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  1. The Dallas Mavericks, an NBA franchise owned by Mark Cuban, are hiring Haralabos "Bob" Voulgaris as Director of Quantitative Research and Development, reported Adrian Wojnarowski and Zach Lowe of ESPN on Thursday. The hiring of Voulgaris, a famed former professional sports bettor known to play high-stakes poker, is another dynamic maneuver within the progressive NBA. As a poker player, Voulgaris became known during the boom years. He arrived on the scene in 2005 when he reached the televised final table of the Season III WPT L.A. Poker Classic $10,000 Championship. Voulgaris finished second to Michael “The Grinder” Mizrachi and took home $904,122. He has since earned 10 addition cashes on the World Poker Tour, including a third-place finish in the Season XVI WPT Borgata Poker Open $10,000 Championship for $434,560. Another career highlight on the felt for Voulgaris includes a fourth-place finish in the 2017 World Series of Poker $111,111 High Roller for One Drop where he earned $1.158 million. At the time of this report, Voulgaris had $3.091 million in live tournament earnings. Voulgaris also has several notable appearances on poker cash games on TV, including High Stakes Poker and the PokerStars Big Game. The move could prove transformative for the Mavericks in two ways. Voulgaris’ success in sports betting can be directly associated with his deep knowledge of statistical analysis and application of data. providing the Mavericks with a very high-level get. Through making the hire, the Mavericks can look to apply Voulgaris’ insight and analysis to such things as roster construction and on-court strategy in an effort to get a leg up on the competition. Given his vast experience as a professional sports bettor, the move also provides the Mavericks with a great asset in alignment with the league’s changing landscape surrounding legalized sports betting. As sports betting becomes legal in more and more states within the U.S. and allows for increased revenue generation within the league, having someone on staff with the strategic mindset of Voulgaris could prove incredibly valuable. Photo courtesy of WPT.
  2. Steve ‘MrTimCaum’ O’Dwyer earned himself another huge payday on Tuesday when he took down the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller for £450,000. O’Dwyer topped a field of 51 entries to score another trophy for his case and move to more than $24 million in career live tournament earnings. O’Dwyer’s 2018 may be flying under the radar, as a lot of other players grab headlines, but he’s been no slouch on the felt this year with more than $4 million in live tournament earnings following this victory. It’s his eighth six-figure cash of the year and fourth of more than $500,000. What’s more is that O’Dwyer’s victory in the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller comes almost immediately after he wrapped up excellent performances in the 2018 PokerStars World Championship of Online Poker (WCOOP) and partypoker POWERFEST. In WCOOP, O’Dwyer won his first WCOOP title when he took down Event-57-H ($2,100 No Limit Hold’em Eight Max) for a $227,101 first-place prize. In the POWERFEST series, O’Dwyer took down Event #123 Super High Roller Championship Event: $25,500 No Limit Hold’em for $896,610. O’Dwyer defeated Fabrizio ‘SixthSenSe19’ Gonzalez in heads-up play, with Gonzalez taking home £236,750. Interestingly, the event’s third-place finisher, Orpen ‘orpenkk’ Kisacikoglu, placed second to O’Dwyer when he won the POWERFEST Super High Roller Championship Event. Final Table Payouts 1. Steve O’Dwyer - £450,000 2. Fabrizio Gonzalez - £236,750 3. Orpen Kisacikoglu - £200,000 4. Christoph Vogelsang - £140,000 5. Aymon Hata - £100,000 6. Niall Farrell - £60,000 The top six places were set to finish in the money, and it was a notable face in 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess eliminated on the bubble. Riess was short, with only four big blinds in his stack, and moved all in with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="ts"]. He was called in two spots - Niall 'firaldo87' Farrell with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="9c"] and Aymon Hata with the [poker card="as"][poker card="2s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] to bust Riess. In the money, O’Dwyer was fourth in chips but quickly scored a double up to take the chip lead. O’Dwyer doubled through Farrell, who then busted in sixth place. After that, O’Dwyer knocked out Haha in fifth. O’Dwyer also busted Christoph Vogelsang in fourth place when his [poker card="As][poker card="kh"] came from behind against Vogelsang’s two kings thanks to an ace on the flop. O’Dwyer also came from behind when he spiked an ace with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"] against the pocket jacks for Kisacikoglu to knock Kisacikoglu out in third. O’Dwyer took a massive lead into heads-up play, with more than 45 million to Gonzalez’s 6.25 million. From there, he made quick work of Gonzalez to seal the deal. On the final hand, it was O’Dwyer coming from behind once again. He jammed with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"] against Gonzalez, who had just seven big blinds in his stack. Gonzalez picked up a dream hand with pocket aces, but the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="js"][poker card="qc"] JcTs9sJsQc board gave O’Dwyer a full house and the victory. As the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK rolls on, stay tuned to PocketFives.com for more coverage. We’ll be recapping the £5,300 Main Event and £10,300 High Roller later this week. Photo courtesy of My partypoker LIVE.
  3. The Dallas Mavericks, an NBA franchise owned by Mark Cuban, are hiring Haralabos "Bob" Voulgaris as Director of Quantitative Research and Development, reported Adrian Wojnarowski and Zach Lowe of ESPN on Thursday. The hiring of Voulgaris, a famed former professional sports bettor known to play high-stakes poker, is another dynamic maneuver within the progressive NBA. As a poker player, Voulgaris became known during the boom years. He arrived on the scene in 2005 when he reached the televised final table of the Season III WPT L.A. Poker Classic $10,000 Championship. Voulgaris finished second to Michael “The Grinder” Mizrachi and took home $904,122. He has since earned 10 addition cashes on the World Poker Tour, including a third-place finish in the Season XVI WPT Borgata Poker Open $10,000 Championship for $434,560. Another career highlight on the felt for Voulgaris includes a fourth-place finish in the 2017 World Series of Poker $111,111 High Roller for One Drop where he earned $1.158 million. At the time of this report, Voulgaris had $3.091 million in live tournament earnings. Voulgaris also has several notable appearances on poker cash games on TV, including High Stakes Poker and the PokerStars Big Game. The move could prove transformative for the Mavericks in two ways. Voulgaris’ success in sports betting can be directly associated with his deep knowledge of statistical analysis and application of data. providing the Mavericks with a very high-level get. Through making the hire, the Mavericks can look to apply Voulgaris’ insight and analysis to such things as roster construction and on-court strategy in an effort to get a leg up on the competition. Given his vast experience as a professional sports bettor, the move also provides the Mavericks with a great asset in alignment with the league’s changing landscape surrounding legalized sports betting. As sports betting becomes legal in more and more states within the U.S. and allows for increased revenue generation within the league, having someone on staff with the strategic mindset of Voulgaris could prove incredibly valuable. Photo courtesy of WPT.
  4. Steve ‘MrTimCaum’ O’Dwyer earned himself another huge payday on Tuesday when he took down the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller for £450,000. O’Dwyer topped a field of 51 entries to score another trophy for his case and move to more than $24 million in career live tournament earnings. O’Dwyer’s 2018 may be flying under the radar, as a lot of other players grab headlines, but he’s been no slouch on the felt this year with more than $4 million in live tournament earnings following this victory. It’s his eighth six-figure cash of the year and fourth of more than $500,000. What’s more is that O’Dwyer’s victory in the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller comes almost immediately after he wrapped up excellent performances in the 2018 PokerStars World Championship of Online Poker (WCOOP) and partypoker POWERFEST. In WCOOP, O’Dwyer won his first WCOOP title when he took down Event-57-H ($2,100 No Limit Hold’em Eight Max) for a $227,101 first-place prize. In the POWERFEST series, O’Dwyer took down Event #123 Super High Roller Championship Event: $25,500 No Limit Hold’em for $896,610. O’Dwyer defeated Fabrizio ‘SixthSenSe19’ Gonzalez in heads-up play, with Gonzalez taking home £236,750. Interestingly, the event’s third-place finisher, Orpen ‘orpenkk’ Kisacikoglu, placed second to O’Dwyer when he won the POWERFEST Super High Roller Championship Event. Final Table Payouts 1. Steve O’Dwyer - £450,000 2. Fabrizio Gonzalez - £236,750 3. Orpen Kisacikoglu - £200,000 4. Christoph Vogelsang - £140,000 5. Aymon Hata - £100,000 6. Niall Farrell - £60,000 The top six places were set to finish in the money, and it was a notable face in 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess eliminated on the bubble. Riess was short, with only four big blinds in his stack, and moved all in with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="ts"]. He was called in two spots - Niall 'firaldo87' Farrell with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="9c"] and Aymon Hata with the [poker card="as"][poker card="2s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] to bust Riess. In the money, O’Dwyer was fourth in chips but quickly scored a double up to take the chip lead. O’Dwyer doubled through Farrell, who then busted in sixth place. After that, O’Dwyer knocked out Haha in fifth. O’Dwyer also busted Christoph Vogelsang in fourth place when his [poker card="As][poker card="kh"] came from behind against Vogelsang’s two kings thanks to an ace on the flop. O’Dwyer also came from behind when he spiked an ace with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"] against the pocket jacks for Kisacikoglu to knock Kisacikoglu out in third. O’Dwyer took a massive lead into heads-up play, with more than 45 million to Gonzalez’s 6.25 million. From there, he made quick work of Gonzalez to seal the deal. On the final hand, it was O’Dwyer coming from behind once again. He jammed with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"] against Gonzalez, who had just seven big blinds in his stack. Gonzalez picked up a dream hand with pocket aces, but the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="js"][poker card="qc"] board gave O’Dwyer a full house and the victory. As the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK rolls on, stay tuned to PocketFives.com for more coverage. We’ll be recapping the £5,300 Main Event and £10,300 High Roller later this week. Photo courtesy of My partypoker LIVE.
  5. Staking arrangements are commonplace in poker, and for the most part, things tend to work out. That said, there are disagreements between parties and the best way to resolves those issues may not be so commonly known, especially when you get into specifics such as how to deal with an outstanding makeup figure. PocketFives spoke with poker professionals who have experience with staking arrangements for some advice on how to best handle sticky situations and what to make sure you cover when you enter a staking agreement. “From a staker's point of view, you want to be confident that your horse is profitable in the events they are competing in and holds a record of integrity,” Jason Somerville said when asked what to look out for before entering a staking deal. “There is a ton of trust in staking, and as an investor, you need to be sure your horse will treat the investment professionally and as if it were their own money (or better). As a horse, you want to be sure your investor has sufficient funds to survive standard variance and will be easy to communicate with.” When it comes to makeup, it can be handled in different ways depending on the deal between the parties involved. Somerville, who has lots of experience with staking arrangements, said there are often a lot of questions to be answered regarding makeup, but that it’s important to agree upon these terms ahead of time. “Discussing what happens to makeup in different scenarios is important before you agree to terms of the deal,” Somerville said. “I've had horses quit poker and you can't really do anything about it, except that if they return to poker they return to makeup. It's usually up to the backer if they want to quit or not, and if they do then typically makeup vanishes at the end of the agreement. It's important to hammer out these issues beforehand — can makeup be transferred/sold? Can the horse potentially keep a small piece of their action, separate from the stake? Does makeup just expire at the end of a certain period? It's key to nail this before settling on a deal.” Another Jason, Jason Mercier, mentioned dealing with a makeup figure generally comes down to who wants out. If the player is the one who wants out, he or she should work out a deal to buy the makeup from the backer — known as a buyout. In cases where the player may simply want to play poker less, he or she should give the backer the option to still stake the person. If it’s the backer who calls off the deal, the player often assumes no makeup. Natasha Mercier, Jason’s wife and also a poker player, replied to a thread on Twitter involving a situation Cate Hall and Chad Power are in echoing her husband’s comments: “Jason had that happen with multiple [people]. They don’t owe, but when they play he gets to choose if he wants it on the stake.” Other pros we talked said similar things. Tristan Wade agreed, in that the common result simply comes down to who is the one deciding to end the backing arrangement. "Usually, if a backer wants to end an agreement with a horse, the backer can either try to sell the makeup or drop the horse and lose out on all the makeup,” Wade said. “If a horse wants to end the agreement, then a backer might let the horse pay [a percentage] of the makeup to get out of the deal.” At the end of the day, it’s important to do your due diligence and ask important questions before you dive into a staking deal so you and your backer can avoid any headaches down the road. You can never be too prepared.
  6. Steve ‘MrTimCaum’ O’Dwyer earned himself another huge payday on Tuesday when he took down the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller for £450,000. O’Dwyer topped a field of 51 entries to score another trophy for his case and move to more than $24 million in career live tournament earnings. O’Dwyer’s 2018 may be flying under the radar, as a lot of other players grab headlines, but he’s been no slouch on the felt this year with more than $4 million in live tournament earnings following this victory. It’s his eighth six-figure cash of the year and fourth of more than $500,000. What’s more is that O’Dwyer’s victory in the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK £25,000 Super High Roller comes almost immediately after he wrapped up excellent performances in the 2018 PokerStars World Championship of Online Poker (WCOOP) and partypoker POWERFEST. In WCOOP, O’Dwyer won his first WCOOP title when he took down Event-57-H ($2,100 No Limit Hold’em Eight Max) for a $227,101 first-place prize. In the POWERFEST series, O’Dwyer took down Event #123 Super High Roller Championship Event: $25,500 No Limit Hold’em for $896,610. O’Dwyer defeated Fabrizio ‘SixthSenSe19’ Gonzalez in heads-up play, with Gonzalez taking home £236,750. Interestingly, the event’s third-place finisher, Orpen ‘orpenkk’ Kisacikoglu, placed second to O’Dwyer when he won the POWERFEST Super High Roller Championship Event. Final Table Payouts 1. Steve O’Dwyer - £450,000 2. Fabrizio Gonzalez - £236,750 3. Orpen Kisacikoglu - £200,000 4. Christoph Vogelsang - £140,000 5. Aymon Hata - £100,000 6. Niall Farrell - £60,000 The top six places were set to finish in the money, and it was a notable face in 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess eliminated on the bubble. Riess was short, with only four big blinds in his stack, and moved all in with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="ts"]. He was called in two spots - Niall 'firaldo87' Farrell with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="9c"] and Aymon Hata with the [poker card="as"][poker card="2s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] to bust Riess. In the money, O’Dwyer was fourth in chips but quickly scored a double up to take the chip lead. O’Dwyer doubled through Farrell, who then busted in sixth place. After that, O’Dwyer knocked out Haha in fifth. O’Dwyer also busted Christoph Vogelsang in fourth place when his [poker card="As][poker card="kh"] came from behind against Vogelsang’s two kings thanks to an ace on the flop. O’Dwyer also came from behind when he spiked an ace with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"] against the pocket jacks for Kisacikoglu to knock Kisacikoglu out in third. O’Dwyer took a massive lead into heads-up play, with more than 45 million to Gonzalez’s 6.25 million. From there, he made quick work of Gonzalez to seal the deal. On the final hand, it was O’Dwyer coming from behind once again. He jammed with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"] against Gonzalez, who had just seven big blinds in his stack. Gonzalez picked up a dream hand with pocket aces, but the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="js"][poker card="qc"] board gave O’Dwyer a full house and the victory. As the partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK rolls on, stay tuned to PocketFives.com for more coverage. We’ll be recapping the £5,300 Main Event and £10,300 High Roller later this week. Photo courtesy of My partypoker LIVE.
  7. Staking arrangements are commonplace in poker, and for the most part things tend to work out. That said, there are disagreements between parties that do occur, such as the recent dispute with Cate Hall and Chad Power involving a $60,000 makeup figure. The best way to resolve these issues may not be so commonly known, and it’s important to do your due diligence before you dive into a staking deal so you and your backer can avoid any headaches down the road. Here is what some players with extensive experience believe. “From a staker's point of view, you want to be confident that your horse is profitable in the events they are competing in and holds a record of integrity,” Jason Somerville said when asked what to look out for before entering a staking deal. “There is a ton of trust in staking, and as an investor, you need to be sure your horse will treat the investment professionally and as if it were their own money (or better). As a horse, you want to be sure your investor has sufficient funds to survive standard variance and will be easy to communicate with.” When it comes to makeup, it can be handled in different ways depending on the deal between the parties involved. Somerville, who has lots of experience with staking arrangements, said there are often a lot of questions to be answered regarding makeup, but that it’s important to agree upon these terms ahead of time. “Discussing what happens to makeup in different scenarios is important before you agree to terms of the deal,” Somerville said. “I've had horses quit poker and you can't really do anything about it, except that if they return to poker they return to makeup. It's usually up to the backer if they want to quit or not, and if they do then typically makeup vanishes at the end of the agreement. It's important to hammer out these issues beforehand — can makeup be transferred/sold? Can the horse potentially keep a small piece of their action, separate from the stake? Does makeup just expire at the end of a certain period? It's key to nail this before settling on a deal.” Another Jason, Jason Mercier, mentioned dealing with a makeup figure generally comes down to who wants out. If the player is the one who wants out, he or she should work out a deal to buy the makeup from the backer — known as a buyout. In cases where the player may simply want to play poker less, he or she should give the backer the option to still stake the person. If it’s the backer who calls off the deal, the player often assumes no makeup. Natasha Mercier, Jason’s wife and also a poker player, replied to a thread on Twitter involving a situation Cate Hall and Chad Power are in echoing her husband’s comments: “Jason had that happen with multiple [people]. They don’t owe, but when they play he gets to choose if he wants it on the stake.” Other pros we talked said similar things. Tristan Wade agreed, in that the common result simply comes down to who is the one deciding to end the backing arrangement. "Usually, if a backer wants to end an agreement with a horse, the backer can either try to sell the makeup or drop the horse and lose out on all the makeup,” Wade said. “If a horse wants to end the agreement, then a backer might let the horse pay [a percentage] of the makeup to get out of the deal.” At the end of the day, it’s important to do your due diligence and ask important questions before you dive into a staking deal so you and your backer can avoid any headaches down the road. You can never be too prepared.
  8. Staking arrangements are commonplace in poker, and for the most part things tend to work out. That said, there are disagreements between parties that do occur, such as the recent dispute with Cate Hall and Chad Power involving a $60,000 makeup figure. The best way to resolve these issues may not be so commonly known, and it’s important to do your due diligence before you dive into a staking deal so you and your backer can avoid any headaches down the road. Here is what some players with extensive experience believe. “From a staker's point of view, you want to be confident that your horse is profitable in the events they are competing in and holds a record of integrity,” Jason Somerville said when asked what to look out for before entering a staking deal. “There is a ton of trust in staking, and as an investor, you need to be sure your horse will treat the investment professionally and as if it were their own money (or better). As a horse, you want to be sure your investor has sufficient funds to survive standard variance and will be easy to communicate with.” When it comes to makeup, it can be handled in different ways depending on the deal between the parties involved. Somerville, who has lots of experience with staking arrangements, said there are often a lot of questions to be answered regarding makeup, but that it’s important to agree upon these terms ahead of time. “Discussing what happens to makeup in different scenarios is important before you agree to terms of the deal,” Somerville said. “I've had horses quit poker and you can't really do anything about it, except that if they return to poker they return to makeup. It's usually up to the backer if they want to quit or not, and if they do then typically makeup vanishes at the end of the agreement. It's important to hammer out these issues beforehand — can makeup be transferred/sold? Can the horse potentially keep a small piece of their action, separate from the stake? Does makeup just expire at the end of a certain period? It's key to nail this before settling on a deal.” Another Jason, Jason Mercier, mentioned dealing with a makeup figure generally comes down to who wants out. If the player is the one who wants out, he or she should work out a deal to buy the makeup from the backer — known as a buyout. In cases where the player may simply want to play poker less, he or she should give the backer the option to still stake the person. If it’s the backer who calls off the deal, the player often assumes no makeup. Natasha Mercier, Jason’s wife and also a poker player, replied to a thread on Twitter involving a situation Cate Hall and Chad Power are in echoing her husband’s comments: “Jason had that happen with multiple [people]. They don’t owe, but when they play he gets to choose if he wants it on the stake.” Other pros we talked said similar things. Tristan Wade agreed, in that the common result simply comes down to who is the one deciding to end the backing arrangement. "Usually, if a backer wants to end an agreement with a horse, the backer can either try to sell the makeup or drop the horse and lose out on all the makeup,” Wade said. “If a horse wants to end the agreement, then a backer might let the horse pay [a percentage] of the makeup to get out of the deal.”
  9. "I'm gonna make this happen. Somehow, I'm gonna win one of these damn passes." After calling his shot earlier this year, Nathan Manuel has done it. He's won a PokerStars Players No-Limit Hold’em Championship Platinum Pass. Winning the Pass involved topping a field of 825 entries in the $86 buy-in Moneymaker PSPC Tour stop at Run It Up Reno. After 128 players hit the money, the field worked its way down to the final table. Manuel entered the final table with the chip lead and had to battle with a tough group of competitors, including three-time Run It Up Reno trophy winner Andrew Cha and Florida grinder Hayden Fortini, who finished in sixth and eighth places, respectively. In the end, Manuel was left to battle with Run It Up Reno regular Marty Gorenc. Manuel entered the heads-up match at a 3-1 disadvantage but ultimately prevailed. "I'm sure it has not sunk in," Manuel said 24 hours after the win. "I have not done the paperwork yet, but it'll probably feel more real once I do all of that and know what the situation looks like." Manuel has already been all over in his quest for a Platinum Pass, and knowing his opportunities were running out more and more by the day, he was prepared to jump overseas in his chase. "The thing that makes it the most real is that I was literally planning a trip to London to play two events there — a MegaStack and a £2,000 event that both had Platinum Passes, and I was trying to figure out any alternate ways that I might find to win a Pass. The fact that I'm not having to do that and go to these extra lengths to give myself more opportunities makes it feel more practically real, but I don't think the reality of accomplishing a goal has settled in yet." No matter how he won a Pass, Manuel would have felt a great success, but doing so in a Moneymaker PSPC Tour stop was something that resonated with Manuel as he drew some similarities between himself and Chris Moneymaker. "For me, poker is something that I love and something that I am passionate about," Manuel said. "I'm an everyday guy with a job, who, very much like Chris Moneymaker, lives a professional career, but this game opens up opportunities that are unique and that you can’t even anticipate. "I find myself in a place today where I have some opportunities and it's interesting to find myself in the position to play a $25K tournament that I clearly would never play based on my bankroll and based on the history I have playing poker," Manuel said. "My average tournament buy-in is sub-$1,000, so to have an opportunity to play something with the best players in the world in a field that’s going to be super unique in that it has all these people being added to it that likely are not professional players, it puts a really interesting spin on it. I do feel some relief that I’ve won a Pass because I came into this knowing that I was not a favorite to win a Pass." Now that he’s clinched a Pass and will be off to the Bahamas in January, Manuel is quick to change gears. Even though recognizes the odds weren’t in his favor to win a Platinum Pass, Manuel realizes that winning a Pass, albeit a very big accomplishment in itself, is only part of the larger goal. "All that I'm thinking about at this point is that the goal has now changed," Manuel said. "I'm not trying to win this Pass, I'm not trying to learn Japanese to win a Pass, which is something I wanted to do and I'm really excited I did, but now it's getting better at poker. Think about poker, think about poker at the highest level, think about poker at the level of $25K buy-in tournaments and the people who you’re going to be interacting with and playing with in that field, even though I know a huge percentage, probably half of the field, will be non-professionals. I hope and anticipate and expect of myself a lot. Part of that is expecting that I'll play well. Even if I don't make a deep run, that I'll play well for myself and be happy with the way that I play in that tournament for myself." You can follow Nathan Manuel on his quest to the PSPC via his Twitter account and his YouTube channel.
  10. This Tuesday and Wednesday, clear your schedules for "Godfather Week" on Poker After Dark. Doyle Brunson will be joined by a handful of poker’s biggest names as they compete for astronomical stakes in a mixed game cash game on PokerGO. Along with Brunson, Gus Hansen, Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates, Scott Seiver, Brian Rast, and Billy O'Neill will be playing mixed games at limits of $1,500/$3,000. The minimum buy-in is $50,000 and they will be playing HORSE and Deuce to Seven Triple Draw. The action starts at 6 pm ET (3 pm PT) on PokerGO. The all-star team of Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman will be in the booth to provide commentary and analysis for both nights of action. Will Hansen Provide the Action? Hansen took a bit of time off from high-stakes poker in more recent years but appears to be back and ready to tackle some of the best at incredible limits. The 'Great Dane' has a career the includes more than $10.2 million in live tournament earnings, and he is also the owner of three WPT titles and one WSOP gold bracelet. Hansen has been known to bring a style all his own to the poker table, and it's often been one that drives a lot of the action in a game. Will we be getting the old Hansen driving play or will we be getting a newer, more tame version of this poker great? That's a question we can't wait to see answered come Tuesday. Cates, Seiver, and Rast Represent Today's Mixed Game Specialists Cates, Seiver, and Rast represent the best mixed game players in poker today. Cates is the youngest of the three at 28, Seiver is the middle child at 33, and then Rast is 36. Their ages may not seem old, but these guys have all played millions of hands of poker between online and live play and regularly lock horns in games of the highest stakes. Having the opportunity to watch the three of them play in such a high-caliber lineup at limits larger than most of the paychecks many of us see on a monthly basis will be nothing short of a treat. It will also provide a great learning experience because with hole cards shown, the audience will be able to pull back the curtain for insight into every street of every hand. Don’t Sleep On Billy O'Neill If there was a name you wouldn't recognize at this table, it'd be that of Billy O'Neill, but don't be surprised if he leaves the game as the biggest winner. If you follow poker closely, you've likely seen his name pop up here or there, or you may recognize his face from a photo or two. Even if you attempted to look up some of his results, you wouldn’t find much. HendonMob.com only has him winning just more than $195,000 and all of those results come from 2010 to 2012. O'Neill is a regular in Bobby's Room at Bellagio or the Ivey Room at ARIA, playing the highest stakes in all games. All of his peers know the level of skill he brings to the table and the stakes won't be foreign to him. The $1,500/$3,000 mixed game action for Godfather Week on Poker After Dark starts Tuesday, October 23, at 6 pm ET on PokerGO. Get your popcorn ready. If you don't already have a PokerGO subscription, sign up using the code "pocket5s" to receive $10 off an annual subscription.
  11. Asi Moshe is no stranger to the World Series of Poker winner’s circle, and on Tuesday he joined the ranks of two-time WSOP bracelet winners when he captured his second piece of gold in WSOP Europe’s Event #2: €1,650 No-Limit Hold'em 6-Handed Deepstack. Moshe topped a field of 221 entries to earn the €82,280 top prize. Moshe entered the final table with the chip lead and rode that lead to victory. The Israeli player now has more than $2.15 million in live tournament earnings. Moshe’s first WSOP bracelet came at the 2014 WSOP in Las Vegas, when he topped a field of 2,396 entries in a $1,500 no-limit hold’em tournament to win $582,321. Final Table Results 1st: Asi Moshe - €82,280 2nd: Robert Schulz - €50,842 3rd: James Bullimore - €33,149 4th: Giuliano Bendinelli - €22,210 5th: Van Tiep Nguyen - €15,303 6th: Viktor Katzenberger - €10,852 Moshe started off the final table winning the first pot and never looked back. He busted Viktor Katzenberger in sixth place and sent Van Tiep Nguyen home in fifth place before James Bullimore stepped in to knock out Giuliano Bendinelli in fourth place. During three-handed play, the three stacks pulled close to even before Moshe stepped on the gas once again to widen the gap. He then knocked out Bullimore in third place with the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="9c"] against Bullimore's [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"]. Moshe had raised to 140,000 from the small blind with the blinds at 25,000-50,000 with a 40,000 big blind ante. Bullimore called to see the [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9s"] flop and Moshe fired 120,000. Bullimore kicked it up with a raise to 305,000, to which Moshe called to see the [poker card="Qc"] hit the turn. After Moshe checked, Bullimore bet 525,000. Moshe called and the dealer delivered the [poker card="2c"] on the river. Moshe moved all in with his flush and Bullimore found a call with a lesser straight to bust in third. Busting Bullimore gave Moshe around 75% of the chips in play entering heads-up action against Robert Schulz. Schulz tried to fight back, but in the end, Moshe proved too strong an opponent. Schulz did land a couple of double ups, but nothing that could really dent Moshe’s stack as they came after Moshe had cut him down even more. On the final hand, Moshe moved all in from the button with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="4h"]. Schulz called off his last 12 big blinds with the [poker card="Kd][poker card="8h"]. The flop, turn, and river came [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Th"] and Schulz was out in second place, earning €50,842.
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