Jump to content
advertisement_alt

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'shaun deeb'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 9 results

  1. It took just one week for the 2021 World Series of Poker to settle into a routine. After the initial chaos of the early events with their long lines and sometimes slow-paced verification processes, the vibe at the Rio found its stride with big names winning bracelets, shot takers living their dream, and a historic blow-up we all saw coming. Week two brought back a very familiar feel to the WSOP, even under the “current conditions.” From packed fields of poker's brightest stars to an old-fashioned dose (or two) of drama, things remained lively throughout the week. With that, let’s check out the five biggest storylines from Week 2 of the World Series of Poker. #1. Hellmuth Melts Down, Wants To Burn It Down The question of whether Phil Hellmuth would win WSOP gold bracelet #16 before he lost control has been answered. This week, Hellmuth was at the third final table of his first five events and took the chip lead into the final day of the $10K Stud. The entire poker world tuned in to see if he would make history - and he most certainly did. Just not by winning a bracelet. Hellmuth saw his chip lead slip away and, as his stack tumbled, his #POSITIVITY absolutely crumbled. Then it happened - he finally freaked out. (Note: there’s an eff-ton of eff-bombs in this video so fair warning) https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1447982387619528709?s=20 After losing a key pot to eventual winner Anthony Zinno, Hellmuth had a full-on meltdown. Hurling insults, swear words, and a few self-congratulatory comments. He jokingly threatened to “burn this motherf***ing place down” if he didn’t end up winning. He even re-introduced himself to the table, asking if this table even knew who he was?! For poker purists, like commentator Norman Chad, Hellmuth clearly crossed the line. https://twitter.com/NormanChad/status/1447979843811823619?s=20 For pure entertainment value, it was a historic, epic Hellmuth “Poker Brat” moment. It was an all-timer for sure and “burn it down” is going to rival “idiot from Northern Europe” in future memes. https://twitter.com/HunterGrouse/status/1448075867004022787?s=20 Once he calmed down, Hellmuth took to Twitter, issued as much of an apology as he could muster, and took his medicine. He even retweeted some of the harshest comments directed at him (see above). But for poker as a whole, this is another love-it-or-hate-it moment from the WSOP. And wherever you fall, this is for certain, this moment is one we won’t forget anytime soon. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1448431418762088448?s=20 https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1448544952162553856?s=20 #2. Misguided Man Enters the Ladies Event In case you hadn’t seen our op-ed published earlier - here’s a link. The facts are that a poker player from Minneapolis decided to be the sole man to pay the $10,000 entry fee and play the Ladies Event. He claimed it was all to raise money for unspecified women’s charities, even though in order to make any money, he would have needed to have a final table finish of eighth place or better. As should be expected the decision was met with plenty of backlash, including from some of the women who played in the event. The player ended up not making the money and according to reports, the announcement of elimination was met with plenty of cheers. As of this writing, the player has not spoken more about his experience or if he plans on making donations to women’s charities despite finishing out of the money. More importantly, the event drew a field of 643 women, including top-tier pros Jennifer Shahade, Sofia Lovgren, Jamie Kerstetter, Melanie Weisner, Elena Stover, and J.J. Liu who made the final table. https://twitter.com/JenShahade/status/1447642272221184001?s=20 https://twitter.com/thegroupie/status/1447682599426531328?s=20   The final table of the Ladies Event can be watched for free on YouTube. #3. Big Names Add Bracelets To Resume The deeper into the series, the most notable names have been emerging with new gold bracelets to add to their trophy case. Over the course of the past seven days, John Monette picked up his fourth career WSOP victory after besting Nate Silver in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship for $245,680. Days later it was Anthony Zinno grabbing his third bracelet in the aforementioned $10K Stud where he overtook a talented final table including Hellmuth, Poker Hall of Fame member Jack McClelland, and Stephen Chidwick. Zinno took home more than $182K with the win. Mixed game specialist Dylan Linde can be taken off the “best without a bracelet” list as he grabbed gold in the $1,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo for $170,269. Finally, longtime grinder DJ Alexander found a way to to the end of the $1,000 Flip & Go to earn some hardware of his own plus the $180,655 first-place prize. That’s leads us to… #4. Flip and Go Madness For the better part of two days, you couldn’t look at social media from the World Series of Poker without seeing the crowds that gathered in the single table satellite area of the Pavilion, hoping to flip their way into the money of the $1,000 Flip and Go event sponsored by GGPoker. READ: Fast and Furious Flip and Go Event Incites Action At The WSOP Daniel Negreanu lit the fuse and soon thereafter people were lining up to pay $1,000 to try and win a single hand in order to advance to the money round. For some, it was one and done. But for a couple of big-name pros, the quest to win the flip became costly. The event was polarizing with plenty of detractors feeling like it was a rake trap and added to the narrative that the WSOP was cheapening the brand by allowing people to “flip for a bracelet.” However, there were also plenty of accounts of people embracing the madness and adrenaline that came with leaning into the luck factor in order to advance. #5. Drama Returns to the Rio The World Series of Poker is in full swing so is the drama that comes with it. Of course, there’s the aforementioned Hellmuth explosion and “Man Entering Ladies Event”, which are their own stories. However, other mini-drama bombs have gone off this week, some of which have serious implications, some of which are just reminders of the kind of spats that take place when highly competitive players are fighting for massive prize pools. The first took place when poker pro Adam Hendrix tweeted out an issue that he heard about where an unnamed poker pro was entered in an event, sat down, and was waiting for the event to start but decided to unregister. Then later, that player re-registered (which is standardly against the rules). When that player turned out to be Kelly Minkin who unreg’d for a variety of reasons and only re-registered hours later, the air was cleared and the social media spat was squashed. Here’s a taste of the back-and-forth: https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446585726372499456?s=20 https://twitter.com/The_Illest/status/1446595732065042436?s=20 https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446656678041055235?s=20 While that gave Poker Twitter some good reads for a few hours, Shaun Deeb encountered a much more serious scenario when he woke up, with what he said, was someone in his hotel room. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1447215029758033922?s=20 Deeb’s been mum about the incident since, not saying what if anything was taken. Thankfully, he’s fine and was spotted at the tables soon thereafter.
  2. One of the biggest days in recent World Series of Poker history played out at the Rio on Day 18 of the 2021 WSOP as Phil Hellmuth won his 16th bracelet with victory in the $1,500 2-7 Lowball Draw Event #31. Hellmuth saw off a stacked final table of talented mixed game specialists to oust Jake Schwartz heads-up after he had earlier taken out the overnight chip leader, Rep Porter. Hellmuth Makes History With 10 players reaching the final day, Hellmuth began the action second in chips behind Porter and by the time the final table of eight players was reached, Hellmuth remained second, albeit behind a new chip leader in Dario Sammartino. It didn’t take long for Porter to get back among the action, however, as he busted Kevin Gerhart in eighth place for $7,602. With seven players left, Hellmuth dropped to fifth in chips as the swingy variant of poker that has tested the best in the game over half a century put players under pressure in every pot. Jason Lipiner was defeated in seventh place for $10,023 after his stack was taken by Joshua Faris, and when Porter put Sammartino in the cage in another hand, the Italian lost a huge chunk of his stack. Sammartino was on the rail in sixth place for $13,463 when Porter took the remainder of his chips, before Hellmuth began the heater that would end in poker history. A key hand with nine-high would give the Poker Brat the lead as he played under the dutiful gaze of his wife, Katherine on the rail. After Joshua Faris’ elimination in fifth place for $18,421, Porter lost his stack as the overnight chip leader left in fourth for $25,661. Porter’s chips went to Schwartz, and when Hellmuth took out Chris Vitch in third place for $36,387, the stage was set for a huge heads-up showdown with the chips not far from even. Hellmuth had 3.1 million, just 600,000 short of Schwartz’s stack going into the final duel as the cameras zoomed in on the Poker Brat and a hundred reporters notebooks saw pens poised ready to capture the moment of poker history. Schwartz initially extended his lead and looked like spoiling the party for Hellmuth as the Poker Brat’s fellow American raced into a 2:1 chip lead in pursuit of his first bracelet. A massive all-in from Hellmuth after Schwartz had bet aggressively both pre-flop and post-flop caused Schwartz to fold and that gave Hellmuth the momentum he needed to seal the deal, as Hellmuth’s nine-high hand drew two cards and landed a seven and five to mean Schwartz had no chance of a comeback having drawn for one card with ten-high. Hellmuth celebrated - along with a rail featuring a gleeful Mike Matusow as the moment of his 16th WSOP bracelet win arrived just like the Poker Brat predicted it would. With four final tables in the first fortnight of the 2021 World Series, surely Hellmuth might also be the favorite to win Player of the Year, where his most likely challenger is Anthony Zinno. You can read all about Hellmuth’s reaction as he won his 16th World Series of Poker bracelet in the Rio right here. WSOP 2021 Event #31 2-7 $1,500 Lowball Draw Final Table Results: Phil Hellmuth - $84,851 Jake Schwartz - $52,502 Chris Vitch - $36,387 Rep Porter - $25,661 Joshua Faris - $18,421 Dario Sammartino - $13,463 Jason Lipiner - $10,023 Kevin Gerhart - $7,602 Ryan Leng Surges To Monster Lead In Event #30 The Day 2 action in the $1,500-entry Monster Stack Event #30 saw three-time WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Leng (4,070,000) bag the chip lead overnight. Just 162 players survived from a Day 2 starting field of 1,220, with the popular professional Leng amounting a slight lead ahead of Jason Wheeler (3,805,000) and a bigger one from Linda Huard (3,290,000) who are Leng’s closest challengers. Elsewhere, players such as Ian O’Hara (3,025,000), Steven Sarmiento (3,000,000), and Anthony Ortega (2,660,000) all totaled top ten stacks, with other big names such as Pavel Plesuv (915,000), Dylan Linde (820,000), and Chris Brewer (2,280,000) all well placed to make a run at the bracelet. With so many making it through, even more went home, as David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Anton Wigg, Ron McMillen, Daniel Strelitz, Natalie Hof-Ramos, and Ari Engel all failing to make a bag for Day 3. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Leng - 4,070,000 Jason Wheeler - 3,805,000 Linda Huard - 3,290,000 Rafael Reis - 3,125,000 Jeffrey Vertes - 3,035,000 Ian O'Hara - 3,025,000 Steven Sarmiento - 3,000,000 Uri Reichenstein - 2,995,000 Antonio Matic - 2,905,000 Anthony Ortega - 2,660,000 Eli Elizera, Maria Ho in $3K H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Event #32, the $3,000-entry H.O.R.S.E. tournament, saw some very big names bag chips at the close of play on Day 2. Only 20 players remained in seats by the close of the action, but among them sit several of poker’s elite. The chip leader with 20 left is Eli Elezra, who bagged up a massive 1,036,000 to become only one player of two past a million by close of play. Elezra is followed in the chip counts as you might imagine by some of the best mixed game players in the world, with his nearest rivals being Qinghai Pan (1,036,000) and Michael Parizon (979,000) both breathing down his neck. Elsewhere, there were Day 3 bags for Maria Ho (908,000), Barabara Enright (446,000) and Daniel Negreanu (414,000) as plenty of big names made it through to the latter stages of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #32 $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Eli Elezra - 1,243,000 Qinghai Pan - 1,036,000 Michael Parizon - 979,000 Michael Trivett - 973,000 Maria Ho - 908,000 Jim Collopy - 890,000 Paramjit Gill - 779,000 Ahmed Mohamed - 772,000 Richard Bai - 708,000 Sachin Bhargava - 655,000 159 Remain in $800 Deepstack The first day of Event #33, the $800-entry Eight-Handed tournament saw just 159 players take chips through to the penultimate day of the event, with Alex Miles (2,700,000) leading the way from Tony Nguyen (2,185,000) and Todd Ivens (2,030,000) as a host of recognized names gather in his slipstream. Others who will feel hopeful of adding a final table to their World Series include Ankush Mandavia (1,600,000), Simon Lefevre (1,300,000), Matt Affleck (840,000), and Ryan Laplante (650,000), with players such as WSOP Main Event winners Martin Jacobson and Ryan Riess both losing their stacks, along with Jeremy Ausmus, Sylvain Loosli, and Adrian Mateos. WSOP 2021 Event #33 $800 Eight-Handed NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Alex Miles - 2,700,000 Tony Nguyen - 2,185,000 Todd Ivens - 2,030,000 Stefano Calezane - 1,925,000 Ankush Mandavia - 1,600,000 Florian Guimond - 1,560,000 Damien Gayer - 1,370,000 Ian Steinman - 1,320,000 Eric Dillon - 1,300,000 Simon Lefevre - 1,300,000 Big Names Bag in Limit 2-7 Last, but by no means least, the $1,500-entry Event #34, the Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw tournament saw just 76 players survive, with over two-thirds of the 284-strong field gone on Day 1. British pro Adam Owen bagged up the biggest stack of the night with 246,000 chips, closely followed on the leaderboard by Ahmed Amin (229,500) and Brian Yoon (226,500), with others such as Andre Akkari (71,000) and Ari Engel (39,000) scraping through with fewer chips. WSOP 2021 Event #34 $1,500 Limit 2-7 Lowball Top 10 Chipcounts: Adam Owen - 246,000 Ahmed Amin - 229,500 Brian Yoon - 226,500 Matt Grapenthien - 210,000 Daniel Anton - 207,500 David Funkhouser - 204,500 Cory Zeidman - 198,000 Ian Feller - 159,000 Ian Johns - 140,500 Matt Schultz - 130,000 Finally, Shaun Deeb has always had his finger on the pulse of the poker industry... but is this early call on Day 18 more than a little spooky? https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1449812866584899584
  3. Chance Kornuth won his third World Series of Poker bracelet as the self-confessed Short Deck novice won the $10,000-entry event to claim the $194,670 top prize. With a talented selection of six top players returning to the felt in the Thunderdome for the final table, Kornuth got the better of Chad Campbell heads-up as the final duel ended in the poker professional and coaching expert’s favor in dramatic fashion. Kornuth Claims Dramatic Victory Against Campbell The final table of six kicked off with Kornuth in a slim lead over Chad Campbell as the half dozen final table players battled to a winner under the lights. There was a quick bust-out to kick the action off as Thomas Kysar, who came into the action with the shortest stack, busted in sixth place for $32,437 with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Td"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"] as the board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] gave the chip leader two pair to further boost his stack ahead of just four remaining opponents. Next to go was Joao Vieira as the Portuguese player was eliminated by Campbell just a few hands later. Vieira jammed with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] and was called by Campbell with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"]. On the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"], Campbell made two-pair and Vieira missed turn and river to bust for $42,885 in fifth place. With four players remaining, a lot of play took place without anyone losing their stack. Kornuth and Campbell traded places at the top, but neither Dan Shak or fourth-place finisher Moshe Gabay could make any in-roads into their advantage and it was no surprise when Gabay lost his stack next for $58,601. The manner of Gabay’s exit was, however, a shock. Calling Shak’s shove, Gabay was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="As"] and ahead of Shak’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] was a sensational one, however, as while it kept Gabay ahead, it offered Shak the chance of a straight flush, which he duly hit on the [poker card="8c"] turn. The [poker card="Jh"] was insignificant in the extreme and Shak chipped up at Gabay’s expense. Despite winning that hand, Shak couldn’t threaten the leaders and bowed out in third after a courageous run. All-in with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="Js"] gave Kornuth a vital pot to send him into heads-up with a lead of 2.6 million chips to Campbell’s 1.4 million. Shak, meanwhile, went to the rail with a score of $82,678. Heads-up, Kornuth took very little time to emerge victorious, after the shortest battle of the final table. On a board showing [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"], Campbell raise-shoved with [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"] and Kornuth called with a flopped full house, holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"]. The river of [poker card="7d"] ended the event and Kornuth could celebrate his third WSOP title with the bracelet and $194,670 top prize, while Campbell commiserated himself with the runner-up result worth $120,316. Kornuth’s title will feel even sweeter as he proved to his wife Emily that he was able to do it based on some YouTube learning. https://twitter.com/Srirachaaa/status/1449597512495419398 WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Final Table Results: Chance Kornuth - $194,670 Chad Campbell - $120,316 Dan Shak - $82,678 Moshe Gabay - $58,601 Joao Vieira - $42,885 Thomas Kysar - $32,437 Dylan Weisman Gets His First Gold In Event #28, Dylan Weisman sealed a memorable victory in the $1,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha tournament for a top prize of $166,461. Weisman is a name well-known to PLO players, coaching on the popular Upswing Poker site and he utilized his stack advantage over the field to maximum effort in winning his debut WSOP bracelet. Just five players came back to the final table to play out the conclusion of the event, with Weisman holding a big lead coming into the action. Weisman had almost as many chips as his two closest challengers combined and ran over the table to become champion. Before long had elapsed, Weisman had half the chips at the table and watched on as Tim Van Loo busted Ran Niv of Israel in fifth place for $40,109. Van Loo might have been hoping to put those chips to good use, but he was the next to leave, ousted by Alexander Yen in fourth place for $54,230. It was a remarkable run for Van Loo, as not only was it his first appearance at a WSOP final table, but his first World Series cash of any kind, and the young German will be one to watch based on this event. His conqueror in the final hand, Yen, busted in third place for $74,239 in the pivotal hand of the final. Yen’s set of eights was crushed by Weisman’s set of nines and when both players improved to a full house on the board, Weisman knocked out his more dangerous rival in terms of chips. Craig Chait only had 1.7 million to Weisman’s stack of almost 20 million, so it was no surprise when Chait was busted in the runner-up position for $102,884. Weisman’s victory was worth $166,461 and in taking down the tournament, he won his first-ever gold bracelet, to the delight of his many fans and friends on the rail. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Dylan Weisman - $166,461 Craig Chait - $102,884 Alexander Yen - $74,239 Tim Van Loo - $54,230 Ran Niv - $40,109 Chase Fujita - $30,040 Manan Bhandari - $22,787 Youness Barakat - $17,510 Hellmuth In Position For 4th Final Table Phil Hellmuth will go into his fourth final day of an event this World Series, and with the Poker Brat holding over a million chips, there’s a chance the controversial star wins bracelet #16 tomorrow. With only Rep Porter (1,129,000) bagging up more chips than Hellmuth, who totalled 1,016,000 at the close of play, the Poker Brat will be putting on a charm offensive ahead of the final day. A little further back sits Dario Sammartino (800,000) who finished as runner-up in the last live, authentic Las Vegas WSOP Main Event in 2019. Sammartino isn’t the only other big-name chasing down Porter and Hellmuth at the top of the leaderboard. Chris Vitch (447,000), Jake Schwartz (398,000) and Ryan Riess (266,000) will all harbor hopes of victory as they battle for the bracelet on the final day of another prestigious mixed game event, with stars such as Rok Gostisa, Ali Imsirovic and Melanie Weisner all missing out during Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #31 $1,500 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Day Chipcounts: Rep Porter - 1,129,000 Phil Hellmuth - 1,016,000 Kenji Faris - 840,000 Dario Sammartino - 800,000 Jason Papastavrou - 666,000 Jason Lipiner - 663,000 Kevin Gerhart - 581,000 Chris Vitch - 447,000 Jake Schwartz - 398,000 Ryan Riess - 266,000 Ryan Leng, Dylan Linde Score Monster Stacks The massive Monster Stack field was grown to a total of 3,520 players on Day 1b, with 1,219 players making the Day 2 seat draw through both Day 1a (518) and Day 1b (701). The biggest chipstack on Day 1b belonged to Rajaee Wazwaz (510,500), with Pavel Plesuv (483,500) and 2021 bracelet winner Ryan Leng (473,000) the nearest to overtaking the leader at the close of play. Others such as Dylan Linde (443,000), Andrew Neeme (304,500), Upeshka De Silva (219,000), Jesse Sylvia (129,000), Cate Hall (125,000), Ari Engel (108,000) and Ronnie Bardah (75,000) all making the cut. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Rajaee Wazwaz - 510,500 Pavel Plesuv - 483,500 Ryan Leng - 473,000 Mitchell Collins - 465,000 Dylan Linde - 443,000 Francois Pirault - 440,500 Joshua Gordon - 440,500 Yeon Bae - 433,500 La Sengphet - 428,000 Matthew Eng - 424,500 Brian Hastings, Maria Ho In $3K H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Finally, in Event #32, 154 players survived from a Day 1 field of 282 who took part. Lithuanian player Vincas Tamasauskas leads the way with 197,000 chips, from top 10 players such as Brian Hastings (178,400), Maria Ho (169,400), and David Williams (168,900). Elsewhere, John Monnette (120,600), Yuri Dzivielevski (105,800), Ari Engel (95,100), Ryan Laplante (59,000), and John Racener (52,500) all made Day 2 in good chip health, while players such as Frank Kassela, Shaun Deeb, Norman Chad, Mike Matusow, and Chino Rheem all crashed out before the end of the first day. WSOP 2021 Event #32 $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Vincas Tamasauskas - 197,000 John Fahmy - 188,700 Brian Hastings - 178,400 Daryl Aguirre - 174,600 Sachin Bhargava - 173,300 George Alexander - 169,700 Maria Ho - 169,400 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 169,400 David Williams - 168,900 Paramjit Gill - 139,500 Maria Ho, who made it through in seventh place on the leaderboard, revealed her tactics as she made her way from the Rio after a successful day’s work at the felt. https://twitter.com/MariaHo/status/1449534894325977090 Finally, it’s still a few weeks until the WSOP Main Event kicks off, but Phil Hellmuth has kicked off some speculation about his ‘entrance outfit after posting this picture of some old classics. We’ll take some action on a green-blue tracksuit with the number ‘456’ in the corner. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1449148701247639559
  4. The latest round of action saw two more bracelet winners take down titles and earn gold as Rafael Lebron conquered the final six of the Seven Card Stud Event #14, beating David Williams heads-up for the bracelet and Harvey Mathews also took gold on a busy day at the felt. Rafael Lebron Outlasts Shaun Deeb, David Williams For Event #14 Title Lebron’s achievement was a stunning one, as despite coming into the final table with the chip lead, he faced five experienced opponents including Shaun Deeb, the former WSOP Player of the Year. Deeb, however, was unable to really get going despite this positivity before the table kicked off. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1446406630396989441 Declaration of intentions might be more of a Negreanu-style tweet, but the former #1-ranked Deeb was unfortunate to slide out in fifth place after Nicholas Seiken busted first. With four players left, Christina Hill, who had come into the day very short-stacked, managed to get up to a cash worth $25,344. It was the turn of David Moskovitz to go in third place before Lebron got to take on a player he credits as having helped him get into the game. Heads-up was an imbalanced fight from the beginning of the battle, with Lebron having used his stack to accumulate plenty of chips more than David Williams, with a chip lead of around 3:1. He put that lead to good use, getting over the line to win the second WSOP bracelet of his career, in doing so denying Williams the same achievement. The former Magic the Gathering player has now finished as runner-up in a WSOP event for a fourth time. WSOP 2021 Event #14 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Final Table Results: Rafael Lebron - $82,262 David Williams - $50,842 David Moskowitz - $35,521 Christina Hill - $25,344 Shaun Deeb - $18,475 Nicholas Seiken - $13,766 Maurizio Melara - $10,490 Hal Rotholz - $8,179 Steven Albini - $6,528 Mathews Claims $3K Freezeout Event #13 also concluded on Friday night, with Harvey Mathews the winner of what was his first-ever bracelet. The final day began with just seven players in seats and it wasn’t long before that number was reduced to six. Craig Mason busted first on the day for $49,238 when his [poker card="5h"][poker card="5c"] was looking good on the [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="5d"] flop and all the money went in on the [poker card="Td"] turn with Girish Apte holding just [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"]. But the Broadway straight came in on the gutting river of [poker card="Kd"] for Mason in every sense. It wasn’t long before two more bust-outs sent the table even shorter handed. David Lolis cashed for $65,072 in sixth place after calling off a couple of big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2d"] and losing to Mathews [[poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"] had Lolis crushed to a chop from the turn. Brandon Caputo had led the field into play, but he departed in fifth place for $87,288 when his [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"] was overtaken by Mathews’ [poker card="7d"][poker card="2d"] on a board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="Qd"] which flushed him away on the river. Apte would join him on the rail with $118,815 just a few minutes later when his last three big blinds went into the middle with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9c"] only to be dominated then defeated by Michael Gathy’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9s"]. Gathy was the table’s most decorated player by far with the Belgian having won four WSOP bracelets in a stellar career. He would eventually bust in third place for $164,083 when [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8d"] couldn’t overtake Mathews’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"]. The board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="8s"] has Gathy drawing dead from the turn. Heads-up, Mathews had a better than 4:1 chip lead against Gabriel Andrade, and although Andrade almost levelled up the stacks at one point, he eventually slid back to the same level he started the duel with to bust. Andrade called off his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="9d"] and couldn’t hold against Mathews’ [poker card="Kh"]Td], the board of [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Ks"] ending the tournament on the river. Mathews won his first bracelet at $371,914, while Andrade had to settle for just $229,848 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #13 $3,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Day Results: Harvey Mathews - $371,914 Gabriel Andrade - $229,848 Michael Gathy - $164,083 Girish Apte - $118,815 Brandon Caputo - $87,288 David Lolis - $65,072 Craig Mason - $49,238 https://twitter.com/kuufer/status/1446683409535832070   There was controversy on Poker Twitter, where, in the six-handed Event #15 professional player Adam Hendrix posted on Twitter that a ‘well-known pro’ asked to be unregistered then re-registered the same event. https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446585726372499456 The context for this was duly supplied by the pro in question, Kelly Minkin, whose explanation not only satisfied the original poster but most fans who arrived to find out the truth. https://twitter.com/The_Illest/status/1446595732065042436 As Day 2 played down to a final two tables of eight players, it was Jeremy Malod who led the last eight players with a stack of 7,570,000, while Bradley Jansen was his closest challenger on just over six million chips. WSOP 2021 Event #15 $1,500 NLHE Six-Handed Final Table Chipcounts: Jeremy Malod - 7,570,000 Bradley Jansen - 6,075,000 Jesse Yaginuma - 5,415,000 Ryan Andrada - 4,495,000 Ryan Pedigo - 4,270,000 Mark Liedke - 2,950,000 Jon Baylor - 2,130,000 Sean Hegarty - 1,450,000 John Racener, Jason Somerville, Terrence Chan Make $10K Limit FT A whole host of familiar names grace the final table of Event #16 ($10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship) with former Main Event final tablist John Racener leading the way as the only player with over 1 million in chips. He's joined by Jason Somerville, who has come out of semi-retirement to make an appearance, Nater Silver, and Limit Hold'em legend Terrence Chan. WSOP 2021 Event #16 $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship Final Table Chipcounts: John Racener - 1,090,000 Eric Kurtzman - 975,000 Jason Somerville - 670,000 Scott Tuttle - 650,000 Kevin Song - 515,000 Nate Silver - 440,000 Terrence Chan - 350,000 Ray Dehkharghani - 315,000 John Monnette - 270,000 Christopher Chung - 250,000 Would-be Millionaires Kick Off Event #17 The popular $1,500 Millionaire Maker got underway on Friday with 2568 runners taking a shot at the $1,000,000 guaranteed first-place prize. By the end of the night, just 567 remained with Yiming Lee holding the chip lead, followed closely by Donovan Dean, and Mark Dube. The $1,500-entry Millionaire Maker saw 2,564 players reduced to only 567 players as Yiming Li bagged up the biggest total of 487,000 chips. That was some way clear of Donavan Dean (391,500) and Mark Dube (375,000) who will go into Day 2 second and third in chips respectively. With players such as Chance Kornuth (324,000), Kitty Kuo (276,500), Anton Wigg (178,500), Shannon Shorr (101,000), Ryan Riess (97,000), and Adrian Mateos (70,000) all making the cut, another massive day will take place on Saturday as Day 1b brings thousands more players into what could be a record-breaking field in the event which guarantees the winner will become a millionaire. WSOP 2021 Event #17 $1,500 Millionaire Maker Top 10 Chipcounts: Yiming Li - 487,000 Donavan Dean - 391,500 Mark Dube - 375,000 Shan Jing - 374,500 R.A. Villaluna - 366,000 David Siegel - 363,000 Nicholas Lebherz - 360,000 Frank Bonacci - 352,500 Keyu Qu - 347,500 William Nguyen - 341,000 The final event of the day to kick off was Event #18, the $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event, which enjoyed a showing of 253 entries overall. Of those, just 104 players made it through to Day 2, with only 38 of those going to cash. Robert Mizrachi bagged up the chip lead of 201,000 chips, but he is joined by some legends of the felt, with last year’s winner of this event, Dan Zack, taking through 127,500 and other luminaries of live poker such as Julien Martini (180,000), Scott Seiver (177,000), Benny Glaser (129,000), David Benyamine (112,000), Daniel Negreanu (61,000) and Steve Zolotow (37,500) all zipping up their chips and preparing for a push towards the final table on Day 2. Mizrachi, Martini Mix it Up in Triple Draw A star-studded field took their seats for Event #18 ($2,500 Mixed Triple Draw) on Friday with Robert Mizrachi bagging up the chip lead at the end of the day. Right behind him was PSPC runner-up Julien Martini and high-stakes crusher Scott Seiver. WSOP 2021 Event #18 $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Mizrachi - 201,000 Julien Martini - 180,000 Scott Seiver - 177,000 Carlos Rodriguez - 174,500 Domnick Sarle - 173,500 Brian Tate - 173,000 Philip Sternheimer - 168,000 Schuyler Thornton - 166,500 Craig Love - 161,000 Steve Lee - 160,000 Finally, Anton Wigg isn’t just a poker boss at the felt, he’s picked up on one of the most satisfying moments in the game whether you’re at the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas or just your home game. https://twitter.com/Anton_Wigg/status/1446605905395478528
  5. The $25,000-entry Heads Up Championship, Event #11, on the 2021 World Series of Poker schedule was always going to be a dramatic one. With four fantastic players making the final stages of the tournament, finding a winner would be a war of wits like no other as four men played off to meet in the final and then battle it out for the bracelet. Jason Koon Takes Down $25K Heads-Up In the semifinals, Daniel Zack was the first player to hit the rail and that meant a new winner would take home the gold as Zack was the only remaining bracelet winner in the final four. Gabor Szabo had a nut flush early to work himself into a massive lead, before making a great call with bottom pair just a few hands later. Sealing the deal with a Broadway straight against Zack’s two-pair, Szabo awaited the winner of another titanic tussle on the other table. It was a lengthy scrap for the other place in the final as Finnish online boss Henri ‘ButtonClickr’ Pusstinen was shot down by Jason Koon. Puustinen was a tricky customer and Koon found it difficult to close the match out. Puustinen dropped behind early in the match-up but consistently found a way to survive until Koon’s two pair eventually got the job done against the Finn’s bottom pair. In the final, neither player took a distinctive lead for over an hour as play started tentatively with the bracelet on the line. Koon moved into the lead but that was reversed by the talented Hungarian who established a 2:1 lead. Koon was all-in for his tournament life with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"] and was called by Szabo with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] before a dramatic flop of [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="4h"] gave both men a big sweat. The turn of [poker card="Jd"] and river of [poker card="Js"] kept Koon alive and vaulted him into the lead, but Szabo evened up the stacks to almost level by the time the pivotal hand arrived, with both men committing their stacks to the middle pre-flop and over 90% of the chips being on the line with Koon holding [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] and Szabo dominated with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"]. The flop of [poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] saw Koon remain in the lead and nothing altered that on the [poker card="9h"] turn. When the [poker card="Qd"] river fell, Koon had an overwhelming lead. Just a few hands later it was all over and the newly named GGPoker ambassador had ended his long career wait for a WSOP bracelet. Szabo was all-in and at risk pre-flop with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9d"] and Koon, who had pushed all-in with [poker card="Js"][poker card="7d"] needed to hit. The flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5h"] saw jacks once again come to Koon’s rescue and after the [poker card="8d"] turn and [poker card="6h"] river, Koon had won his first-ever WSOP bracelet and the $243,981 top prize, with Szabo claiming $150,790 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #11 $25,000 Heads Up Championship Results: Jason Koon - $243,981 Gabor Szabo - $150,790 Henri Puustinen -$89,787 Daniel Zack - $89,787 Mikita Badziakouski - $36,280 Bin Weng - $36,280 Benjamin Reason - $36,280 Jake Daniels - $36,280 https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1446398841264087044 Former #1 Ari Engel Wins $10K Omaha 8 Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Ari Engel was a popular winner in Event #9, the $10,000-entry Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship, where Phil Hellmuth busted out first of the final five. Hellmuth went all the way to the river against Engel and Eddie Blumenthal, but his two opponents ended up chopping the pot and sending the 15-time bracelet winner to the rail for a cash worth $80,894. With four players remaining, it was Blumenthal who was next to go, eliminated in fourth place for $107,204. The American busted to the eventual winner when Engel’s higher flush edged out his opponent and strengthened his chip lead. Engel then busted his next victim when his nut flush and low hand scooped the pot against Andrew Yeh, who received $143,988 for coming third. With Engel holding a better than 4:1 chip lead, the final battle could have been simple, but it was anything other than that. Over the course of almost eight hours and one of the longest heads-up matches in living memory, Engel and his opponent, Zachary Milchman both held the lead on multiple occasions. Both men had chances to seal victory long before Engel’s two pair queens and tens topped Milchman’s queens and eights. While Milchman brought home $195,968 for a runner-up result, it was Engel’s day and his second bracelet, which came with a top prize of $317,076. WSOP 2021 Event #9 $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Final Table Results: Ari Engel - $317,076 Zachary Milchman - $195,968 Andrew Yeh - $143,988 Eddie Blumenthal - $107,204 Phil Hellmuth - $80,894 George Wolff - $61,877 Robert Mizrachi - $47,987 Ben Landowski - $37,738 Khamar Xaytavone - $30,102 https://twitter.com/AriEngelPoker/status/1446382753910439937 Bronshtein Scores Second Career Bracelet The third and final WSOP bracelet winner of the day came in Event #12, the $1,500 Limit Hold’em event. It was Yuval Bronshtein who eventually prevailed in another lengthy battle into the small hours at the Rio. Heading into the final table, Kevin Erickson had the chip lead and he made that count over the course of the final day, with 16 players reduced to the final table in just a couple of hours play. Despite that momentum, Erickson would run out of luck at just the wrong moment. Working himself into a heads-up battle against Bronshtein with a 3:1 chip lead, Erickson improved that dramatically to look nailed on for the win with an 18:1 chip lead a short time later. Bronshtein somehow worked his way back into contention, however, and managed to turn the tide to go 3:1 up in chips himself. On the final hand, Bronshtein got it into the middle with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kd"], which was way ahead of Erickson’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qd"] and stayed there through the jack-high board to relegate Erickson to runner-up for $76,868 and give Bronshtein $124,374 and the much-coveted WSOP bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #12 $1,500 Limit Hold'em Top 10 Chipcounts: Yuval Bronshtein - $124,374 Kevin Erickson - $76,868 Tom McCormick - $53,588 John Bunch - $38,011 Ian Glycenfer - $27,488 Zachary Gruneberg - $20,262 Guy Cicconi - $15,230 Tony Nasr - $11,677 Anh Van Nguyen - $9,137 https://twitter.com/Yuvee04/status/1446408541682556928 Final Table Set For $3K Freezeout In the 13th event of the 2021 WSOP, the $3,000 NLHE Freezeout event, it was Brandon Caputo who captured the chip lead heading into the final day. With just seven players remaining, Caputo’s stack of 7,200,000 was a little ahead of Belgian player Michael Gathy (6,700,000), the four-time WSOP bracelet winner, with Gabriel Andrade (4,900,000) a little further back. Elsewhere in the event, several players made the money without managing to seal a final table seat, with Betrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier (32nd for $9,299), Sergio Aido (21st for $10,816) and Niall Farrell (12th for $18,815) all going close to the final seven but falling short. Andrew Jeong, the Day 1 chip leader, bubbled the last day in 8th place for $37,824 when his top pair with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"] on a flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] couldn’t hold against Gathy’s [poker card="8d"][poker card="6c"] for two pair. The turn of [poker card="Td"] and river [poker card="9d"] ended the hand, sent Jeong to the rail, and ended the day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #13: $3,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Table Chipcounts: Brandon Caputo - 7,200,000 Michael Gathy - 6,700,000 Gabriel Andrade - 4,900,000 Craig Mason - 2,780,000 Harvey Mathews - 2,520,000 Girish Apte - 2,425,000 David Lolis - 2,295,000 Shaun Deeb, David Williams At Event #14 Final Table Event #14, the $1,500 Seven Card Stud event, saw six players remain with chips after a rollercoaster day sent a former WSOP world champion to the rail in the money and plenty of other big names missed out on the final day. Tom McEvoy (29th for $2,687) worked his way to a min-cash, while Day 1 chip leader Elias Hourani lasted a little longer to go out in 20th place for $3,390. Anthony Zinno ran all the way to 11th place for (5,338), but missed out on the last half-dozen, which were headlined by Rafael Lebron with 1.69 million chips. Of the six players who survived Day 2 as 76 players were cut down to just half a dozen, Shaun Deeb (1,195,000) and David Williams (1,050,000) will look to add to already legendary WSOP resumes with victory on the third and final day of the event. They’ll both be desperate to win the next WSOP Gold Bracelet and the $82,262 top prize to go with it. WSOP 2021 Event #14: $1,500 Seven Card Stud Final Table Chipcounts: Rafael Lebron - 1,690,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,195,000 David Moskowitz - 1,150,000 David Williams - 1,050,000 Nicholas Seiken - 970,000 Christina Hill - 435,000 $1,500 Six-Handed Kicks Off Event #15 saw players take to the action in the $1,500 Six-Handed tournament, with 96 players surviving from a Day 1 field of 1,450 total entries. The chip leader at the close of play was Daniel Orgil, who ended the day with a,650,000. He was followed by Daniel Rezaei (1,266,000) and Jun Obara (1,200,000) as well as plenty of other big names, such as Jonas Mackoff (502,000), Melanie Weisner (467,000), Joni Jouhkimainen (320,000), Darren Elias (265,000) and the man who has more WSOP cashes than anyone, Roland Israelashvili (262,000). WSOP 2021 Event #15 $1,500 NLHE Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Daniel Orgil - 1,650,000 Daniel Rezaei - 1,266,000 Jun Obara - 1,200,000 Steve Foutty - 971,000 Jesse Yaginuma - 843,000 Jeremy Eyer - 825,000 Itai Levy - 782,000 Jared Ambler - 635,000 Sean Hegarty - 621,000 Mark Liedtke - 616,000 Dzivielevski, Nate Silver In $10K Limit Top 10 It took until the small hours of the night for Event #16, the $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship, to wind to a close as 78 players were more than halved to just 35 hopefuls heading into Day 2. The chip leader at the end of the opening night’s play was Eric Kurtman, who bagged up 466,000 chips, some distance ahead of his nearest rivals Andony Wasaya (314,000) and two-time WSOP event winner Yuri Dzivielevski, who made it through with a stack of 270,000. Elsewhere in the top 10 chipcounts, Nate Silver (198,000) and Chad Eveslage (162,000) will both be hoping to add to their poker resumes with a bracelet, while former bracelet winners Chris Vitch (162,000) and Anthony Zinno (159,000) are also very well placed for more glory on the final day of the event. Some players not to make the next day's play, missing out on the money bubble, which is yet to burst, included Scott Seiver, Jake Daniels, David Benyamine, Mark Gregorich, David 'ODB' Baker, Eli Elezra, Dan Zack, Ronnie Bardah, Daniel Negreanu and Robert Mizrachi. WSOP 2021 Event #16 $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Eric Kurtzman - 466,000 Andony Wasaya - 314,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 270,000 Casey Mccarrel - 232,000 Christopher Chung - 201,000 Nate Silver - 198,000 Mike Thorpe - 178,000 Christopher Vitch - 162,000 Chad Eveslage - 162,000 Anthony Zinno - 159,000
  6. To win a high-profile WSOP bracelet, it takes beating the best over and over again. Just 16 remain in the $25,000-entry NLHE Heads Up Championship and they include some of the best poker players in the world. After the first day of action in the $25,000-entry No Limit Hold’em Heads Up Championship, players are just three heads-up victories away from playing the bracelet and top prize of $243,981. Star-Studded $25K Heads-Up Championship The early stages of this year’s Heads-Up Championship, one of the most prestigious WSOP bracelets any player can win, were complex given the number of entries. Players were drawn together, with seven of the initial player given a bye to the second round. That meant for some, winning two matches to achieve the $25,000 min-cash. For others, it meant only winning one match. Every table was packed with quality, however, and some of the early skirmishes featured players who could easily have been competing in the final. Cary Katz beat Dimitar Danchev in a topsy-turvy affair, while Daniel Zack got the better of Nick Petrangelo. Kane Kalas was overcome by Mikita Badziakouski, while David Peters took out the in-form Jonathan Jaffe. Other players to lose their chance of glory included Adrian Mateos, Ali Imsirovic, Joao Vieira, and Seth Davies. Day 2 will see both the Round of 16 and the quarterfinals take place, with some intriguing match-ups coming next. Newly appointed GGPoker ambassador Jason Koon will take on Sam Soverel’s conqueror, Johannes Becker in one of the most eagerly anticipated ties, will everything on the line as players shoot for the bracelet in one of the most demanding disciplines of all. Round of 16 Line-Up (consecutive winners to play in quarterfinals): Gal Yifrach vs. Jake Daniels Johannes Becker vs. Jason Koon Ben Reason vs. Galen Hall Henri Puustinen vs. Cary Katz Dan Zack vs. James D’Ambrosio Bin Weng vs. Julien Martini Aleksandr Shevlyakov vs. Mikita Badziakouski David Peters vs. Gabor Szabo Long Ma Crowned Reunion King The Reunion has already been described as one of the events of the Autumn and on Tuesday, it produced the winner, Long Ma, who took the title and massive $523,604 for just a $500 entry. Yesterday’s 17-hour Day 2 was in complete contrast to today’s final which took just over an hour as Ma, an electronics manager and poker tournament enthusiast, eliminated each of his four opponents in double-quick time to win his first WSOP bracelet. The final day action got going almost immediately with a bust-out as short-stacked Michael Eddy became Ma’s first victim. Eddy moved all-in for around five big blinds with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"] and Ma made the call with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8c"], turning an ace on the [poker card="9c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"] board. Eddy, who had come into play knowing he needed a great deal of luck to survive, cashed for $142,847. Next to go was Alex Vazquez, who busted with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] against Ma’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"] after a jack on the turn saw Vazquez shove and Ma call on the board of [poker card="Kh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="8h"]. Vazquez cashed for $185,281, but it only strengthened Ma’s already dominant position. That position for Ma got even better when he reduced the battle to a heads-up clash with a big lead. Max Tavepholjalern called off his stack pre-flop after three-betting with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8d"] and he would need to win a race against Ma who held [poker card="4h"][poker card="4d"]. That didn’t happen as the double-paired board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] played out and Tavepholjalern collected $241,766 in winnings. Heads-up saw Ma go into the action with a better than 4:1 chip lead and in no time at all, he had the bracelet. When Lentini open-shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Jc"], Ma made a snap-call with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7s"] and watched as the board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"] gave him over half a million dollars and the biggest-field bracelet won so far in the 2021 World Series of Poker. WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Final Table Results: Long Ma - $513,604 Giuliano Lentini - $317,352 Max Tavepholjalern - $241,766 Alex Vazquez - $185,281 Michael Eddy - $142,847 Anthony Cass - $110,794 Jugal Daterao - $86,462 Derrick Stoebe - $67,886 Adrian Buckley - $53,625 [caption id="attachment_636553" align="aligncenter" width="768"] Long Ma, winner of the biggest-field event of the WSOP so far, the $500-entry The Reunion[/caption] Lally Takes $1,500 Dealer's Choice Another winner took home gold in Event #7, the $1,500 Dealer’s Choice event as Jaswinder ‘Jesse’ Lally won the six-handed event for $97,915. Lally, a long-time player but business owner who counts poker as more of a hobby than a career, beat former bracelet winners to the gold at a final table packed with action. Just 11 players returned to the felt at the start of the day, with Craig Chat (11th for $5,612), Adam Friedman (10th for $5,612), and Jeremy Heartberg (9th for $7,307) first to leave the action. When Naoya Kihara busted in eighth place for the same amount and Day 1 chip leader Nathan Gamble left in seventh for $9,768, the official final table was set and it didn’t take long for five more players to hit the rail. Christopher Lindner busted in sixth place for $13,396 when he busted in a Seven Card Stud 8 or Better hand to the eventual winner and Lally, suddenly with all the momentum, added to his list of victims when he busted Adam Kipnis in fifth for $18,839. Ian O’Hara came into play chasing the leader and will have been disappointed to exit in fourth place so near to the gold he has yet to win in his poker career. O’Hara lost out in a three-way Stud hand where Lally’s diamond flush conquered O’Hara’s hand, leaving the young player to quip, “Stud master.” as he left the stage. It wasn’t long before Lally proved himself a master of the event itself, after former bracelet winner Andrew Kelsall brought about heads-up play. Kelsall’s elimination of the overnight chip leader, Ray Henson in No Limit 2-7 Single Draw for $40,062 gave the experience Kelsall 1.7 million chips and a chance of victory, but Lally extended his lead heads-up quite quickly in a Razz hand to race into a 5:1 lead. The final hand saw Lally win a Pot Limit Omaha hand with the nut straight on the turn busting Kelsall’s two-pair after a flush draw fell short on the river and gave Lally his first-ever WSOP bracelet. Kelsall cashed for an impressive $60,514, but Lally’s victory was worth a massive $97,915 and the bracelet was perhaps worth just as much judging by the beaming smile on Lally’s face. WSOP 2021 Event #7 $1,500 Dealer's Choice Final Table Results: Jesse Lally - $97,915 Andrew Kelsall - $60,514 Ray Henson - $40,062 Ian O’Hara - $27,147 Adam Kipnis - $18,839 Christopher Lindner - $13,396 Quick Win For Michael Perrone The third and final winner of the day was Michael Perrone, who took down the super-fast Super Turbo Bounty event which cost $1,000 and lasted just one day at the felt. With 16 hours of play producing plenty of fast-paced bounty action, a prize pool of $1.4m was chopped up, with Perrone crushing dreams on his way to banking over 10% of it. Plenty of big names ran deep, with Shaun Deeb (59th for $2,505), Cate Hall (82nd for $1,731), and Vanessa Kade (227th for $1,065) all making the money. WSOP 2021 Event #10 $1,000 Super Turbo Bounty NLHE Final Table Results: Michael Perrone - $152,173 Pierre Calamusa - $94,060 Jeremiah Fitzpatrick - $69,454 Scott Podolsky - $51,787 Paul Dhaliwal - $38,996 Paul Jain - $29,657 John Moss - $22,783 Badr Imejjane - $17,680 Gabriel Ramos - $13,861 Brock Wilson - $10,980 ElkY Ready To Roll It’s been an incredible start to the 2021 WSOP in terms of attendance with the great and good arriving in style to put down their money and take their chips for a shot at glory, including GGPoker ambassador Bertran ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, who, over a decade on from his first WSOP appearance was still as excited as a first-timer to arrive at the Rio. https://twitter.com/elkypoker/status/1445206290452533248 It’s not only ElkY who is loving this year’s return to the Rio, with WSOP Main Event runner-up David Williams delighted to be back amongst it in 2021. https://twitter.com/dwpoker/status/1445486745089294345 Zhi Wu Leads $600 Deepstack Event One of the busiest Day 1s of the World Series so far saw 4,527 players arrive yesterday to play the $600-entry No Limit Hold’em Event #8, but after a thrilling Day 2, just five players remain in with a chance of winning their first WSOP bracelet and a top prize of $281,604. With the prize pool of $2.3 million, 216 players took to the tables and it was Zhi Wu who ended the day with the biggest stack of 46.1 million, ahead of Chrishan Sivasundaram (31.5m) and Ryan Chan (29.2m). With two more players having slightly shorter stacks to play with in Nicholas Zautra (15m) and Ari Mezrich (13.9m) even the short-stacked Mezrich will have eight big blinds to play with. WSOP 2021 Event #8 $600 No Limit Hold'em Final Table Chipcounts: Zhi Wu - 46,100,000 Chrishan Sivasundaram - 31,500,000 Ryan Chan - 29,200,000 Nicholas Zautra - 15,000,000 Ari Mezrich - 13,900,000 Hellmuth, Volpe In Omaha 8 Top 10 Event #9, the $10,000-entry Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship saw some very big names take part in the action, with 16-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil ‘the Poker Brat’ Hellmuth reaching the final day with an 8th-placed stack of 550,000 chips. The chip leader overnight is Andrew Yeh, whose massive pile of 995,000 represents a chip lead few have enjoyed so far after Day 1, with his nearest challengers Chris Vitch and Alan Sternberg, both of whom are some way back from the pacesetter with 650,000. Other big names hover not far behind, with Paul Volpe (445,000), Day 1 chip leader Michael Noori (370,000), Robert Mizrachi (340,000), and Brian Rast (165,000) all surviving a tricky Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #9 $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship: Andrew Yeh - 995,000 Chris Vitch - 650,000 Alan Sternberg - 650,000 Ben Landowski - 630,000 Ken Aldridge - 595,000 Aditya Prasetyo - 560,000 Eddie Blumenthal - 555,000 Phil Hellmuth - 550,000 Khamar Xaytavone - 485,000 Paul Volpe - 445,000 Take It To The Limit Finally, Event #12, the $1,500 Limit hold’em bracelet event saw Jeremy Maher bag the chip lead after Day featured 422 total entries. With a prize pool of $563,370 generated, just under a third of those who took to the felt survived, with the money bubble yet to burst. Day 2 will see plenty of big names in the hunt to reach the final 64 players and enter the money places, before pushing towards the $124,374 top prize and WSOP gold bracelet. They will include the chip leader Jeremy Maher (226,500) and Zinno, who bagged up 217,500 chips ahead of some reputable rivals in the shape of Yuval Bronshtein (141,500), and Barry Greenstein (86,500), and former WSOP Main Event winner Joe McKeehen (60,000) to name just three. With stars such as Dan Shak (55,000), Ronnie Bardah (52,000), and Jason Somerville (48,000) all still in with a shout, it is bound to be a high-caliber fight to reach the final table. Other stars of the felt didn’t survive, with mixed game regulars Daniel Negreanu, Shaun Deeb and David ‘ODB’ Baker all failing to make the Day 2 cut. WSOP 2021 Event #12 $1,500 Limit Hold'em Top 10 Chipcounts: Jeremy Maher - 226,000 Anthony Zinno - 217,500 Truong Tran - 195,000 Kristopher Burchfield - 194,500 John Bunch - 192,500 Aldon Patatanyan - 190,000 John Esposito - 187,500 Mori Eskandani - 173,500 Arthur Cole - 165,000 Tom McCormick - 160,500 Finally, while she may have stepped back from poker in the last few years to raise her family, Vanessa Selbst, always enjoys it when someone asks her if she used to play and knows their friend who also enjoys the game. A bit. https://twitter.com/VanessaSelbst/status/1445534865567461376
  7. It’s incredibly difficult to win a World Series of Poker gold bracelet. Even in an era where more than 160 will be added to poker resumes this calendar year, it still takes being one among tens of thousands of players who take their shot at winning one of the most coveted trophies in the game. But as hard as it is to win a bracelet, it’s perhaps just as (if not even more) difficult to win the title of WSOP Player of the Year. There are maybe two dozen players at most that can be considered frontrunners with a realistic shot at being immortalized on a POY banner. The reasons it’s so difficult are many - from the mental fortitude of the time, as well as having a bankroll big enough to compete. And over the years, it’s only become more difficult. The award was first introduced in 2004, with only 15 players yet to earn the honor. Daniel Negreanu is the only player to have won it twice and, without a live series in 2020, Robert Campbell was, famously, the last to win the award in 2019. Here at the start of the 2021 WSOP, a number of players will once again have designs on winning the award. Five of the 15 took the time to talk about what it takes to compete for the WSOP Player of the Year race and what will get it done here in 2021. “It's just playing your A-game all day, every day,” said Shaun Deeb, four-time WSOP bracelet winner and 2018 Player of the Year. “You have to play 50-some-odd days straight. That's a real grind. From my online background, I play every day. I'm good at that. “And make sure you play everything. You can't just play Mixed Games, you can’t just play No Limit. To win Player of the Year, someone's going to play 50-plus events or 70% of the total events out there, whatever it ends up being.” Daniel Negreanu agrees. The two-time Player of the Year (2004, 2013) says that no matter how many events you are willing to play, someone out there is likely looking to take even more shots. “I think, if someone's actually trying to chase Player of the Year, the most important advice is that if you're serious about it, you really need to be willing to put in a ton of volume,” Negreanu said. “There's no week off or two weeks off. To give yourself the best chance, you want to play the maximum number of events based on [the points system] and most importantly, one of your best chances to win, is going to be to learn Mixed Games. “If you don't play mixed games, it's going to be tough for you to accrue really big amounts of points,” he continued. “Because in these big field No Limits, you can min-cash a lot but they're also incredibly hard to make the final table and win. Whereas, if you play mixed games, sometimes you're playing against a field of a hundred. So, if you make the final table or win you can include some pretty big numbers.” Mixed games have become an important component of the Player of the Year. It’s been rare to have a POY that doesn’t accumulate crucial points through the variety of poker variants. But it has happened. Jeff Madsen did it in 2006 by winning a pair of NLHE events. In 2012, Greg Merson accomplished it was well after taking down the $10,000 Six-Handed No Limit Hold’em Championship followed by becoming the Main Event champion. However, as the points system has evolved, mixed games have become a more prominent factor. Winners have needed to be able to balance a schedule that includes whatever tournament is running on any given day. “The Player of the Year was really, originally, established to help encourage the participation in all the events that weren't No Limit Texas Hold'em. Specifically, to have a counterbalance to the WSOP main event,” said Frank Kassela, 2010 Player of the Year and three-time bracelet winner. Kassela, who grabbed gold in the $2,500 Razz and the $10K Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Championship that year, notes that competing in every event isn’t just a matter of having the knowledge of how to play those games well, but having the means to do it. “I mean the most challenging thing right now for anybody that wants to try to win Player of the Year is the amount of expense they’ve added to being competitive because of all of the rebuys,” Kassela said. “Like when I did it, the year I won, was one of the first years that they were allowing even double rebuys in some of the events like No Limit Deuce and PLO. “I feel like it got so crazy the end of the last year between Sean and Daniel. I mean, whoever could afford it was the one most likely to win it.” Of course, last year, neither Deeb nor Negreanu won it. It was Robert Campbell who officially walked away with the title but only after it was awarded to Negreanu. An error in the points awarded was discovered and the title was “taken back” from Kid Poker and correctly assigned to Campbell. “I think probably the most important part nowadays is to understand the point system, which I really didn't focus on that when I won,” said 2007 Player of the Year Tom Schneider. “In 2013, I had a good chance of winning it had the rules been the same as they were before. I don't even know what the rules are this year, to be honest. So understanding of the point system, determining how valuable cashes are versus winning.” Knowledge of all the games. Check. Understanding the points system and what’s more valuable. Check. Having the resources to play as many events as possible. Check. But while all of those are important items to keep in mind, 2015 WSOP Player of the Year Mike Gorodinsky says it’s keeping the totality of the grind in check in order to be at your best is what’s really needed. “My biggest piece of advice would be to simply not put yourself into a position where you're likely to burn out,” Gorodinsky said. “Outside of a very small handful of guys who have the bankroll, skill-set, and love of the game to show up at the Rio every day and just blast through whatever tournaments happen to be that day, there aren't many people that I've met over the years, myself included, who can spend 12+ hours at the Rio every day and come out at the end of the summer not feeling like they've aged 10 years. “Remember that poker is supposed to be fun! Setting up a 40 tournament schedule may seem exciting and optimal a few months out before the series starts up, but the reality of that day-to-day grind, especially if you're not making frequent deep runs, is pretty grim. So just pace yourself, play what you're excited about/good at, and let the results come as they will.” When Gorodinsky won it, he said he didn’t start the series with the intent of winning the title but “as the results started to roll in and the possibility of it actually became attainable, I definitely did play more tournaments than I otherwise would have.” When Schneider went to the WSOP in 2007, he said he had a goal of playing an increased schedule but, more specifically, he wanted “to make three final tables.” The POY wasn’t in his sights at the start. He reached his goal of three final tables, winning two of them, and he said he did it by not getting distracted by the chase. “I know that some people have a strategy of playing, entering three events at the same time, then going over playing a little bit. That was never my strategy,” Schneider said. “My strategy was to focus on the event that I was playing. I think a lot of times you can get distracted. And when you're running really good and you got lots of money, it probably doesn't hurt, but my strategy was more play the events that I felt like I had the best chance of winning.” That mental strain can get to anybody, the feeling that in order to keep pace, you need to play everything. That includes the smaller buy-in, large field No Limit events that take up valuable time and mental energy away from being able to focus on the big-time events like the $50,000 Poker Players Championship (the very event that clinched the award for Gorodinsky in 2015.) “The hardest part for me and the part that really doesn't help me is, it's frankly really easy to cash in these small buy-in events. Like the big, huge field events. You could late regs, you play for a couple of hours, and you're in the money,” Negreanu said. “You get points for that. And, to add that to a schedule of all these big $10,000 and $25,000, that can be really taxing. I wish that wasn't the case. I would prefer an adjustment to this formula where instead of counting, 30 cashes, you count your top 12 and go from there, for example. That way, these little min-cashes don't really make the difference, because they kind of do now. So, that's probably the hardest part is just having to play multiple events in a day and late [registering] and all that sort of stuff.” “The toughest part of the WSOP/POY grind for me personally is always the lifestyle that's required to do it,” Gorodinsky added. “I’m someone who both values their sleep, as well as their time outdoors, so while I definitely love playing tournament poker, doing it day in/day out for two straight months wears pretty heavily on me. Getting into the mindset of playing until 2-3 AM most nights and then coming back to Day 2 restarts 12 hours later or less is always the toughest part of it for me. For Schneider though, any potential problems that took place while he was en route to his banner are pains that have subsided over time. “It didn't feel like a grind,” Schneider said looking back. “I mean, most poker players love poker and at the time I loved poker. The opportunity to sit in another tournament and play a tournament with big fields and big money, it's not a grind. Just like I don't think The Masters golf tournament would be a grind to golfers. I mean, I'm sure they would think that of course is tough and they got to think about every shot and all that, but that's every time they go out and play. But it's more of a privilege than that grind. That's the way I looked at it.” But Schneider, who continues his work as a CFO outside of poker, admits that he won’t be in the running this year, opting out of attending citing the WSOP COVID policies. Gorodinsky also feels like it’s unlikely he’ll take another shot at it this year. He will be in Las Vegas with plans on playing the series this year including the majority of the bigger buy-in mixed game events. But he says he doesn’t want to prioritize playing tournaments when maybe a day spent rock climbing is what he’s in the mood for. “Honestly, it isn't really a goal for me to win it again,” Gorodinsky said. “Would I go for it if I had a strong start to the summer? Absolutely. I love poker and competition in general, so the POY chase with a few other guys sounds pretty fun, but it's not an intention of mine to claim the title again." Kassela says that he’ll be back in town in early October with nearly a quarter-million of buy-ins on his schedule. That may or may not be enough to contend for the POY title but he thinks it would be a bad idea to count him out. “Well, I mean, because of my style of play, I feel like even with an abbreviated schedule compared to other people, that I'm as much of a threat to win Player of the Year as anybody else, because I'm very streaky. When I get in the zone, I've had multiple times over my poker years where I'll hit three or four final tables in a week. And I'll get in those... And if you win a bracelet, win another bracelet, come in third…you just go, bam, bam, bam, a few things like that, you're just kind of leading the pack.” Then there’s the rivalry between Negreanu and Deeb. There was a time it was personal, but Negreanu has been public about how the pair have buried the hatchet. But in no uncertain terms, both players, once again, have their sights set on taking the POY in 2021. “Yeah, I'll be in the running,” said Negreanu. “I’m not going to be as insane about it, where I'm playing every $400 event or whatever. I'm going to see how the first half goes, but really my focus is actually to win some bracelets as well. And usually, when that happens, you have a good chance to win Player of the Year. But I'll be grinding all the big, high roller events and big stuff like that. So, that bodes well for my chances, for sure.” “I pretty much go out there and my goal is to win Player of the Year,” Deeb said. “I got second in 2019, got first in 2018, but I really want to win it again. And basically, that's my goal. Try to be like Johnny Chan a little bit.” But when it comes to winning Player of the Year, there’s really only so much one can control. “The only other thing I was going to add, being just generally more open advice, is it's important to get a fast start,” Kasella added. “I know the years I feel like I've got a shot at Player of the Year have those moments when you win your first bracelet in the first week or two. I think it was the sixth or seventh day in 2010 when I won $10K Stud 8-or-Better. And then I won the Razz bracelet six days later. “When you get a ‘Bam-bam’…when lightning strikes early, makes it much easier.”
  8. Three events kicked off the action on a busy opening day of the 2021 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas as the Rio returns to poker action for what is heavily rumored to be the final time. With the $500 Casino Employees event offering the first ‘Shuffle Up and Deal!’ of the series and $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. and $1,000 COVID-19 Relief Charity events also taking place, there was something for every bankroll on opening day. Eveslage the Leader in $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. With 73 entries, the $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Event #2 attracted some of the best mixed games players in poker, with former #1-ranked Shaun Deeb, Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, and Matthew Ashton all pitching up to take part from the off. After over 11 hours at the felt, just 47 players remained, with Chad Eveslage well clear of the chasing pack on 860,000 chips. Eveslage, who has never won a WSOP bracelet, was top of the pile by a long way from his nearest challengers of John Monette (589,500) and Jean Gaspard (569,000) and will head into Day 2 in pole position to make a run at the title of this all-new three-day event. Cary Katz was the first player to bust, with Mike Gorodinsky sending Katz home in a Stud Hi-Lo hand where Gorodinsky’s sevens and deuces triumphed. There were strong opening days at the felt for Mike Matusow (421,500), Deeb (321,000), and Negreanu (270,000), all of whom finished above average. Elsewhere, 15-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth (206,000) and legendary WSOP commentator Norman Chad (150,500) both made the cut. Registration is still open until the first card hits the felt when Day 2 resumes at 2 pm Vegas time, so with a prize pool that is sure to grow, there is plenty of excitement ahead for a thrilling event. Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chip Counts: Chad Eveslage - 860,000 John Monnette - 589,500 Jean Gaspard - 569,000 Jesse Klein - 490,500 Mike Matusow - 420,500 Adam Friedman - 420,500 Chris Vitch - 371,500 Shaun Deeb - 321,000 Hal Rotholz - 314,000 Randy Ohel - 295,000 Just Five Remain In Event For COVID Relief Event #3, the $1,000-entry COVID-19 Relief Charity took place with 266 players taking to the felt, creating a prize pool of $205,400 and a top prize of $54,844. With 39 players paid, play went down to the final five, with the great and good gathering to play poker and donate money to help those who are most vulnerable at the same time, with the eventual chip leader, Jesse Lonis, ending the night on 2,285,000 chips. Plenty of big names busted outside the money, including three-time WSOP winner Adrian Mateos, fellow three-time winner Upeshka De Silva, and Maurice Hawkins. Hovering halfway down the chip counts for much of Day 1 but also failing to make the money was a former World Champion in the shape of Ryan Riess, who had a serendipitous seat to welcome him to the Rio, the scene of his greatest triumph, with a cameo from legendary WSOP bracelet winner Ron McMillen to boot. https://twitter.com/RyanRiess1/status/1443744580717801494 Once the bubble burst, players such as Ali Imsirovic (32nd for $1,590) Ryan Laplante (31st for $1,590), Pavel Plesuv (26th for $1,817), Shannon Shorr (21st for $1,817), Dylan Linde (20th for $1,817), Ryan Riess (18th for $2,000) and Matt Stout (16th for $2,000) all making the money but missing out on the final table. In the end, of the five players who remain, it was Lonis who led. With just four players between Lonis and a WSOP bracelet - including Jeremy Ausmus and former #1-ranked Steve Gross - it's only Lonis and Asher Coniff yet to win WSOP bracelets. Event #3 COVID-19 Charity Event Final Table Chip Counts: Jesse Lonis - 2,285,000 Jeremy Ausmus - 1,345,000 Asher Conniff - 755,000 Steve Gross - 485,000 Mitchell Halverson - 385,000 "Shuffle Up And Deal" The $500-entry Casino Employees Event kicked off the 2021 WSOP in style, with 419 entries making a prize pool of $175,980. Leo Abbe led the field after the day’s conclusion, sitting on a massive pile of 537,000 chips, with Shaun Weintraub (474,000) and Roberto Reyna (461,000) his closest challengers in an all-American top 10. One player who enjoyed his day at the felt in the first event of the series was Jesse Fullen, who provided commentary on the WSOP Online series for thousands of poker fans to enjoy this summer. Fullen began as he meant to go on, busting a player early then continuing to run up his stack throughout the opening day, ending on 223,000 chips, well above the average. Jon Aguiar was also riding high in the event and advocated the positive atmosphere as one of the benefits of playing in the opening event. https://twitter.com/JonAguiar/status/1443753395865546754 Aguiar busted in 102nd place, outside the money, but he had good company, with former event winner Chad Holloway and Garry Gates, who finished fourth in the 2019 WSOP Main Event both failing to make the money too. With the money bubble bursting on Day 1, just 63 players made a profit on their investment. The bubble didn’t last long and when it burst, Chris Moon was the man eclipsed by the field as he busted with pocket nines to Jason Smith’s ace-ten, with both an ace and ten on the flop doing the fatal damage. In the end, just 50 players remained, with Smith making the top 10 and Abbe the chip leader heading into Day 2 of the opening event with the remaining players battling for a $39,013 top prize. Event #1 $500 Casino Employees Event Top 10 Chip Counts: Leo Abbe - 537,000 Shawn Weintraub - 474,000 Roberto Reyna - 461,000 Andrew Bart - 422,000 Akash Desai - 415,000 Jack Behrens - 363,000 Marco Starnoni - 363,000 Jason Smith - 351,000 James Barnett - 343,000 Daniel Kim - 337,000
  9. Shaun Deeb is known as a master of mixed games. He’s won four World Series of Poker bracelets, each of them in a different variant. His first was in Pot Limit Hold’em, his next came in Seven Card Stud. In 2018, when he won WSOP player of the year, he took home two titles - one in PLO and another in No Limit Hold’em. It doesn’t matter the game, Deeb loves it: 5-Card Draw, Triple Stud, H.O.R.S.E… …"Contra." "Contra." Not a poker variant, but the popular run-and-gun shooter first produced by Konami in the late 80’s during the quarter arcade boom. The game was an early success but really took off in popularity when it was then brought over to Nintendo Entertainment Systems in 1988. For Deeb, playing "Contra" on his NES eventually became one of his early video game go-to's and helped open him up to the world of gaming. “I always loved video games,” Deeb said. “When ‘Fortnite’ got big there was a whole poker contingency [that played]. We had a group, about 10-15 guys from poker - a couple who had never played video games - we got on every morning, it was fun. Bunch of shit talking, played props and stuff…I mean, I love gambling and video games, it’s a great combination for me.” Enter Nelson Laffey, careerist collector of all things “nerdy” from video games to "Magic the Gathering" to "Pokémon" cards. Deeb and Laffey first met while playing poker in New York. They quickly bonded and discovered that they have more in common than just poker. Deeb heaps praise on the “really, really sharp” Laffey calling him “pretty much the most knowledgable guy” in the collectibles sector. [caption id="attachment_636114" align="aligncenter" width="618"] World Series of Poker 2018 Player of the Year Shaun Deeb.[/caption] “I just happened to run into him at a casino, he’d just gotten into poker and we became friends right away. Now, we hang out all the time and he’s one of my closest friends,” Deeb said. “He has always been big into Magic [the Gathering] and Pokémon and stuff and he approached me a couple of years ago. He said ‘hey listen, I’m buying these games, you should give me some cash, we should be partners, and I’m going to buy us a bunch of stuff.’” That “bunch of stuff” turned out to be vintage, factory-sealed video games. Convinced, Deeb cut Laffey a proverbial check, and off Laffey went, determined to succeed in his quest. They scooped up all the titles they could find that kids from the ’80s and '90s obsessed over: “Final Fantasy”, “Double Dragon”, “Deja Vu”, “Street Fighter II” and, of course, “Contra.” In total, according to Deeb, the investment brought in roughly 100 pieces. But the crowning piece, that title that brings their whole collection together, is a top-graded, third-print copy of the Nintendo classic “The Legend of Zelda.” “It is arguably my favorite piece in my collection,” Laffey said. “It’s arguably going to be - if not is - the most coveted piece throughout the entire lot. I don’t think I’ve ever met somebody that says I don’t like ‘Zelda.’” Laffey’s suspicions are easily confirmed. A recent post on TMZ.com shows that a factory-sealed copy of “The Legend of Zelda”, donated to Goodwill in Connecticut (very similar to the graded copy in Deeb and Laffey’s collection), recently sold for a record $411,278. Deeb explains that after building up the collection over the past few years, a message from end boss Cliff Josephy connected him with Ken Goldin. Goldin, a former online grinder and PocketFiver who played under the name ‘isuck123’, is the founder of Goldin Auctions, an online auction house specifically tailored for collectibles, sports cards, and memorabilia. Goldin says that the red hot video game collectibles market which has “really popped in the last 12 months” is a product of when a portion of “hundreds of millions of video game players became nostalgic...it set up a new collectibles market.” Titles like “The Legend of Zelda” along with “Pokémon”, “Super Mario Bros.” and “Sonic the Hedgehog” are currently sitting at the top of the heap for investors. A look at Goldin Auctions sees a top-graded copy of “Zelda” currently sitting with a bid of $75,000 - with roughly two weeks left to bid. [caption id="attachment_636109" align="alignleft" width="279"] In April 2021, a factory-sealed edition of "Super Mario Bros." sold at auction for $660,000.[/caption] An early edition, factory-sealed copy of the original “Super Mario Bros.” for NES has a bid of $400,000, while a near-pristine copy of “Sonic the Hedgehog” is sitting with a bid of $120,000. Deeb and Laffey’s lot is being sold as individual pieces, some this month (September 18 is the final chance to bid) and others in November, to allow investors and collectors to pick and choose what they’d like to add to their own collection. Deeb is excited to see what the collection fetches, however, investing in video games has become more than just a transaction for him. He’s discovered an investment of passion, one that connects him to his childhood and something he plans on continuing to pursue. “I love the games, it sucks to get rid of them but I know that the market’s really hot and so we’re going to unload our games and try to buy more. We’re trying to make a profit, but we love the games. I remember as a kid playing Contra and my wife used to play Zelda so it’s been really cool to have them in our collection.” Deeb enjoys video games, and clearly enjoys gaming in general but when it comes to what’s next for the investment, he insists that will be his partner’s call. “It’s a booming industry and with so much inflation going on, I’m so happy that I had part of my net worth tied into these games. And, you know, if we make money that’s cool. If we lose a little, no big deal…,” he said. “But I think we’re going to make a lot of money.”
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.