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BscHons

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About BscHons

  • Community Level
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  • All-time high

    4,586 (2013)

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Latest post

  1. I want to make one last comment (I promise!) here to round this off. I want to explain how I made this possible. There is definitely some merit in my original post, but it's riddled with negativity and self-defeatism. It represents someone who's fed up with feeling like no matter what they do, they cannot make the grade. It’s amazing how different I feel now; the transformation since then, and this is what I want to share with you. Saying that, the real fruit in this thread is in the responses. Lenail mentioned 'balance', and this is key. From day one, the dream consumed me. My life was woefully imbalanced, and this isn't a recipe for success. After writing this thread, I took a break from poker for a few months (sound advice G2thV & gjallen1975). After a while the hunger returned, and this is when I knew I had to give it one final go. I spoke with one of my friends, and he said the reason why I could not give up poker is because I had never truly failed. Equally, I'd never fully committed to poker. So I gave myself one last chance. It had to be different this time - I had to use everything I had learned on the journey thus far to my benefit. I had to commit to a strict regime of study and playing. I laid everything out on the table with painful honesty - all my leaks, mental and technical. Through prolonged study and discipline I had an epiphany - I am my own worst enemy. Both at the tables and away. I was overcomplicating everything (spot on again G2thV!), and as hard as it was to believe, the answer was a simple one. 'If you want to be great at anything, you have to start with the basics.' Mentally, I lacked belief and discipline. So I set about tackling this. I read some biographies of successful people to study their mindset. I particularly like Randy Pausch's 'Last Lecture: Achieving your childhood dreams', (a profoundly inspirational video - on youtube - and I recommend it to all). I learned from him that walls are there for us to break them down, and if you want something badly enough, you have to persevere. All clichéd, but all true. I read 'The Skinny on Willpower', by Jim Randel: an excellent summary of current research on self-discipline. I forced myself to think positively about poker, to make myself believe that I COULD do it. I learned was that it doesn't pay to compare yourself to others, and their success. I created a regime of self-discipline founded upon sound preparation. What it all boils down to though, is hard work, and never, ever giving up. This is the common trait amongst successful people - L Rocketz: 'Winners don't quit and quitters don't win'. How true. Finally, thank you. Thank you to all those who shared their thoughts - they played their part. It's not a life changing amount of money, but it means so much more than that. At the risk of sounding trite, it's the culmination of a long journey, and the beginning of another. Psychological ceiling?! BULLSHIT! Good luck all.
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