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Found 38 results

  1. The second half of the third annual PokerStars New Jersey Championship of Online Poker continued on Monday two more tournaments and $48,000 worth of guarantees. After taking a trip to the Mohegan Sun in Connecticut to participate in another stop of the Moneymaker Tour, PokerStars Ambassador and one-time World Series of Poker Champion Chris Moneymaker was back inside New Jersey borders and back in the hunt for yet another NJCOOP title. Moneymaker made his presence felt in the first of the two tournaments on the schedule. Event #28 ($300 NLHE Four Max) drew 139 runners which created a prize pool of $38,920. Moneymaker not only made the final table, but he got heads-up for the title. However, he was facing one of New Jersey’s most talented grinders in the #3-ranked US player, Michael ‘J3tBl@ckP0pe’ Gagliano. Galliano and Moneymaker battled it out with Gagliano coming out on top. The Borgata sponsored pro earned $12,439.67 for first place and added a second 2018 NJCOOP title to his long resume. The score was the highest take-home score of the night and puts him in striking distance of $3.5 million in career earnings. For ‘Gags’ it was his tenth NJCOOP cash of the series and second of the evening. Moneymaker, who earned back-to-back titles just last week, was denied his third NJCOOP title but still earned $7,677.74 for his second-place efforts. ‘bvays’ finished in third place for $4,021.60 and rounding out the Four Max final table was Mike ‘MartinChatwn’ Lavenburg finishing in fourth place for $2,559.37. This was Lavenburg’s third final table of the series and fourth cash overall. Event #29 ($500 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller Six Max) brought out 49 players that helped create a prize pool of $23,030. Matthew ‘MattEMenz’ Mendez joined the two-time winners club as he secured his second 2018 NJCOOP title and earned $6,909 for the win. Yong ‘iFoldN0T’ Kwon finished as the runner-up, adding $4,606 to his bankroll. Kwon has had a number of close calls in the past few days, finishing in the top four players three times for his past three results. His second-place finish is the most lucrative of his nine NJCOOP cashes. It seems that Daniel ‘loxonbagel’ Buzgon has started a heater himself. He finished in sixth place on the Six Max final table for $1,266.65 and had made the money in each of the last four NJCOOP events. Event #28 ($300 NLHE Four Max) Entries: 139 Prize pool: $38,920 1. J3tBl@ckP0pe - $12,439.67 2. Money800NJ - $7,677.74 3. bvays - $4,021.60 4. MatrinChatwn - $2,559.37 Event #29 ($500 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller Six Max) Entries: 49 Prize pool: $23,030 1. MattEMenz - $6,909 2. iFoldN0T - $4,606 3. JinxySkunk - $3,454.50 4. $gt. Tibbs - $2,303 5. LookAtMyDabx - $1,727.25 6. loxonbagel - $1,266.65
  2. Fifteen years ago, the poker world was introduced to Chris Moneymaker. The accountant from Tennessee with an unthinkable last name earned his way into the 2003 World Series of Poker Main Event via a satellite on PokerStars for a paltry $86. Moneymaker went on to win the event thanks to a storybook run in poker’s greatest tournament and recently was the subject of the acclaimed 30 For 30 Podcasts by ESPN. "They actually approached me about doing the TV series, 30 for 30, a while back and I thought that sounded really cool," Moneymaker said of the opportunity with ESPN. "Then I guess they didn’t think I was cool enough for the TV show, or they saw my face and said that I have a face for radio, and they moved it over to the podcast (laughs). A guy came to Memphis, where I live, and spent three days with my wife and I, just hanging out and being part of the family. I did a bunch of interviews and then basically did about a million follow-up questions. It was a cool process. I haven’t heard the podcast yet myself, but I’d be interested to hear what the others [on the podcast] said. I know kind of what I said because I've said it a few times, but it’d be interesting to hear what Matt Savage and some of the others guys said." Moneymaker’s story is the stuff dreams are made of. Even though his big win was 15 years ago, at times it still appears that the relationship Moneymaker has with poker is still going through the honeymoon period. Make no mistake about it, though, the man once very open about his amateur status in the game now comes with a win-first mentality. "My goal is that whenever I come into a room, I want to take everybody's money, but I want them to be really happy when I do," Moneymaker said. Since his WSOP Main Event victory, Moneymaker's been on the ride of a lifetime, and understandably so. Many would argue his win was the win in poker. It catapulted Moneymaker into poker stardom and since then he's been triumphantly serving as one of the game's most prominent ambassadors. "It's been pretty surreal," Moneymaker told PocketFives of the last 15 years. "There's been ups and downs like anything else. Mostly it’s been up, but obviously, there's downsides of it, too. At the end of the day, poker went through a very hard time around Black Friday, and I think that we’re coming out and we’re recovering. There are other things that are attracting the younger generation’s attention that we’re sort of competing against for the new players coming up, but I think Twitch and what everyone else is doing is helping get us some buzz. We have things like PokerGO putting out great content, too.” One of Moneymaker’s recent trips took him to Reno, Nevada, for Jason Somerville’s Run It Up Reno VII festival. He brought with him the Moneymaker Tour, his brightest ambassador costume, and fierce-but-fun-loving competitiveness. While there, Moneymaker, alongside PokerStars, helped dish out another Platinum Pass in the stop’s $86 buy-in Moneymaker Tour event, deemed the "Moneymaker Spectacular." That tournament attracted the largest turnout of Run It Up Reno VII, with 825 entries blasting away in hopes of winning the $30,000 Platinum Pass package. In the end, it was Nathan Manuel achieving a lofty goal he set out to complete months prior. "First of all, [PokerStars] gave all of the ambassadors one seat to give away and our goal was to send everybody here to Reno and give away that seat," Moneymaker said. "It morphed into giving away a Platinum Pass away at every single stop [on the Moneymaker Tour], which is just absolutely incredible. It’s huge for me because I give someone else the opportunity that I had 15 years ago to turn $86 into life-changing money. Even for people go down there and don’t make anything, there’s a lot of people who can’t afford to go to the Bahamas so it’s already life changing for them. Then they have the opportunity, if they work hard or they want to get better, that I’m offering resources to help them get better and give them a real shot at making something in this tournament. My hope is that one of the people that won one of my tournaments makes a deep run or wins the [PokerStars Players No-Limit Hold’em Championship]. Actually, I hope I win it, let’s be real, so they can get second (laughs). Again, to me, it’s about giving someone else the opportunity that I had so many years ago. It’s been really the most enriching experience to go through and play at every one of these stops. We’ve had people come in that have never played poker before or haven’t played poker in 10 years or never been to casinos before." While in Reno, Moneymaker cashed in three events for a total of $8,015 and was one player away from taking home a Run It Up Reno trophy when he placed second in the $235 6-Max 8-Game tournament for $5,400. If he’d have won that event, Moneymaker could’ve added the trophy right next to his bevy of PokerStars NJCOOP titles, of which he scored two more earlier in the month of October. Ever since online poker became legal in New Jersey and PokerStars launched PokerStarsNJ, "Money800" has been a regular fixture in the Garden State's virtual streets, locking horns with the best the state has to offer and coming out on top. In April 2018, he won two NJCOOP titles and placed second and fourth in two other NJCOOP events during the series. In October, Moneymaker doubled the weight of his NJCOOP bag by adding two more titles in back-to-back days. "It's awesome," Moneymaker said of being able to play regulated online poker in New Jersey. "It’s been, what? Two, three years now? I’ve had really good results in NJCOOP since I moved up there to play, and it’s always good the time the series comes in. There are a couple games I like to focus on. I always focus on the 8-game and a couple of the other variants, and they have all those so I really enjoy playing that series because they have a lot of different variants to play." When playing regulated online poker in New Jersey, Moneymaker can often be found on Twitch streaming his grind when he’s there for some action. Back when Moneymaker won the WSOP Main Event, and for much of the 15-year period between his win in 2003 and now, online poker streaming wasn’t a thing. Now, it’s everywhere, serving audiences in both entertainment and enhanced instruction. "Back when I won [the WSOP Main Event], there was Super/System and Mike Caro’s Book of Tells," Moneymaker said of poker’s new age involving Twitch and streaming. “I think those were the only two books, maybe a few more. There just wasn’t that much poker material out there. No one knew what they were doing, and now, you have all this free access. If you want to learn and get good at poker, you can do it for free, which is through time. All it takes is time, and energy to sit there and ask questions and watch a good streamer play. And there are so many different streamers to choose from. You can find one that fits your style, obviously, there are so many training sites and videos, there’s just so many resources now that poker is just so much more difficult now. The average player is just going to be better. That’s a tough thing for new players getting in the game, as they’re coming into a very knowledgable market that knows what they’re doing and it’s tough to just come in without trying to learn. To just be a recreational player, it’s difficult to sort of break through and be successful. But, the great thing about poker is that there is luck in the game and even people that aren’t as experienced are going to have good runs and maybe win a main event." *Photo courtesy of Run It Up.
  3. Poker action on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean came into focus throughout October. Another edition of WSOP Europe got underway - but didn't finish - in Rozvadov, Czech while some of the best online players in New Jersey were busy chasing down NJCOOP titles. Steve O'Dwyer Picks Up $1M With Two Tournament Wins It could be argued that nobody had a better October than Steve O'Dwyer. He traveled to Dusk Till Dawn in Nottingham, UK and beat 51 and 105 players in back-to-back tournaments to win $407,734 and $592,448 respectively. The two wins came one month after O'Dwyer picked up PokerStars WCOOP and partypoker Powerfest wins. READ: Steve O’Dwyer Wins partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK Super High Roller for £450,000 READ: Steve O’Dwyer Wins Again; Captures partypoker LIVE MILLIONS UK High Roller Title Haralabos Voulgaris Takes Job Alongside Mark Cuban Haralabos Voulgaris has a cult-like following in the poker world. Once a regular in World Poker Tour events, Voulgaris is now more known for his deep understanding of NBA analytics. While Voulgaris was one of the most successful NBA bettors of all time thanks to his application of those analytics, Voulgaris had been able to resist overtures from NBA teams looking to bring him on board. That all changed in October when Mark Cuban came calling. READ: NBA’s Dallas Mavericks Hire Haralabos Voulgaris New Jersey Grinders Shine in NJCOOP The NJCOOP prize pools don't yet compare to their WCOOP or SCOOP counterparts, but for New Jersey online poker players, it's a must-play series. Some of the best players in the Garden State shined brightest during the 10-day series. Anthony Maio, fresh off of a sixth place finish in the WPT Borgata Poker Open, won the Moneymaker Tour Online event to win a $30,000 Platinum Pass. The man that tour was named for also managed to put on a show of his own during NJCOOP, picking up two titles. READ: NJCOOP: Chris Moneymaker KO’s The Competition, Wins Event 14 READ: NJCOOP: Moneymaker Does It Again, Takes The Title In 8-Game Mix The series wrapped up with Ryan Hohner winning the Main Event for a little more than $28,000. READ: NJCOOP: Anthony Maio Grabs Platinum Pass with Moneymaker Tour Win READ: NJCOOP: Ryan ‘ISlowRollYou’ Hohner Takes Down Main Event for $28K 'Girafganger7' Still Enjoying the Chase One of online poker's most well-respected MTT grinders, 'Girafganger7' is far from being stressed out by the daily grind. Just the opposite in fact. He's still in love with the game and believes that the dream of being a top pro is still alive for anybody that wants to put the work in. READ: The Poker Dream is Still Very Much Alive For ‘Girafganger7’ WSOP Europe Kicks Off - Nine Bracelets Before the Main King's Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic might be in the middle of nowhere, but for a little more than three weeks in October, it was also the center of the poker universe. WSOP Europe 2018 had 10 bracelet events on the schedule and nine of them concluded in October while the Main Event carried on into November. The biggest win of the nine came from poker bad boy Martin Kabrhel. The Czech picked up €2,624,340 after beating David Peters heads-up in the €100,000 Super High Roller event. READ: WSOP Europe: Tamir Segal Wins Colossus for €203,820 READ: WSOP Europe: Asi Moshe Wins €82,280 and Second Bracelet in NL Deepstack READ: WSOP Europe: Hanh Tran Earns Second Bracelet, €59,623 In PLO READ: WSOP Europe: Ukraine’s Mykhailo Gutyi Wins Bounty Hunter For €61,299 READ: WSOP Europe: Timur Margolin Wins Second Bracelet In Monster Stack READ: WSOP Europe: Norbert Szecsi Denies Shaun Deeb, Wins PLO/NLHE Mix READ: WSOP Europe: Hong Kong’s Anson Tsang Wins Bracelet, €91K In PLO READ: WSOP Europe: Michael Addamo Conquers €25K Super High Roller READ: WSOP Europe: Martin Kabrhel Wins €100,000 Super High Roller  
  4. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. Phil Ivey BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 10 60 $6,303,530 33 Right in the middle of the 2000 World Series of Poker, Amarillo Slim was heads-up in a $2,500 Pot Limit Omaha event for what could have been his fifth career bracelet. Across the table from him was a 23-year-old from New Jersey who had made his WSOP debut just a few days earlier. Preston had never been heads-up and lost. Enter Phil Ivey. Ivey went on to beat Slim that night to win his first bracelet and thus began one of the most outstanding careers in WSOP history. Over the next 18 years, Ivey went on to become just the fourth poker player to reach double digits in the bracelet category and the owner of one of the most complete WSOP resumes ever assembled. In 2002, Ivey went from "kid with one bracelet" to legitimate superstar. He took down three separate events that year; $1,500 Seven Card Stud, $2,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo, and $2,000 SHOE and put the poker world on notice. One year later, a fateful river card famously prevented Ivey from making the final table of the WSOP Main Event but helped launch poker into a different stratosphere. Down to 10 players, Ivey and Chris Moneymaker clashed in a pot with Ivey holding pocket nines for a full house on a [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="6s"][poker card="9c"] board. Moneymaker, holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"], bet and Ivey moved all-in over the top. Moneymaker called and then stood and watched the dealer deliver the [poker card="as"] river card to eliminate Ivey in tenth. Had Ivey won the hand, he could have been one of the chip leaders at the final table. Ivey picked up another bracelet in 2005, and then won two more in 2009. In the middle of the November Nine era, Ivey made his way through 6,485 other players to make the final table of the Main Event. The media, both within the industry and mainstream, spent three months talking about Ivey and how he was going to be on poker's biggest stage with a chance to win its biggest prize. November came and Ivey fizzled out in a seventh-place finish. The $1,404,014 he earned there is his largest WSOP cash yet. While those two cashes are the highlights of Ivey's Main Event record, he has cashed six times in the event over the course of his career. YEAR PLACE WINNINGS 2002 23rd $40,000 2003 10th $82,700 2005 20th $304,680 2009 7th $1,404,014 2014 430th $25,756 2018 547th $23,940 In the summer of 2010, Ivey won his eighth bracelet in an eighth different poker variant. Ivey beat out 477 other players including a final that included Chad Brown, David 'ODB' Baker, Jeffrey Lisandro, John Juanda, and runner-up Bill Chen to win a $3,000 HORSE event. Proving himself as a master of all games, Ivey's ninth and tenth bracelets came in 8 Game mixed events in 2013 and 2014. All told, Ivey has played nine different poker variations on his way to collecting 10 bracelets. Despite all of his Main Event success though, Ivey has yet to win a bracelet in a No Limit Hold'em event, though it was part of the game rotation in both 8 Game wins. In 2011, in the aftermath of Black Friday, Ivey elected to not play any WSOP events. With thousands of players having money held on Full Tilt Poker, Ivey declared it was unfair for him to play the WSOP when others couldn't. He released a statement at the time that said in part, "I am not playing in the World Series of Poker as I do not believe it is fair that I compete when others cannot." Ivey also skipped the 2017 WSOP in its entirety while involved in lawsuits in both England and Atlantic City over his baccarat play. Ivey has cashed three times in the $50,000 Players Championship, including a third-place finish in the inaugural event in 2006. He followed that up with a 12th place result in 2008 and a 9th place finish in 2018. Ivey's WSOP record at the final table is also very impressive. He's made 28 final tables since 2002 and has won 35.7% of those. He has a 10-4 heads-up record and the only four players to have beaten him for a bracelet are Huck Seed, Sammy Farha, Chris Reslock, and Andy Frankenberger.
  5. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. This list details the players who made spots #21 - #30 on our list. If you haven't yet caught up on the other names we've announced so far you can check out #41 - #50 here and #31 - #40 here. #30 - Barry Greenstein BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 102 $3,196,072 24 Barry Greenstein has one of the most recognizable faces in poker, plus plenty of accolades to go along with it. He has three WSOP gold bracelets with the first coming in 2004 when he won the $5,000 No-Limit 2-7 Single Draw event to the tune of $296,200. Greenstein went on to win his second gold bracelet in 2005 before landing his third in 2008. Interestingly, each of Greenstein's three bracelets has come in different variants. In addition to the No Limit 2-7 Single Draw bracelets he has, Greenstein won one in pot-limit Omaha and razz. When poker exploded in the early- to mid-2000s, Greenstein's face was one of those that was everywhere. He was a high-stakes cash game player who constantly found himself in the money in WSOP events. To date, Greenstein has racked up 102 cashes and 24 top 10 finishes in World Series of Poker events. At the WSOP in 2017 and 2018, Greenstein cashed 13 times each year. “Dubbed ‘The Robin Hood of Poker’, Barry Greenstein is one of the games all-time great grinders. His 101 summer series cashes is good for fifth on the all-time WSOP cashes list and his three bracelets have come in three different disciplines, proving that he’s a master of all the games. But Barry has brought more than results, being one of the most approachable of the poker boom superstars while in the halls of the Rio. Between his results, his philanthropy, and his ability to connect with his fans Greenstein is an all-time great.” - PocketFives Senior Writer Jeff Walsh #29 - Huck Seed BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 53 $3,579,604 28 Huck Seed is very much known for his 1996 WSOP Main Event victory that saw him win the $1 million top prize when he topped a field of 295 entries in the world championship tournament. What many don't know is that Seed had actually already won a WSOP gold bracelet. Seed earned his first bracelet in 2004 when he won the $2,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event for $167,000. That first win seemed inevitable for Seed, who prior to it had six WSOP cashes and all of them were top 10 finishes. Seed returned to the WSOP Main Event final table in 1999 and won bracelets three and four in 2000 and 2003, both of which came in razz. #28 - Berry Johnston BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 67 $2,112,340 30 In similar fashion to Huck Seed, many don't know that Berry Johnston had already won a WSOP gold bracelet before he won the WSOP Main Event. He first claimed gold in 1983 before going on to win the granddaddy of them all in 1986. Interestingly, Johnston's first-ever recorded cash came when he placed third in the WSOP Main Event in 1982. In 1985, he took third again in the event and then finally won it the following year. Further adding to Johnston's WSOP standing, he finished fifth in the WSOP Main Event in 1990 and has several other deep runs in the event. #27 - Shaun Deeb BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 66 $4,281,461 17 Shaun Deeb came up in poker as an online player, but he's transitioned to the live realm very well and has been quite the WSOP performer over the years. Since his first WSOP cash in 2007, Deeb has won four bracelets, finished in the top 10 17 times, and cashed 66 times. Deeb's first taste of WSOP gold came in 2015, when he won the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship for $318,857. He added his second bracelet in 2016, and then two more in 2018 en route to winning the 2018 WSOP Player of the Year title. His two bracelets in 2018, were worth $1.402 million and $814,000. Deeb cashed 16 times at the 2018 WSOP and then four more times at the 2018 WSOP Europe. "Not many players who came up in the world of online poker have been able to move to the live felt with as much success as Shaun Deeb. His talents make him one of the top poker players in the world and we're really starting to see him carve out his place in poker history over more recent years. Deeb appears to be as all in as possible when it comes to the WSOP. Deeb first hit the WSOP winner's circle in 2015 and won four gold bracelets and one Player of the Year title in the four-year span from 2015-2018. Plus, he had 10 additional cashes in the top 10 of events over that span. If the volume is there in any sort of way, Deeb is a threat to win WSOP Player of the Year and multiple bracelets every summer, and it wouldn't be a stretch to see him challenge Phil Hellmuth for most bracelets all time if he keeps playing these events at such a high frequency over the next decade or two." - PocketFives Managing Editor Donnie Peters In today's poker world, Deeb is considered to be as tough a competitor as any. He's a threat to win a WSOP bracelet, or two or three, every single year, and a strong contender for WSOP Player of the Year. #26 - Daniel Alaei BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 36 $4,427,139 8 Daniel Alaei may not make a lot of noise at the table, but the game he brings to the WSOP each and every year speaks volumes. Alaei has five WSOP gold bracelets, with the first coming in 2006 when he won the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw event. He later added bracelets two, three, four, and five in 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2015. Each time he won his way to the WSOP winner's circle, Alaei did it facing some of the toughest competition around. His first gold bracelet in the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw tournament saw Alaei battle through a final table that included David Williams, Men Nguyen, Greg Raymer, and Allen Cunningham. His other four bracelets were all in Omaha tournaments and each of those events had a buy-in of $10,000. His wins in 2010 and 2013 were in the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship, when he took home $780,599 and $852,692, respectively. "Daniel Alaei is an incredible poker talent, and his skills have led to WSOP success several times, especially when it comes to Omaha. Personally, I wish Alaei would play more WSOP events every summer because I don't feel his actual results are anywhere near the potential he has. If there was ever a player to be called a "silent killer" on the felt, it's Alaei. He doesn't say much, he's quiet when he does talk, and his demeanor is unassuming, but his poker prowess is as loud as they come. When it comes to Omaha, the WSOP's second most popular variant, Alaei is one of the best, if not the absolute best, in the world and his four bracelets in the game are clear evidence of that." - Donnie Peters #25 - Chris Moneymaker BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 1 4 $2,532,041 2 Chris Moneymaker is as important a player in WSOP history as anyone. His storybook win in the 2003 WSOP Main Event played a part in igniting the poker boom and the ambassadorship he's served in since rivals anyone in the game. But for as important a figure as Moneymaker is when it comes to WSOP history, his results since his moment of glory in 2003 have been minimal and it's the reason he's not higher on this list. Of his $2,532,041 in WSOP earnings, $2,500,000 of that is from his 2003 WSOP Main Event victory, and he only has three other cashes and one other top 10 finish. Moneymaker's last WSOP cash was more than a decade ago in 2007. “An argument can be made that the most famous accountant from Tennessee to ever play poker simply doesn’t have the numbers needed to be on this list. However, if Chris Moneymaker is not in the field in 2003, if he did not bluff Sammy Farha and he never took home the Main Event title - poker may not be where it is today. The man that sparked the poker boom influenced a generation of poker players who saw what he did on ESPN and thought to themselves ‘I can do that too.’ Moneymaker is the poker icon that the industry needed and his being where he was, when he was has helped the World Series of Poker become the series that it is today.” - Jeff Walsh #24 - David Chiu BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 71 $3,653,340 26 Another WSOP stalwart to find his way to PocketFives' Top 50 Greatest WSOP Players list is David Chiu, with 71 cashes, 26 top 10 finishes, and five gold bracelets. Chiu's first WSOP cash came in 1996, and it also turned out to be his first WSOP gold bracelet win when he took down the $2,000 Limit Hold'em tournament for $396,000. Future bracelets wins for Chiu came in 1998, 2000, 2005, and 2013. Chiu's skills have been on display at the WSOP ever since he started playing there, and he's a player well-versed in all games. His bracelets have come in hold'em, seven-card stud, and Omaha. Additionally, Chiu has four runner-up finishes in gold bracelet tournaments. "Many of his colleagues will make the argument that David Chiu could be the most underappreciated player of his generation. His WSOP record is impressive. He's one of just 25 players to have won five or more bracelets. He also has four runner-up finishes and two thirds. Had a hand or two (or six) gone differently during those events, we could be talking about him as pushing to join the double-digit bracelet club." - PocketFives Editor in Chief Lance Bradley. #23 - Barbara Enright BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 22 $463,499 4 Barbara Enright is a three-time WSOP gold bracelet winner best known for being the only woman to date to ever reach the WSOP Main Event final table. That came in 1995 when she placed fifth in the big one. In 1986 and 1994, Enright won the WSOP Women's Event, and then she took down the 1996 $2,500 Pot-Limit Hold'em tournament for $180,000. In a male-dominated industry, especially in the 1990s, Enright helped pave the way for female poker players around the world. #22 - Jeff Lisandro BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 71 $3,790,497 27 Not too many players can claim to have won three WSOP bracelets. Even fewer can claim to have won three in the same year. Jeff Lisandro has six WSOP gold bracelets in all, and three of those came in 2009 when he absolutely crushed seven-card stud at the WSOP, winning the $1,500 Seven-Card Stud, $2,500 Razz, and $10,000 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Low. He won his first bracelet back in 2007, also in seven-card stud, and won his other two in pot-limit Omaha. Further adding to the chapter Lisandro wrote in the WSOP history books, he won one of his bracelets at WSOP Europe and another at WSOP Asia-Pacific. "Half of Lisandro's six bracelet wins came in 2009 when he was clearly a dominant force on his way to winning WSOP Player of the Year. It would be a shame to let that performance overshadow the other things Lisandro has done in his career. He's won at least one bracelet in all three variants of Seven Card Stud and is part of an elite group of players who have won a bracelet on three different continents. You could easily make the argument that at #22, he gets the short end of the stick." - Lance Bradley #21 - Ted Forrest BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 38 $2,055,472 23 Ted Forrest also has six WSOP gold bracelets and he is also a player who can claim to have won three gold bracelets in a single year. Forrest achieved the feat in 1993, when he stormed onto the poker scene with three gold bracelet wins in three different games. First, he won the $5,000 Seven-Card Stud tournament. Then, he won the $1,500 Razz event. He followed that up with a victory in the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Low tournament. In 2004, Forrest was back winning multiple bracelets in the same summer, taking home two that year. He'd add his sixth in 2014. Forrest has always been a feared player at the table, and when he reaches the money he's playing to win, as evidenced by his 38 WSOP cashes resulting in 23 top 10s. In addition to his six gold bracelets, Forrest has reached the top three of a gold bracelet event on five other occasions.
  6. The 2019 Poker Hall of Fame finalists includes nine World Series of Poker bracelet winners, three former Main Event champions, and for the first time ever, a magician. Well, The Magician. Antonio Esfandiari, once known as 'The Magician, is the only first-time finalist in the group of 10 players selected by the WSOP Hall of Fame Committee that will now be voted on by living Hall of Fame members and a select panel of poker media and industry personnel. The top two vote-getters will be inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame later this summer. Voters are tasked with considering the following criteria when awarding their votes: A player must have played poker against acknowledged top competition Be a minimum of 40 years old at time of nomination Played for high stakes Played consistently well, gaining the respect of peers Stood the test of time Or, for non-players, contributed to the overall growth and success of the game of poker, with indelible positive and lasting results. The other nine finalists are Chris Bjorin, David Chiu, Eli Elezra, Chris Ferguson, Ted Forrest, Mike Matusow, Chris Moneymaker, David Oppenheim, and Huck Seed. The final group of 10 was put together by the "WSOP Hall of Fame Committee". In years past, the public was invited to submit names for inclusion with the 10 most-suggested names being the finalists. This marks Bjorin's seventh time as a finalist. No other player has been nominated as often as the two-time bracelet winning Swede. Now 71, Bjorin has earned $5.75 million in lifetime earnings. He's been nominated in seven of the last eight years. Chiu has now been a finalist six times, including the last three in a row. The 58-year-old has five WSOP bracelets, won the WPT World Championship in 2008, and has just over $8,000,000 in lifetime earnings. Ferguson, Moneymaker, and Seed are all former Main Event champions. For Ferguson, this marks a return to the list of finalists. His only previous nomination came in 2010, before Black Friday and the Full Tilt Poker scandal. He's since won WSOP Player of the Year, a sixth bracelet and cashed 65 more times. Moneymaker was previously a finalist in 2016 and 2018. The 2003 WSOP Main Event champion is credited with being an integral part of poker's explosion in popularity in the mid-2000s. So much so, that it's often called 'The Moneymaker Effect'. Seed has four bracelets, including the 1996 Main Event championship. He also won the 1998 Carnivale of Poker and the 2009 NBC National Heads-Up Poker Championship. Matusow, who has four WSOP bracelets, is a finalist for the fifth time. He won the 2013 NBC National Heads-Up Poker Championship and has just over $9.5 million in lifetime earnings. Six WSOP bracelets, an NBC National Heads-Up Poker Championship title, and a World Poker Tour victory are just the highlights from Forrest's tournament resume. He was also an integral figure in the Andy Beal cash games in the mid-2000s. Fresh off of winning his fourth bracelet, Elezra's nomination is his second. He was a finalist first in 2016. Oppenheim is the only player nominated that has not won a WSOP bracelet. Mainly a cash game player, Oppenheim has $1,866,190 including just nine WSOP cashes, three of which came in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. The 2019 Poker Hall of Fame inductees will be announced during the WSOP Main Event in early July.
  7. Is it 2003 all over again? That was the year Chris Moneymaker made poker history when he famously won the World Series of Poker Main Event. Moneymaker earned his way to the big dance via an $86 satellite tournament on PokerStars and turned that into a life-changing $2.5 million payday. On Sunday, Moneymaker confirmed to PocketFives that he won a 2019 WSOP Main Event seat via an $80 All-In Satellite on WSOP.com. Now 16 years later, for the 50th annual WSOP, Moneymaker will again compete in the $10,000 Main Event for a fraction of the cost. In 2003, Moneymaker was one of 839 entries in the WSOP Main Event. In a field full of the best players in the game, Moneymaker was just a guy. In fact, he wasn’t even sure he wanted to play in the event. He originally thought to lose the satellite so that he would take the cash prize that came for finishing in a lesser place, but a good friend convinced him that he should win the seat and go on to play in the event. The result was a storybook ending and Moneymaker has been a staple of the poker world ever since, serving as one of the game’s top ambassadors globally. This time, though, he won’t be the unknown accountant from Tennessee with a too-good-to-be-true last name. Moneymaker is a known commodity in today’s poker world, and a player that is as celebrated by the community as they come. On Saturday night, he took home three awards at the WSOP’s First Fifty Honors. Moneymaker won the ‘Most Memorable TV Hand’ for his ‘Bluff of the Century’ against Sammy Farha in the 2003 WSOP Main Event. He then earned ‘Most Impressive WSOP main Event Win’ for his 2003 WSOP Main Event run and was honored as one of the ‘Four Most Important Players in WSOP History.’ Since his memorable victory in 2003, Moneymaker has just four WSOP cashes, with his best being a 10th-place finish worth $21,000 in the $5,000 Pot-Limit Omaha tournament in 2004. Moneymaker has yet to cash in the WSOP Main Event since his win in 2003, but it would prove to be quite fitting if he made the money this summer during the 50th annual WSOP and having won his seat via an $80 satellite. Moneymaker wasn’t the only big name to win a 2019 WSOP Main Event via a WSOP.com $80 All-In Satellite on Sunday. Jason Somerville, playing under the screen name 'HADERADE,' did as well. Somerville has cashed in the WSOP Main Event on three occasions. His first run to the money was in 2010, and his deepest run came in 2012 when he finished in 69th place from 6,598 entries for $106,056. The $80 All-In Satellite qualifiers on WSOP.com are a new addition for 2019 and have become a fun, fast-paced way for players to take an affordable shot at winning a $10,000 seat to the WSOP Main Event. The qualifiers run when 128 players sign up for $80 each and they are rake free. The winner gets a $10,000 Main Event seat and places 2-8 get a small cash payout. The catch is that all players must go all in from the moment the tournament starts. Players just sign up and watch the cards fall as they may from there. They don’t even have to be online when the tournament starts in order to win.
  8. After four days of play, Tom Marchese defeated the 536-entry field of the inaugural partypoker MILLIONS Vegas at the ARIA Resort & Casino to take home the $1,000,000 first place prize. Packed with superstar talent, the $10,000 buy-in event exceeded the $5 million guarantee, generating a prize pool of $5.36 million in partypoker’s first foray into Las Vegas during the World Series of Poker. The trip to Sin City paid off for partypoker in what was a dream final table lineup packed with some of the biggest names in the game of poker vying for the MILLIONS title and seven-figure payday. Perhaps the biggest of those names at the final table was that of Chris Moneymaker. The Poker Hall of Fame nominee entered the final table as one of the chip leaders but after losing a clash with Sergio Aido, found himself with a vulnerable stack. After Marchese opened from early position, Moneymaker three-bet from the small blind with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"]. Marchese made the call holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="2c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="5h"]. Moneymaker bet the flop and Marchese called. The turn provided Marchese the [poker card="8s"]. Moneymaker checked and Marchese took the lead putting out a healthy bet, which Moneymaker called. The river was the [poker card="4h"] and after Moneymaker checked for a second time, Marchese moved all-in. Moneymaker quickly called with his overpair but after being shown Marchese’s set, the 2003 World Series of Poker Main Event champion headed for the cage to collect his $80,000 prize for finishing in ninth. Germany’s Tobias Duthweiler was the next to exit the final table after shipping his short stack in holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="js"]. 888poker sponsored pro Ana Marquez reshoved with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"]. The race was on and the board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="th"][poker card="ad"] giving Marquez the hand and Duthweiler $100,000 for finishing in eighth place. Rainer Kempe shipped his stack in holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="ts"] in late position, however Marchese looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"] in the big blind and made the call to put Kempe at risk. Kempe was going to need some help, but the board of [poker card="7h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="7s"] provided little drama. Kempe, the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl champion, finished his tournament in seventh place adding $130,000 to his over $20 million in career live earnings. The next elimination happened when Jeremy Ausmus opened the hand with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] only to be three-bet all in by UK online phenom Conor ‘1_conor_b_1’ Beresford who picked up [poker card="th"][poker card="tc"]. Ausmus made the call and Beresford saw the bad news. The flop fell [poker card="3d"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6h"] providing little help to Beresford who was going to need to spike a ten or running straight cards. The turn was the [poker card="qs"], leaving Beresford drawing to two outs. The river was the [poker card="7h"] and Beresford exited in sixth place, collecting a career-high live cash of $170,000. Already with a massive chip lead, Marchese added to his stack in a hand with Sergio Aido. Marches raised under the gun with [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"] and Aido put in his remaining chips holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="3d"]. After a short deliberation, Marchese called and the flop came [poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="jc"] offering Aido a few extra chop outs. However the turn was the [poker card="9s"] and the river was the [poker card="th"] sending Aido to the rail in fifth place for $230,000. Marchese wasn’t done knocking players out and his next opponent was poker legend Freddy Deeb. Marchese put in a raise holding [poker card="9s"][poker card="9d"] and Deeb made his all in move holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="7h"]. Marchese made the call and the flop came [poker card="7c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9c"] giving Marchese top set. Deeb needed running cards to get out from under but the turn was the [poker card="2d"] and the river the [poker card="8s"]. Deeb finished in fourth place for $319,200, his largest cash since 2015. After Ausmus picked up chips off Marchese, the two of them had a large chip advance over Ana Marquez. After battling for some time, Marquez’ tournament came to an end in a blind on blind confrontation with Ausmus. From the small blind Marquez put her short stack in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="2h"] and Ausmus made the quick call with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="qd"][poker card="8h"] flop gave Ausmus a pair, taking away some outs for Marquez. The turn came [poker card="3s"] and the [poker card="5d"] river saw the 888poker ambassador exit in third place for $445,000. Heads up play began with Marchese holding a sizable chip lead that was quickly equalized by Ausmus. Although he got close to Marchese at one point, Marchese never relinquished the chip lead and Ausmus soon saw the gap widen as Marchese eventually opened up a 4:1 chip advantage. The pair of Aria regulars battled for quite some time until the final hand of the tournament saw Marchese open with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"] only to be shipped on for 14bbs by Ausmus. Marchese eventually made the call and Ausmus turned over the [poker card="kh"][poker card="ts"]. The board ran out clean for Marchese with a [poker card="5c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="7d"] flop and a turn [poker card="ah"] which left Ausmus drawing dead to the river [poker card="4h"]. Ausmus finished as the runner-up, settling for $650,000. Tom Marchese picked up an even $1,000,000 for first place, the seventh seven-figure score of his career. partypoker MILLIONS Final Table Payouts 1. Tom Marchese - $1,000,000 2. Jeremy Ausmus - $650,000 3. Ana Marquez - $445,000 4. Freddy Deeb - $319.200 5. Sergio Aido - $230,000 6. Conor Beresford - $170,000 7. Rainer Kempe - $130,000 8. Tobias Duthweiler - $100,000 9. Chris Moneymaker - $80,000
  9. The name Chris Moneymaker is forever attached to the World Series of Poker. We all know of the storybook run of Moneymaker in 2003 that began with an $86 online poker satellite. Now, 16 years later, Moneymaker is looking to turn another $80 online poker satellite into a life-changing sum of money. "Overall, I feel really good," Moneymaker said later on Day 3 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. "It's been a good day. The first two days were tough, I never caught any cards, but I’m trying to stay patient and realize that this is more of a marathon than a sprint. In years past, I’ve probably sprinted out a little bit too much and buried myself, so I’m trying to stay composed and not get in a hurry." The 2019 WSOP Main Event attracted its second-largest field ever, drawing 8,569 players to the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino. The winner will take home $10 million. That's a far cry from the 839 players to play in 2003 when Moneymaker won it. Although he said there aren't really any comparisons between now and then, Moneymaker did say the turnout this year was a bit like what was experienced in 2004. That’s when the field size grew by more than 1,700 entries to 2,576, showing just how popular and healthy poker was. "There’s really no comparison," Moneymaker said. "We’re breaking the record for the second-biggest crowd ever. It doesn’t even really compare to what we had. I guess the closest thing we could compare it to would be 2004 at Binion's. We had so many people that we were playing 11-handed and I started out playing on my knees in the first hour. The lines to get in Sit & Gos were three, four hours long. It was just insane. Obviously we don’t have that issue here at the Rio. We just have so many people, which is amazing to see that we got over 8,000 people this year. Poker has been growing every year. It’s great to see after everybody was proclaiming that poker was dead a couple of years ago. I’m glad to see that all of the tours seem to be growing and that the game is popular and it’s only going to improve." Going from 7,874 entries in 2018 to 8,569 in 2019 proved quite the rise in attendance, and this is without widespread legalized online poker in the United States. Nevada, New Jersey, and Delaware have regulated online poker, which is a start, and as more states come on board it can only mean good things for the industry and the WSOP. Pennsylvania is next in line. Legislation passed in the Keystone State and now it's just a waiting game for when Pennsylvania online poker is going to launch. A date of July 15 is pegged as the launch date, but there’s plenty of word on the streets that things may be delayed a little bit. Nonetheless, online poker is coming to Pennsylvania and it will be the largest state by quite a big margin to have legal online poker. Of the three states to currently have legal online poker in the US, New Jersey has the largest population at 8.9 million people. Pennsylvania’s population is 12.8 million, so nearly 4 million more. As an ambassador for PokerStars, Moneymaker has a lot of experience pushing for the advancement of legalized US online poker. Although he lives in Tennessee, he’s spent plenty of time in New Jersey with PokerStars. He’ll likely be doing the same once Pennsylvania is on board. "Hopefully, we can get sharing of player pools," Moneymaker said. "For Pennsylvania, I’ll be up there close to when they open to check out the site. I think it’s going to be great. I still think we need a state like California, New York, or Florida [to get on board]. Pennsylvania, landmass wise, is a huge state, but we still need a New York or California to push it over the hump. Once they see the tax revenue dollars coming in from a big state like that, I think that’s when it will start going similar to how marijuana and sports betting have gone." Right now, it’s a waiting game for Pennsylvania online poker players, but launch day will be here before we know it. When legal PA online poker does become available, Moneymaker suggests to take it slow and get yourself acclimated with the current game. "Most people used to play online poker back a certain number of years ago, so start off small, step your toe in, and get used to it again because the game has changed a lot," Moneymaker said. "If you haven’t played in a decade because you used to be an online player and you don’t play anymore, or you’ve been playing live, the online game, if you remember, is quite different. Start small, get your feet wet, and get used to it again." Another tip for Pennsylvania online poker players is to do some research and get up to speed and what’s allowed and what’s not allowed. This can be done while waiting for launch day. "Do some research to find out what tools are out there that you can use as far as HUD trackers and things like that, or if those things are illegal," Moneymaker said. "Make sure that you’re up on all of the regulations and have fun with it."
  10. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event went from 1,286 players down to 354 on Tuesday Those left are deep in the money and guaranteed $34,845, and it’s Dean Morrone holding the chip lead entering Day 5. Former NFL star Richard Seymour was one of the big stacks to advance. Morrone Leads the Way Morrone is a Canadian player and a qualifier from 888poker. He’s making his first career WSOP cash with his run in this year’s WSOP Main Event and it’s also his largest live tournament score to date as he entered the tournament with just $10,138 in live earnings. Morrone entered Day 4 with 365,000 before he went on to finish with 4.98 million and the lead. Other big stacks in the group behind Morrone on the leaderboard were Lars Bonding (4.04 million), Michael Messick (3.925 million), Warwick Mirzikinian (3.9 million), and Henrik Hecklen (3.862 million) to round out the top five. Morrone’s fellow 888poker qualifier Mihai Manole finished the day with a very healthy 3.781 million. Top 10 Chip Counts Dean Morrone - 4,980,000 Lars Bonding - 4,040,000 Michael Messick - 3,925,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 3,900,000 Henrik Hecklen - 3,862,000 Mihai Manole - 3,781,000 Robert Heidorn - 3,700,000 Sean Mills - 3,692,000 Christopher Wynkoop - 3,563,000 Andrew Brokos - 3,518,000 Former NFL Star Richard Seymour On the Rush Former NFL star and three-time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour was among those to advance to Day 5. He spoke with The Fives Poker Podcast at the end of Day 3 about his sixth time playing the WSOP Main Event being a charm and things only got sweeter on Tuesday. Seymour came into the day with 275,000 and quickly got his stack up to 400,000. It wasn’t long before he reached 1 million in chips and then the progression only continued after he was moved to one of the secondary features tables. Seymour bagged up 2.75 million in chips, but he wasn’t the only former NFL player to move on. Eric Stocz, who spent time in the NFL with the Detroit Lions, reached the money in the WSOP Main Event for the second time in his poker career. He’s already outperformed the 402nd-place finish he netted in 2011 that earned him $30,974 and will only be looking for more. Stocz bagged 350,000 for Day 5. Former PocketFives #1 Players Performing Well A handful of former PocketFives #1 players are performing well and have advanced to Day 4 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Fabrizio Gonzalez bagged 2.916 million, Chris Hunichen finished with 2.617 million, and Yuri Dzivielevski ended with 1.79 million. Hunichen bagged those chips despite losing one of the biggest pots of the tournament so far. He got involved in a big one with David Guay and Guay flopped a set of tens against Hunichen’s pocket kings. The hand resulted in a full double for Guay and took a dent of about 1.2 million out of Hunichen’s stack. Eight from Pennsylvania Still Alive Pennsylvania online poker has been legalized and the launch date is coming up soon. When sites do go live there will be a handful of players with some extra money to deposit thanks to deep runs in this WSOP Main Event. Eight players from Pennsylvania remain, with Thomas Parkes of Alburtis finishing Day 4 with the most chips at 3.172 million. Pittsburgh’s Chad Power is next with 2.78 million, and then it’s Matthew Sabia (1.81 million), Kenneth Smaron (1.806 million), Edward Pham (1.43 million), Jake Schindler (1.168 million), Donald Dombach (799,000), and Matt Glantz (690,000). Yoon, Esfandiari, Cheong Among Bracelet Winners Remaining In addition to all the names that have been mentioned, Brian Yoon (2.622 million), Antonio Esfandiari (2.583 million), Craig McCorkell (2.5 million), Chris Wallace (1.98 million), and Joseph Cheong (1.958 million) represent some of the WSOP gold bracelet winners still in the field. Yoon and Esfandiari are both three-time gold bracelet winners who have had some deep runs in the WSOP Main Event before. Yoon has finished in the top 60 on three separate occasions (2018, 2016, and 2011), and Esfandiari finished 24th in 2009. McCorkell took 13th in 2014, and Wallace finished 32nd in 2017. We also know very much about Cheong’s third-place finish behind Jonathan Duhamel and John Racener in 2010 that earned him $4.13 million. All Former Main Event Champs Gone Of course, not every player could advance. Three former WSOP Main Event champions began the day, with Johnny Chan, Chris Moneymaker, and Qui Nguyen still in the field, but all three of them busted out on Day 4. Moneymaker finished 687th for $20,200, Chan took 560th for $24,560, and Nguyen went out 455th for $30,780. Nguyen’s bust came when he got the last of his chips in with pocket fives only to lose out to an opponent’s two sixes. With no former WSOP Main Event champions in the field, we will see a brand new winner in 2019. Others to bust on Day 4 were Ricky Guan (362nd - $34,845), Scott Lazar (388th - $34,845), Jean-Robert Bellande (415th - $30,780), Bryan Campanello (435th - $30,780), Josh Arieh (485th - $27,390), Adam Owen (570th - $24,560), and Cliff Josephy (759th - $20,200). Day 5 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event starts at 12 pm PT on Wednesday, July 10 at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino.
  11. In the eight years since the World Series of Poker Main Event went to a three-starting flight schedule, only once has the Day 1A field reach 1,000 or more players and that was 2012 when they snuck into four-digit territory with 1,066 players. There was no sneaking in on Wednesday. 1,336 players showed up to play Day 1A, giving WSOP officials hope that this year's event might be a record-breaker. Williams wasn't the only notable to suffer an early end to his Main Event. Shane Warne, Frank Kassela, Bryn Kenney, Mohsin Charania, Brandon Shack-Harris, and Kristen Bicknell all ended with a zero as their Day 1A chip count. Former Main Event Champs Advance Just two former Main Event winners managed to work their way through the five levels of play on Day 1A. Chris Moneymaker, fresh off of his ninth-place finish in the partypoker MILLIONS Las Vegas, ended the day 95,000 while 2016 Main Event winner Qui Nguyen had a much better day, finishing with 180,500. Foxen, Strelitz, Bonomo Highlight Notables Moving on to Day 2A There were 960 players who made it through Day 1A. While a number of top players like to wait until Day 1C to play, there were a plethora of poker superstars who played on Wednesday and finished with chips in a bag. Daniel Strelitz, still basking in the flow of winning his first bracelet, finished with 185,300. Poker vlogger Johnnie Moreno (aka Johnnie Vibes) tripled his starting stack and finished with 184,000. Alex Foxen nearly did the same, ending with 173,200. Justin Bonomo accumulated 96,000 through the day to move on to Day 2. Other notables advancing from Day 1A include Patrick Serda (216,700), Jeff Lisandro (180,100), Jack Sinclair (153,800), Isaac Baron (146,600), Kelly Minkin (137,100), Billy Baxter (131,500), Brian Hastings (124,200), Matt Glantz (120,800), Arlie Shaban (113,600), Brian Rast (109,100), Kevin MacPhee (82,500), Garrett Greer (69,300), Ben Yu (63,600), Mike Gorodinsky (57,800), Erik Seidel (57,400), Stephen Chidwick (45,000), Marvin Rettenmaier (30,800), and Poker Hall of Fame finalist Chris Bjorin (18,000). Rapper Hoodie Allen Goes to Work, Bags Big Rapper Hoodie Allen, real name Steven Markowitz, was a Happy Camper at the end of Day 1A. The 31-year-old University of Pennsylvania grad lived up to The Hype and finished with 151,500, good enough for a top 100 stack. Markowitz will hope People Keep Talking when he returns for Day 2AB on Sunday. He has one previous WSOP cash, a 35th place finish in a 2016 $1,000 No Limit Hold'em event. Michael Miller Leads Pennsylvania Contingent into Day 2A With the launch of Pennsylvania Online Poker looming, 17 players from the Keystone State managed to turn Day 1A into a trip to Day 2A. Leading the way is Michael Miller. The Haverford, PA native just missed out on having a top 10 stack after finishing with 235,800. The next biggest Pennsylvania stack belongs to Gregory Fishberg with 168,800. They're joined by Jesse Smith (136,600), Alan Schein (135,000), Brian Hastings (124,200), Matt Glantz (120,800), Alexander Krisak (117,000), John Andress (104,900), Joseph Palma (100,100), Sean Magee (88,500), Dennis Cronin (85,700), David Knudsen (76,600), James Hundt (72,900), Jennifer Shahade (72,400), Ronald Lankin (49,500), Gary Bowker (25,800), and Seth Berger (DNR). The Day 1A Numbers Could Be Hinting at Something Big Historicially, Day 1A is always the least popular Main Event starting flight. It requires being in Las Vegas the longest amount of time, there's a two-day gap between Day 1A and Day 2A, and it means being in Sin City on July 4th. Over the last five years, Day 1A has accounted for an average of 11.44% of the overall field size, staying steady with a high of 11.75% last summer and a low of 11.01% in 2017. If that trend were to hold true this year, WSOP officials are looking at a record-setting year that will eclipse the 8,773 runners that turned out in 2006. Top 10 Chip Counts Bryan Campanello - 417,500 Timothy Su - 297,300 Quentin Roussey - 266,400 Takehiro Kato - 259,200 Charidimos Demetriou - 252,000 Craig Chait - 249,600 Stephen Graner - 247,100 Mark Zullo - 245,600 David Lolis - 245,100 Thomas Roupe - 238,800
  12. In January, PokerStars made history by hosting the PokerStars Players Championship - the largest $25,000 buy-in poker tournament of all time. Now, seven months later they've announced that they're bringing it back and giving it a new host city. The 2020 PokerStars Players Championship will be held in Barcelona, August 20-24 as part of the European Poker Tour stop. The first PSPC held in conjunction with the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, had a field of 1,039 and a total prize pool of $26,455,500. “The inaugural PSPC generated hundreds of personal stories of achievement and ambition among the Platinum Pass winners who dared to dream of playing in an exclusive high-roller event,” said Severin Rasset, Managing Director & Commercial Officer at PokerStars. “The PSPC demonstrates our commitment to cultivating and growing the game, not only by creating opportunities for poker fans of all levels to win life-changing sums of money, but by showcasing poker and its many inspirational stories well beyond the poker realm.” [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"] The 2019 PSPC featured an additional $1 million added to the first place prize and PokerStars gave away 320 Platinum Passes that included the $25,000 buy-in. PokerStars had yet to confirm if the 2020 event will include the first place prize bump or the number of Platinum Passes they plan to award over the next year. The first five 2020 Platinum Passes were awarded Tuesday as part of the announcement. Five players who were brought to EPT Barcelona to be part of a live-streamed event with some Team PokerStars Pros. Adrian Garcia, Clement Eloy, Danielle Summer, Christoph Walkenhorst, and Daryl Inglis will be returning to Barcelona in 2020 to play the PSPC. On Wednesday, ten more passes will be awarded on PokerStars through the Stars Rewards program in Mystery Chests. Throughout 2018, PokerStars found a myriad of ways to award poker players and fans with a $30,000 Platinum Pass. This included the Moneymaker PSPC Tour which was 11 live and online tournaments with a $86 buy-in that included a Platinum Pass for the eventual winner. Other PokerStars Team Pros also held contests that gave away a Platinum Pass for completing certain tasks or creating content. Players who win or are awarded 2020 Platinum Passes will get a €22,500 buy-in to the PSPC, six nights hotel in a five-star hotel, €1,250 to cover other expenses, as well as PSPC merchandise and airport transfers. The value of each package is approximately $30,000 US. Spaniard Ramón Colillas, who earned a Platinum Pass for winning the 2018 Campeonato de España de Poker, won the 2019 PSPC for $5.1 million. One month after his victory, he became a member of Team PokerStars.
  13. Over the last 72 hours, California poker room Stones Gambling Hall has found itself as the epicenter of cheating allegations based around the live-streamed cash game action hosted by the casino. The allegations of cheating in the game first came to light after Veronica Brill, who has played in and worked as a commentator for the game, tweeted the following:
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