead surged to roughly three-to-one. “This is f***ing ridiculous actually,” Hellmuth fumed. “Noone’s ever beaten me raising every f***ing button before.”   Dwan continued to apply pressure, looking for the knockout blow and moving in with his big draws. But Hellmuth hung around and as he had in matches prior, turned his short stack around. Not only did he draw even with Dwan, but he reclaimed the chip lead for a short amount of time. But eventually, as the fifth hour was coming to a close, Dwan grabbed the lead back as well as a momentum that he wouldn’t let go of. With the blinds at 3,500/7,000, Dwan completed from the button with the [poker card="8h"][poker card="3h"] and Hellmuth checked holding the [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4h"] and the action checked through. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and Hellmuth led out for 9,000 from his 83k stack. Dwan considered and opted for a call with his heart flush draw and live eight. The river came the [poker card="8s"], giving Dwan the best hand and when Hellmuth fired 11,000, Dwan found the call, scooped the pot, and built one of his biggest leads of the match. “Motherf***er. Call nine thousand with a dry f***ing flush draw,” Hellmuth rants. “Never getting paid off…He doesn’t know any better.” As Hellmuth paced and ranted, Dwan didn’t reply with the bravado he showed off in 2008. He calmly stacked his chips, like a pro who had been there many times before, unfazed by the antics. While not the final hand, the one that summed up the match came early in the sixth hour of play. Dwan made it 9,000 to go on the button with [poker card="kh"][poker card="2s"] and Hellmuth made the call from the big blind with the [poker card="td"][poker card="8d"]. The flop came [poker card="9c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2d"], giving Dwan bottom pair. Hellmuth checked to Dwan who checked it back. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Hellmuth fired for 11,000 and Dwan made the call. The [poker card="3s"] hit the river and after cutting out some chips, Hellmuth announced a bet of 27,000 - half his remaining stack. Dwan tanked, used a time extension and let out a long sigh. Eventually, Dwan made the call, scooping the pot and grabbing an overwhelming eight-to-one chip lead. Down to his final 20K, Hellmuth picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"] on the button and limped for 4,000. Dwan checked his [poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"] and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="5c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"]. Dwan led out for 5,000 with his middle pair and Hellmuth sprung the trap, moving all-in with his pocket aces. Dwan called the extra three big blinds and was looking for help. Help arrived for Dwan when the [poker card="9c"] hit the turn, improving him to two pair. Down to his final card, Hellmuth needed help. However, as the [poker card="6c"] arrived on the river, Hellmuth’s High Stakes Duel unbeaten streak was over and Dwan became the show’s new champion. “Good battle,” Hellmuth said shaking Dwan’s hand with a smile on his face. Dwan laughed and replied “Yea, crazy last one.” Hellmuth now has 72 hours from the end of the match in which to declare if he will challenge Dwan for another match. If he declines, a new challenger will be announced for Round 3.
  17. Stop us if you’ve heard this one before. Niklas Astedt, the former worldwide #1-ranked pro and one of the most decorated online poker players in history, captured this week’s GGPoker Super MILLION$ title, the third of his career, and added the $337,599 first-place prize to his more than $22.4 million in career recorded online earnings. Astedt fought through this week’s field of 171 entries to reach a record-extending thirteenth Super MILLION$ final table. A favorite in any field, the winner of the PocketFives #1 NumberOne award was, once again, faced with top-tier competition en route to the win. Newly minted PokerStars pro Benjamin Rolle, Canada’s #1-ranked Mike Watson, 2019 WSOP Main Event finalist Dario Sammartino, and the start of day chip leader Kahle Burns all made the final nine, but in the end, it was Astedt that became just the second player in Super MILLION$ history to record more than two victories. On the very first hand of the final table, with the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (5,000 ante) current worldwide #5-ranked pro Mike Watson opened to 88,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. After ‘Neel’ called from the button holding [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"], Astedt three-bet to 332,500 from the small blind. When the action got back to Watson, he moved all-in for just over 1 million in chip and when ‘Neel’ released his hand, Astedt quickly called putting Watson at risk. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2c"], leaving Watson looking for help to survive. The turn was the [poker card="jd"], opening the door for a gutshot straight if he could catch one of the two remaining kings. But the river came the [poker card="9h"] and Watson’s day was over in just one hand as he exited in ninth place for $52,486. While Watson was felted quickly, the rest of the table had a mind to stick around for a while. The eight players passed chips around for more than an hour and twenty minutes before the next player hit the rail. The blinds were up to 35,000/70,000 (8,500 ante) and Dario Sammartino found himself sitting on the short stack with fewer than 10 big blinds left. The action folded to him in the small blind and he shipped all-in for just over 550,000 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="2c"] and Benjamin Rolle, in the big blind, made the call with a dominating [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"] flop offered Sammartino some chop opportunities to go along with his outs. The turn was the [poker card="kh"], keeping kickers in play. The [poker card="6s"] river was no help to Sammartino and the former 2019 WSOP Main Event final tablist added another $66,235 to his bankroll for an eighth-place finish. After the hand, Rolle, who started the day ninth in chips, has climbed to third overall. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (10,000 ante), Eelis Parssinen woke up with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"] in the small blind. With the table folding to him, he put in a raise to 200,000 and a short-stacked ‘oldfishing’ decided to defend his big blind with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="8d"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3d"] flop gave ‘oldfishing’ a pair and a flush draw and when Parssinen bet 120,000 into him with his aces ‘oldfishing’ went with his hand and moved all-in. Parssinen quickly called and the pair saw a turn of the [poker card="js"], sending ‘oldfishing’s two pair into the lead. However, the river came the [poker card="3h"], giving Parssinen a better two pair and ending ‘oldfishing’s run in seventh place for $83,585. India’s ‘Neel’ found themselves slipping in the chip counts and when the blinds hit 60,000/120,000 (15,000 ante) he was looking for a spot to pick up some chips. When it folded to him in the cutoff, he put in a raise holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="jh"] to 900,000, leaving himself with roughly 5 big blinds behind. On the button, Astedt looked at [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"] and put in a raise to 2.2 million, more than enough to put everyone left in the hand all-in. The blinds both folded and when it came back to ‘Neel’, he eventually shipped all-in. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"], giving ‘Neel’ outs to a gutshot straight. The [poker card="7s"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="qs"] river hit, Astedt picked up the healthy pot and increased his chip lead to roughly double the next closest player. ‘Neel’, who won his way into this week’s Super MILLION$ on a $525 satellite, parlayed that seat into a $105,482 payday for his sixth-place finish. After ‘Neel’ departed, Brazil’s Rodrigo Selouan was firmly in last place with roughly six big blinds in his stack. Four hands later, Rolle opened the button to 240,000 with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] and after Astedt folded his small blind, Selouan defended his big blind with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="4d"]. The [poker card="th"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"] flop gave both players a pair and when Selouan checked it over to Rolle, the new PokerStars Pro put in a bet of 120,000. Selouan check-shipped his stack of just over 500,000 and Rolle snap-called. The [poker card="js"] and [poker card="jh"] completed the board sending Selouan out in fifth for $133,113. Six hands later it was Parssinen’s turn to be all-in. During the same level, Astedt opened first-to-act to 240,000 with [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"]. Four-handed, and on the button, Parssinen three-bet shoved his 14 big blind stack holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. When the action returned to Astedt, he made the call and the flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7s"], giving Parssinen top pair but providing Astedt with additional flush outs and backdoor straight outs. The turn was the [poker card="8h"] giving Astedt open-ended straight outs as well. Parssinen couldn’t dodge all of Astedt’s outs as the [poker card="js"] river gave Astedt the flush and the hand. Parssinen, who started the day second in chips, wrapped up in fourth place which was good for $167,983. Three-handed play lasted twenty minutes with start-of-day chip leader Kahle Burns looking up at both Rolle and Astedt, each of which had more than three times his stack. The blinds were up to 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) when Burns completed his small blind holding [poker card="9c"][poker card="7d"] and Rolle checked his option in the big blind with [poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="6c"][poker card="4s"] flop brought a pair for Rolle and the action checked through. The turn was the [poker card="td"] and again, the action went check-check. The [poker card="9h"] hit the river pairing both, but improving Rolle to two pair. Burns led the river for 462,000 and after a few moments, Rolle moved all-in. Burns took just a few seconds before making the call for the rest of his stack and seeing the bad news. Burns took home $211,988 for his third-place finish. Heads-up play between Rolle and Astedt started with Rolle having a 10 big blind chip lead. Astedt quickly clawed back the chip lead and was on the verge of closing it out a number of times until Rolle turned the tides once again. It became an entertaining back and forth affair with both players finding themselves on the brink of elimination multiple times. After Astedt picked off a river bluff attempt by Rolle with the blinds up to 200,000/400,000 (50,000 ante) - one of the longest Super MILLION$ in recent history - Rolle found himself left with fewer than 10 big blinds as Astedt continued to apply maximum pressure. The final hand had Rolle shipping nearly 3 million on the button with [poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"] and Astedt making the quick call in the big blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="8d"]. The [poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2d"] flop looked good for Rolle, giving him flush and straight outs to go along with pair possibilities. The turn was the [poker card="as"] and Rolle was left looking for one of his 17 outs. The [poker card="jc"] was not one of them and Rolle, who rose up from the shortest stack at the start of the day, bowed out as the runner-up and collected $267,520. Niklas Astedt picked up $337,559 for his third Super MILLION$ victory. The former worldwide #1-ranked pro joins Michael Addamo as the only two players to win a Super MILLION$ in both Season One and Season Two. Super MILLION$ Final Table Results (8/24) Niklas Astedt - $337,599 Benjamin Rolle - $267,520 Kahle Burns - $211,988 Eelis Parssinen - $167,983 Rodrigo Selouan - $133,113 'Neel' - $105,482 'oldfishing' - $83,585 Dario Sammartino - $66,235 Mike Watson - $52,486
  18. “Pick your stakes heads up…I’ve said it a million times.” The highly-anticipated heads-up match 13 years in the making will finally take place on Wednesday, August 25 when Phil Hellmuth takes on Tom Dwan in High Stakes Duel III (Round 2) at 8 pm ET on PokerGO. Now with an undefeated record of 7-0 in the High Stakes Duel format, Hellmuth most recently vanquished Fox Sports personality Nick Wright in the first round of HSD III. When Wright declined the option for a rematch, the powers at PokerGO filled the open seat with of the most popular personalities to emerge from the early eras of online poker, fan favorite Tom Dwan. Hellmuth and Dwan will pick up where Wright left off, skipping the initial $50,000 buy-in match and jumping straight to Round 2, where both players will put up $100,000. "We're going to play heads up, I told you." Bringing Dwan in to face Hellmuth is more than just a case of fan service, it’s also a nice nod to history. At the 2008 NBC Heads-Up Poker Championship, Hellmuth and Dwan faced off in what is arguably the most memorable match of the events eight-year history. Back then, Hellmuth was just an 11-time WSOP bracelet winner - still the record holder - and as popular as he’d ever been. Dwan was an emerging online poker star in a time when there was still a divide between “real poker” and “internet poker.” The miniature heads-up table was nowhere near big enough for the two egos sitting at either end. Hellmuth, clad in his then signature Ultimate Bet hockey jersey, looked eager to show the kid a lesson or two while Dwan, having trouble getting comfortable, wasn’t interested in old-school ways of thinking. And just when the match was getting started, it was over. Hellmuth and Dwan were both all in, Hellmuth with pocket aces and Dwan with pocket tens. Standard. But when the ten of spades hit the turn and Dwan took the lead, the Poker Brat quickly emerged and the jawing began. “Son, I would tell you this much, son, I’d never put in more than three thousand with two tens before the flop,” Hellmuth chided Dwan. “I was going to say good game, sorry for the suck out but…when you phrase it that way it makes me not wanna.” Dwan replied, with his ever-present skyward side-eye in full effect. “Phil, that’s why you lose money online.” Dwan pushed the envelope telling Hellmuth to pick his stakes, that he’d play Hellmuth as many times as he’d like. As the back-and-forth continued, Hellmuth then uttered what may be the most memorable line from the match. “We’ll see if you’re even around in five years,” Thirteen Years Later Far more than five years later, Dwan is still here and both he and Hellmuth enjoy the perks of being two of the most popular players in the game today. With the clash of thirteen years ago well behind them, the 2008 NBC Heads Up Poker Championship is still the backdrop for what will be an interesting clash of perceived styles when they reunite to finally face off in a televised rematch. The hype for the match will get started on PokerGO on Tuesday, August 24 at 8 pm. ET when Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman are scheduled to break down what can be expected when the two meet face-to-face. Then both Hellmuth and Dwan sit down with Nejad just before cards are in the air during The Weigh-In which starts on Wednesday, August 25 at 7:30 pm ET. Both players will give their thoughts about the match and, very likely, talk about their history together both in front of the cameras and behind the scenes. [caption id="attachment_635969" align="aligncenter" width="750"] Phil Hellmuth, Tom Dwan (and Mr. Beast) play high-stakes cash at the Aria.[/caption] Finally, the action kicks off on August 25 at 8 pm ET as Hellmuth puts his undefeated record on the line while Dwan returns to the poker spotlight, bringing his years of playing in the ultra-high-stakes Macau cash games to the High Stakes Duel felt. Whether Dwan bests Hellmuth to take the HSD belt or if Hellmuth avenges his 2008 NBC Heads-Up loss over Dwan, the loser of the match will have the option to call for a rematch with the stakes doubling to $200,000 a player. High Stakes Duel III, Round 2 - Phil Hellmuth vs. Tom Dwan is available with a subscription to PokerGO.
  19. Poker Hall of Fame member Erik Seidel captured his ninth career World Series of Poker bracelet after winning GGPoker 2021 WSOP Online Event #11 ($10,000 Super MILLION$ High Roller) for $977,842. With the victory, Seidel moves into a tie for third all-time bracelets with the legendary Johnny Moss and sits just one bracelet win behind Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey, and Johnny Chan. Seidel's last WSOP gold bracelet win took place in 2007 when he won the live $5,000 Duece To Seven Lowball Championship for $538,835 of his now more than $37 million in career live earnings. The final table was especially hard-fought as not only was the gold bracelet on the line, but the WSOP edition of the Super MILLION$ had nearly $1 million up top. Start of the day chip leader Francisco Benitez applied constant pressure while some of today's best online pros including Thomas Mueloecker, Isaac Baron, and Rui Ferreira fought over six-figure sums. It took just two hands before the first player fell. With the blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Thomas Muehloecker opened from under the gun to 336,000 holding [poker card="js"][poker card="jd"]. When it folded to Rui Ferreira in the hijack, he moved all in for roughly 15 big blinds with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Muehloecker took only a second to call, and Ferreira was flipping for his tournament life. The board ran out [poker card="td"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="qc"] allowing Muehloecker’s pocket jacks to hold and ending Ferreira’s day before it got started in ninth place for $129,410. Despite the quick elimination of Ferreira, the action at the final table slowed down considerably. It took nearly an hour for the next player to hit the rail. The blinds were up to 125,000/250,000 (30,000 ante) when a short-stacked Isaac Baron opened from under the gun to 1.25 million with [poker card="qd"][poker card="js"], leaving himself with just over one big blind behind. In the cutoff, Chin-wei Chien flat called holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"] and the rest of the table let go of their hands. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] and Baron moved all-in for his final big blind and Chien snap-called. The turn was the [poker card="2s"], giving Baron some flush outs but the river came the [poker card="tc"] and shipped the pot to Chien, as Baron, who started the day sixth in chips, exited in eighth place for $166,631. Five hands later, former Super MILLION$ champion Claas Segebrecht found himself on the short stack and looking for help. After Erik Seidel opened from UTG+1 to 500,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"], it folded to Segebrecht in the big blind with [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"] and he moved all-in. Seidel made the quick call and the flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"] keeping Seidel’s pocket kings in great shape to hold. The [poker card="kd"] effectively ended the hand improving Seidel to a set and leaving Segebrecht drawing dead to the [poker card="9h"] river. It was a small river needle for Segebrecht who collected $214,557 for his seventh-place finish. Thirty minutes later, the blinds had climbed to 175,000/350,000 (45,000 ante) when Norway’s Joachim Haraldstad put in a raise to 1.575 million with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"], leaving himself with three big blinds behind. By this time, Fransicso Benitez had amassed a healthy chip lead over the field and moved all-in from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Both the blinds released their hands and Haraldstad committed the rest of his stack. The flop came [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"], keeping kickers in play. The turn was the [poker card="qc"], bringing some additional chop outs for Haraldstad. But the river came the [poker card="4c"], awarding the pot to Benitez and sending Haraldstad out in sixth place for a $276,268 payday. Moments later, Chien moved all-in for nearly 3.9 million from the cutoff with [poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] and when it folded to Muehloecker in the big blind with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"] he made the call. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"][poker card="6s"] flop put Muehloecker in the lead with top pair and left Chien looking for running spades or one of the last two fours in the deck. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] and the river was the [poker card="kh"], ending Chein’s run in fifth place for $355,728. A tense four-handed battle was waged for the better part of thirty minutes as Benitez held the chip lead, Muehloecker was not terribly far behind, and both Seidel and Shyngis Satubayev were within striking distance with around 20 big blinds. With the blinds at 250,000/500,000 (60,000 ante), Benitez put in a raise to 1 million on the button with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] and Satubayev shoved all-in for more than 12 million holding [poker card="ts"][poker card="td"]. Seidel folded his [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"] and Benitez quickly called putting Satubayev’s tournament life at risk. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"], keeping the pocket queens in the lead. The turn fell the [poker card="ks"], reversing Satubayev’s outs from the final two tens to two queens to make a straight. But the river was [poker card="kc"] and the cooler sent Satubayev to the rail in fourth place for $458,043. Benitez held a roughly 2:1 chip lead over both Muehloecker and Seidel when, with the blinds at 300,000/600,000 (75,000 ante), he opened from the button to 1.2 million with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"]. After Seidel folded his small blind, Muehloecker shipped his 26 big blind stack all-in holding [poker card="as"][poker card="th"]. Benitez made the call and Muehloecker saw that he was dominated. The flop came [poker card="7d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"], keeping Benitez ahead. The turn was the [poker card="kh"], and Muehloecker needed a ten to survive. However, the river fell the [poker card="jd"] and Muehloecker bid for a Super MILLION$ title ended in third place for $589,785. Benitez had both the chip lead and momentum when heads-up play against Seidel started. But only a few hands into heads-up play, Seidel found a double when he coolered Benitez holding [poker card="qs"][poker card="qd"] against the [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"] of Benitez. After than, Seidel built a chip lead of his own, taking a 2:1 advantage. On the last hand, with the blinds at 350,000/700,000 (85,000 ante) Seidel limped the button holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="8h"] and Benitez put in a raise to 2.8 million with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"]. Seidel took a few seconds and then shipped all-in and Benitez snap-called creating a monster pot of more than 52 million. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="4h"], giving Seidel heart flush out while keeping Benitez with a small edge. The turn was the [poker card="ad"], but it was the [poker card="3h"] river that helped Seidel come from behind in the hand to win it all. Benitez settled for runner-up and its $759,418 payday for second place, while Erik Seidel claims World Series of Poker bracelet number 9 and the $977,842 first-place prize. WSOP Online Event #11 (Super MILLION$) Final Table Erik Seidel - $977,842 Francisco Benitez - $759,418 Thomas Muehloecker - $589,785 Shyngis Satubayev - $458,043 Chin-wei Chien - $355,728 Joachim Haraldstad - $276,268 Claas Segebrecht - $214,557 Isaac Baron - $166,631 Rui Ferreira - $129,410
  20. Brazilian domination over PocketFives Online Player of the Month honors continued in July as current worldwide #6-ranked Renan Carlos Bruschi became the latest player from the poker powerhouse country to take home the title. Bruschi joins the likes of Brunno Botteon, Yuri Dzivielevski, Dalton Hobold, and Geraldo Cesar in the parade of Brazilians who have claimed the top spot in the monthly race. In July, Bruschi earned 3,251 leaderboard points, more than enough to keep second place Christopher ‘basile28’ Basile at bay by 116 points and eclipsing Joao ‘Naza114’ Vieira by 396 points. Bruschi’s results were bolstered by a pair of high roller victories including his win in the July 11 edition of the PokerStars $1,050 Sunday HR for $32,055 and 398.75 points. Then, on July 21, he bested the 172-entry field of the GGPoker $1,050 High Rollers Super Tuesday for $39,526.48 and another 414.73 points. The pair of scores both made it into Bruschi’s top-20 career scores, but they weren’t the only five-figure cashes of his month. At the same time he was taking down the PokerStars High Roller Club, Bruschi finished as the runner-up in the PokerStars $109 Bounty Builder for a score of more than $11,700. The very next day he continued his string of deep runs with another second-place finish in the GGPoker $1,050 Sunday High Rollers Heater for $12,382 and 194.04 points. By the end of the month, Bruschi recorded a total of 125 cashes for more than $242,000. This marks his second career monthly title, his first since 2015 and now he sits just $111,000 away from surpassing $7 million in total career earnings. it was also a mammoth month for current #1-ranked American grinder Christopher ‘basile28’ Basile who finished second in the Online Player of the Month race by grinding the World Series of Poker events on WSOP.com. In total, Basile had 59 results which earned him more than $266,000. While he wasn’t able to lock down a gold bracelet, he did pick up six five-figure scores including a career-high cash. On July 2, Basile fell just one place short of a bracelet when he finished as the runner-up in WSOP Bracelet Event #1 ($500 NLHE The BIG 500 Kickoff) for $64,935 and 500.13 points, which, at the time, was far and away the largest score of his online career. Days later, on July 7 he took down the WSOP.com Tuesday Showdown for $17,835 and 247.39 points. Basile continued to accumulate scores but his largest of his month, and career-to-date, came on July 21 when he finished in fourth place in WSOP Bracelet Event #20 ($3,200 NLHE High Roller) for $71,990 and 423.91 points. When all was said and done, Basile racked up 3,135 leaderboard points, soared past $1 million in total lifetime earnings, and climbed to a career-high worldwide ranking of #52 in the world. While Basile is just getting started when it comes to racking up big-time scores, Joao ‘Naza114’ Vieira - this month’s third-place finisher with 2,855 points - is a veteran in the game. With over $25 million in recorded lifetime earning, Vieira is currently sitting atop the Online All-Time Money List and spent the better part of July doing what he does best - grinding. Vieira posted 76 in-the-money finishes for a total of $244,784, the bulk of which came on July 5 when he finished as the runner-up to Damian Salas in the 589-entry field of the GGPoker $1,050 Sunday High Rollers Main Event for $86,179 and 506.34 points. He followed that up with another pair of five-figure scores including a fourth-place finish in the July 6 edition of the GGPoker $100K High Rollers Main Event for $17,950 and on July 19 he made the final table of the $1,050 Battle of Malta Sunday High Rollers for another $27,160. July Player of the Month Results [table id=258 /]
  21. Daniel Smiljkovic entered the final day of GGPoker WSOP Online Event #8 ($5,000 6-Handed NLH Championship) with a healthy chip lead that he never relinquished as he sailed to victory, earning an online career-high score of $423,426 and his first World Series of Poker gold bracelet. The 479-entry field generated a prize pool of more than $2.275 million and featured a who’s who of online poker talent. Notable names including Super MILLION$ crusher Thomas Muehloecker, former #1-ranked Niklas Astedt, and 2020 WSOP Main Event champion Damian Salas were all eliminated just a few spots shy of making the money. Daniel Negreanu streamed his way to a cash and was joined by the likes of Brazilian Pedro Padilha, Kevin Martin, Anatoly Filatov, Galen Hall, and last year’s GGPoker WSOP Online Main Event champion Stoyan Madanzhiev. By the end of Day 1, only nine players were left, and once Roman Hrabec (9th, $32,218) and ‘DontTIltGG’ (8th, $37,451.71) were eliminated the final seven players converged at the final table. Mere minutes into play, Aki Virtanen hit the rail when his [poker card="3s"][poker card="3h"] couldn’t outrace Xuming Qi’s [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"] on the [poker card="jh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="js"]qc] board. Virtanen’s seventh-place run was good for $60,489.34. With six left and the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (10,000 ante), the chip stacks were polarized with three players sitting on dangerously low chip stacks and looking to double in order to get back in the thick of things. Five hands after Virtanen’s bustout, the first of the final six fell. Smiljkovic put in a raise from under the gun to 160,000 with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="4h"] and Yonatan Koko, next to act, moved all-in for just shy of 191,000 holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="4s"]. On the button, Qi made the call with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8d"], and Smiljkovic completed as well. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"] and the action checked through. The turn was the [poker card="7d"] and, again, both Smiljkovic and Qi checked. The river came the [poker card="3d"] and when both players checked a third time, Qi’s pocket eights were good and Koko was eliminated in sixth place for $83,662.13. At 50,000/100,000 (12,500 ante), Qi put in a raise from the cutoff to 200,000 with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"] and George Wolff three-bet shipped his final 12 big blinds on the button with his [poker card="ts"][poker card="th"]. Christodoulos Christodoulou called the shove from the small blind holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"] and when the action returned to Qi, they called as well. The flop came [poker card="qs"][poker card="2c"][poker card="jh"], keeping Wolff’s pocket tens in the lead and both Christodoulou and Qi checked. The [poker card="tc"] hit the turn and while Wolff improved to a set, Christodoulou hit a gutshot straight draw. Christodoulou led for just 200,000 into the pot of 4 million and Qi flat called. The river was the [poker card="kc"], improving Qi to a straight as well and when Christodoulou, again, bet 200,000, Qi made the call and the pair chopped the pot as Wolff’s set was second best. Wolff finished in fifth place and collected $115,712.02. The elimination of Wolff was good news for Marius Gierse who was sitting on just four big blinds and would, at the very least, ladder a pay jump of roughly $45,000. On Gierse’s big blind, Qi opened from under the gun to 200,000 and when it folded back to the Austrian, he defended, leaving himself fewer than two big blinds behind. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] and Gierse checked to Qi who moved all-in for more than enough to cover Gierse. Gierse folded, leaving himself just one hand to try and come back. From the small blind on the next hand, Gierse put his final 165,000 in the middle with [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"] and Qi quickly called holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="9s"] and the board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="9d"], shipping the small pot to Qi and sending Marius out in fourth place for $160,040.02. Combined with his third-place finish in the GGPoker Super MILLION$ just one day prior for $198,800, Gierse took home more than $358,000 in a 24-hour span. At three-handed Smiljkovic held a better than 2:1 chip lead over both Qi and Christodoulou and for the better part of 20 minutes the two shorter stacks took turns passing chips back and forth and taking over second place. For Christodoulou, his key final table hand took place when the blinds were at 70,000/140,000 (17,5000 ante). On the button, Qi raised to 280,000 with the [poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] and Christodoulou found [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] in the small blind and made it 420,000 to go. Smiljkovic let go of his big blind and Qi called the min-raise. The flop came [poker card="4s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3h"] giving Qi trips and leaving Christodoulou’s aces needing help. Christodoulou led out for 280,000 and Qi flatted. The turn was the [poker card="td"] and Christodoulou led again, this time for 560,000. Qi raised to 1.4 million and Christodoulou, having Qi covered, instantly shipped. Qi snap-called and showed Christodoulou that he was about to have his aces cracked. The river was the [poker card="8s"] sending the massive 8.4 million pot to Qi and leaving Christodoulou with just over 1 million in chips. Despite finding a quick double two hands later, Christodoulou hit the rail in third place just four hands later when he moved all-in with [poker card="qd"][poker card="7d"] and Smiljkovic called with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"] and the board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"][poker card="5s"][poker card="kd"]. Christodoulou took home $221,349.35 for the third-place finish. The heads-up battle between Smiljkovic and Qi didn’t last long. Over the course of 15 minutes, Smiljkovic steadily chipped away at Qi’s stack, applying pressure in key spots and showing down big hands in others. By the time the final hand played out, Smiljkovic turned his lead into a 10:1 advantage. With blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Qi open-shipped the button holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"] and Smiljkovic called for the win with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="as"][poker card="3s"][poker card="3c"] flop kept king-high in the lead. The [poker card="4h"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="qc"] river hit, Qi’s run was over in second place which was good for $306,145.45. Smiljkovic ended up with a career-high online cash of $423,426.16, and his first WSOP gold bracelet. GGPoker WSOP Online Event #8 Final Table Results Daniel Smiljkovic - $423,426.16 Xuming Qi - $306,145.45 Christodoulos Christodoulou - $221,349.35 Marius Gierse - $160,040.02 George Wolff - $115,712.02 Yonatan Koto - $83,662.13
  22. Andras Nemeth started the final table of this week’s GGPoker Super MILLION$ eighth in chips, but the former #1-ranked online pro quickly climbed out of the cellar and promptly ran over the table, eliminating five of his final eight opponents and earning his first career Super MILLION$ title and the $325,957 top prize. It took nearly forty minutes for the first player to hit the rail. Although he started the day seventh in chips, with the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (5,000 ante) Daniel Dvoress was sitting at the bottom of the chip counts. After Nemeth opened from the cutoff to 84,000 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"], Dvoress moved all-in for 536,000 from the big blind with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="jc"]. Nemeth made the quick call and the board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"] shipping the pot to Nemeth’s pocket kings and ending Dvoress’ day in ninth place for $45,100. With the blinds up to 30,000/60,000 (7,500) ante, a rare double bustout took place. A short-stacked ‘Nator’ moved all-in from middle position for just over 530,000 holding [poker card="js"][poker card="tc"] and right behind him, Marius Gierse called with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. When the action folded around to Daniel Smiljkovic in the big blind, he moved all-in for a total of 1.1 million with [poker card="jc"][poker card="jd"]. With ‘Nator’ already all-in, Gierse took a few moments and, with the largest stack of all three, decided to make the call. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"], quickly putting Gierse in command of the hand. The turn was the [poker card="8h"] and the river was the [poker card="qs"], giving Gierse top two pair and securing the double KO. ‘Nator’ officially exited in eighth place for $57,750 and Smiljkovic finished in seventh place, good for $73,948. One orbit later, Nemeth opened to 126,000 from under the gun with [poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"] only to be three-bet to 646,000 by Austria’s ‘niNohR’ on the button holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"]. After the blinds let their hands go Nemeth four-bet enough to put ‘niNohR’ all-in, and ‘niNohR’ called it off. Nemeth’s pocket sevens held across the board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3d"] and in just their second ever Super MILLION$ event, ‘niNohR’ finished in sixth place for $94,689. Thomas Muehloecker has had a habit of making the final table of the Super MILLION$ as of late, but has yet to close one out. He started the day fifth in chips but had a hard time gaining momentum. On his final hand of the day, with blinds up to 35,000/70,000 (8,500 ante) Nemeth raised from the button to 147,000 with [a][poker card="9h"] and from the small blind, Muehloecker shipped his 13 big blind stack with [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. With the overwhelming chip lead, Nemeth made the call. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="js"][poker card="4h"] bringing Nemeth top pair, and pairing Muehloecker’s jack. The [poker card="3c"] turn was no help to Muehloecker and the [poker card="5d"] river ended his quest for a Super MILLION$ title in fifth place for $121,247. Minutes later, after the blinds escalated to 40,000/80,000 (10,000 ante), ‘oiltrader’ open-shoved his 1.3 million stack with [poker card="kd"][poker card="js"]. On the button, high-stakes savant Artur Martirosian three-bet shipped his more than 2 million chip stack with [poker card="td"][poker card="th"] forcing folds from Gierse and Nemeth. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"] flop brought ‘oiltrader’ flush outs to go with his overcards, but the [poker card="4h"] turn and [poker card="5c"] river was of no help. ‘oiltrader’ fell in fourth place for $155,254. Three-handed play started with Nemeth holding a roughly 2:1 chip lead over both Martirosian and Gierse. Nemeth would add on to his lead in a classic flip against Gierse. In the small blind, Gierse completed with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"] and Nemeth put in a raise to 320,000 holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"]. Gierse took a few seconds and three-bet to 960,000 and Nemeth promptly four-bet shoved. Gierse, looking for a double up, called with his pocket queens and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="2c"], putting Nemeth in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="jd"] bringing Gierse some additional outs, but the [poker card="js"] was not one of them and Gierse, who started the day with the chip lead, settled for third place and a $198,800 payday. Heads-up play didn’t last long as momentum continued to be on Nemeth’s side. On the final hand of the day the blinds were at 50,000/100,000 (12,500 ante) and Nemeth held a better than 12:1 lead over his talented Russian opponent. Martirosian completed on the button with [poker card="jd"][poker card="8s"] and Nemeth checked his option with [poker card="3h"][poker card="2c"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="2h"][poker card="2s"] flop provided all the action that was necessary to finish the tournament. Nemeth checked, Martirosian bet 100,000, Nemeth check-raised to 200,000, Martirosian made it 350,000 and Nemeth called. The turn was the [poker card="tc"] and after Nemeth checked, Martirosian moved all-in and Nemeth quickly called leaving Martirosian looking for an eight. The river was the [poker card="6s"] and Martirosian ended up in second place for $254,559 while Nemeth captured the $325,957 first-place prize. Super MILLION$ Final Table Results (8/10) Andras Nemeth - $325,957 Artur Martirosian - $254,559 Marius Gierse - $198,800 ‘oiltrader’ - $155,254 Thomas Muehloecker - $121,247 ‘niHohR’ - $94,689 Daniel Smiljkovic - $73,948 ‘Nator’ - $57,750 Daniel Dvoress - $45,100 edit: a previous version of this article indicated that Nemeth had won his second Super MILLION$ title when it was his first. This has been corrected, we regret the error.
  23. Brazil’s Thiago Macedo scored a second bracelet for Brazil in the early events of the GGPoker 2021 World Series of Poker Online after taking down Event #4 ($800 Double Chance No Limit Hold’em) for $161,637. The two-day event drew 1,643 entries, generating a prize pool of more than $1.24 million with a number of notable names working their way into the final nine. Macedo, a former top-20 ranked PocketFiver with more than $6.7 million in recorded lifetime earnings, was joined by Finland’s longtime grinder Tomi Brouk, and Bulgaria’s Stoyan Obreshkov, who just one year ago made the final table of the international 2020 WSOP Online Main Event. A little over 50 minutes into the final table, the first player fell. With the blinds at 100,000/200,000 (25,000 ante) Russia’s Sergei Pillpenko open-shoved for his final four big blinds. In the big blind, Tomi Brouk made the call holding [poker card="tc"][poker card="8h"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="3s"] flop kept Pillpenko’s ace-high in the lead. All of that changed on the [poker card="th"] turn, when Brouk hit a pair. The river was the [poker card="3h"] ending Pillpenko’s day in ninth place for $16,163. Seven hands later the blinds were up to 125,000/250,000 (30,000 ante) and Sung keung Pang found themselves short stacked in the big blind. Stoyan Obreshkov opened from mid-position to 500,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and when the action folded back to Pang, they defended their big blind with [poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"]. The flop came [poker card="jc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"] and Pang shoved for the rest of their eight big blind stack and Obreshkov snap-called with his two overs and flush draw. The turn was the [poker card="ad"] and the river came the [poker card="ts"], giving the hand to Obreshkov pair of aces. Pang was eliminated in eighth place for $21,554. Two orbits later, Brouk opened to 550,000 from under the gun and Obreshkov, next to act, just flat called holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"]. Ido Aboudi then three-bet shipped for just over 3.4 million with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="qd"]. Brouk got out of the way and Obreshkov made the call. The board ran out [poker card="5d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] giving Obreshkov a full house and sending Aboudi to the rail in seventh place for $28,743. Obreshkov took over the chip lead, however, during the next 45 minutes he played a pair of big pots that sent his stack towards the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 175,000/350,000 (45,000 ante), Andras Nasman, who took a big chunk of Obreshkov’s chips earlier, opened to 700,000 with [poker card="th"][poker card="tc"]. When the action folded to Obreshkov on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"] he three-bet half his stack. Nasman immediately four-bet enough to put Obreshkov all-in and Obreshkov made the call. The board ran out [poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="td"][poker card="ad"] and Obreshkov was drawing dead from the turn with Nasman spiking a full house. Obreshkov picked up $38,330 for his sixth-place finish and Nasman soared to a massive chip lead. The blinds climbed to 200,000/400,000 (50,000 ante) when Ukraine’s Ivan Babintsev made his last stand, shipping his final six big blinds in the middle with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qc"]. When it folded to Mathias Siljander in the big blind, he made the call with the [poker card="as"][poker card="7s"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3s"] brought a pair for Siljander and left Babinstev looking for help in the form of pairing his over cards or runner-runner backdoor clubs. No such help arrived on the [poker card="6h"] turn and the [poker card="4s"] river, leaving the Ukranian to settle for fifth place and a $51,114 payday. During the same level, Macedo played a pivotal pot when Brouk opened the button to 800,000 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"] and Macedo defended holding the [poker card="kc"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"] giving Macedo top pair and Brouk second pair and an open-ended straight draw. Macedo checked and Brouk put out a bet of 600,000 which Macedo called. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Macedo checked to Brouk who checked it back. The river was the [poker card="4s"] and Macedo, who had Brouk covered, led for just over 1 million. Brouk fired all-in and after a short tank, Macedo made the call winning the pot with his pair of kings. Brouk fell in fourth place and picked up $68,161. It didn’t take long for Macedo to shift into high gear. Two hands after finding a double through Siljander, Macedo finished him when Siljander moved all-in from the button with [poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"] and Macedo called with [poker card="kh"][poker card="9s"]. Macedo spiked top pair on the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"][poker card="4c"] flop and it held through the [poker card="7c"] turn and [poker card="as"] river. Siljander was felted in third place and added $90,894 to his bankroll. At the start of heads-up play, Nasman held nearly a two-to-one chip lead over Macedo. But it didn’t take long for Macedo to turn the tables and reverse the chip lead in his favor. The pair battled for over 40 minutes until the tournament came to an end. On the final hand of the tournament, with the blinds at 400,000/600,000 (100,000 ante), Macedo limped the button holding [poker card="qs"][poker card="9c"]. Nasman put in a raise roughly 4 big blinds with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="js"] and Macedo made the call. The flop came [poker card="qs"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6h"], giving Macedo top two pair while Nasman had all the outs with a straight draw, flush draw, and the straight flush draw. Nasman led out for roughly half pot and Macedo smooth called. The turn was the [poker card="8h"] and both players checked. When the [poker card="kc"] river hit, Nasman moved all-in and Macedo made the call to win it all. Nasman picked up $121,209 as the runner-up while Macedo locked up $161,637, a top-5 career online score, and his first World Series of Poker bracelet. GGPoker WSOP Bracelet Event #4 Final Table Payouts Thiago Macedo - $161,637 Andreas Nasman - $121,209 Mathias Siljander - $90,894 Tomi Brouk- $68,161 Ivan Babintsev - $51,114 Stoyan Obreshkov - $38,330 Ido Aboudi - $28,743 Sung Keung Pang - $21,554 Sergei Pillpenko - $16,163
  24. It was a dominating day for Michael Addamo at the final table of this week’s GGPoker Super MILLION$ as he eliminated every single player at the table en route to his record-best fourth career Super MILLION$ title and the $325,957 first-place prize. All early signs pointed to Addamo walking away with the win, from his overwhelming chip lead at the start of the day to the frequency that he woke up with premium starting hands. He went wire-to-wire and was never really in danger of losing his lead despite being up against a lineup of online poker’s elite including Ludovic Geilich, Isaac Haxton, Bert Stevens, and the current #1-ranked player in the world Yuri Dzivielevski. A little more than twenty minutes into the final table, with the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (6,000 ante), Addamo got it started when he opened to 100,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"]. When the action folded to Aleks Ponakovs in the hijack with [poker card="td"][poker card="th"] he moved all-in for more than 1.1 million which Addamo quickly called. The flop came [poker card="7h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9d"] bringing Ponskovs additional open-ended straight outs. However, the turn was the [poker card="7c"] and the river came the [poker card="7d"] giving Addamo a full house and sending Ponakovs out in ninth place with a $45,100 payday. The very next hand, Addamo again opened for 100,000 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"]. ‘Aunty_Ninja’ three-bet to 250,000 holding the [poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"] and Ludovic Geilich (playing under his screen name ‘Gr4vyB04t’) four-bet to 518,675 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"], leaving himself just two big blinds behind. Action quickly returned to Addamo who moved all-in, forcing ‘Aunty_Ninja’ to fold her pocket jacks. The board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2h"] giving Addamo’s pocket kings the pot as Geilich hit the rail in eighth place for $57,750. Addamo made it three victims in a row when on the next hand it folded to former #1-ranked Bert Stevens in the small blind with [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"] and he moved all-in for 12 big blinds. Addamo picked up [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"] in the big blind and made the call. The flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"] giving Stevens some life by picking up a flush draw. The turn was the [poker card="8s"], keeping Addamo’s king-high in the lead and when the [poker card="3h"] river hit, Addamo completed the three-hand hat trick and sent Stevens home in seventh place for $73,948. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (7,500 ante) the current #1-ranked online pro in the world, Brazil’s Yuri Dzivielevski, opened to 120,00 on the button with [poker card="js"][poker card="jc"]. After Addamo folded his small blind, New Zealand’s ‘Aunty_Ninja’ moved all-in for more than 1.1 million holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"] and Dzivielevski, with slightly fewer chips, made the call. The flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"], keeping Dzivielevski’s pocket jacks as the favorite. The turn was the [poker card="6h"], giving ‘Aunty_Ninja’ additional flush outs to go with her overcards. But the river came the [poker card="8c"] and Dzivielevski found a much-needed double up while ‘Aunty_Ninja’ was left crippled. Two hands later ‘Aunty_Ninja’ was out of the tournament in sixth place for $94,689 when she moved all-in with her final big blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"] against two players, one of which was Addamo who made a king-high flush on the river. In the next level, 40,000/80,000 (10,000 ante), Addamo again went to battle with a premium hand. He opened from under the gun to 160,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"] and Francisco Benitez quickly shipped his remaining ten big blinds with [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"]. Holding a massive chip lead still, Addamo made the call and there was little drama as the board ran out [poker card="4c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="ac"] shipping another pot to Addamo and eliminating Benitez in fifth place for $121,247 Two orbits later, down to four players, the action folded to Addamo in the small blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"] and he put in a raise to 280,000. In the big blind, former Super MILLION$ champ Isaac Haxton picked up [poker card="ad"][poker card="jc"] and decided to make a stand, shipping all-in for just over 2.6 million in chips. It didn’t take but a second for Addamo to make the call, putting Haxton at risk. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3h"] flop kept Addamo in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="5h"], taking away some outs for Haxton. The river was the [poker card="4h"] giving Addamo the flush and sending Haxton, who started the day second in chips, out in fourth which was good for $155,254. After that hand, Addamo climbed to over 12 million in chips and had a roughly 6:1 advantage over second-place Dzivielevski. ‘judd trump’ sat in third place, with only three big blinds. But ‘judd trump’ found a double. And then another. Eventually, the Super MILLION$ grinder climbed into second place as Dzivielevski dwindled. Eventually, with blinds at 60,000/120,000 (15,000 ante), Addamo opened the button to 240,000 and after ‘judd trump’ folded his small blind, Dzivielevski defended holding [poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"]. Dzivielevski checked it to Addamo on the [poker card="qh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2d"] flop and after Addamo min-bet, Dzivielevski made the call. The turn was the [poker card="7d"] and both players checked. The river was the [poker card="jc"] and once Dzivielevski checked to Addamo, the chip leader shoved all-in putting Dzivielevski to the test for the rest of his chips. Dzivielevski took a few moments but eventually made the call only to see his hand dominated. Dzivielevski exited in third place and added another $198,800 to his more than $13.6 million in career online earnings. Addamo started heads-up play with a sizable lead, and over the course of twenty minutes continued to chip away at ‘judd trump’s stack. Eventually, with the blinds up to 70,000/140,000 (17,500 ante), Addamo opened to [poker card="ah"][poker card="qc"] on the button and with fewer than 15 big blinds left, ‘judd trump’ shipped his stack holding [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"]. Addamo snap-called and the pair watched as the flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="tc"][poker card="9c"], giving Addamo a whole host of outs. The [poker card="8h"] turn was one of them, leaving ‘judd trump’ drawing dead to a chop. But the river was the [poker card="kh"] and Addamo completed the clean sweep of the final table. ‘judd trump’ settled for second place and $254,559. Addamo scored $325,957 for first place and becomes the first player to reach four Super MILLION$ titles as well as the only player to have won a title in both Season One and Season Two. Super MILLION$ Final Table Results (8/3) Michael Addamo - $325,957 ‘judd trump’ - $254,559 Yuri Dzivielevski - $198,800 Isaac Haxton - $155,254 Francisco Benitez - $121,247 ‘Aunty_Ninja’ - $94,689 Bert Stevens - $73,948 Ludovic Geilich - $57,750 Aleks Ponakovs - $45,100
  25. Chidwick - 4 Petrangelo - 4 Ismirovic - 3 Maio - 2 Manuel - 2
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.