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Found 41 results

  1. [caption width="640"] Being a successful poker player wasn't enough for Ryan Fee - he wanted more - and found it with Upswing Poker (WPT photo)[/caption] Ryan Fee became one of the best poker players on the planet by honing his craft online. He earned a mainstream poker following, however, by founding Upswing Poker - a training site created by Fee, Doug Polk and Matt Colletta. Fee and Polk are the prominent faces of the site and are both successful, high-stakes poker pros over the last decade. They know each other from gaming ventures before poker, but if it wasn’t for Polk trolling a poker forum in 2008, the two may have never become friends. “Doug hates this story,” said Fee. “But I think it’s hilarious. Let me give you a little back story on this. In high school, Doug got in an argument with a statistics teacher about Martingaling. He thought he solved it and that was it. Boom. Gambling was done. He was just going to take 100 bucks, go start betting 1 dollar on black jack and then just be a millionaire.” Polk posted a story in a prominent online poker forum about how he gambled away his bankroll using the Martingale system. Having already had some history with Polk in other games, Fee felt compelled to help his fellow gamer and up-and-coming poker pro. Use coupon code 'pocket5s' to get the UpswingPoker Postflop Game Plan for just $19 - that's an $8 savings. The Postflop Game Plan is a system that allows you to make quick, high-quality, profitable poker decisions, which translates into more money in your pocket. Buy it now!“He’s like ‘I thought that could never happen.’ Blah, blah blah,” said Fee about Polk’s post in the forums. “I see this thread and I send him a message. I’m like ‘Hey man. I used to play you in Warcraft III. We got to stick together.’ So, I’m like ‘I’ll send you 250 bucks. And I’ll give you some coaching. And try to get you back on your way here.” After that the two became close friends and kept in touch online for the rest of the year while Polk used the money to grind up a roll playing .10/.25 No Limit hold'em. They met up in Las Vegas in 2009 and spent some time living and grinding up the stakes together. A couple years later, however, Fee found out that the story that created their friendship was completely fabricated. “I was stunned when I heard this,” said Fee. “That the story he made up about him Martingaling his roll away in college. [It was] completely made up. Didn’t happen. That was the basis for our friendship, so I’m glad he did it. It worked out for both of us.” The two laughed and joked about the story. It never affected their relationship. Fee chalks it up to how easy it was to pull the wool over people’s eyes back in those days. “So, there was wild shit happening, people posting on the forums, and it would be real,” said Fee about the state of online forums in ’09. “Sometimes it would be bullshit and it was like hard to tell. Whereas, like now, you pretty much always know if somebody’s real or full of shit. It just wasn’t like that 10 years ago.” It wasn’t very long after the two became very close and rapidly moving up the stakes of the online cash game world that Black Friday happened. Like many young online grinders living in America at the time, the duo hit the road and spent most of the time out of the country playing online. After spending several years on the road in Canada, Europe and Southeast Asia, Fee felt like a change of pace was needed. He wanted to come back to the United States. Both him and Polk had already beaten the highest stakes that were being offered online at the time, so they decided to come back to the U.S. and take a shot at playing live tournaments. “From 2011 through ’13, so for three years I was on the road the whole year basically,” said Fee. “I was just sort of like ‘Dude, enough is enough of this shit, right?’ So, I was like ‘I’m just going to sort of change pace.’ And that went into me playing tournaments. In 2014, I played all the tournaments. The majority of my tournament results come from that year.” A year of grinding live tournaments was enough for Fee. Neither him or Polk had any real desire to travel again for online action and they didn’t want to grind live tournaments full time. They decided to move in a different direction. Upswing Poker was born. “Upswing started because of a guy named ‘Scubba,’ who some people may remember,” said Fee. “He’s an old school like legendary cap player.” Steve 'Scubba' Cesaro was playing less poker at the time of Black Friday and moved into the business world after the U.S. government dropped the proverbial hammer on internet poker. He gave them the idea to start a training website, citing the inefficiencies in the current business models of training sites that were available. “He was like ‘Yeah, they’re doing it all wrong. You’ve got to do it this way. If you do it this way, you’ll crush,’” said Fee. “We’d sort of done everything and honestly just looking for new challenges and wanted to spend more time in the U.S.” Fee introduced Polk to Colletta and the three of them got working on developing their own training site. There was just one problem. None of them had any business experience. “It was a good spot because we had all this poker expertise,” said Fee. “But we didn’t know anything about running the business, right? So, it was a spot where, and I think this is sort of true for a lot of businesses. You want to be an expert in one dimension of the business, right? So, for Upswing, we were expert poker players with a lot to offer. But we didn’t know much about the business. “So, that was more of the learning process. Whereas now, if we’re going to do a business, we could do another poker business or we could so something tangentially related. Like something involving like the web based stuff because now we have that expertise. So, it’s learning and growing and stuff.” With the business growing, Fee also grew as a person and, in his opinion, it’s a change for the better. Fee used to spend all of his time grinding out a win rate in front of a computer screen. Now, he’s building a more balanced and complete life for himself. Fee, a Philadelphia native, picked up the game as a senior in high school. He had turned a $300 bankroll into a nice sum of cash by the time he was receiving his diploma. He spent a semester at Drexel University before taking a leave of absence to pursue the game full time. He stayed on the east coast for a little while before making his way west to Vegas and California. He earned an LAPT title and a six-figure score just after turning pro, grinded up the stakes, playing the biggest games on the web, amassed over $3 million in live tournament earnings and even earned a WSOP bracelet with Polk in the $1,000 No Limit Hold’em tag team event last year. Adding Upswing to his life made him a more well-rounded and happier person. He started making decisions on what made him happier as opposed to what was the most plus-EV. “Upswing sort of comes first,” said Fee about balancing poker with his business. “That’s where I get the most joy and satisfaction. And you know what really it is? I think this almost goes back to being the philosophy of sort of teaching people versus keeping everything a secret. What I started doing was I just started making compromises for money. “I was like ‘Yeah, this isn’t going to make me as much money, but it’s going to make me happier.’ And that was honest. I had like a real epiphany last year about that. So, now most of my decisions center around what ads to the greatest life satisfaction rather than what makes the most money.” Fee realized that he was traveling around the world playing online poker, making a lot of money by anybody’s standards, but he was miserable while he was doing it. “I would go to great places, then I would be sitting on my computer 10 hours a day, waiting for a fish to log on and play me,” said Fee. “Or like wait to get in good games or whatever. I’d be happy to take half as much money for ten times as much life.” He’s only a year removed from his first bracelet win, but that won’t change Fee’s outlook when all of the tournaments get underway at the Rio. With the WSOP about to get underway, Fee is still content playing poker when he wants to and working on modules for Upswing. “I think it’s really easy to get wrapped up and lost [in poker],” said Fee. “It’s something I went through and I think that’s why I sort of have that position.”
  2. [caption width="640"] Steve Madara utilized the tools available to him on Upswing Poker and won 9,000 at The Borgata Poker Open as a result.[/caption] The opening and development of Upswing Poker brought a new poker training tool into the marketplace last year. In its relatively short time as an available tool, many customers have walked away satisfied with their experience with the product and are writing rave reviews as a result. Perhaps the most public of Upswing’s happy customers is Steve '7douche' Madara. Last September, Madara won the “Almighty Million” event at the Borgata Poker Open for $169,000. While he was busy winning the title, Madara flaunted the popular Upswing shirt that brings to light the term popularized by Upswing co-founder Doug Polk, “Bad Reg.” Madara wore the shirt in jest and overall has been tremendously pleased with his experience using the site after starting his membership based on name recognition alone. “I first started using Upswing simply after I heard Ryan Fee and Doug Polk were going to be coaches on the site. Being the huge poker nerd that I am, I knew that these two guys were considered top bosses in the game for many years. Then there’s me, an online mid-stakes New Jersey reg winning or losing thousands a day, it was a no-brainer to spend $300 on this new site that had videos made by them with also a chance for them to personally answer your questions.” Like others in his position, Madara realized that his purchase of all the tools that Upswing has to offer was of much better value than seeking out individual coaching, which oftentimes requires students to spend hundreds of dollars per hour. Why spend that much per hour when you can get a much better value that comes at an annual cost? Madara estimates that Fee and Polk’s coaching services were worth four figures each and he was getting a great deal by purchasing the full Upswing Lab, which includes 40 videos made by Polk along with over two dozen available learning modules for players like Madara who are looking to expand their game. RELATED: The Upswing Poker Lab: The Ultimate Poker Training ExperienceBefore he joined Upswing, Madara was climbing the ranks in New Jersey’s online sites but once he fully engaged with the learning material on the website, Madara says he started looking at the game from a whole new perspective. “In poker, there are countless possibilities, but overall, once you categorize all your hands into ranges and start to notice how they play on certain board textures, you begin to be able to build a much more solid framework to build your game around. You begin to feel like you’ve almost been in that spot before even if you’ve never played it simply because you’ve studied enough similar spots,” said Madara. "The lab is all about this core teaching of solid theory and math that once you gain an overall understanding of, there’s really no excuse as to why you can’t be a winning poker player.” There are many options available within the Upswing Lab for what a player can learn and based how much time they are willing to invest, fully grow their knowledge of the game. One aspect of Upswing that Madara particularly enjoys is the familiarity in learning only from Fee and Polk and gaining a comprehensive understanding of their way of thinking. There is still a lot for Madara to learn as he builds his game but he knows that with the tools available to him inside The Lab, the possibilities are endless. Madara may not be the “bad reg” that his shirt advertises and he admits that as he discovers more about the game, his prior understanding was small in comparison. The next Steve Madara is out there. Are you willing to do what it takes to take your game to the next level? Sign up for the UpswingPoker Lab here and use the coupon code 'pocket5s' at checkout and you'll get $20 off your purchase.
  3. [caption width="640"] Doug Polk believes he's the best Heads Up No Limit Hold'em player in the world - and now he's willing to teach everybody else how to be better (WPT photo)[/caption] The man once known only as ‘WCGRider’ has been a busy guy of late. Not only has Doug Polk managed to create a YouTube channel with close to 70,000 followers that’s jam-packed with original content; he’s also found the time to get back to his roots of Heads Up No Limit Hold’em cash games. However, he hasn’t been playing. Now he’s turned his attention to teaching. Polk happily calls his Upswing Poker Advanced Heads-up Mastery the "best heads-up course of all time" and thinks players will learn a great deal from this course. “I have been spending more or less my entire last year building my audience, and creating content for Upswing Poker,” Polk says. “[But] we knew from the get go that this was ultimately a course we wanted to offer.” As Polk is based in Las Vegas, he’s unable to play the highest online stakes. He instead turned his attention to having fun, streaming bankroll challenges and grinding micro stakes. “When we started Upswing, we thought it was important to start off with offering material to the widest number of people, which meant a focus on smaller stakes play,” he explains. “Heads Up No Limit has been my bread and butter for the past six years. I reached an established number position in the game type for about three years, and then my students came up and became top 5-10 players as well. I am the most qualified person in the world to teach this course, and was happy to get the chance to create it.” There’s no denying Polk’s credentials as one of the most successful heads-up specialists in the game. But what exactly does this course involve? Well, one of the main areas Polk focuses on is how to “correctly navigate the branches of the game tree”. “[This] has been an important part of poker for years, players just didn’t realize it.” he says. “In Heads Up poker variants, you will consistently see certain situations over and over again. This means - if you are making mistakes in them - it will compound and your opponent will get a good opportunity to make money off of you. “Playing the game tree is important, but you have to know what you are looking for to begin with. You should be striving to hit certain frequencies for all of your actions, and learning how to balance out those ranges correctly. I think in today’s game, we just know much more specifically what that looks like.” Sign up for the UpswingPoker Lab here and use the coupon code 'pocket5s' at checkout and you'll get $20 off your purchase.There are already plenty of options out there for online learning in poker, so aside from Polk’s excellent credentials, what else makes this course unique. “I don’t think I’m stretching by saying nothing like this has ever been released to the public,” Polk says. “I am in every moment of the video, and it walks you through how to play all parts of the game tree. This is done in a structured way, with sample analysis and examples. “There is simply nothing else like this out there on the market if you are trying to take your game to the next level.” While Polk doesn't play as much online these days, he hasn’t slowed down in his attempts to get better. “I still enjoy playing the game of poker, but time is a commodity I don’t have as much of anymore,” he says. “I think it is important to still try to learn about the game of poker, and playing in tough environments helps you do that. You don’t want to end up falling behind the curve. “It is unlikely we will see too much of [me playing online high stakes]in the future, although I am known to get in the mix from time to time. I am planning on doing some streaming during the Spring Championship Of Online Poker, so I should be putting at least some volume in during that period of time.” And finally, what’s next for Upswing Poker? “This course is already live, and we are excited by the launch,” Polk says. “I have received so much positive feedback from everyone who has made the purchase, I can’t say how good that feels about the months spent putting it together. “Next up we are going to spend time bolstering the lab with quality content. It is essential to Upswing to make sure that the Lab remains a top focus, and it is the best destination for smaller stakes players looking to up their game. “After that, we might have a little PLO in the works, but I will leave that story to be told by our newest member of Upswing, Jnandez.” To purchase the Doug Polk Heads Up Mastery Course - click here.
  4. [caption width="640"] Doug Polk is the captain of The Postflop Engine (Photo c/o Upswing Poker)[/caption] When it comes to No Limit Hold’em, players have plenty of ways to improve their preflop game. Memorize a few key percentages, examine some hand rankings charts, keep position on the brain. These mantras can have any level of poker player feeling like preflop success is attainable. Postflop can be a lot more intimidating, though. Sure, we all learn the chances your flopped flush and straight draw will hit, but what to do you when you flop bottom pair is a whole other matter. Upswing Poker, lead by Doug Polk and Ryan Fee, is now offering a training module designed to make postflop strategy a lot more attainable - and it's ridiculously affordable. The site’s Postflop Engine is a standalone, multimedia training product designed specifically to help beginner players catch their postflop skills up to their preflop ones. The product comes at a flat fee of $7. “The Postflop Engine teaches you how we categorize hands into one of four categories. Each corresponds how to play a given hand in your range, in any postflop situation. It sounds more complicated than it actually is. The PFE basically teaches the fundamental way of how to think about playing your hands postflop,” explains Upswing Poker President and poker proMatt Colletta. Sign-up here for the Upswing Poker Postflop Engine for just $7!The driver of the Postflop Engine is fellow Upswing Poker founder and WSOP bracelet winner Doug Polk. With a mix of videos from Polk and written lessons, a beginning player can learn all the fundamentals to transform their game in a couple of hours. Upswing Poker provides a subscription service in addition to free articles and The Postflop Engine. If you are nervous about investing in a monthly subscription, Colletta says The Postflop Engine is a good example of how content is presented in The Poker Lab. “It gives an insight into the material presented in the Poker Lab. Additionally, the Poker Lab covers more advanced topics with much more depth and specificity.” All users need to do in order to get The Postflop Engine is to start an account on UpswingPoker.com. By clicking on The Postflop Engine image, users will be directed to a page where they can use PayPal or credit card to pay the $7 fee. Once the fee is paid, users will have access to that are of the site just a few clicks of the mouse later. The basic gist of the product is learning how to classify your postflop holdings into one of four categories. Then the Engine gives you tips and concepts to apply to each type of hand. If you are looking to find a holistic, simplistic way to begin mastering postflop play, this is a foundational resource intended to quickly recoup its relatively low cost. The material is easy to process, but that does not mean it does not permeate throughout your hold’em game. The Engine itself does not take too long to read through and watch, but it is designed to be a core strategy players learn to master and then build upon. Colletta explains how to best utilize The Postflop Engine. “A true amateur player will gain a huge increase in their poker skill level after going through the material in the PFE. There has never been a better product for new/amateur players ever in poker. And for just $7… the value is off the charts. They will have a key insight into how to think about poker.” In a training site world dominated by subscriptions and big year-long commitments, The Postflop Engine stands out because it is standalone. Upswing Poker also offers more intense, subscription-based services, as mentioned, but by catering to players still looking to work on the fundamentals without having to make a big commitment to poker training, they stand out with a useful offering that does not use up a ton of time to understand.
  5. [caption width="640"] The latest episode of The Fives is now available on iTunes and Stitcher.[/caption] Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and interview players and industry leaders. GREAT NEWS: The Fives is now available on Stitcher. Check out the links below to start listening on your favorite podcast app. In this episode, Lance Bradley and Matt Clark get into the latest info the Matt Kirk vs. Leon Tsoukernik drama, wrap up WPT Montreal and get into Doug Polk's calling out of players bailing on high stakes televised appearances. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES GET THE FIVES ON STITCHER
  6. [caption width="640"] Fedor Holz is one of the players that make PokerGO's Poker Masters a must-watch event (WPT photo)[/caption] The first-ever Poker Masters kicks off Wednesday night at the Aria Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas with a number of the best players in the game today set to take their shot at some seven-figure prize pools and a custom-designed Purple Jacket. The Poker Masters is a series of five events; four $50,000 buy-in events with a single re-entry followed by a $100,000 buy-in freezeout. All five events will be streamed on PokerGO, giving poker fans around the world the chance to watch high roller action for eight straight days. The Purple Jacket will be awarded to the player with the highest total earnings across all five events. With cards in the air on Wednesday night, PocketFives has put together a list of five players to keep an eye on as the action progresses now through September 20. Daniel Negreanu He's poker's all-time leading money earner and easily the most visible star in the game today, but that doesn't mean Daniel Negreanu has any interest in resting on his laurels. Negreanu is - as he often is - very confident in how he thinks he's going to do during the Poker Masters. So much so, that he took on as many $50,000 must-win bets on himself against any other player in the field as he could book. Along with the prize money he'd win,Negreanu stands to win an additional seven figures if he takes home the Purple Jacket. It's worth noting that despite all of Negreanu's success, he has only won one event with a buy-in of $25,000 or more; the €25,600 2013 WSOP Europe High Roller. Fedor Holz Remember when Fedor Holz won the 2016 World Series of Poker One Drop High Roller and then promptly retired? Well, he still considers himself retired as he focuses his energy on his new company, Primed Mind, but the German superstar does come out of the woodwork every now and then to play an event or two. He'll be playing all five events and will be vlogging from start to finish for PokerCentral. Adrian Mateos At just 23 years old, Adrian Mateos already has a ridiculously impressive list of accomplishments next to his name. He's won three WSOP bracelets, the European Poker Tour Grand Final and almost $10,000,000 in live tournaments alone. Earlier this year, in the span of just 31 days, Mateos finished runner-up to Dietrich Fast at the $50,000 Super High Roller event at Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood, Florida and then won the €50,000 Eight Max Shot Clock event at the PokerStars Championship Monte Carlo. Doug Polk Doug Polk should probably make this list just for being the most recent WSOP One Drop High Roller champ, but Polk has become one of the game's biggest stories thanks to the content he's produced and his willingness to put himself out there. He's also got a growing rivalry of sorts with Negreanu and getting the opportunity to see those two clash during any of the five events is worth the price of subscription alone. Phil Hellmuth We've already mentioned that all five events are streamed on PokerGO and everybody knows that Phil Hellmuth has never met a camera he didn't like. The chance to be a constant part of an eight-day long broadcast while sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with some of the best players in the game is something Hellmuth lives for. On top of that, he's also coming into the Poker Masters with a little bit of momentum. Three weeks ago he beat Polk and Dan Cates to win the Poker Night in America King of the Hill event. He followed that up with a runner-up finish in the World Poker Tour Legends of Poker event for his 12th biggest score ever.
  7. [caption width="640"] Brandon Adams won the final ,000 buy-in Poker Masters event on Sunday (PokerCentral photo)[/caption] Heading into the final table of the last $50,000 Poker Masters event on Sunday afternoon, it looked like German Steffen Sontheimer might be on his way to a second win. The German came into the final table behind only Doug Polk and Brandon Adams in chips. When the dust settled though, Sontheimer busted earlier than he would have hoped and Adams ending up beating Polk heads-up to win Event #4. After Zach Clark was eliminated on the bubble in seventh place, the final six players went to work chasing the $819,000 first place prize. From the hijack, David Peters raised to 36,000 before Jake Schindler re-raised to 90,000 from late position. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"], Peters checked and Schindler moved all in for 314,000. Peters snap-called and revealed [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"] for top set while Schindler showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="7c"] for top two. The hand was wrapped up after the [poker card="8c"] turn and the river was the [poker card="th"]. Sontheimer, making his third final table appearance of the Poker Masters, had his run at a second title fall short. Action folded to Sontheimer on the button and he bet 350,000, leaving himself just 40,000 behind. Adams called to see a flop of [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2d"]. Sontheimer threw in his last 40,000 and Adams called. Sontheimer turned up [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] while Adams had [poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. Neither the [poker card="th"] turn or [poker card="2c"] river were any help for Sontheimer and he was out in fifth place. Sontheimer cashed in three of the four $50,000 preliminary events. He finished fourth in Event #1, first in Event #2 and now fifth in Event #4 for $1,221,000 total earnings. The German sits atop the Purple Jacket standings heading into the final event, the $100,000 freezeout which gets underway Monday. Just 45 minutes later, Adams sent another player to the rail. Adams raised to 75,000 from UTG and action folded to Justin Bonomo who moved all in from the big blind for 770,000. Adams called and showed [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] while Bonomo tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="3c"]. The board ran out [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="4s"] to eliminate Bonomo in fourth and propel Adams into the chip lead for the first time. Adams had a hand in the next elimination too. Adams raised to 90,000 from the button, Doug Polk made it 260,000 to go from the small blind before Peters moved all in from the big blind for 545,000. Adams responded by moving all in and Polk called. Peters tabled [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"], Adams showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"] while Polk was well ahead of both with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"]. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="qs"] to eliminate Peters in third and send Polk into the chip lead as heads up play began. Over the next 20 minutes, Adams re-took the lead and eventually finished Polk off. With Adams up just over 2-1 in chips, Polk raised to 80,000 from the button and Adams called. After the [poker card="ks"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"] flop, Adams checked, Polk bet 100,000 and Adams re-raised to 320,000. Polk moved all in and Adams called immediately. Polk showed [poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"] for a flush draw but Adams tabled [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] for a better flush draw. The [poker card="2d"] turn ended any chance for Polk and he was out in second place. The inconsequential river was the [poker card="5s"]. Payouts Brandon Adams - $819,000 Doug Polk - $468,000 David Peters - $273,000 Justin Bonomo - $175,500 Steffen Sontheimer - $117,000 Jake Schindler - $97,500
  8. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640"] 2017 saw it's fair share of poker players mixing it up both on and off the tables[/caption] As the final days of 2017 slowly tick by, it's time to take a look back at the year in poker. Over the last 10 days of the year, PocketFives is taking readers on a trip back in time to recap the last 12 months in a fun and unique way. To date we've gone over the top five off-the-felt news stories of 2017, the top heaters of the year, covered the game's newest characters and breakout stars. Now it's time to get into the he said, she said world of grudges Mike 'The Mouth' Matusow vs. Shawn Sheikan. Tom Dwan vs. Dan 'Jungleman' Cates. 'Jesus' Ferguson vs. The Poker Community at Large. Throughout the history of the game of poker, there's been no shortage of ill will, well-timed “needles” and downright disrespect among poker players. 2017 was no different with a number of hard-fought grudges developing over an assortment of disagreements. #5 - Maurice Hawkins vs. Tim Reilly An on-the-felt conflict led to a war of words off-the-felt this summer when 10-time World Series of Poker Circuit ring winner Maurice Hawkins clashed with Massachusetts grinder Tim Reilly. Deep in WSOP Event #23, The Marathon, Hawkins and Reilly played a hand against each other where Reilly spiked a one-outer on the river to give him a royal flush against Hawkins aces full, allowing Reilly to double through Hawkins with only 22 remaining. Then, depending on which of the two you speak with, the reported war of words not only spilled off the table but into the press with Hawkins claiming that Reilly said to him “This ain’t the circuit. Go back to the circuit.” and Reilly saying that Hawkins “literally lies more than anybody I’ve met in my entire life” and that his table talk was simply “trying to belittle him.” As the tournament intensified it seems so did their mutual dislike with the needles going back and forth. Finally, Reilly says he went up to Hawkins to try and squash the beef and apologize but, according to Reilly, Hawkins told “Hey man, you’re a piece of ***.”, right to his face. Both players ended up at the final table with Hawkins finishing in ninth for $54,000 and Reilly in fourth for $224,000. Both went home with a grudge that likely won’t soon be forgotten. #4 - Doug Polk vs…Lots of Players Doug Polk, the YouTuber who won the 2017 High Roller For One Drop for over $3.6 million, has never shied away from the spotlight of controversy and in 2017 he found himself fighting very public battles on many fronts. Not one to be without an opinion and an audience with an insatiable appetite for content, Polk tackled a number of issues troubling to him, firing shots at a variety of popular poker players in the process. Just some of the items Polk took issue with were players who may or may not have angled on Poker Night in America by not having his big chips visible (Alec Torelli), players who may or may not have agreed to appear at televised poker games and opted not to show up (Matt Berkey), players who may or may not have tried to argue the notion that “more rake is better” (Daniel Negreanu) and players who lost a ton of money at the high stakes games on PokerStars (Luke Schwartz). For, each of these issues Polk took to his Silver Play Button YouTube channel (or Facebook live) to call them out. But a good grudge isn’t one sided and Torelli, Berkey, Negreanu and Schwartz all shot back, either defending themselves or attacking Polk directly, on their social media platforms and in the media. Are the grudges real? There seems to be some very real disdain from each of these guys but for Polk, who every day is finding new ways to market himself, 2018 will likely find him embattled in brand new issues with a new cast of high profile players - and we’ll likely be watching. #3 - Phil Hellmuth vs. The Germans Is there anyone who would disagree that the current contingency of German high rollers are crushing the game right now? Yes. Phil Hellmuth. Whether it’s just his public persona or very real hubris, the 14-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner seems to think he’s a favorite against the field in just about any No Limit Hold’em game. After the 2017 Poker Masters, despite a lackluster performance, Hellmuth tweeted out he was “always the #1 seed” in NLHE tournaments and it started off a firestorm between him and Daniel Negreanu as to just how much of a favorite Hellmuth is in today’s modern high-rolling circuit. Negreanu accusing Hellmuth of constantly muttering how bad all the players are, especially the Germans, and how disrespectful he was to their games. For his part, Hellmuth claimed he was a “good guy” and even told Fedor Holz and, the eventual winner of the 2017 Poker Masters Purple Jacket, Steffen Sontheimer that "he liked them". When the war of words began to escalate into a big-time prop bet Hellmuth ended up easing off the gas but never conceding that he is always a huge favorite. Sontheimer, for his part, kept it classy. In the media he talked about how he liked Hellmuth, but is more than willing to play him, just about anytime, anywhere. #2 - Leon Tsoukernik vs. Matt Kirk A late night high-stakes heads-up match at the Aria Casino in Las Vegas between King’s Casino owner Leon Tsoukernik and “Aussie” Matt Kirk not only ended up with Tsoukernik losing $3 million of money he borrowed from Kirk but after a confusing series of events, the pair have found themselves in a bitter lawsuit in the Nevada court system. Depending on who you listen to Tsoukernik, Kirk or even Dusk Till Dawn owner Rob Yong, who ended up as an intermediary between the two parties, Tsoukernik was either was too drunk to know what he was doing, simply lost a massive amount of money and refused to pay it back, or the pair struck a deal for a lesser amount which Kirk’s “backers” refused to take. However you look at it, the situation is cloudy and now the lawyers are involved. The lawsuit at first was simply Kirk wanting his $3 million back but now there is a countersuit from Tsoukernik claiming that the reports in the media that he refused to pay has damaged his reputation and he wants $10 million from Kirk for defamation of character and he also wants the Aria Resort & Casino in on the lawsuit for over-serving. Someone is not going to be happy at the conclusion of this saga and it’s not very likely that the pair will be shuffling chips on the felt together anytime soon. #1 - Cate Hall vs. Mike Dentale A three month war of words between the two outspoken professional poker players, Cate Hall and Mike Dentale, reached its conclusion back in March after the pair booked a mini-HU4Rollz match on Poker Night In America, finally putting their money where their mouths were. Dentale, very publicly, called out the play of Hall from a hand during the December 2016 World Poker Tour Five Diamond. Hall, eventually having enough, issued the challenge and before long the pair sat across the felt from each other with $15,000 playing $75/$150 NLHE in a best two-out-of-three match. While Dentale may have started it with his comments online, Hall finished it off by sweeping the Brooklyn player in two straight matches, earning his $30,000 and, maybe, his respect? Not so much. “Remember you will always suck,” Dentale said to Hall during the match. In the end, Hall took home the cash, Dentale apologized to his fans and both raised money for charity. All's well that ends well for the pair as both went on to earn six-figures over the course of 2017.
  9. On Thursday, February 22 the Global Poker Index and PokerStars present the 4th Annual American Poker Awards. The ceremony, being held in Hollywood, will bring together some of the biggest names in poker to celebrate the achievements of both players and industry members in 20 different categories. There’s a lot to look forward to when the celebration of the year-that-was takes place at the Andaz Hotel this week. PokerCentral Leads The Way There’s no doubt that Cary Katz’ PokerGo streaming service, part of Poker Central, has had an important impact on not just how fans can consume their favorite game but how much poker they now have at their disposal. Poker Central leads the way in award nominations with eight opportunities to pick up a trophy. Both the Super High Roller Bowl and the Poker Masters are included in the Event Of The Year category. Nick Schulman and the longtime poker voice of Poker After Dark, Ali Nejad are competing for the Broadcaster of the Year. Additionally, “Tom Dwan’s Return to Poker After Dark”, Matt Berkey’s “Dead Money” documentary, the Poker Central Podcast and Cary Katz himself are all up for awards as well. Doug And Daniel Go Head To Head It’s no secret that Daniel Negreanu and Doug Polk, two of poker’s biggest personalities, have an acrimonious relationship. At the American Poker Awards the pair finds themselves nominated in a trio of categories against one another. Both are nominated for the Video Blogger Award (along with Joe Ingram and Andrew Neeme), The People’s Choice For Poker Personality of the Year (along with Jonathan Little and Andrew Neeme) and Poker’s Biggest Influencer (along with tournament director Matt Savage and Poker Central’s Cary Katz). Players Of The Year A pair of awards are pre-determined as both Bryn Kenney and Kristen Bicknell will be honored for their tournament performances in 2017. Kenney, who destroyed the high roller scene last year, earned himself the 2017 GPI American Player of the Year on the back of 15 six-figure scores. Bicknell will be presented with the 2017 GPI Female Player of the Year award with the help of her victory in the $5,000 prelim at the World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic in December of 2017 for just under $200,000. The Favorites There’s little doubt that all of the players and industry members that have been nominated are deserving. That said, there are a few that would likely be considered favorites in their respective categories. Vlogger Andrew Neeme crashed the poker personality party in 2017 with his engaging, well-produced vlogs. In a little over a year, the bulk of which occurred in 2017, he’s amassed over 80,000 subscribers to his YouTube Channel. He’s up against some heavy hitters including the award-winning Poker Life Podcast host Joey Ingram, Doug Polk and Daniel Negreanu, but his consistent vlogging has opened up the new space of poker content like none other. The Broadcaster of the Year category is stacked with class as well. Longtime ESPN WSOP commentator Lon McEachern, Poker After Dark’s Ali Nejad and the lovable voice of both the PokerStars EPT and Poker Night In America, Joe Stapleton are some of live poker’s biggest assets. But the smooth delivery and easy-to-grasp hand analysis of Nick Schulman took over the coverage of the High Roller Bowl and was as highly-acclaimed as one could be by just about everyone who heard it. In the Podcast category, there’s some amazing content to be had, but the longevity and entertainment of the TwoPlusTwo Pokercast with Adam Schwartz, Terrence Chan and Ross Henry may have an edge this year. The trio does it all: addressing poker’s biggest issues, answering listener email, expounding on the latest #pokertwitter drama all while giving their listeners a glimpse into their real lives. It could be a close one, but it should be their year. An Industry Showcased Performances both at the table and away will be celebrated with both players and industry members getting their due. The categories of Breakout Player, Tournament Performance and Moment of the Year shine a light on the people and moments of 2017 that players and fans won’t soon forget. Event Of The Year, Industry Person of the Year, Journalist of the Year and the Media Content category celebrate the efforts of some in the world of poker who dedicate their time to showcasing the game we love. A Pair For PocketFives PocketFives.com is not without its own nominations this year as well. President and Editor-In-Chief of PocketFives.com, Lance Bradley, scored a nomination for Journalist of the Year for his work covering the personalities of both the live and online poker scene. Additionally, his article entitled "Resilience Defined: Sheddy Siddiqui Raising His Two Boys #ForCathy" was honored with a nomination for Media Content of the Year. Special Awards A handful of awards are without nominations but will be unveiled on Thursday including the Charitable Initiative award, the Jury Prize, our own PocketFives Legacy Award (celebrating an online legend who has made great strides in the live tournament circuit) and the Award for Lifetime Achievement in Poker. In a field that thrives on competition of the highest order, the American Poker Awards is more of a celebration of another successful year of those moments and individuals that expand the reach and grow the game of poker.
  10. The notion of vlogging isn’t completely new, with some of the world’s most popular vloggers, like Casey Neistat, having turned the camera on themselves for the better part of this decade. But when it comes to vlogging in poker, it’s still a little bit of the Wild West. The growing genre is finding many previously largely unknown personalities now making a name for themselves by showcasing their on-the-felt (and off) adventures for all to see. But while many of the personalities that are drawing attention in the space are of the up-and-coming variety some of the biggest stars in poker have spent time vlogging letting their fans in on what they are doing and increase their reach. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Negreanu, arguably, one of the most well-known poker players on the entire planet occasionally turns to vlogging to bring fans inside his routine while playing some of the biggest events of the year. During the 2017 World Series of Poker Negreanu’s team produced 45 days worth of behind-the-scenes content of how Daniel prepares himself to play day-in and day-out. More recently, he fired up the vlog again in his quest to capture the Poker Masters Purple Jacket. He mentioned on his podcast that despite the fact that the WSOP vlog was a ton of continuous work, there’s a good chance that his over 166,000 subscribers will get a fresh batch of WSOP footage beginning this June. Doug Polk One of poker’s more masterful marketers, Doug Polk commands the attention of a legion of fans. Not just in poker but also in the world of cryptocurrency. Nowadays, he’s been more into the world of crypto news and, on the poker side, going in-depth in breaking down televised hands. But Polk has been known to take his audience for a ride along when he’s out doing things like…winning the 2017 High Roller For One Drop at the WSOP for over $3.6 million. Polk has always seemingly been able to jump between social mediums, racking up nearly 175,000 subscribers on his Doug Polk Poker YouTube channel, 100,000 Twitter followers and roughly 70,000 followers on Instagram. It’s been a while since he’s properly vlogged but should crypto take a nose dive and Polk needs to find his way back to the Rio this summer, there’s a good chance his camera won’t be too far behind. Matt Berkey High-stakes cash game grinder Matt Berkey helped produce the eight-part Dead Money documentary on his path to the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl. The episodes are available as streaming-content on PokerGo and Berkey has continued to chronicle his adventures in poker on his YouTube channel. In addition to being a promotional vehicle for his training site, Solve For Why Academy, the vlog focuses on Berkeley and his team as they do everything from detail hand histories from tournaments to recap live cash games. Berkey’s channel is still growing, with just over 6,000 subscribers currently, but Dead Money won an American Poker Award and so it’s likely he’s in the content creation game for some time to come. Jaime Staples As one of the most prolific poker streamers, Jaime Staples is also on a near daily vlogger. Staples documents his travels around the world, looking for places to eat, houses with the best wi-fi and, of course, providing updates on one of the craziest #ultimatesweat weight loss (and gain) bets the poker world has seen since Ted Forrest’s $2 million bet with Mike Matusow. The Team PokerStars Online pro has been gaining followers while shedding pounds. He has been steadily increasing his influence in the community through his 15,000 followers of his daily vlog and the near 50,000 that follow his poker highlights YouTube channel. Jeff Gross Jeff Gross was once dubbed a “professional best friend”, hanging around with the likes of Olympic Champion Michael Phelps, original One Drop winner Antonio Esfandiari and Streamboat Captain Bill Perkins. Nowadays, he’s hanging out with his viewers having secured a sponsorship deal with PokerStars, Gross spends his time streaming his Flow Show and dabbling in the occasional vlog when he’s playing live events. These are just a few of already established players who have taken to vlogging. Others like World Series of Poker bracelet winner Ryan Laplante, Team PokerStars Online pro Fintan Hand, and Poker Life Podcast host Joey Ingram all have taken turns breaking down hands, sharing their thoughts and peeling back the curtain of their day-to-day lives. With less than 100 days left until the World Series of Poker fans of poker vlogs can expect an avalanche of content from some of these popular poker personalities.
  11. One look at #WSOP gives even those with the slightest interest in poker a severe case of FOMO. The first week of the 49th Annual World Series of Poker had it all. Big names fighting for multimillion-dollar scores and players mixing it up both on and off-the-felt. It’s impossible to catch everything that’s happening at the Rio in Las Vegas but here are some of the highlights we enjoyed that will make you feel like you’re in the thick of the action yourself. So Many Rings When you want to stretch your bankroll, perhaps a single table satellite is the way to go. Just beat a soft field of 9 other players and next thing you know you’re vying for a gold bracelet. Well, maybe the field isn’t that soft. On to week two!
  12. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Back from Las Vegas, Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters discuss their takeaways from the World Poker Tour final tables at Luxor and how they're maybe not as fan-friendly as we were lead to believe when the company announced the decision to move all TV final tables to Sin City. They also review not only the nominees for the Global Poker Awards, but offer suggestions on ways to vastly improve the shortlist and nomination process. As a hot of a topic as the GPAs are, Lance and Donnie also go over some of the people who were snubbed and some of the people who got nominated despite not having a body of work worthy of that honor. And it wouldn't be an episode of The Fives in 2019 if they didn't discuss the dwindling attendance in the PokerStars Sunday Million. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  13. After tabulating the votes of over 130 Nomination Panel members, the Global Poker Index, along with their partner PokerCentral, has unveiled the nominations in thirteen of the 20 categories of the first ever Global Poker Awards. The awards are set to take place on April 5 at the PokerGO Studios in Las Vegas where poker players and industry members from 10 different nations will be represented in a wide variety of categories that aims to celebrate all aspects of the poker community. PocketFives is well represented within the nominees. The Fives Podcast is one of five nominees for Podcast of the Year and PocketFives' President & Editor in Chief Lance Bradley's book, The Pursuit of Poker Success, Here are the nominees, presented in alphabetical order: Tournament Performance of the Year Justin Bonomo (Super High Roller Bowl IV) John Cynn (2018 World Series of Poker Main Event) Maria Lampropulos (2018 PCA Main Event) Dylan Linde (WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic) Breakout Player of the Year Almedin ‘Ali’ Imsirovic Maria Konnikova Ping Liu Christopher Michael Soyza Streamer of the Year Jeff Gross Jason Somerville Jaime Staples Lex Veldhuis Vlogger of the Year Marle Cordeiro Joe Ingram Andrew Neeme Daniel Negreanu Doug Polk Podcast LFG Podcast PokerCentral Podcast PokerNews Podcast The Chip Race The Fives Poker Podcast Broadcaster Maria Ho Lon McEachern Nick Schulman Lex Veldhuis Poker Journalist Drew Amato Sarah Herring Remko Rinkema Christian Zetzsche Media Content Drew Amato (photo: Brunson bids farewell to WSOP) Lance Bradley (book: The Pursuit of Poker Success) Haley Hintze (article: Vayo v. PokerStars) PokerCentral/PokerGO (Super High Roller Club: Schulman featuring Nejad) Industry Person Angelical Hael (World Poker Tour) Cary Katz (Poker Central) Matt Savage (WPT, TDA) Ty Stewart (World Series of Poker) Rob Yong (Dusk Till Dawn, partypoker) Tournament Director Tony Burns (Seminole Hard Rock) Paul Campbell (ARIA) Jack Effel (World Series of Poker) Kenny Hallaert (Unibet Open) Mid-Major Tour/Circuit 888poker LIVE RUNGOOD Poker Series Unibet Open WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit Event of the Year partypoker Caribbean Poker Party Main Event Super High Roller Bowl IV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic WSOP Main Event Moment of the Year Jeremy Hilsercop received PSPC Platinum Pass via Christmas Day viral video Joe Cada wins The Closer after finishing 5th in WSOP Main Event Doyle Brunson plays his final WSOP event Justin Bonomo wins Big One for One Drop, completing Super High Roller Streak In addition to the above categories, there are seven other awards that will be given out during the ceremony. Due to their results in 2018, Alex Foxen and Kristen Bicknell will each be receiving awards for the 2018 GPI Player of the Year and the 2018 Female Player of the Year respectively. Along with trophies for Foxen and Bicknell the following categories will be determined by the Global Poker Awards Jury: - Lifetime Achievement in Poker Award - Charitable Initiative - Jury Prize As has been the case in previous GPI award shows, the “people” will have a voice and will vote to award the People’s Choice Award for Poker Personality of the Year. Also, PocketFives will be handing out the PocketFives Legacy Award acknowledging a player who has come from the world of online poker to make major contributions to poker’s live tournament scene. The Global Poker Awards can be watched live on PokerGO on April 5.
  14. The cheating allegations against California professional poker player Mike Postle while playing on the Stones Gambling Hall live-streamed cash game is attracting the attention of news outlets outside of the poker world. Last Update: Sunday, October 6, 2019 On Thursday night, Scott Van Pelt, one of ESPN's most popular personalities, highlighted the story during the midnight (ET) edition of SportsCenter on his ‘1 Big Thing’ segment. “If a guy were able to cheat his way to six-figure gains playing cards and it goes solved by a bunch of poker sleuths on the internet, is that a story that interests you? Because it did me,” Van Pelt said. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Over the next three minutes, Van Pelt masterfully summarized the current state of the Mike Postle controversy. He starts from the very beginning of the initial suspicions by Veronica Brill and into Joey Ingram’s in-depth hand breakdowns on his YouTube channel. “Accusations of cheating are taken very seriously in the poker community, and I credit Ingram for taking great caution to give a guy, who is apparently very well-liked, the benefit of the doubt. But the more than Ingram and others combed through the video, the harder that has become to do.” Van Pelt hits all the major points of the story from theories about Postle having a man-on-the-inside partnership with someone who runs the stream, a possible listening device being stuffed into Postle’s hat, and Stones, after issuing a statement that they had already investigated, being forced to re-investigate as the story got bigger. Van Pelt wrapped up the segment with this analogy. “If you’re the equivalent of a guy who shows up to play pick-up basketball and you never, ever missed a shot for a couple of years…wouldn’t you go play in the NBA? If you’re some kind of poker god who almost never lost, who made the right call or fold virtually every single time - if you were this good - why would you be playing in games only with a video feed and a 1-3 table at Stones Poker Room. Why wouldn’t you be in Vegas winning all the money in the world?” The Ringer Finds Fascination In Postle Controversy Bill Simmons’ sport/pop culture website The Ringer published a headline story on Friday entitled ‘The Cheating Scandal Rocking the Poker World’ as writer David Hill not only breaks down the fundamentals of the story but finds himself “trapped in the wormhole this week, unable to focus on anything else.” The article summarizes the facts but while capturing the feelings of a poker community gripped with the biggest story of 2019. Hill injects himself into the story wondering how so many missed the signs for so long. “But then I start to see things that seem so obvious, but I wonder whether they aren’t just paranoia after hours and hours of digging into the mystery, Like the fact that he starts wearing a hat that has a strange bulge around the brim - one that vanishes after the game when he’s doing an interview in the booth. Is it a bone-conducting headset, as some online have suggested, sending him messages directly into his inner ear by vibrating on his skull? Of course it is! How could it be anything else? It’s so obvious!” CNBC Reaches Out For Comment On October 5, financial news network CNBC published a story on their website which also summarized the entire situation. The story was updated after Postle appeared on Mike Matusow’s podcast where he voiced his side of the argument. "Postle has not yet responded to CNBC’s request for comment. He has defended himself on Twitter as well as on a poker podcast, ‘The Mouthpiece with Mike Matusow,’ saying 'it is absolutely impossible for me to be doing what they’re claiming. It is 1000% impossible.'" The article also pulled from information provided by Matt Berkey on the nature of RFID playing cards. "Berkey said Postle made plays no pro would ever make, and he did them often, and they worked. Poker is a game of incomplete information. Berkey said Postle played ‘as if he had perfect information.’" Local Television Jumps On Story While Joey Ingram was name-checked on the ESPN national broadcast, Doug Polk’s investigation of the allegations was highlighted in Sacramento’s FOX40 televised coverage of the incident. “It’s really hypothetical at this point, it’s just the most logical conclusion,” Polk told Fox40 reporter Eric Rucker.” Somebody in the back was working with one of the players to transmit that information in the middle of the hand to a player at the table so that he knew the exact two cards you would have.” Another local news broadcast, KCRA3 (NBC affiliate) also touched on the news giving a broad overview of the current state of the situation without going into too much detail. The report mentioned that the station had reached out to the California Bureau of Gambling Control for comment, but had not heard back by airtime.
  15. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Don't miss another all-new episode of The FIVES Poker Podcast as Lance and Donnie recap the latest and greatest news and views from this week in the world of poker. In addition to recapping all of the action and bracelet winners from the 2020 World Series of Poker, the guys discuss the latest developments in the simmering heads-up match between long-time rivals Daniel Negreanu and Doug Polk. While Negreanu and Polk still have to sort all the details out, friends (and rivals) Antonio Esfandiari and Phil Hellmuth played a $100K heads-up match in the first episode of PokerGO's High Stakes Duel for free and all to see. Subscribe to The FIVES and never miss an episode - available everywhere you enjoy your favorite podcasts. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  16. The long-running feud between Doug Polk and Daniel Negreanu is apparently be coming to a livestream near you. After two days of back and forth on Twitter, the pair are now on a collision course for a high stakes heads-up poker match sometime in the fall. The animosity between the two was reignited earlier this week after Polk posted a video on his YouTube channel which featured footage from Negreanu's livestreamed threat that caused the six-time WSOP bracelet to have his Twitch channel suspended. Polk's video, which was subsequently removed from YouTube, also included clips from Negreanu's MasterClass commercial and footage of Negreanu wearing blackface. The pair have feuded over the last several years dating back to 2016 when Polk produced a video titled Daniel Negreanu Says More Rake Is BETTER?!. Those four words, "More Rake is Better", became a mantra used by Polk and many of his supporters to voice their displeasure with PokerStars, the poker site Negreanu was a Team Pro for at the time, and Negreanu himself. Polk went as far as to wear a t-with the slogan on it during the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl where he was serendipitously seated next to Negreanu and rented a billboard outside of the Rio Hotel & Casino a week later during the World Series of Poker with the four-word saying emblazoned on it. The idea of the two playing a high stakes poker match to try and settle the feud came from podcaster Joey Ingram. At the very least, it does appear that the two sides have agreed to a framework built around the following conditions: Between 10,000 - 25,000 hands of No Limit Hold'em Stakes of $200/$400 Online, two tables at a time A time and a date has not been officially agreed upon yet, but both players indicated that late-September or early-October fit their schedule. Details on the potential streaming of the match - including a contentious point on whether or not hole cards will be shown to the viewing audience - are also still being finalized. The actual match may still be months away, but both players continued the verbal sparring on Twitter on Thursday after Negreanu wrote a blog post detailing his reasons for agreeing to the match. "So in the end, why am I doing this? To give the people what they want. For many years now this man has made a living off of trashing me on a regular basis, well past an unhealthy obsession, regurgitating the same attack lines over and over. Not because he truly believes I’m an evil monster, but purely for personal gain disguised as standing for some noble cause," Negreanu wrote.
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