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Found 73 results

  1. It was an action-packed Sunday with multiple six-figure scores and some of online poker’s biggest names taking their talents to big-money final tables. 'Wild_Smurf', Ivan 'Negriin' Luca Take Home Six-Figures One of the largest payouts of the day went to Germany’s 'Wild_Smurf’ who took down the PokerStars Sunday Million with an outright win for $140,572.39. The tournament drew 5,202 runners creating a prize pool of $1,040,400 allowing everyone at the final table to earn no less than $11,782. Belgium’s ’francais50’ settled for second place and a healthy $98,647.39. PocketFiver ‘BenjaminChalot' made his way to the final table, laddering to seventh place for $16,790.28. With the score, the Hungarian just eclipses $600,000 in lifetime earnings. Usually, the winner of the Sunday Million is the day’s biggest winner, but this Sunday PokerStars was also running Bounty Builder special editions of some of their High Rollers. This led to Argentina’s Ivan ’Negriin’ Luca combining his winnings for his victory in the $2,100 High Roller SE Bounty Builder #4 for the biggest haul on Sunday. He earned $72,909.23 for the win and another $92,671.87 in bounties or a total of just over $165,580. Finishing right behind Luca was former top-10 ranked player ‘ekziter’. He walked with $55,485.96 (+ $17,281.25 in bounties) for his single largest payday of 2018. A familiar name was atop the leaderboard in the PokerStars Sunday Warm-up as Bryan ‘bparis’ Paris walked away as the winner. He defeated the 1,031 player field and added $33,458.20 to his already legendary online earnings total of over $11.3 million. Joining him at this final table was another online poker veteran as Ami ‘UhhMee’ Barer finished in fourth place for $12,436.27 ‘GlobalHappiness’ Outlasts Karmatskiy In partypoker SHR ‘GlobalHappiness’ celebrated a victory in the partypoker $2,600 Super Sunday High Roller, winning $57,000 for the win. He defeated one of the best Russian players on the planet in Arsenii ‘josef_shvejk’ Karmatskiy who settled for second place and $39,000. The cash is his largest score since taking third place in Powerfest Event #97 for over $64,000 and puts him up over $2.8 million in career earnings. Joining the final table of this one was the world’s #4-ranked ‘C Darwin2’ from Sweden. He captured fifth place and added $14,000 to his $10.8 million in lifetime scores. The Swede is on pace to hit $11 million by year’s end. The partypoker $1,050 Sunday Bounty Hunter High Roller pulled in 211 runners and exceed the $200K guarantee with its $215,220 prize pool. ‘Dextered’ ended up with all the chips and $21,511.45 (+ $26,341.26 in bounties) for first place. A pair of top 10-ranked player also made the final eight as the #1-ranked player in the world ‘lena900’ (‘Drulitooo’) finished in eighth place adding $2,426.50 to his already $12.3 million in lifetime earnings. Lasting one extra spot was ‘Ariados’ who also took down a major tournament on 888poker. In other partypoker action, ‘MaXiMiSpkr’ defeated the 213 runners in the $1,050 Sunday Main Event High Roller for over $43,000. Also, ‘BOOMALOOM’ made a deal in the $215 Sunday Main Event for $26,195.58. The runner-up, ‘LordPiasonG’ took him $23,356.53 in the deal. Ariados & Ramiro Rule 888poker A pair of Swedish crushers made a deal in the 888poker $60,000 Whale. The #7-ranked player in the world ’Madeon1994’ (aka ‘Ariados’) took home the top prize of $20,054.90 and officially gets the win. His countryman ‘creutz93’ finished as the runner-up, earning nearly $3,000 more than the posted second place, walking with $18,385. ‘creutz93’ is currently ranked 107 in the world. Argentia’s #1-ranked pro Ramiro ‘Ramiro’ Petrone bested the 314 runners that registered the $100,000 Sunday Mega Deep. The #10-ranked player in the world won $19,500 for his second five-figure cash this week. He climbed up over $4.25 million in lifetime earnings with the victory. ‘Baistipoika’ finished as the runner-up earning $14,500 and PocketFiver ‘wisimaki’ captured the bronze for $11,000. PokerStars Sunday Million Entries: 5,202 Prize pool: $1,040,400 1. Wild_Smurf - $140,572.39 2. francais50 - $98.647.39 3. Galva1388 - $69,227.69 4. razvanik08 - $48,581.79 5. Worjoh - $34,093.28 6. vovtroy - $23,925.66 7. BC1989RF - $16,790.28 8. TheMrsTT - $11,782.94 PokerStars Sunday Warm-Up, $200K Gtd Entries: 1,031 Prize pool: $206,200 1. bparis - $33,458.20 2. FROGGERT - $24,055.93 3. kill_619 - $17,296.40 4. UhhMee - $12,436.27 5. raissa1990 - $8,941.78 6. que_te_crio - $6,429.23 7. Widzywidzy^^ - $4,622.67 8. S3d3m2 - $3,323.75 PokerStars $530 High Roller SE Bounty Builder #3, $500K Gtd Entries: 1,609 Prize pool: 804.500 1. alitogiu30 - $57,472.04 (+ $44,633.90 in bounties)* 2. cruelShark - $47,236.24 (+ $4,076.17 in bounties)* 3. win2980 - $31,062 (+ $9,329.09 in bounties) 4. pececada - $22,142.41 (+ $3,574.22 in bounties) 5. cartoon2387 - $15,783.88 (+ $17,791.23 in bounties) 6. boris801 - $11,251.29 (+ $8,508.30 in bounties) 7. Proupflop - $8,020.30 (+$5,970.85 in bounties) 8. rojorulez - $5,717.17 (+ $6,839.85 in bounties) * denotes deal PokerStars $2,100 High Roller SE Bounty Builder #4, $500K Gtd Entries: 403 Prize pool: $806,000 1. Negrin - $72,909.23 (+ $92,671.87 in bounties) 2. ekziter - $55,485.96 (+ $17,281.25 in bounties) 3. Pwndidi - $42,226.42 (+ $20,296.88 in bounties) 4. n3xD - $32,135.58 (+ $11,468.75 in bounties) 5. NastyMinder - $24,456.13 (+ $15,031.25 in bounties) 6. Stakelis24 - $18,611.82 (+ $8,343.75 in bounties) 7. 0409479 - $14,164.16 (+ $3,750 in bounties) 8. compris - $10,779.36 (+ $3,500 in bounties) partypoker $1,050 Sunday Main Event High Roller, $150K Gtd Entries: 213 Prize pool: $213,000 1. MaXiMuSpkr - $43,430.70 2. IamPEAKing - $31,524 3. SouhftW - $22,471.50 4. JimyTransaction - $16,614 5. megustaestrecha - $11,715 6. VolZoK_ - $8,946 7. z-boooo - $6,603 8. MOTHERSMATTERS - $4,899 partypoker $215 Sunday Main Event, $150K Entries: 811 Prize pool: $162,200 1. BOOMALOOM_ - $26,195.58* 2. LordPiasonG - $23,356.53* 3. DieMeerkat - $13,835.66 4. BobBogdanovich - $9,375.16 5. IliusDooo - $6,617.76 6. Iamnotyourbuddy - $4,768.68 7. POKERPRO2.0 - $3,406.20 8. XINBAMA - $2,368.12 * denotes deal partypoker $2,600 Super Sunday High Roller, $200K Gtd Entries: 79 Prize pool: $200,000 1. GlobalHappiness - $57,000 2. josef_shvejk - $39,000 3. rdcrsnn - $27,000 4. Phil_Zajmo - $18,000 5. HellmuthTheGr8 - $14,000 6. CapEstel - $11,000 7. MOTHERSMATTERS - $9,500 8. MechaCorta - $8,500 partypoker $1,050 Sunday Bounty Hunter-HR, $200 Gtd Entries: 211 Prize pool: $215,220 1. Dextered - $21,511.45 (+ $26,341.26 in bounties) 2. ItiusDooo - $15,614 (+ $7,385.62 in bounties) 3. RingelStink - 11,130.25 (+ $2,941.25 in bounties) 4. PotatoLottery - $8,229 (+ $4,842.50 in bounties) 5. justkot - $5,802,50 (+ $6,378.12 in bounties) 6. PureBaadi - $4,431 (+ $1,495 in bounties) 7. Algorhytm - $3,270.50 (+ $4,810 in bounties) 8. Drulitooo - $2,426.50 (+ $780 in bounties) 888poker, $1,050 The $60,000 Whale Entries: 45 Prize pool: $62,000 1. Madeon1994 2. creutz93 3. DeuceofDuc0 4. Farrugia_1 5. chazcombes 6. sweet_dr34ms 888poker $215 The $100,000 Sunday Mega Deep Entries: 314 Prize pool: $100,000 1. lasochobi - $19,500 2. Baistipoika - $14,500 3. wisimaki - $11,000 4. summuNNN - $8,000 5. tikkapekka - $5,500 6. Legenden - $4,000 7. KimberSlice - $3,000 8. Holdababy - $2,500
  2. The 2019 World Series of Poker is only growing closer. Continuing with our pre-WSOP coverage, PocketFives is comparing event structures for 2019 to ones from 2018, in an attempt to see if the WSOP's marketing push of "more value" is true or not. Spoiler: there is more value! As you saw with the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker structure, it's not simply more chips that have been added to the 2019 events. Our deep dive does show that indeed more value has been added to the events in the form of more play for those competing. Now, let's take a look at the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack structure. 2019 WSOP Monster Stack Structure Buy-In: $1,500 Starting Chips: 50,000 Level Duration: 60 minutes Late Registration Period: 10 levels Re-Entry: None Click here for structure sheet DATE EVENT DAY START TIME (PT) DAY LENGTH 6/21 Day 1A 10 a.m. 11 levels 6/22 Day 1B 10 a.m. 11 levels 6/23 Day 2 11 a.m. 10 levels 6/24 Day 3 11 a.m. 10 levels 6/25 Day 4 12 p.m. To six players 6/26 Day 5 12 p.m. To winner *Per WSOP structure sheet: In the event that the final table of this event gets selected for live streaming, management reserves rights to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate. First, let's look at the blind structure for the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack. On this table, "BB depth" represents how many big blinds are in the starting stack if a player was to buy in during that level."M" represents a player's M ratio in regards to the starting stack. M can be calculated by dividing the starting stack by the sum of the small blind, big blind, and antes for a given round. Although M is a term that can get laughed at when it's brought up, using it provides a simple and informative comparative metric when looking at structure sheets. The 2019 WSOP Monster Stack is using a big blind ante format, so keep that in mind when thinking about the ante displayed here. For this table, levels during the registration period are shown, plus one additional level that you'd start playing if you registered right before registration closed. LEVEL ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 - 100-100 500 250 2 - 100-200 250 166.67 3 200 100-200 250 100 4 300 100-300 166.67 71.43 5 400 200-400 125 50 6 500 300-500 100 38.46 7 600 300-600 83.33 33.33 8 800 400-800 62.5 25 9 1,000 500-1,000 50 20 10 1,200 600-1,200 41.67 16.67 11 1,600 800-1,600 31.25 12.5 As you can see, if you wait until the last minute to enter the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack, you'll begin the tournament with a stack of 31.25 big blinds entering Level 11. Just as in the Millionaire Maker, this appears pretty good on the surface when you consider the fact that tournament has already played 10 levels and you're coming in quite late. To best gauge the "more value" aspect and see if more value has been achieved, we'll compare the 2019 structure to the 2018 structure in this very same event. The next table shows this comparison. The starting stack for the 2018 WSOP Monster Stack was 15,000. In 2019, the Monster Stack has a starting stack of 50,000, giving players 3.33 times more chips to begin with. But, it's not just about the number of chips you start the tournament with. It's about the structure you play with those chips. For "ante," we took the standard ante from the 2018 structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. This was done to align the comparisons better. 2018 Structure Compared To 2019 Structure LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 0 25-50 300 200 2019 0 100-100 500 250 - - 2 2018 0 50-100 150 100 2019 0 100-200 250 166.67 - - 3 2018 0 75-150 100 66.67 2019 200 100-200 250 100 - - 4 2018 225 75-150 100 33.33 2019 300 100-300 166.67 71.43 - - 5 2018 225 100-200 75 28.57 2019 400 200-400 125 50 - - 6 2018 450 150-300 50 16.67 2019 500 300-500 100 38.46 - - 7 2018 450 200-400 37.5 14.29 2019 600 300-600 83.33 33.33 - - 8 2018 675 250-500 30 10.53 2019 800 400-800 62.5 25 - - 9 2018 900 300-600 25 8.33 2019 1,000 500-1,000 50 20 - - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,200 600-1,200 41.67 16.67 - - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,600 800-1,600 31.25 12.5 In 2018, registration lasted through eight levels, just as it did in the Millionaire Maker, whereas in 2019 it has been increased to 10 levels. For comparison purposes, we'll refer to the first nine levels as the "overlapping registration periods." Furthermore, although you could not enter the WSOP Monster Stack in Level 9 in 2018, you could still do so in the break right before it, giving you a fresh stack of 15,000 in chips to begin Level 9. The same then applies for 2019 and Level 11, when you'd start with 50,000 in chips. Looking at the comparison table between 2018 and 2019, we can see that at any point during the overlapping registration periods, the 2019 structure gives you more big blinds in the starting stack, and it's not really close. Players beginning the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack from the start are greeted with a starting stack that is a whopping 200 big blinds deeper than what was received in 2018. The added depth is carried throughout the overlapping registration periods to provide much more play. A player's M ratio is also much better throughout, giving players more flexibility within his or her stack size. In fact, even though players can register two levels later in the structure in 2019 when compared to 2018, entering at the very last moment in the registration period still yields a deeper starting stack. In 2018, if you entered right at the close of registration, you'd start Level 9 with 15,000 in chips and the blinds at 300-600 with a 100 ante. That's a starting stack depth of 25 big blinds and an M of 8.33. In 2019, if you entered right at the close of registration, you'd start Level 11 with 50,000 in chips and the blinds at 800-1,600 with a 1,600 big blind ante. That's a starting stack depth of 31.25 big blinds, which is 6.25 big blinds more than when registration closed the year before. You'll also have an M of 12.5, which is 1.5 times greater than the M would have been at the close of registration in 2018. That's quite the improvement for a tournament that was already considered to have one of the best structures of the summer. What Happens After Registration Closes? There's no need to worry about what happens in the later stages of the tournament, too. After registration closes, no level increments are skipped throughout the duration of the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack. You do get to larger blinds earlier in the 2019 structure, but the greater starting stack size makes up for it, as evidenced by the fact that a player has more big blinds in a starting stack when registration closes. To accommodate the deeper play of the 2019 structure, the WSOP Monster Stack is listed as a six-day event as compared to 2018's listing as a five-day event. An Added Day of Play In similar fashion to what was done with the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker structure, tournament organizers tacked on an extra day of play to the 2019 WSOP Monster Stack structure. With the added chips and increased depth of play throughout, having the Monster Stack end in four days of action would have been a tall task. The added day is welcomed foresight. Just like the Millionaire Maker, the verdict is that, yes, more value has been added to the WSOP Monster Stack in 2019. Want to know more? Check out 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.'
  3. And just like that, the 2019 World Series of Poker schedule is complete after WSOP officials released the final piece of the schedule, the online bracelet events, on Thursday afternoon. The 2019 schedule includes nine online bracelet events that will be competed for on WSOP.com. This is a vast increase over 2018 when four events were played out online. "Just like the land-based WSOP, the annual summer series is also the best time for online poker players in the U.S. to chase big prize pools and WSOP gold bracelets," said WSOP.com head of online poker Bill Rini. "WSOP.com is offering a consistent gold bracelet schedule this year, plus non-stop satellites to both the online and live events, giving players the best opportunity to participate in the 50th Annual WSOP." The addition of these nine events means the 2019 WSOP will consist of 89 different events, another all-time high. The online events, which were available to players in Nevada and New Jersey in 2018, are currently only open to players in Nevada. WSOP officials have stated that the eligibility of New Jersey players is to be determined and is likely a result of the uncertainty regarding the new Wire Act Opinion from the Department of Justice. The nine events include eight No Limit Hold'em events and a single Pot Limit Omaha offering. Other variants aren't available in the WSOP.com client. 2019 World Series Of Poker Online Events Schedule Date Time Event Buy-in Chips Levels Re-Entry June 2 3:30 PM PT No Limit Hold'em $400 15,000 15 minutes 3X June 9 3:30 PM PT Six Max Pot Limit Omaha $600 15,000 20 minutes Unlimited June 16 3:30 PM PT KO No Limit Hold'em $600 20,000 15 minutes None June 19 3:30 PM PT Turbo No Limit Hold'em Deepstack $500 40,000 8 minutes 3X June 23 3:30 PM PT Double Stack No Limit Hold'em $1,000 30,000 15 minutes 3X June 30 3:30 PM PT No Limit Hold'em Championship $1,000 15,000 20 minutes 3X July 3 3:30 PM PT High Roller No Limit Hold'em $3,200 25,000 20 minutes 3X July 7 3:30 PM PT Six Max No-Limit Hold'em $800 15,000 15 minutes 3X July 14 3:30 PM PT Summer Saver No-Limit Hold'em $500 20,000 15 minutes 3X Along with the nine bracelet events, players can also qualify for other WSOP events online. Satellites began running two weeks ago and will culminate with the 25 Seat Scramble on June 30. For more information on the 2019 WSOP, read Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.
  4. The World Series of Poker continued with its piece-by-piece announcements of the 2019 WSOP schedule on Tuesday, dropping the full schedule for all events with a $10,000-or-higher buy-in. Highlights include a $10,000 Short Deck event, a $50,000 High Roller in celebration of the 50th WSOP, and the WSOP Main Event being played with big blind ante format. "We are proud to be the only tournament series offering such a wide variety of poker variants," WSOP Vice President Jack Effel said in the press release. "Players at this buy-in level should continue to expect terrific structures, with registration open until Day 2 in most cases and plenty of play to determine the champion in each discipline." The announcement comes one week after the WSOP released a batch of 13 events for the 2019 WSOP. There are 20 events with a buy-in of $10,000 or higher, starting with the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty on May 29, 2019, that features 20-minute levels. The $50,000 buy-in 50th Annual High Roller kicks off May 31 at 3 p.m. PT. Players in this new four-day event start with 300,000 in chips and are allowed one re-entry. The $10,000 Short Deck tournament is a four-day event starting on June 2. Players are allowed one re-entry in this event. For those unfamiliar with short deck poker, it is a variant of no-limit hold’em that has quickly risen in popularity in the last couple of years. The game is largely played in high-stakes cash games, but it has been making its way to the tournament scene more recently. With this variant of no-limit hold’em, deuces through fives are removed from the standard 52-card deck, leaving a new 36-card deck that includes only sixes through aces. The 2019 WSOP Main Event kicks off July 3 and plays through July 16, featuring three opening flights and an increased starting stack of 60,000 in chips. As part of this new announcement, the WSOP Main Event will be played using the big blind ante format and registration will remain open until the start of Day 2, which is either July 6 or July 7 at 12 p.m. PT. The WSOP's $100,000 High Roller and $10,000 6-Handed No-Limit Hold’em events will be played as post-lim tournaments, starting after the WSOP Main Event is well underway on July 11 and July 13, respectively. DATE EVENT BUY-IN CHIPS LEVELS RE-ENTRY TIME 5/29 Super Turbo Bounty $10,000 60,000 20 minutes None 12 p.m. 5/31 50th Annual High Roller $50,000 300,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/2 Short Deck NL $10,000 60,000 60 minutes 1 6 p.m. 6/5 Heads-Up NL $10,000 60,000 20 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/6 Omaha Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/8 NL 2-7 Draw $10,000 60,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/11 H.O.R.S.E. $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/14 Dealers Choice 6-Handed $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/17 Seven-Card Stud $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/19 High Roller PLO $25,000 150,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 6/20 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/22 PLO 8-Handed $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/24 Poker Players Championship $50,000 300,000 100 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/26 Razz $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/28 PLO Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 6/30 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 7/2 Limit Hold'em $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m. 7/3 WSOP Main Event 1a $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/4 WSOP Main Event 1b $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/5 WSOP Main Event 1c $10,000 60,000 120 minutes None 12 p.m. 7/11 High Roller $100,000 600,000 60 minutes 1 3 p.m. 7/13 6-Handed NL $10,000 60,000 60 minutes None 3 p.m.
  5. The $888 Crazy Eights No-Limit Hold'em event returns to the World Series of Poker in 2019 and provides another lower buy-in option for players looking to chase a gold bracelet in Las Vegas. The event has four starting flights across three days and there is a guaranteed first-place prize of $888,888. The biggest change to the event on its surface is the amount of chips players begin with, as the starting stack for 2019 is 40,000 versus the 8,000 in starting chips in 2018. Here is PocketFives' look at the new structure for the 2019 WSOP $888 Crazy Eights tournament. 2019 WSOP $888 Crazy Eights Structure Buy-In: $888 Starting Chips: 40,000 Level Duration: 30 minutes on Day 1, 60 minutes on Days 2-4 Late Registration Period: 12 levels Re-Entry: Unlimited Click here for structure sheet DATE EVENT DAY START TIME (PT) DAY LENGTH 6/28 Day 1a 10 a.m. 19 levels Day 1b 5 a.m. 19 levels 6/29 Day 1c 10 a.m. 19 levels 6/30 Day 1d 10 a.m. 19 levels 7/1 Day 2 12 p.m. 10 levels 7/2 Day 3 12 p.m. To eight players 7/3 Day 4 12 p.m. To winner *Per WSOP structure sheet: In the event that the final table of this event gets selected for live streaming, management reserves rights to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate. The 2019 version of the $888 Crazy Eights event is a four-day event and is using a big blind ante format and has the same structure and starting chips as the 2019 Colossus does. You can see the 2019 Crazy Eights structure in the table below, where levels during the registration period are shown, plus one additional level that you'd start playing if you registered right before registration closed. LEVEL ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 - 100-100 400 200 2 - 100-200 200 133.33 3 200 100-200 200 80 4 300 100-300 133.33 57.14 5 400 200-400 100 40 6 500 300-500 80 30.80 7 600 300-600 66.67 26.67 8 800 400-800 50 20 9 1,000 500-1,000 40 16 10 1,200 600-1,200 33.33 13.33 11 1,600 800-1,600 25 10 12 2,000 1,000-2,000 20 8 13 2,500 1,000-2,500 16 6.67 Just like in the Colossus, the added chips to the starting stack allow for much deeper play right from the start. You can also see that if you enter or re-enter right at the close of registration and head into Level 13 with a fresh 40,000-chip starting stack, you'll have 16 big blinds and an M of 6.67 to work with. If you did that in 2018 when registration lasted eight levels, you'd have come into Level 9 with a starting stack of 8,000 in the 300-600 level with a 100 ante. That would have been good for 13.33 big blinds and an M of 4.44, so the 2019 version of the structure is better at this point. In a further comparison of the two structures, the table below is a year-by-year look at the two structures. The starting stack for the 2018 WSOP Crazy Eights was 8,000 and it's been upped to 40,000 for 2019. That's five times more chips to start, but it's not just about the number of chips you start the tournament with. It's about the structure you play with those chips. We already pointed out that there's a little more play with a fresh stack at the close of registration this year versus last year, so let's look at all of the early levels. For "ante," we took the standard ante from the 2018 structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. This was done to align the comparisons better. 2018 Structure Compared To 2019 Structure LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 0 25-50 160 106.67 2019 0 100-100 400 200 - - 2 2018 0 50-100 80 53.33 2019 0 100-200 200 133.33 - - 3 2018 0 75-150 53.33 35.56 2019 200 100-200 200 80 - - 4 2018 225 75-150 53.33 17.78 2019 300 100-300 133.33 57.14 - - 5 2018 225 100-200 40 15.24 2019 400 200-400 100 40 - - 6 2018 450 150-300 26.67 8.89 2019 500 300-500 80 30.80 - - 7 2018 450 200-400 20 7.62 2019 600 300-600 66.67 26.67 - - 8 2018 675 250-500 16 5.61 2019 800 400-800 50 20 - - 9 2018 900 300-600 13.33 4.44 2019 1,000 500-1,000 40 16 - - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,200 600-1,200 33.33 13.33 - - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,600 800-1,600 25 10 - - 12 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 2,000 1,000-2,000 20 8 - - 13 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 2,500 1,000-2,500 16 6.67 As previously mentioned, registration lasted through eight levels in 2018. In 2019, it's been upped to 12 levels. For comparison purposes, we'll refer to the first nine levels as the "overlapping registration periods." Furthermore, although you could not enter the WSOP Crazy Eights in Level 9 in 2018, you could still do so in the break right before it, giving you a fresh stack of 8,000 in chips to begin Level 9. The same then applies for 2019 and Level 13, when you'd start with 40,000 in chips. As we've grown accustomed to seeing when comparing 2019 structures to 2018, there is more play throughout the tournament at each level. The difference between the two structures in the Crazy Eights event isn't as large as it is in the Colossus event, but there are still improvements at every level. The reason the gap isn't as great is that the Crazy Eights event started with 8,000 in chips in 2018, whereas the Colossus began with 5,000 in chips. Right off the bat in 2019, you have 240 more big blinds to play with than you did in 2018. Your M is also greater by almost double to start. The added depth is carried throughout the overlapping registration periods to provide much more play. What Happens in the Later Stages? The later stages of the 2019 WSOP Crazy Eights look good from a structure standpoint, too. There are a few mismatches due to the big blind ante format, but overall, all of the levels played in 2018 are there in 2019 so players don't have to worry about the structure skipping levels late. Once again, the verdict is that there has indeed been more value added to the WSOP Crazy Eights in 2019 when compared to 2018. Want to know more? Check out 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.'
  6. The World Series of Poker has made a handful of announcements regarding the 2019 WSOP. To make your life easier, PocketFives put together the various pieces of the 2019 WSOP puzzle to bring you everything you need to know about the series, so far. We’ll keep this article updated as more announcements are made. Last update: Wednesday, May 1, 2019 Where and When Is the 2019 WSOP? The 2019 WSOP takes place in Las Vegas, Nevada, at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino. It is the 50th edition of the World Series of Poker, with action scheduled to begin Wednesday, May 29, 2019. The 2019 WSOP is scheduled to end Tuesday, July 16. [caption id="attachment_617048" align="aligncenter" width="640"] The World Series of Poker again returns to the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino in 2019[/caption] New Additions To the 2019 WSOP The Big 50 - Leading the way for new events on the 2019 WSOP schedule is 'The Big 50.' This event is a $500 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournament with a $5 million prize pool guarantee. The winner is guaranteed to take home $1 million, with payouts slated to begin on Day 2, according to the WSOP. While prize guarantees are nice, arguably the biggest draw for The Big 50 is the fact that everyone’s first entry into the event is rake-free. The event is re-entry and additional entries past the first will see $65 withheld for house and staff fees. The WSOP Big 50 starts Thursday, May 30, and has multiple starting flights. Additional starting flights take place Friday, May 31, Saturday, June 1, and Sunday, June 2. The Big 50 is scheduled to reach a winner on Friday, June 7. Click here for The Big 50 structure sheet. Mini Main Event - Another exciting new event on the 2019 WSOP schedule is the 'Mini Main Event.' This tournament mirrors the WSOP Main Event but comes without the $10,000 buy-in. The WSOP Mini Main Event has a buy-in one-tenth the amount at $1,000. It features the same starting stack and structure as the $10,000 Main Event, but with level times that are 30 minutes instead of the 120 minutes played in the regular WSOP Main Event. The Mini Main Event is slated to be a two-day tournament, kicking off Monday, July 1, and leading directly into the $10,000 Main Event. Click here for the Mini Main Event structure sheet. Short Deck - Short deck poker is getting a lot of love these days. The game quickly became a regular fixture on the high roller scene and was recently launched as part of PokerStars’ online offering. Now, the game is coming to the World Series of Poker and in a big way. The WSOP announced that the 2019 schedule includes a $10,000 Short Deck tournament that will be played for a gold bracelet. The $10,000 Short Deck tournament is a four-day event starting on Sunday, June 2. Players are allowed one re-entry in this event. For this event, the rankings of hands will be, in order: royal flush, straight flush, four of a kind, flush, full house, straight, three of a kind, two pair, one pair, high card. Click here for the Short Deck structure sheet. $50,000 High Roller - In celebration of it being the 50th World Series of Poker in 2019, tournament organizers added a ‘50th Annual High Roller’ to the schedule. This event carries a $50,000 buy-in and comes right at the beginning of the summer, kicking off on Friday, May 31. The WSOP’s 50th Annual High Roller is listed as a four-day event and players are allowed one re-entry. Click here for the $50,000 High Roller structure sheet. Bracelet Winners Only - Another addition to the 2019 WSOP program is the $1,500 buy-in 50th Annual Bracelet Winners Only No-Limit Hold’em tournament. Open to only past WSOP gold bracelet winners and marketed by the WSOP to "crown the 'champion of champions' from any of the 1,078 WSOP gold bracelet winners since 1970 who decide to participate, along with the 60+ who win one at this year’s series prior to this event’s start," this tournament feels akin to the World Poker Tour Tournament of Champions that is open to only WPT Champions Club members. Click here for the Bracelet Winners Only structure sheet. Low Buy-In 'Deepstack' Events - The WSOP announced six additional low buy-in poker 'Deepstack' tournaments in the $600-$800 range, covering both no-limit hold'em and pot-limit Omaha. These new bracelet events come in addition to such things are The Big 50, Colossus, and the GIANT. There are four no-limit hold'em Deepstack events, one pot-limit Omaha, and one that is a mix of no-limit hold'em and pot-limit Omaha. The final Deepstack event in this category is the $600 buy-in No-Limit Hold'em Deepstack Championship. This event comes with a $500,000 prize pool guarantee and is a three-day event. The winner will take home an added $10,000 WSOP Main Event seat. In this event, players will begin with 30,000 in starting chips. Salute To Warriors - Another addition to the 2019 WSOP schedule is a charity event to honor military service members, deemed the 'Salute To Warriors' tournament. The gold bracelet event has a $500 buy-in and starts Tuesday, July 2. It is a three-day tournament that will conclude on Thursday, July 4, which is Independence Day in the U.S. Proceeds from this event are said to be donated to the USO and other veteran organizations. The Salute To Warriors event is not restricted. It's open to all participants. Click here for the Salute To Warriors structure sheet. Main Event Seat Giveaway - In celebration of the 50th annual WSOP, the organization is giving away five WSOP Main Event seats through a drawing held on July 1, 2019. Simply swipe your Caesars Rewards card at the Rio Caesars Rewards desk to earn an entry. Additional entries, up to a maximum of five, can be earned by playing gold bracelet events. $500 Hot Seat Promotion - Starting June 3 and running to July 9, the WSOP will draw a random seat every hour of the WSOP and the player in that seat will receive $500 in cash value casino chips. According to the promotion’s official rules, a “drawing will be held each hour on each day starting at 12 am only in the event that there is an eligible poker game running.” A $1 jackpot promotional rake will be taken from each pot that reaches $10 or more at eligible live action tables. Automatic Shufflers - One hundred automatic shuffling machines will be added to the Rio’s Amazon Room. In past years, only a handful of tables in the Amazon Room had automatic shufflers. Gavin Smith Memorial Poker Tournament - On May 28, the WSOP will host a $200 buy-in memorial tournament to benefit the family of Gavin Smith. The event will be rake-free and start at 6 p.m. PT. From each $200 buy-in, $100 will go to the prize pool and $100 will be donated to the Gavin Smith Trust. Ladies Warm-Up Tournament - The 2019 WSOP Ladies Championship kicks off on June 20. The day before, June 19 at 6 pm, the WSOP will host a special, one-day, non-bracelet Ladies No Limit Hold’em Warm-Up event with a $150 buy-in. Seniors and PLO Deep Stack Events - Every Wednesday from May 28 to July 10, the WSOP will host special seniors-only (50+) one-day, deep-stack, No Limit Hold’em tournaments. These tournaments will start at 9 am PT. Every Sunday from June 2 to July 14, the WSOP will host special one-day, deep-stack, pot-limit Omaha tournaments. These tournaments will start at 5 pm and have a $250 buy-in. Larger Starting Stacks As the World Series of Poker put it, "gone are the days of a starting chip stack equivalent to the buy-in amount." For the 2019 WSOP, the majority of events received a bump in starting stack size. For example, $1,500 buy-in no-limit hold’em events that saw a starting stack of 7,500 in 2018 will now have a starting stack of 25,000. What isn’t so prominently mentioned in this regard is that the tournament structures are altered as well. Although full tournament structures have yet to be released, it’s safe to assume the stack multiplier won’t carry over to the number of big blinds a player starts the tournament with. Below is a chart to lays out the starting stack sizes for no-limit hold'em and pot-limit Omaha bracelet events at the 2019 WSOP, showing the comparison to the 2018 WSOP. Buy-In 2018 Starting Stack 2019 Starting Stack $400 n/a 40,000 $500 5,000 25,000 $600 n/a 30,000 $800 n/a 40,000 $888 8,000 40,000 $1,000 5,000 20,000 $1,500 7,500 25,000 $2,500 12,500 15,000 $2,620 26,200 26,200 $3,000 15,000 20,000 $5,000 25,000 30,000 $10,000 50,000 60,000 $25,000 125,000 150,000 $50,000 250,000 300,000 $100,000 500,000 600,000   [caption id="attachment_622478" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Larger starting stacks aim to be a big draw for the 2019 WSOP[/caption] Of note, the $500 buy-in 'Big 50' features a 50,000-chip starting stack. The $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em Double Stack and $1,000 Mini Main Event, although they are at the $1,000 buy-in level, have 40,000-chip starting stacks. The $1,111 Little One for One Drop also has a 40,000-chip starting stack when the $111 add-on is purchased. At the $1,500 buy-in level, the $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em Double Stack, $1,500 Monster Stack, and $1,500 50th Annual Bracelet Winners Only No-Limit Hold'em have 50,000-chip starting stacks. Below is a chart to lays out the starting stack sizes for mixed games, limit, and seven-card stud gold bracelet events, plus the non-bracelet Daily Deepstacks tournaments at the 2019 WSOP, with a comparison to the 2018 WSOP stack sizes. Buy-In 2018 Starting Stack 2019 Starting Stack $150 10,000 10,000 $200 15,000 15,000 $250 20,000 20,000 $400 25,000 25,000 $1,500 7,500 10,000 $2,500 12,500 15,000 $3,000 15,000 20,000 $10,000 50,000 60,000 For a further look at some of the 2019 WSOP tournament structures and how they compared to the structures from 2018, see the links below. 2019 WSOP Structure Breakdown: Millionaire Maker 2019 WSOP Structure Breakdown: The Colossus 2019 WSOP Structure Breakdown: Monster Stack 2019 WSOP Structure Breakdown: Crazy Eights 2019 WSOP Structure Breakdown: The Main Event Big Blind Ante The 2019 World Series of Poker will see a big blind ante format applied to all no-limit hold’em tournaments at the Rio during the summer. That’s not just WSOP gold bracelet events. This new change applies to Daily Deepstacks and mega satellites. While some WSOP events have been played with big blind ante before, 2019 will be the first time the WSOP Main Event features big blind ante. Utilizing the big blind ante format is a positive move that will be well received by players, as it makes the game much more efficient. Schedule for All 2019 WSOP Bracelet Events DATE EVENT BUY-IN TIME 5/29 Casino Employees $500 11 a.m. 5/29 Super Turbo Bounty $10,000 12 p.m. 5/30 'The Big 50' 1a $500 11 a.m. 5/30 Omaha Hi-Lo $1,500 3 p.m. 5/31 'The Big 50' 1b $500 11 a.m. 5/31 50th Annual High Roller $50,000 3 p.m. 6/1 'The Big 50' 1c $500 10 a.m. 6/1 Limit Mixed Triple Draw $2,500 3 p.m. 6/2 'The Big 50' 1d $500 10 a.m. 6/2 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em $400 3:30 p.m. 6/2 Short Deck NL $10,000 6 p.m. 6/3 NL Deepstack $600 11 a.m. 6/3 Dealer's Choice $1,500 3 p.m. 6/3 No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 6 p.m. 6/4 Super Turbo Bounty $1,000 10 a.m. 6/4 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw $1,500 3 p.m. 6/5 H.O.R.S.E. $1,500 11 a.m. 6/5 Heads-Up NL $10,000 3 p.m. 6/5 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $1,500 4 p.m. 6/6 No-Limit Hold'em Shootout $1,500 11 a.m. 6/6 Omaha Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 6/7 Millionaire Maker 1a $1,500 10 a.m. 6/7 Seven-Card Stud $1,500 3 p.m. 6/8 Millionaire Maker 1b $1,500 10 a.m. 6/8 NL 2-7 Draw $10,000 3 p.m. 6/9 Double Stack $1,000 11 a.m. 6/9 Eight-Game Mix $1,500 12 p.m. 6/9 WSOP.com 6-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha $600 3:30 p.m. 6/10 PLO Deepstack $600 11 a.m. 6/10 Marathon $2,620 12 p.m. 6/10 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $1,500 3 p.m. 6/11 No-Limit Hold'em $1,000 11 a.m. 6/11 H.O.R.S.E. $10,000 3 p.m. 6/12 Pot-Limit Omaha $1,000 11 a.m. 6/12 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 6/13 Seniors (50+) $1,000 10 a.m. 6/13 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $1,500 3 p.m. 6/14 Double Stack NL 1a $1,000 10 a.m. 6/14 Dealers Choice 6-Handed $10,000 3 p.m. 6/15 Double Stack NL 1b $1,000 10 a.m. 6/15 No-Limit Hold'em Shootout $3,000 3 p.m. 6/16 NL Deepstack $800 11 a.m. 6/16 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Knockout $600 3:30 p.m. 6/17 Super Seniors (60+) $1,000 10 a.m. 6/17 Pot-Limit Omaha $1,500 12 p.m. 6/17 Seven-Card Stud $10,000 3 p.m. 6/18 NL/PLO 8-Handed Deepstack $600 12 p.m. 6/18 Mixed Big Bet $2,500 3 p.m. 6/19 No-Limit Hold'em (w/ Bounties) $1,500 11 a.m. 6/19 High Roller PLO $25,000 3 p.m. 6/19 WSOP.com Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Deepstack $500 3:30 p.m. 6/20 Ladies $10,000/$1,000 11 a.m. 6/20 No-Limit Hold'em $2,500 12 p.m. 6/20 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $10,000 3 p.m. 6/21 Monster Stack 1a $1,500 10 a.m. 6/21 Mixed Omaha-8/Stud-8 $2,500 3 p.m. 6/22 Monster Stack 1b $1,500 10 a.m. 6/22 PLO 8-Handed $10,000 3 p.m. 6/23 NL 8-Handed Deepstack $800 11 a.m. 6/23 Razz $1,500 3 p.m. 6/23 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Double Stack $1,000 3:30 p.m. 6/24 Super Turbo Bounty $1,500 10 a.m. 6/24 Tag Team (2-4 person teams) $1,000/Team 12 p.m. 6/24 Poker Players Championship $50,000 3 p.m. 6/25 NL Deepstack Championship $600 11 a.m. 6/25 Pot-Limit Omaha-8 $1,500 3 p.m. 6/26 Colossus 1a $400 10 a.m. 6/26 Razz $10,000 3 p.m. 6/27 Colossus 1b $400 10 a.m. 6/27 Omaha Mix $1,500 3 p.m. 6/28 Crazy Eights NL 1a $888 10 a.m. 6/28 PLO Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 6/28 Crazy Eights NL 1b $888 5 p.m. 6/29 Crazy Eights NL 1c $888 10 a.m. 6/29 Limit Hold'em $1,500 3 p.m. 6/30 Crazy Eights NL 1d $888 10 a.m. 6/30 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 6/30 WSOP.com Championship $1,000 3:30 p.m. 7/1 Mini Main Event $1,000 11 a.m. 7/1 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 3 p.m. 7/2 Salute To Warriors NL $500 11 a.m. 7/2 Limit Hold'em $10,000 3 p.m. 7/3 WSOP Main Event 1a $10,000 12 p.m. 7/3 WSOP.com High Roller $3,200 3:30 p.m. 7/4 WSOP Main Event 1b $10,000 12 p.m. 7/5 WSOP Main Event 1c $10,000 12 p.m. 7/6 Little One for One Drop 1a $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/7 Little One for One Drop 1b $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/7 WSOP.com 6-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $800 3:30 p.m. 7/8 Little One for One Drop 1c $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/8 Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 7/9 Pot-Limit Omaha (w/ Bounties) $1,500 11 a.m. 7/9 No-Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 7/10 Mixed NLHE/PLO 8 Handed $1,500 11 a.m. 7/10 50th Annual Bracelet Winners Only $1,500 3 p.m. 7/11 Double Stack $1,500 11 a.m. 7/11 High Roller $100,000 3 p.m. 7/12 The Closer 1a $1,500 11 a.m. 7/12 Six-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha $3,000 3 p.m. 7/13 The Closer 1b $1,500 11 a.m. 7/13 6-Handed NL $10,000 3 p.m. 7/14 The Closer 1c $1,500 11 a.m. 7/14 H.O.R.S.E. $3,000 3 p.m. 7/14 WSOP.com Summer Saver No-Limit Hold'em $500 3:30 p.m. 7/15 No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 12 p.m.   Schedule for No-Limit Hold'em Events Only DATE EVENT BUY-IN TIME 5/29 Casino Employees $500 11 a.m. 5/29 Super Turbo Bounty $10,000 12 p.m. 5/30 'The Big 50' 1a $500 11 a.m. 5/31 'The Big 50' 1b $500 11 a.m. 5/31 50th Annual High Roller $50,000 3 p.m. 6/1 'The Big 50' 1c $500 10 a.m. 6/2 'The Big 50' 1d $500 10 a.m. 6/2 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em $400 3:30 p.m. 6/2 Short Deck NL $10,000 6 p.m. 6/3 NL Deepstack $600 11 a.m. 6/3 No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 6 p.m. 6/4 Super Turbo Bounty $1,000 10 a.m. 6/5 Heads-Up NL $10,000 3 p.m. 6/5 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $1,500 4 p.m. 6/6 No-Limit Hold'em Shootout $1,500 11 a.m. 6/7 Millionaire Maker 1a $1,500 10 a.m. 6/8 Millionaire Maker 1b $1,500 10 a.m. 6/9 Double Stack $1,000 11 a.m. 6/10 Marathon $2,620 12 p.m. 6/11 No-Limit Hold'em $1,000 11 a.m. 6/12 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 6/13 Seniors (50+) $1,000 10 a.m. 6/14 Double Stack NL 1a $1,000 10 a.m. 6/15 Double Stack NL 1b $1,000 10 a.m. 6/15 No-Limit Hold'em Shootout $3,000 3 p.m. 6/16 NL Deepstack $800 11 a.m. 6/16 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Knockout $600 3:30 p.m. 6/17 Super Seniors (60+) $1,000 10 a.m. 6/19 No-Limit Hold'em (w/ Bounties) $1,500 11 a.m. 6/19 WSOP.com Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Deepstack $500 3:30 p.m. 6/20 Ladies $10,000/$1,000 11 a.m. 6/20 No-Limit Hold'em $2,500 12 p.m. 6/21 Monster Stack 1a $1,500 10 a.m. 6/22 Monster Stack 1b $1,500 10 a.m. 6/23 NL 8-Handed Deepstack $800 11 a.m. 6/23 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Double Stack $1,000 3:30 p.m. 6/24 Super Turbo Bounty $1,500 10 a.m. 6/24 Tag Team (2-4 person teams) $1,000/Team 12 p.m. 6/25 NL Deepstack Championship $600 11 a.m. 6/26 Colossus 1a $400 10 a.m. 6/27 Colossus 1b $400 10 a.m. 6/28 Crazy Eights NL 1a $888 10 a.m. 6/28 Crazy Eights NL 1b $888 5 p.m. 6/29 Crazy Eights NL 1c $888 10 a.m. 6/30 Crazy Eights NL 1d $888 10 a.m. 6/30 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Championship $1,000 3:30 p.m. 7/1 Mini Main Event $1,000 11 a.m. 7/1 Six-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 3 p.m. 7/2 Salute To Warriors NL $500 11 a.m. 7/3 WSOP Main Event 1a $10,000 12 p.m. 7/3 WSOP.com High Roller $3,200 3:30 p.m. 7/4 WSOP Main Event 1b $10,000 12 p.m. 7/5 WSOP Main Event 1c $10,000 12 p.m. 7/6 Little One for One Drop 1a $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/7 Little One for One Drop 1b $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/7 WSOP.com 6-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $800 3:30 p.m. 7/8 Little One for One Drop 1c $1,000+$111 11 a.m. 7/9 No-Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 7/10 50th Annual Bracelet Winners Only $1,500 3 p.m. 7/11 Double Stack $1,500 11 a.m. 7/11 High Roller $100,000 3 p.m. 7/12 The Closer 1a $1,500 11 a.m. 7/13 The Closer 1b $1,500 11 a.m. 7/13 6-Handed NL $10,000 3 p.m. 7/14 The Closer 1c $1,500 11 a.m. 7/14 WSOP.com Summer Saver No-Limit Hold'em $500 3:30 p.m. 7/15 No-Limit Hold'em $5,000 12 p.m.   Schedule for Omaha Events Only DATE EVENT BUY-IN TIME 5/30 Omaha Hi-Lo $1,500 3 p.m. 6/6 Omaha Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 6/9 WSOP.com 6-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha $600 3:30 p.m. 6/10 PLO Deepstack $600 11 a.m. 6/12 Pot-Limit Omaha $1,000 11 a.m. 6/17 Pot-Limit Omaha $1,500 12 p.m. 6/19 High Roller PLO $25,000 3 p.m. 6/22 PLO 8-Handed $10,000 3 p.m. 6/25 Pot-Limit Omaha-8 $1,500 3 p.m. 6/27 Omaha Mix $1,500 3 p.m. 6/28 PLO Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 7/9 Pot-Limit Omaha (w/ Bounties) $1,500 11 a.m. 7/12 Six-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha $3,000 3 p.m.   Schedule for Limit and Mixed Game Events Only DATE EVENT BUY-IN TIME 5/30 Omaha Hi-Lo $1,500 3 p.m. 6/1 Limit Mixed Triple Draw $2,500 3 p.m. 6/3 Dealer's Choice $1,500 3 p.m. 6/4 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw $1,500 3 p.m. 6/5 H.O.R.S.E. $1,500 11 a.m. 6/6 Omaha Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 6/7 Seven-Card Stud $1,500 3 p.m. 6/8 NL 2-7 Draw $10,000 3 p.m. 6/9 Eight-Game Mix $1,500 12 p.m. 6/10 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $1,500 3 p.m. 6/11 H.O.R.S.E. $10,000 3 p.m. 6/13 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $1,500 3 p.m. 6/14 Dealer's Choice 6-Handed $10,000 3 p.m. 6/17 Seven-Card Stud $10,000 3 p.m. 6/18 NL/PLO 8-Handed Deepstack $600 12 p.m. 6/18 Mixed Big Bet $2,500 3 p.m. 6/20 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw $10,000 3 p.m. 6/21 Mixed Omaha-8/Stud-8 $2,500 3 p.m. 6/23 Razz $1,500 3 p.m. 6/24 Poker Players Championship $50,000 3 p.m. 6/26 Razz $10,000 3 p.m. 6/27 Omaha Mix $1,500 3 p.m. 6/29 Limit Hold'em $1,500 3 p.m. 6/30 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo $10,000 3 p.m. 7/2 Limit Hold'em $10,000 3 p.m. 7/8 Limit Hold'em $3,000 3 p.m. 7/10 Mixed NLHE/PLO 8-Handed $1,500 11 a.m. 7/14 H.O.R.S.E. $3,000 3 p.m.   Schedule for WSOP.com Online Bracelet Events Only DATE EVENT BUY-IN TIME 6/2 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em $400 3:30 p.m. 6/9 WSOP.com 6-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha $600 3:30 p.m. 6/16 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Knockout $600 3:30 p.m. 6/19 WSOP.com Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Deepstack $500 3:30 p.m. 6/23 WSOP.com No-Limit Hold'em Double Stack $1,000 3:30 p.m. 6/30 WSOP.com Championship $1,000 3:30 p.m. 7/3 WSOP.com High Roller $3,200 3:30 p.m. 7/7 WSOP.com 6-Handed No-Limit Hold'em $800 3:30 p.m. 7/14 WSOP.com Summer Saver No-Limit Hold'em $500 3:30 p.m.   Qualify for the 2019 WSOP WSOP.com has started running online satellites for the 2019 World Series of Poker, available for players in the U.S. in the states of Nevada, New Jersey, and Delaware. On May 30, at 8 p.m. ET and 5 p.m. PT, WSOP.com NJ and WSOP.com NV, respectively, will be hosting a special 50-seat guarantee Big 50 Mega Satellite for $33. That's right, 50 $500 seats will be guaranteed in a satellite that costs $33 to enter. Players can win their seats to the 50-seat guarantee Big 50 Mega Satellite for even cheaper, too, by playing the $2 mega super satellites that are running daily. [caption id="attachment_623704" align="aligncenter" width="598"] Here's how you can win your way to the 2019 WSOP with WSOP.com[/caption] During May, WSOP.com is running satellites every single day, offering up ways for players to win their way to WSOP events for as little as $1. Below is the May daily schedule for WSOP.com NJ satellites. TIME (ET) SATELLITE BUY-IN 6 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (RE) $10 7:30 p.m. Big 50 2019 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 8:30 p.m. Super Satellite Into 50-Seat Gtd. Big 50 Mega Satellite $2 9 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (RE) $10 9:15 p.m. WSOP Kick-Off Weekend Package Satellite (R&A) $30 10 p.m. Super Satellite To Any $10 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $1 11 p.m. $600 WSOP Online Bracelet PLO Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 11:30 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (Freezeout) $20 Additionally, WSOP.com NJ is running satellites that take place every Tuesday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday in May, per the table below. DAY TIME (ET) SATELLITE BUY-IN Tue 6 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 Sat 5:15 p.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 Sun 5:15 p.m. $600 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 6:30 p.m. 10 Seats GTD to the $400 Online Bracelet (R&A) $33 6:30 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 6:45 p.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 7:45 p.m. WSOP Kick-Off Weekend Package Satellite (R&A) $30 9:30 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 Mon 12:30 a.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 Below is the May daily schedule for WSOP.com NV satellites. TIME (PT) SATELLITE BUY-IN 3 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (RE) $10 4:30 p.m. Big 50 2019 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 5:30 p.m. Super Satellite Into 50-Seat Gtd. Big 50 Mega Satellite $2 6 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (RE) $10 6:15 p.m. WSOP Kick-Off Weekend Package Satellite (R&A) $30 7 p.m. Super Satellite To Any $10 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $1 8 p.m. $600 WSOP Online Bracelet PLO Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 8:30 p.m. $400 WSOP Online Bracelet Seat Satellite (Freezeout) $20 Then, similar to what's happening in New Jersey, WSOP.com NV is running satellites that take place every Tuesday, Saturday, and Sunday in May, per the table below. DAY TIME (ET) SATELLITE BUY-IN Tue 6:30 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 Sat 3 p.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 Sun 2:15 p.m. $600 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $10 3:30 p.m. 10 Seats GTD to the $400 Online Bracelet (R&A) $33 3:30 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 3:45 p.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 4:45 p.m. WSOP Kick-Off Weekend Package Satellite (R&A) $30 6:30 p.m. $10,000 WSOP Main Event Seat Satellite (1x RE) $215 8:30 9.m. $1,000 WSOP Online Bracelet Satellite (R&A) $15 9:30 p.m. $1,000 WSOP Seat Satellite (R&A) $25 WSOP.com 25-Seat Scramble On Sunday, June 30, WSOP.com is hosting its 25-Seat Scramble satellite to the 2019 WSOP Main Event. The satellite has a buy-in of $215, starts at 4 p.m. PT that day, and guarantees 25 seats to the WSOP Main Event worth $10,000 each will be given out. Re-entry is unlimited and there's a very good chance more than 25 seats are awarded. The WSOP.com 25-Seat Scramble is a great and affordable way to win your way to the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Where and When To Watch the 2019 WSOP On Wednesday, February 13, the World Series of Poker and Poker Central announced the preliminary live coverage schedule for the 2019 WSOP. Coverage of the event can be viewed on ESPN and PokerGO, Poker Central's subscription streaming service. ESPN will broadcast no less than 40 hours of WSOP coverage, plus an additional 90 hours of originally produced episodes. Streaming of the events will take place on PokerGO. The full PokerGO streaming schedule is yet to be announced, but the WSOP did release the planned broadcast schedule for the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Coverage will be split between ESPN and ESPN2, per the following schedule. DATE EVENT TIME (ET) NETWORK 7/3 WSOP Main Event Day 1a 8:30 p.m. - 2 a.m. ESPN2 7/4 WSOP Main Event Day 1b 9 - 11 p.m. ESPN2 7/5 WSOP Main Event Day 1c 8 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. ESPN2 7/6 WSOP Main Event Day 2ab 6 - 10:30 p.m. ESPN2 7/7 WSOP Main Event Day 2c 2:30 - 6 p.m. ESPN 7/8 WSOP Main Event Day 3 10 p.m. - 2 a.m. ESPN2 7/9 WSOP Main Event Day 4 7 - 11 p.m. ESPN 7/10 WSOP Main Event Day 5 8 - 11 p.m. ESPN 7/11 WSOP Main Event Day 6 12:30 - 2 a.m. ESPN2 7/12 WSOP Main Event Day 7 9 - 11 p.m. ESPN WSOP Main Event Day 7 11 p.m. - 2 a.m. ESPN2 7/14 WSOP Main Event Day 8 10 p.m. - TBD ESPN2 7/15 WSOP Main Event Day 9 10 p.m. - TBD ESPN 7/16 WSOP Main Event Day 10 9 p.m. - TBD ESPN If you don't have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  7. The 2019 edition of the World Series of Poker Colossus event has a bunch of changes when compared to the 2018 version of the event. In fact, almost everything other than the event's name has been changed for this year's WSOP, but players should very much enjoy the alterations that have been made, especially to the structure. Colossal Changes in 2019 Right off the bat, you'll notice the 2019 Colossus has a lot more starting chips than the 2018 version did. In 2019, players will get 40,000 in chips to start, whereas 2018 saw competitors begin with 5,000. In 2018, levels on the Day 1s were 30 minutes long before they were increased to 60 minutes for Day 2 and later. In 2019, levels are 40 minutes throughout, so they're 10 minutes longer on the Day 1s but 20 minutes shorter on the later days. For a $400 tournament, though, you can't really argue with 40-minute levels. Speaking of the buy-in, that's also changed for 2019. Previously a $565 buy-in event, the 2019 edition of this tournament has a price point of $400. The rake has increased by quite a bit, though. In 2018, $65 of the $565 buy-in was taken for entry fees ($50) and tournament dealers and Staff ($15). That same $65 applies for 2019, but coming out of a $400 buy-in is a much larger rake percentage. The 2018 rake was 11.5% of the buy-in, whereas in 2019 it's 16.25%. The event's starting date has shifted from the beginning of the WSOP to the back half. In 2018, the WSOP Colossus had six starting flights and players could re-enter once per flight. In 2019, there are just two starting flights and players can re-enter once per flight. Registration in 2018 lasted eight levels, but in 2019 it's been increased to 12 levels. Now, let's get a little deeper into the nitty-gritty of the structure. 2019 WSOP Colossus Structure Buy-In: $400 Starting Chips: 40,000 Level Duration: 40 minutes Late Registration Period: 12 levels Re-Entry: None Click here for structure sheet DATE EVENT DAY START TIME (PT) DAY LENGTH 6/26 Day 1a 10 a.m. 16 levels 6/27 Day 1b 10 a.m. 16 levels 6/28 Day 2 11 a.m. 15 levels 6/29 Day 3 11 a.m. To winner *Per WSOP structure sheet: In the event that the final table of this event gets selected for live streaming, management reserves rights to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate. The 2019 WSOP Colossus will use a big blind ante format. On the table below, "BB depth" represents how many big blinds are in the starting stack if a player was to buy in during that level."M" represents a player's M ratio in regards to the starting stack. M can be calculated by dividing the starting stack by the sum of the small blind, big blind, and antes for a given round. Although M is a term that can get laughed at when it's brought up, using it provides a simple and informative comparative metric when looking at structure sheets. Also on the table below, levels during the registration period are shown, plus one additional level that you'd start playing if you registered right before registration closed. LEVEL ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 - 100-100 400 200 2 - 100-200 200 133.33 3 200 100-200 200 80 4 300 100-300 133.33 57.14 5 400 200-400 100 40 6 500 300-500 80 30.80 7 600 300-600 66.67 26.67 8 800 400-800 50 20 9 1,000 500-1,000 40 16 10 1,200 600-1,200 33.33 13.33 11 1,600 800-1,600 25 10 12 2,000 1,000-2,000 20 8 13 2,500 1,000-2,500 16 6.67 Drawing from the table above, you can see that if you enter or re-enter right at the close of registration and head into Level 13 with a fresh 40,000-chip starting stack, you'll have 16 big blinds and an M of 6.67 to work with. That's a big improvement from the 8.33 big blinds and M of 2.78 you had in 2018 if you got in right when registration closed, but let's do a year-by-year comparison to really see if more value was added or not. The next table shows this comparison. Again, the starting stack for the 2018 WSOP Colossus was 5,000 and it's been upped to 40,000 for 2019. That's eight times more chips right from the jump. It's not just about the number of chips you start the tournament with, though. It's about the structure you play with those chips. We already pointed out how much more play you'll have with a fresh stack at the close of registration this year versus last year, so let's look at all of the early levels. For "ante," we took the standard ante from the 2018 structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. This was done to align the comparisons better. 2018 Structure Compared To 2019 Structure LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 0 25-50 100 66.67 2019 0 100-100 400 200 - - 2 2018 0 50-100 50 33.33 2019 0 100-200 200 133.33 - - 3 2018 0 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 200 100-200 200 80 - - 4 2018 225 75-150 33.33 11.11 2019 300 100-300 133.33 57.14 - - 5 2018 225 100-200 25 9.52 2019 400 200-400 100 40 - - 6 2018 450 150-300 16.67 5.56 2019 500 300-500 80 30.80 - - 7 2018 450 200-400 12.5 4.76 2019 600 300-600 66.67 26.67 - - 8 2018 675 250-500 10 4.26 2019 800 400-800 50 20 - - 9 2018 900 300-600 8.33 2.78 2019 1,000 500-1,000 40 16 - - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,200 600-1,200 33.33 13.33 - - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,600 800-1,600 25 10 - - 12 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 2,000 1,000-2,000 20 8 - - 13 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 2,500 1,000-2,500 16 6.67 As previously mentioned, registration lasted through eight levels in 2018. In 2019, it's been upped to 12 levels. For comparison purposes, we'll refer to the first nine levels as the "overlapping registration periods." Furthermore, although you could not enter the WSOP Colossus in Level 9 in 2018, you could still do so in the break right before it, giving you a fresh stack of 5,000 in chips to begin Level 9. The same then applies for 2019 and Level 13, when you'd start with 40,000 in chips. Looking at the comparison table between 2018 and 2019, we can see that at any point during the overlapping registration periods, the 2019 structure gives you a colossal amount of more play than you had the year before. Players beginning the 2019 WSOP Colossus are greeted with a starting stack that is a whopping 300 big blinds deeper than what was received in 2018. The added depth is carried throughout the overlapping registration periods to provide much more play. A player's M ratio is also much better throughout, giving players more flexibility within his or her stack size. In fact, even though players can register four levels later in the structure in 2019 when compared to 2018, entering at the very last moment in the registration period still yields a deeper starting stack. In 2018, if you entered right at the close of registration, you'd start Level 9 with 5,000 in chips and the blinds at 300-600 with a 100 ante. That's a starting stack depth of 8.33 big blinds and an M of 2.78. That's just not much value at all. In 2019, if you enter right at the close of registration, you'll start Level 13 with 40,000 in chips and the blinds at 1,000-2,500 with a 2,500 big blind ante. That's a starting stack depth of 16 big blinds, which is just about double when registration closed in 2018. You'll also have an M of 6.67, which is more than double the M at the close of registration in 2018. What Happens in the Later Stages? The later stages of the 2019 WSOP Colossus look good from a structure standpoint. Of course, there are a few mismatches here and there due to the big blind ante format, but overall, all of the levels played in 2018 are there in 2019 so players don't have to worry about the structure skipping levels late. The one big difference will be what we already brought up, which is that the levels in the later stages are 20 minutes shorter than in 2018. That said, the tradeoff isn't bad given the deeper structure. How Deep Might the Final Table Be? Last year, the 2018 WSOP Colossus reached the final table with an average stack of 36.31 big blinds and an average M of 12.74. The blind level was 100,000-200,000 with a 30,000 ante. If the final table were to be reached at the same level in 2019 (100,000-200,000 with a 200,000 big blind ante) with the same field size of 13,070 entries, the average stack would be 290 big blinds and the average M would be 116.18. But, the 2018 WSOP Colossus had six starting flights. In 2019, there are only two starting flights. In 2018, the event averaged 2,178 entries across the six starting flights. Applying that average to 2019's two starting flights gives you a projected field size of 4,356. If that's the case, the average stack of the final table at the same level as 2018 would be 96.81 big blinds and an M of 38.73. That's still much better than in 2018. At the end of the day, the verdict is that, yes, more value has been added to the WSOP Colossus in 2019. Want to know more? Check out 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.'
  8. The World Series of Poker has been pushing "more value" for the 2019 WSOP. Those words have been met with some skepticism around the poker world, as players wanted to wait to see the actual structures for 2019 events before deciding if more value was added or not. After all, it is easy to simply add more starting chips to a tournament but not actually provide more value. Now that the WSOP has added a few of the structure sheets for the 2019 World Series of Poker, we have a chance to compare to 2019 structures versus the 2018 ones, and we'll get started by looking at the ever-popular $1,500 Millionaire Maker tournament. 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker Structure Buy-In: $1,500 Starting Chips: 25,000 Level Duration: 60 minutes Late Registration Period: 10 levels Re-Entry: One re-entry per starting flight Click here for structure sheet DATE EVENT DAY START TIME (PT) DAY LENGTH 6/7 Day 1A 10 a.m. 11 levels 6/8 Day 1B 10 a.m. 11 levels 6/9 Day 2 12 p.m. 10 levels 6/10 Day 3 12 p.m. 10 levels 6/11 Day 4 12 p.m. To six players 6/12 Day 5 12 p.m. To winner *Per WSOP structure sheet: In the event that the final table of this event gets selected for live streaming, management reserves rights to adjust the schedule as needed to accommodate. Below is a table of the blind structure for the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker, where "BB depth" represents how many big blinds are in the starting stack if a player was to buy in or re-enter during that current level. "M" represents a player's M ratio in regards to the starting stack. M can be calculated by dividing the starting stack by the sum of the small blind, big blind, and antes for a given round. Although M is a term that can get laughed at when it's brought up, using it provides a simple and informative comparative metric when looking at structure sheets. The 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker is using a big blind ante format, so keep that in mind when thinking about the ante displayed here. For this table, only levels during the registration and re-entry period are shown. LEVEL ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 - 100-100 250 125 2 - 100-200 125 83.33 3 200 100-200 125 50 4 300 100-300 83.33 37.71 5 400 200-400 62.5 25 6 500 300-500 50 19.23 7 600 300-600 41.67 16.67 8 800 400-800 31.25 12.5 9 1,000 500-1,000 25 10 10 1,200 600-1,200 20.83 8.33 11 1,600 800-1,600 15.63 6.25 As you can see, if you wait until the last minute to enter or re-enter the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker, you'll start with a stack of 15.63 big blinds entering Level 11. On the surface, that feels pretty good considering the tournament has already played 10 levels and you're coming in very late. Sure, just over 15 big blinds are short, but it's not the dreaded danger zone that is 10 big blinds. You'd also enter with an M of 6.25. In order to best gauge the "more value" aspect and see if more value has been achieved, we must compare the 2019 structure to the 2018 structure in this very same event. The next table addresses this comparison. The starting stack for the 2018 WSOP Millionaire Maker was 7,500. In 2019, the Millionaire Maker has a starting stack of 25,000, which is 3.33 times greater. For "ante," we took the standard ante from the 2018 structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. This was done to better align the comparisons. 2018 Structure Compared To 2019 Structure LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 0 25-50 150 100 2019 0 100-100 250 125 - - 2 2018 0 50-100 75 50 2019 0 100-200 125 83.33 - - 3 2018 0 75-150 50 33.33 2019 200 100-200 125 50 - - 4 2018 225 75-150 50 16.67 2019 300 100-300 83.33 35.71 - - 5 2018 225 100-200 37.5 14.29 2019 400 200-400 62.5 25 - - 6 2018 450 150-300 25 8.33 2019 500 300-500 50 19.23 - - 7 2018 450 200-400 18.75 7.14 2019 600 300-600 41.67 16.67 - - 8 2018 675 250-500 15 5.26 2019 800 400-800 31.25 12.5 - - 9 2018 900 300-600 12.5 4.17 2019 1,000 500-1,000 25 10 - - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,200 600-1,200 20.83 8.33 - - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,600 800-1,600 15.63 6.25 In 2018, registration and re-entry lasted through eight levels, whereas in 2019 it has been increased to 10 levels. For comparison purposes, we'll refer to the first nine levels as the "overlapping registration periods." Although you could not enter or re-enter the WSOP Millionaire Maker in Level 9 in 2018, you could still do so in the break right before it, giving you a fresh stack of 7,500 in chips to begin Level 9. The same then applies for 2019 and Level 11, when you'd enter with a fresh 25,000. Looking at the comparison between 2018 and 2019, we can see that at any point during the overlapping registration periods, the 2019 structure gives you more big blinds in the starting stack, and it's not really close. Players beginning the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker from the start are greeted with a starting stack that is 100 big blinds deeper than what was received in 2018. The added depth is carried throughout the overlapping registration periods. A player's M ratio is also much healthier throughout, giving players more flexibility within his or her stack size. In fact, even though players can register or re-enter two levels later in the structure in 2019 when compared to 2018, entering at the very last moment in the registration period still yields a deeper starting stack. That's very solid even though time-wise you're coming in two hours later. In 2018, if you entered right at the close of registration, you'd start Level 9 with 7,500 in chips and the blinds at 300-600 with a 100 ante. That’s a starting stack depth of 12.5 big blinds and an M of 4.17. In 2019, if you entered right at the close of registration, you'd start Level 11 with 25,000 in chips and the blinds at 800-1,600 with a 1,600 big blind ante. That's a starting stack depth of 15.63 big blinds, which is 3.13 big blinds more than when registration closed the year before, and an M of 6.25, which is 1.5 times greater than the M would have been at the close of registration in 2018. What Happens After Registration Closes? One worry might be that tournament organizers could have structured the beginning of the tournament in a fashion that masks deficiencies later on in the structure, but concerned players should rest easy as that doesn't appear to be the case. Although you do begin playing larger blind levels earlier in the 2019 structure, the greater starting stack size more than makes up for it, as evidenced by the fact that a player has more big blinds in a starting stack when registration closes. Looking over the 2019 structure, we can also see that no levels are skipped in the middle and late stages of the tournament, which is when these events really matter with big money on the line. Starting with the 300-600 blind level, all of the levels after are of the same increments in both 2018 and 2019. Final Table Likely Deeper In 2018, the WSOP Millionaire Maker reached its final table of nine players in Level 33 with the blinds at 80,000-160,000 with a 20,000 ante. That made for an average stack of 38.34 big blinds and an M of 19.17. If the final table of nine was reached in Level 33 of the 2019 structure, the blinds would be 120,000-240,000 with a 240,000 big blind ante. That's a higher big blind, but each player would have many more chips given the increased starting stack. Using the same field size of 2018 (7,361 entries), the final nine players would have an average stack of 20.447 million which means they'd have 85.2 big blinds and an M of 34.08. Of course, this science isn't perfect year over year, but it's a solid guess that the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker final table will have much more play at it than the 2018 final table did. Five Days Instead of Four In 2018, the WSOP Millionaire Maker was scheduled as a four-day tournament. Entering the fourth and final day of the event, 17 players remained, instead of being down to a final table. If the same length was kept, the increased play added by the 2019 structure would likely spill this event over into a fifth day. WSOP went ahead and scheduled the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker as a five-day event which should provide adequate additional time for the event. When it comes to the 2019 WSOP Millionaire Maker, the verdict is that, yes, more value has been added to the tournament. Want to know more? Check out 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.'
  9. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Listen to this week's episode of the fastest growing poker podcast on the planet, The Fives, as Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters breakdown the latest schedule announcement from the WSOP, update some of the early returns from the 2019 Aussie Millions and recap the World Poker Tour's trip to Russia. They also pore over the numbers from this weekend's PokerStars Sunday Million and what the shift to a $109 meant for players, PokerStars and the prestige of the event. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  10. Four weeks after releasing the dates and a few select events for the 2019 World Series of Poker, WSOP organizers announced another 13 events that will make up the schedule including most of the signature branded events including the Colossus, Marathon, Little One for One Drop, and The Closer. The Colossus, which was immensely popular when it debuted in 2015 as a $565 buy-in, is now a $400 event after three straight years of declining attendance. In previous years, the Colossus has had upwards of eight starting flights. The 2019 version will feature just two, one of June 26, the second on June 27. Players will get 40,000 chips and levels will be 40 minutes long. Colossus Field Sizes Year Field Size 2015 22,374 2016 21,613 2017 18,054 2018 13,070 The newest addition to the schedule is the $1,000 Mini Main Event. Featuring the same starting stack as the $10,000 Main Event, the tournament will use the same blinds structure but with 30-minute levels. The Mini Main Event is slated to be a two-day long event leading directly into the Main Event. "Things are starting to come together on the rest of the 2019 WSOP playing schedule," said WSOP Vice President Jack Effel. "Being this is our 50th running, we are doing everything we can to make this year’s iteration bigger, better and more valuable for players." Other staple events that are now officially on the 2019 schedule are the Casino Employees event, the Ladies Event, the Seniors Event and the $1,000 version of the Tag Team event. DATE EVENT BUY-IN CHIPS LEVELS RE-ENTRY TIME 5/29 Casino Employees $500 25,000 40 minutes 1 11 a.m. 6/4 Super Turbo Bounty $1,000 20,000 20 minutes None 10 a.m. 6/9 Double Stack $1,000 40,000 30/40 minutes 1 11 a.m. 6/10 Marathon $2,620 26,200 100 minutes None 12 p.m. 6/17 Super Seniors 60+ $1,000 20,000 60 minutes 1 10 a.m. 6/20 Ladies $10,000/$1,000 20,000 60 minutes 1 11 a.m. 6/24 Super Turbo Bounty $1,500 25,000 20 minutes None 10 a.m. 6/24 Tag Team (2-4 person teams) $1,000/Team 20,000 60 minutes None 12 p.m. 6/26 Colossus - Flight A $400 40,000 40 minutes 1/flight 10 a.m. 6/27 Colossus - Flight B " " " " 10 a.m. 7/1 Mini Main Event $1,000 60,000 30 minutes None 11 a.m. 7/6 Little One for One Drop - Flight A $1,000+$111 40,000 60 minutes Unlimited 11 a.m. 7/7 Little One for One Drop - Flight B " " " " 11 a.m. 7 8 Little One for One Drop - Flight C " " " " 11 a.m. 7/11 Double Stack $1,500 50,000 30/40 minutes Unlimited 11 a.m. 7/12 The Closer - Flight A $1,500 25,000 30 minutes Unlimited 11 a.m. 7/13 The Closer - Flight B " " " " 11 a.m. 714 The Closer - Flight C " " " " 11 a.m.
  11. The structure for the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event has been released. From previous announcements, we know that the amount of starting chips went from 50,000 in 2018 to 60,000 in 2019, a big blind ante format will be used and registration has been extended until the start of Day 2. Now, let's dive a little deeper into the details and break down how the WSOP Main Event structure in 2019 compares to 2018's version. 2019 WSOP Main Event Structure Buy-In: $10,000 Starting Chips: 60,000 Level Duration: 120 minutes Late Registration Period: Start of Day 2 Re-Entry: None Click here for structure sheet DATE EVENT DAY START TIME (PT) DAY LENGTH 7/3 Day 1A 12 p.m. 5 levels 7/4 Day 1B 12 p.m. 5 levels 7/5 Day 1C 12 p.m. 5 levels 7/6 Day 2A/B 11 a.m. 5 levels 7/7 Day 2C 11 a.m. 5 levels 7/8 Day 3 12 p.m. 5 levels 7/9 Day 4 12 p.m. 5 levels 7/10 Day 5 12 p.m. 5-6 levels 7/11 Day 6 12 p.m. 5-6 levels 7/12 Day 7 12 p.m. To nine players 7/14 Day 8 6:30 p.m. To six players 7/15 Day 9 6:30 p.m. To three players 7/16 Day 10 5:30 p.m. To winner *Per WSOP structure sheet: Adjustments may be made to the numbers of levels played each day. Once again, the WSOP Main Event is a 10-day competition with three starting flights. Registration is open until the start of Day 2 and players will play five 120-minute levels on Day 1. You can see the levels during the registration period in the 2019 WSOP Main Event structure table below, plus one additional level that you'd start playing if you registered right before registration closed. LEVEL ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 - 100-200 300 200 2 200 100-200 300 120 3 300 200-300 200 75 4 400 200-400 150 60 5 500 300-500 120 46.15 6 600 300-600 100 40 With 60,000 chips to start, players in the 2019 WSOP Main Event begin with 300 big blinds. That is fewer big blinds than players started with for 2018, but the decrease only lasts one level. You can also see that if you enter right at the close of registration (start of Day 2) and head into Level 6 with a fresh 60,000-chip starting stack, you'll have 100 big blinds and an M of 40 to work with. In a further comparison of the two structures, the table below is a year-by-year look at the two structures through the registration periods. The starting stack for the 2018 WSOP Main Event was 50,000, so 10,000 less than what it will be in 2019. It's not the massive increase to the starting stack we've seen in some of the other WSOP events for this year, but it's an increase that benefits the players early on in the structure, past the first level. For "ante," we took the standard ante from the 2018 structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. This was done to align the comparisons better. 2018 Structure Compared To 2019 Structure LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 0 75-150 333.33 222.22 2019 0 100-200 300 200 - - 2 2018 0 150-300 166.67 111.11 2019 200 100-200 300 120 - - 3 2018 225 150-300 166.67 74.07 2019 300 200-300 200 75 - - 4 2018 450 200-400 125 47.62 2019 400 200-400 150 60 - - 5 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500 300-500 120 46.15 - - 6 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600 300-600 100 40 The 2019 WSOP Main Event registration period has been extended and will allow players to register until the start of Day 2. Looking at the above table, you can see that there are three levels that overlap with 2018's registration period. In two of those three overlapping registration periods, the structure benefits players with deeper stacks. The first level was actually deeper in 2018, but the difference isn't anything astronomical that players should be up in arms about. In fact, some players have suggested the WSOP Main Event is a little too slow at the beginning. When comparing the end of registration in both years, players would be deeper in 2018 had they entered at the last chance to start Level 4 with a fresh stack of 50,000. That would make for 125 big blinds and an M of 47.62. If players registered to start Day 2 with a fresh 60,000-chip stack in 2019, they'd start with 100 big blinds and an M of 40. That's two full, 120-minute levels later, and in some cases a full day later for the latecomers. What Happens After Day 1? First, let's take a look at how the two years compare for Day 2. In both years, Day 2 begins with Level 6 and the schedule calls for playing five, 120-minute levels. Remember that for the 2018 ante, we took the standard ante from the structure and multiplied it by nine to show the cost of a full round of antes at a standard nine-handed table. LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS 6 2018 900 300-600 2019 600 300-600 - - 7 2018 900 400-800 2019 800 400-800 - - 8 2018 900 500-1,000 2019 1,000 500-1,000 - - 9 2018 1,800 600-1,200 2019 1,200 600-1,200 - - 10 2018 1,800 800-1,600 2019 1,600 800-1,600 The blinds are exactly the same for 2019 as they were in 2018, the only difference per level is the number of antes paid per round. In 2018, a player at a full, nine-handed table would pay more per round in antes in four of the five levels on Day 2. The only level that fewer antes were paid in 2018 versus 2019 is Level 8. On the surface, this tells us that players will have more play overall on Day 2. When you factor in that players begin the tournament with 20% more chips in 2019, the average stack on Day 2 should be larger, and that adds even more play than 2018. Now, let's take a look at Day 3-6. DAY 3 LEVEL YEAR ANTE BLINDS 11 2018 2,700 1,000-2,000 2019 2,000 1,000-2,000 - - 12 2018 3,600 1,200-2,400 2019 2,400 1,200-2,400 - - 13 2018 4,500 1,500-3,000 2019 3,000 1,500-3,000 - - 14 2018 4,500 2,000-4,000 2019 4,000 2,000-4,000 - - 15 2018 4,500 2,500-5,000 2019 5,000 2,500-5,000 DAY 4 16 2018 9,000 3,000-6,000 2019 6,000 3,000-6,000 - - 17 2018 9,000 4,000-8,000 2019 8,000 4,000-8,000 - - 18 2018 9,000 5,000-10,000 2019 10,000 5,000-10,000 - - 19 2018 18,000 6,000-12,000 2019 12,000 6,000-12,000 - - 20 2018 18,000 8,000-16,000 2019 16,000 8,000-16,000 DAY 5 21 2018 27,000 10,000-20,000 2019 20,000 10,000-20,000 - - 22 2018 36,000 12,000-24,000 2019 24,000 12,000-24,000 - - 23 2018 45,000 15,000-30,000 2019 30,000 15,000-30,000 - - 24 2018 45,000 20,000-40,000 2019 40,000 20,000-40,000 - - 25 2018 45,000 25,000-50,000 2019 50,000 25,000-50,000 DAY 6 26 2018 90,000 30,000-60,000 2019 60,000 30,000-60,000 - - 27 2018 90,000 40,000-80,000 2019 80,000 40,000-80,000 - - 28 2018 135,000 50,000-100,000 2019 100,000 50,000-100,000 - - 29 2018 180,000 60,000-120,000 2019 120,000 60,000-120,000 - - 30 2018 180,000 80,000-160,000 2019 160,000 80,000-160,000 For Day 5-6, we assumed five levels to be played, but note that the structure sheet does say "5-6 levels." If you look at the blind levels for Day 3-6, you'll notice the small blind and big blind amounts are all the same as they were in 2018. The change comes with the ante, and you'll notice the cost of one round of antes is less in the majority of blind levels in 2019 when compared to 2018. Of the 20 levels from Level 11 to Level 30, only three times does the 2019 structure call for a higher price for a round of antes. In several spots, each pot is going to be one small blind or greater less than was played in 2018. For example, Level 13 on Day 3 in 2019. In 2018, this level was 1,500-3,000 with a 500 ante. That put 9,000 in the pot at each nine-handed table to start the hand. In 2019, Level 13 is the same 1,500-3,000 but with a 3,000 big blind ante. That's 7,500 in the pot to start the hand for a difference of 1,500 fewer chips. Another example is in Level 29. In 2018, this level was 60,000-120,000 with a 20,000 ante for 360,000 in the pot to start the hand. In 2019, the level is 60,000-120,000 with a 120,000 big blind ante for 300,000 in the pot to start each hand. More Chips Plus Big Blind Ante Means More Play In conclusion, the larger size of the starting stack and the way the big blind ante format works with the structure will allow for a deeper, slower structure in 2019 compared to 2018 in the WSOP Main Event. Want to know more about the 2019 World Series of Poker? Check out 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP.'
  12. As the 2019 World Series of Poker draws closer, the dream of taking down the biggest tournament of the year grows stronger. For many, the ultimate poker ‘bucket list’ item is to take a seat in the $10,000 WSOP Main Event. Testing their skills against 8,000 other players in an effort to take home life-changing money and write their name in the poker history books. However, in order to even have a shot, you have to get in the game. 888poker is an official partner of the 2019 World Series of Poker and they have plenty of ways for low-rollers, value hunters and tournament grinders to book their ticket to Las Vegas and enter the Main, for far less than ten grand. We've already talked about working your way up from the $5 levels, but if you have a little larger of a bankroll to work with here’s how you can check the biggest item off your bucket list for under $20 ($16.50 to be exact.) The Buy-In By no means are the $16.50 sub-satellites to the WSOP 2019 Main Event Package the very bottom of the satellite chain. Players can start at the very bottom of the Step Satellite system for as little as $0.01. That’s right, one penny. However, we’re taking a closer look at the $16.50 super satellites. For under $20, you can start a three-step journey to winning a $12,600 package to the WSOP that includes six nights stay at the Vdara Hotel, your $10K seat into the tournament and a bonus $1,000 to help you pay for a flight, food, and other expenses. If you do want to take a single step back and win your way into the $16.50 super satellite, that can be arranged. Any tournament that offers a $16.50 ticket can be used as a qualifier into the $16.50, including the $1.50 buy-in tournament that guarantees 50 tickets to the BIG Fish tournament. Instead of playing the BIG Fish, simply take that $16.50 ticket and apply it to your WSOP adventure. Get In The Game The $16.50 satellites are currently running every day on 888poker. Simply go to the Live Events > Tournaments tab to register. There are multiple events running daily. Like the $5 Step Four satellites, the $16.50 is not an ‘on-demand’ super satellite. It runs less often than some of the earlier steps, however, at most times of the day, there is one open for registration and another in the near future. RELATED: Win Your Way Into The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event For $5 What You Win Those who make it to the end of the $16.50 satellite will pick up a $109 tournament ticket. The ticket can be used for any equally priced 888poker tournament or satellite. Of course, players grinding their way to Las Vegas for the summer are going to want to parlay that into taking a shot in the $109 super satellite to the WSOP Main Event, which can be registered for in the same tournament lobby. Tournament Info Players who are used to playing some of the lower buy-in satellites will see a marked improvement in the structure mostly due to the starting stack being increased to 5,000 chips with the same 8-minute levels. This tournament is a pure freezeout with no re-entries or add-ons. If you bust this satellite, you’ll need to take another shot in the next one. The tournament needs at least five players in order for the 1-seat guaranteed event to take place. If there are at least that many players to start, there is 75 minutes of late registration to help players battle for more than a ‘winner-take-all’ seat. Sometimes, this level satellite can have a hard time getting enough players to actually take place, but more often than not (especially as the WSOP gets closer) there will be enough for the tournament to run. Next Step Once you have taken down the $16.50, it’s time to battle in the $109. At that point, you’re just two victories from having to change the dream from playing the Main Event to winning a bracelet.
  13. It goes without saying that playing in (and winning) the World Series of Poker Main Event is the dream scenario for every poker player on the planet. And if it’s not, then it’s for sure in the top 5. But even in today’s world of regularly offered high rollers where players buy-in for astronomical amounts and seven-figure scores are broadcast to fans everywhere, for the average poker player, posting the $10,000 buy-in for the WSOP Main Event is a non-starter. Even the most dedicated online grinder would have a very difficult time walking up to the cage at the Rio in Las Vegas and place a brick of hundred dollar bills on the counter in return for a single tournament. That’s where 888poker comes in. 888poker an official partner of the 2019 World Series of Poker and one of the only online sites authorized to help players qualify for the Main Event. In traditional, 888poker style, they are helping players win their way in for the absolute minimum. Here’s how you can climb the ladder and take your seat in the biggest poker tournament of the year starting at just $5. The Buy-In 888poker has WSOP Main Event qualifiers for players with every size of bankroll. This one is for the low-rollers. Those who are working their way up the ranks can hop into a Step Four satellite to the WSOP for just $5. The truth is players can start even lower. They start at the very bottom and work their way up from the first step for as low as $0.01. However, we’re going to assume that if those who think enough of their game to want to take a shot in the Main, can rip off a five dollar bill and get started. However, for those that DO want to start from the bottom, here’s the beginning of the Steps satellites: Step 1 - $0.01 - winners receive a $0.10 seat to Step Two Step 2 - $0.10 - winners receive a $1.00 seat to Step Three Step 3 - $1.00 - winners receive a $5.00 seat to Step Four Get In The Game The $5 Step 4 to the World Series of Poker tournaments run every day with tournaments popping up in the Live Events > Tournaments tab in the 888poker client. Players will notice that the $5 satellites run a little less often than the earlier steps, however when looking in the lobby players should see one open for registration in the not-too-distant future at all times of the day and night. What You Win The winners of the $5 satellite are playing for either a $16.50 tournament ticket or a $30 tournament ticket. There are two different Step 4 satellites, so you can pick which ladder you want climb up. That earned ticket can be used in any 888poker tournament or satellite of an equal amount. Since we are talking about working your way into the $10K Main Event, players are going to want to use that to buy into either the $16.50 or the $30 super satellite (depending on the payout) to the WSOP Main Event, which can be found in the same tournament lobby. Tournament Info Players who have started in the earlier steps will see an improved structure from the earlier steps. Players are given a 2,500 chip starting stack with eight-minute levels. This tournament is a pure freezout. There are no re-entries, no second chances in these. There are no add-ons either. When it comes to winning this satellite, you have one shot per tournament. If you do bust, there will likely be another $5 satellite firing again in the near future. Four players are needed for the tournament to take place. While there’s the occasional chance for some overlay (if only the minimum is met), if the tournament takes place there should be plenty of players battling for the tickets. Depending on the time of day, sometimes these steps are hard to get off the ground so we recommend checking in at all the convenient times to take your shot. Take The Next Step Once you have won your next seat, it’s time to hop into one of the first direct super satellites to the World Series of Poker Main Event. You’re just three wins away from a summer seat in Las Vegas.
  14. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. Phil Ivey BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 10 60 $6,303,530 33 Right in the middle of the 2000 World Series of Poker, Amarillo Slim was heads-up in a $2,500 Pot Limit Omaha event for what could have been his fifth career bracelet. Across the table from him was a 23-year-old from New Jersey who had made his WSOP debut just a few days earlier. Preston had never been heads-up and lost. Enter Phil Ivey. Ivey went on to beat Slim that night to win his first bracelet and thus began one of the most outstanding careers in WSOP history. Over the next 18 years, Ivey went on to become just the fourth poker player to reach double digits in the bracelet category and the owner of one of the most complete WSOP resumes ever assembled. In 2002, Ivey went from "kid with one bracelet" to legitimate superstar. He took down three separate events that year; $1,500 Seven Card Stud, $2,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo, and $2,000 SHOE and put the poker world on notice. One year later, a fateful river card famously prevented Ivey from making the final table of the WSOP Main Event but helped launch poker into a different stratosphere. Down to 10 players, Ivey and Chris Moneymaker clashed in a pot with Ivey holding pocket nines for a full house on a [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="6s"][poker card="9c"] board. Moneymaker, holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"], bet and Ivey moved all-in over the top. Moneymaker called and then stood and watched the dealer deliver the [poker card="as"] river card to eliminate Ivey in tenth. Had Ivey won the hand, he could have been one of the chip leaders at the final table. Ivey picked up another bracelet in 2005, and then won two more in 2009. In the middle of the November Nine era, Ivey made his way through 6,485 other players to make the final table of the Main Event. The media, both within the industry and mainstream, spent three months talking about Ivey and how he was going to be on poker's biggest stage with a chance to win its biggest prize. November came and Ivey fizzled out in a seventh-place finish. The $1,404,014 he earned there is his largest WSOP cash yet. While those two cashes are the highlights of Ivey's Main Event record, he has cashed six times in the event over the course of his career. YEAR PLACE WINNINGS 2002 23rd $40,000 2003 10th $82,700 2005 20th $304,680 2009 7th $1,404,014 2014 430th $25,756 2018 547th $23,940 In the summer of 2010, Ivey won his eighth bracelet in an eighth different poker variant. Ivey beat out 477 other players including a final that included Chad Brown, David 'ODB' Baker, Jeffrey Lisandro, John Juanda, and runner-up Bill Chen to win a $3,000 HORSE event. Proving himself as a master of all games, Ivey's ninth and tenth bracelets came in 8 Game mixed events in 2013 and 2014. All told, Ivey has played nine different poker variations on his way to collecting 10 bracelets. Despite all of his Main Event success though, Ivey has yet to win a bracelet in a No Limit Hold'em event, though it was part of the game rotation in both 8 Game wins. In 2011, in the aftermath of Black Friday, Ivey elected to not play any WSOP events. With thousands of players having money held on Full Tilt Poker, Ivey declared it was unfair for him to play the WSOP when others couldn't. He released a statement at the time that said in part, "I am not playing in the World Series of Poker as I do not believe it is fair that I compete when others cannot." Ivey also skipped the 2017 WSOP in its entirety while involved in lawsuits in both England and Atlantic City over his baccarat play. Ivey has cashed three times in the $50,000 Players Championship, including a third-place finish in the inaugural event in 2006. He followed that up with a 12th place result in 2008 and a 9th place finish in 2018. Ivey's WSOP record at the final table is also very impressive. He's made 28 final tables since 2002 and has won 35.7% of those. He has a 10-4 heads-up record and the only four players to have beaten him for a bracelet are Huck Seed, Sammy Farha, Chris Reslock, and Andy Frankenberger.
  15. For some, playing the Main Event of the World Series of Poker is a yearly ritual. It is the one 'must-play' event of the year with its field of thousands of casual players combined with the chance to take home life-changing money. But even for a seasoned pro, taking $10K to the cage can be a daunting task. Perhaps it represents a major part of a bankroll. Perhaps bankroll management is tossed out the window. For those with discipline, they know that the best way to take a seat in the Main Event is to get in for the minimum - and that means winning through a satellite. 888poker is an official partner of the 2019 World Series of Poker and they have plenty of ways for players to win their way to Las Vegas for far less than the full price sticker shock of $10,000. In addition to winning a seat, on 888poker players pick up a full package that puts them up at the Vdara Hotel and provides a little extra cash. All of that is simply two steps away when you buy in at $109. The Buy-In The $109 WSOP 2019 Main Event Package is one of the more expensive starting points in the satellite system as it is only one win away from allowing you to participate in the final satellite. For those looking to step back and start at the bottom, there’s an entire satellite step system that allows players to work their way up through the ranks for as little as $0.01. There are a number of direct satellites to the $109 tournament which can be bought in for as little as $5. Obviously, the lower the buy-in point of the super satellite, the fewer the number of $109 tickets will be given away. However, most of the super satellites to the $109 have a guarantee of as many as two tickets, no matter the price point. Get In The Game On most days, you can fire up the 888poker client and find a $109 satellite preparing to take place. They are easy to find by going to the Live Events > Tournament tab. There are often a number of $109 satellites open for registration at the same time so make sure to take a close look and register for the proper satellite, otherwise, you may be battling for a tournament ticket that you never intended to play. Additionally, 888poker is offering a couple of different types of $109 satellites to the $1,050. Most of them have a one-seat guarantee and take place daily. Deepening on when you see this, there may be another tournament later in the week with a 5-seat guarantee. What You Win Players that win in the $109 satellite will be credited a $1,050 ticket to the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event satellite. The final contest between you and a flight to Las Vegas this summer. With some of the earlier satellites, winners could turn a ticket into a shot at some other tournament but after taking down the $109 it’s time to fire into the $1,050 for a shot at the $12,600 package. The ultimate prize includes your $10K Main Event seat, six nights at the 5-star Vdara Hotel in Las Vegas and $1,000 extra to help cover the costs of travel, food and more. Tournament Info With the majority of the higher buy-in satellites, the structure is the same. Players get 5,000 starting chips and eight-minute levels. Unlike some of the smaller satellites, there are two available rebuys providing another 5,000 chips for $100 (no additional entry fee). The daily $109 satellites need a minimum of five players to take place or else it that tournament will be canceled. As the price points go up, it can sometimes be difficult to get players to play a mega satellite in the middle of a weekday so make sure you double check to see if these are taking place. However, if you find one with the minimum number of entries, there’s value to be found in the overlay. Next Step If you take down a $109 satellite, the only next step is to book some time on a Sunday and take your shot at the Main Event. The $1,050 Main Event package satellites take place at 20:30 GMT so make sure you have the time and maybe you will be sitting in the Amazon Room at the Rio this summer undertaking the marathon that is the Main Event.
  16. There’s no tournament like the Main Event of the World Series of Poker. It is widely regarded as the best tournament of the year, with the slowest structure allowing for the most play, and an electric energy that is hard to duplicate. For many recreational players, getting a seat in the Main Event feels more like a far-off fantasy rather than a dream that could possibly come true. However, every year players from all corners of the poker world take shots in mega satellites and win their way to Las Vegas to compete for life-changing money. 888poker offers one of the best ways to do that. 888poker is an official partner of the 2019 World Series of Poker and, once again, this year they are providing players a number of paths to punch their ticket to the Main Event. Not only can you win a seat at the table, but 888poker is also providing an all-inclusive package that puts you up at a hotel and provides extra cash for travel expenses…all for $30. The Buy-In The $30 WSOP 2019 Main Event Package satellite certainly is not the baseline satellite, but for many who have built up a bankroll it is a great place to start. As we have mentioned, players can begin to work their way up from the very bottom where the first step costs a single penny. Yep, $0.01. As we have already covered, those looking to hop in the $30 satellite can also win their way in through a $5 Step 4 satellite. Get In The Game The $30 satellites are an everyday occurrence on 888poker and you can easily find them by going to the Live Events > Tournament tab in the client. They do not run nearly as often as some of the feeder satellites prior to it, like the early Steps satellites or even the $16.50. So, we recommend taking a look in the client and making these $30 tournaments more of an appointment. You'll need to plan a little bit ahead just to make sure you can have an opportunity to participate in them. What You Win The winner of the $30 satellite picks up a $1,050 ticket to the Main Event, putting them one win away to making that dream a reality. There’s no real decision on what to do next. Players will take this $1,050 ticket and have a chance at the $12,600 prize package that includes a six-night stay at the Vdara Hotel in Las Vegas and $1,000 bonus cash to help with flights, food, and other expenses. The $1,050 tournament takes place on Sundays at 12:30 GMT, so check your calendar and make sure you can be in front of your computer at that time. Tournament Info The $30 tournament has a nearly identical structure to the $16.50 satellites with 5000 in starting chips and 8-minute levels. One of the major differences is that there are two rebuys allowed for the first 105 minutes of the tournament. That hopes to help get the prize pool up enough to cover the cost of at least a single seat. It might also offer those who miss out, but still finish in the top spots, some extra cash. The tournament needs at least five players to get underway otherwise it will be canceled. There will be some overlay if it doesn’t reach the 35 player threshold. There have been $30 satellites where this has been the case, so value hunters should be on the lookout. Next Step If you happen to take down the $30 satellite, you are one step away from bagging a seat in the Main Event. Register for the most convenient Sunday $1,050 and run great. If you miss, there are more $30 satellites available every day, or look in the direction of the $109 satellites if your bankroll can support it - the odds aren’t quite as long with the bigger buy-in.
  17. The 2019 World Series of Poker is on the horizon, with action slated to begin on Wednesday, May 29, at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Much has been made of the revamped tournament structures that the WSOP has implemented for the 50th annual WSOP, and players should expect more chips and more play across the board. Now, let’s take a look at the new-look Pot Limit Omaha events for 2019. PLO at the Sub-$1,000 Buy-In Level The first thing that can be noticed when comparing the 2018 schedule to 2019 specific to pot-limit Omaha events is that the 2019 schedule does not have the $365 Pot-Limit Omaha GIANT or $565 Pot-Limit Omaha tournaments. Instead, there is the $600 Pot-Limit Omaha Deepstack event that is at a similar price point. The $565 buy-in PLO event from 2018 is closer to the bone, so that’s the event we’ll use to compare to the $600 PLO Deepstack in 2019. In 2018, the $565 PLO event had a starting stack of 5,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the eight-level registration period, and was a three-day event. This event had 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 60-minute levels on Day 2 and Day 3. In 2019, the $600 PLO Deepstack has a starting stack of 30,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the 12-level registration period, and is scheduled as a two-day tournament. This event has 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 40-minute levels on Day 2. In 2018, the $565 buy-in PLO event had a 11.5% rake, as $65 of the $565 was taken out for fees and staff. In 2019, the rake is listed at 12.5%, so $75 of the $600 buy-in will be taken out. Here's a look at the 2019 $600 PLO Deepstack structure compared to the 2018 $565 PLO structure over the registration levels. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 300 200 - 2 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 75-150 200 133.33 - 3 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 100-200 150 100 - 4 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 150-300 100 66.67 - 5 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 200-400 75 50 - 6 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 250-500 60 40 - 7 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 300-600 50 33.33 - 8 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 400-800 37.5 25 - 9 2018 300-600 8.33 5.56 2019 500-1,000 30 20 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 25 16.67 - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 800-1,600 18.75 12.5 - 12 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,000 15 10 - 13 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,500 12 8.57 As you can see, the 2019 structure is a bit deeper throughout the earlier levels. That's good news for players. Where the structure makes up for it will be on Day 2 when the levels are only 40 minutes compared to 2018's 60 minutes. $1,000 and $1,500 PLO Events At the $1,000 and $1,500 buy-in levels, we also see an increase in starting chips. The $1,000 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018 had a starting stack of 5,000. In 2019, the starting stack has been increased to 20,000. In the $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018, the starting stack was 7,500. In 2019, it’s be upped to 25,000. Both events in 2019 are listed as three-day events, which is the same as in 2018, and the rake is the same at 10%. At the $1,000 level, late registration lasts two levels longer. At the $1,500 level, it lasts three levels longer. Here's a look at the structure for the $1,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 200 133.33 - 2 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 75-150 133.33 88.89 - 3 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 100-200 100 66.67 - 4 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 150-300 66.67 44.44 - 5 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 200-400 50 33.33 - 6 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 300-600 33.33 22.22 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 25 16.67 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 20 13.33 Here's a look at the structure for the $1,500 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 150 100 2019 50-100 250 166.67 - 2 2018 50-100 75 50 2019 75-150 166.67 111.11 - 3 2018 75-150 50 33.33 2019 100-200 125 83.33 - 4 2018 100-200 37.5 25 2019 150-300 83.33 55.56 - 5 2018 150-300 25 16.67 2019 200-400 62.5 41.67 - 6 2018 200-400 18.75 12.5 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 15 10 2019 300-600 41.67 27.78 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 31.25 20.83 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 25 16.67 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 20.83 13.89 As you can see in both of these events, the added chips to the starting stack provide much deeper play. $10,000 PLO Championship Structure The $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed) is back for 2019. In 2018, this event’s starting stack was 50,000. In 2019, it’s up to 60,000. Late registration is open until the start of Day 2 and there is no re-entry, which is the same as in 2018. The rake is also the same as it was in 2018. The blind levels are nearly the exact same except for a few spots where the small blind is larger. Here's a look at the structure for the $10,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 2 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 3 2018 150-300 166.67 111.11 2019 200-300 200 120 - 4 2018 200-400 125 83.33 2019 200-400 150 100 - 5 2018 250-500 100 66.67 2019 300-500 120 75 - 6 2018 300-600 83.33 55.56 2019 300-600 100 66.67 - 7 2018 400-800 62.5 41.67 2019 400-800 75 50 - 8 2018 500-1,000 50 33.33 2019 500-1,000 60 40 - 9 2018 600-1,200 41.67 27.78 2019 600-1,200 60 33.33 - 10 2018 800-1,600 31.25 20.83 2019 800-1,600 37.5 25 - 11 2018 1,000-2,000 25 16.67 2019 1,000-2,000 30 20 In the $10,000 PLO event, you can see that the added chips allow for a deep structure throughout, even despite the two spots early on in the structure when the small blind is higher. The small blind being higher in Level 3 and Level 5 allow the tournament to remove the T25 chips sooner, which should speed up play a little bit. Players who opt to skip Day 1 of this event entirely and buy in for Day 2 will start with five more big blinds and with a greater M when compared to last year. $25,000 PLO High Roller Structure Like the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed), the 2019 version of the $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha High Roller (8-handed) is pretty much identical to what it was in 2018. The one big change is that the starting chips have gone up from 125,000 to 150,000. Other than that, late registration is the same 12 levels, there is one re-entry allowed per player, the rake is the same 5%, and the event is scheduled for four days - all of these things are the same as in 2018. Also like the $10,000 PLO event, there are a few minor tweaks to the blind structure for the small blind in a few spots, but it’s nothing major. Here's a look at the structure for the $25,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 150-300 416.67 277.78 2019 200-300 500 300 - 2 2018 200-400 312.5 208.33 2019 200-400 375 250 - 3 2018 250-500 250 166.67 2019 300-500 300 187.5 - 4 2018 300-600 208.33 138.89 2019 300-600 250 166.67 - 5 2018 400-800 156.25 104.17 2019 400-800 187.5 125 - 6 2018 500-1,000 125 83.33 2019 500-1,000 150 100 - 7 2018 600-1,200 104.17 69.44 2019 600-1,200 125 83.33 - 8 2018 800-1,600 78.13 52.08 2019 800-1,600 93.75 62.5 - 9 2018 1,000-2,000 62.5 41.67 2019 1,000-2,000 75 50 - 10 2018 1,200-2,400 52.08 34.72 2019 1,200-2,400 62.5 41.67 - 11 2018 1,500-3,000 41.67 27.78 2019 1,500-3,000 50 33.33 - 12 2018 2,000-4,000 31.25 20.83 2019 2,000-4,000 37.5 25 - 13 2018 2,500-5,000 25 16.67 2019 2,500-5,000 30 20 The starting stack for 2019 is 25,000 chips more than in 2018. It's not a massive increase when compared to the other PLO events on the schedule, but it's an increase that allows more deeper play throughout the competition.
  18. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. This list details the players who made spots #21 - #30 on our list. If you haven't yet caught up on the other names we've announced so far you can check out #41 - #50 here and #31 - #40 here. #30 - Barry Greenstein BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 102 $3,196,072 24 Barry Greenstein has one of the most recognizable faces in poker, plus plenty of accolades to go along with it. He has three WSOP gold bracelets with the first coming in 2004 when he won the $5,000 No-Limit 2-7 Single Draw event to the tune of $296,200. Greenstein went on to win his second gold bracelet in 2005 before landing his third in 2008. Interestingly, each of Greenstein's three bracelets has come in different variants. In addition to the No Limit 2-7 Single Draw bracelets he has, Greenstein won one in pot-limit Omaha and razz. When poker exploded in the early- to mid-2000s, Greenstein's face was one of those that was everywhere. He was a high-stakes cash game player who constantly found himself in the money in WSOP events. To date, Greenstein has racked up 102 cashes and 24 top 10 finishes in World Series of Poker events. At the WSOP in 2017 and 2018, Greenstein cashed 13 times each year. “Dubbed ‘The Robin Hood of Poker’, Barry Greenstein is one of the games all-time great grinders. His 101 summer series cashes is good for fifth on the all-time WSOP cashes list and his three bracelets have come in three different disciplines, proving that he’s a master of all the games. But Barry has brought more than results, being one of the most approachable of the poker boom superstars while in the halls of the Rio. Between his results, his philanthropy, and his ability to connect with his fans Greenstein is an all-time great.” - PocketFives Senior Writer Jeff Walsh #29 - Huck Seed BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 53 $3,579,604 28 Huck Seed is very much known for his 1996 WSOP Main Event victory that saw him win the $1 million top prize when he topped a field of 295 entries in the world championship tournament. What many don't know is that Seed had actually already won a WSOP gold bracelet. Seed earned his first bracelet in 2004 when he won the $2,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event for $167,000. That first win seemed inevitable for Seed, who prior to it had six WSOP cashes and all of them were top 10 finishes. Seed returned to the WSOP Main Event final table in 1999 and won bracelets three and four in 2000 and 2003, both of which came in razz. #28 - Berry Johnston BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 67 $2,112,340 30 In similar fashion to Huck Seed, many don't know that Berry Johnston had already won a WSOP gold bracelet before he won the WSOP Main Event. He first claimed gold in 1983 before going on to win the granddaddy of them all in 1986. Interestingly, Johnston's first-ever recorded cash came when he placed third in the WSOP Main Event in 1982. In 1985, he took third again in the event and then finally won it the following year. Further adding to Johnston's WSOP standing, he finished fifth in the WSOP Main Event in 1990 and has several other deep runs in the event. #27 - Shaun Deeb BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 66 $4,281,461 17 Shaun Deeb came up in poker as an online player, but he's transitioned to the live realm very well and has been quite the WSOP performer over the years. Since his first WSOP cash in 2007, Deeb has won four bracelets, finished in the top 10 17 times, and cashed 66 times. Deeb's first taste of WSOP gold came in 2015, when he won the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship for $318,857. He added his second bracelet in 2016, and then two more in 2018 en route to winning the 2018 WSOP Player of the Year title. His two bracelets in 2018, were worth $1.402 million and $814,000. Deeb cashed 16 times at the 2018 WSOP and then four more times at the 2018 WSOP Europe. "Not many players who came up in the world of online poker have been able to move to the live felt with as much success as Shaun Deeb. His talents make him one of the top poker players in the world and we're really starting to see him carve out his place in poker history over more recent years. Deeb appears to be as all in as possible when it comes to the WSOP. Deeb first hit the WSOP winner's circle in 2015 and won four gold bracelets and one Player of the Year title in the four-year span from 2015-2018. Plus, he had 10 additional cashes in the top 10 of events over that span. If the volume is there in any sort of way, Deeb is a threat to win WSOP Player of the Year and multiple bracelets every summer, and it wouldn't be a stretch to see him challenge Phil Hellmuth for most bracelets all time if he keeps playing these events at such a high frequency over the next decade or two." - PocketFives Managing Editor Donnie Peters In today's poker world, Deeb is considered to be as tough a competitor as any. He's a threat to win a WSOP bracelet, or two or three, every single year, and a strong contender for WSOP Player of the Year. #26 - Daniel Alaei BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 36 $4,427,139 8 Daniel Alaei may not make a lot of noise at the table, but the game he brings to the WSOP each and every year speaks volumes. Alaei has five WSOP gold bracelets, with the first coming in 2006 when he won the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw event. He later added bracelets two, three, four, and five in 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2015. Each time he won his way to the WSOP winner's circle, Alaei did it facing some of the toughest competition around. His first gold bracelet in the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw tournament saw Alaei battle through a final table that included David Williams, Men Nguyen, Greg Raymer, and Allen Cunningham. His other four bracelets were all in Omaha tournaments and each of those events had a buy-in of $10,000. His wins in 2010 and 2013 were in the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship, when he took home $780,599 and $852,692, respectively. "Daniel Alaei is an incredible poker talent, and his skills have led to WSOP success several times, especially when it comes to Omaha. Personally, I wish Alaei would play more WSOP events every summer because I don't feel his actual results are anywhere near the potential he has. If there was ever a player to be called a "silent killer" on the felt, it's Alaei. He doesn't say much, he's quiet when he does talk, and his demeanor is unassuming, but his poker prowess is as loud as they come. When it comes to Omaha, the WSOP's second most popular variant, Alaei is one of the best, if not the absolute best, in the world and his four bracelets in the game are clear evidence of that." - Donnie Peters #25 - Chris Moneymaker BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 1 4 $2,532,041 2 Chris Moneymaker is as important a player in WSOP history as anyone. His storybook win in the 2003 WSOP Main Event played a part in igniting the poker boom and the ambassadorship he's served in since rivals anyone in the game. But for as important a figure as Moneymaker is when it comes to WSOP history, his results since his moment of glory in 2003 have been minimal and it's the reason he's not higher on this list. Of his $2,532,041 in WSOP earnings, $2,500,000 of that is from his 2003 WSOP Main Event victory, and he only has three other cashes and one other top 10 finish. Moneymaker's last WSOP cash was more than a decade ago in 2007. “An argument can be made that the most famous accountant from Tennessee to ever play poker simply doesn’t have the numbers needed to be on this list. However, if Chris Moneymaker is not in the field in 2003, if he did not bluff Sammy Farha and he never took home the Main Event title - poker may not be where it is today. The man that sparked the poker boom influenced a generation of poker players who saw what he did on ESPN and thought to themselves ‘I can do that too.’ Moneymaker is the poker icon that the industry needed and his being where he was, when he was has helped the World Series of Poker become the series that it is today.” - Jeff Walsh #24 - David Chiu BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 71 $3,653,340 26 Another WSOP stalwart to find his way to PocketFives' Top 50 Greatest WSOP Players list is David Chiu, with 71 cashes, 26 top 10 finishes, and five gold bracelets. Chiu's first WSOP cash came in 1996, and it also turned out to be his first WSOP gold bracelet win when he took down the $2,000 Limit Hold'em tournament for $396,000. Future bracelets wins for Chiu came in 1998, 2000, 2005, and 2013. Chiu's skills have been on display at the WSOP ever since he started playing there, and he's a player well-versed in all games. His bracelets have come in hold'em, seven-card stud, and Omaha. Additionally, Chiu has four runner-up finishes in gold bracelet tournaments. "Many of his colleagues will make the argument that David Chiu could be the most underappreciated player of his generation. His WSOP record is impressive. He's one of just 25 players to have won five or more bracelets. He also has four runner-up finishes and two thirds. Had a hand or two (or six) gone differently during those events, we could be talking about him as pushing to join the double-digit bracelet club." - PocketFives Editor in Chief Lance Bradley. #23 - Barbara Enright BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 22 $463,499 4 Barbara Enright is a three-time WSOP gold bracelet winner best known for being the only woman to date to ever reach the WSOP Main Event final table. That came in 1995 when she placed fifth in the big one. In 1986 and 1994, Enright won the WSOP Women's Event, and then she took down the 1996 $2,500 Pot-Limit Hold'em tournament for $180,000. In a male-dominated industry, especially in the 1990s, Enright helped pave the way for female poker players around the world. #22 - Jeff Lisandro BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 71 $3,790,497 27 Not too many players can claim to have won three WSOP bracelets. Even fewer can claim to have won three in the same year. Jeff Lisandro has six WSOP gold bracelets in all, and three of those came in 2009 when he absolutely crushed seven-card stud at the WSOP, winning the $1,500 Seven-Card Stud, $2,500 Razz, and $10,000 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Low. He won his first bracelet back in 2007, also in seven-card stud, and won his other two in pot-limit Omaha. Further adding to the chapter Lisandro wrote in the WSOP history books, he won one of his bracelets at WSOP Europe and another at WSOP Asia-Pacific. "Half of Lisandro's six bracelet wins came in 2009 when he was clearly a dominant force on his way to winning WSOP Player of the Year. It would be a shame to let that performance overshadow the other things Lisandro has done in his career. He's won at least one bracelet in all three variants of Seven Card Stud and is part of an elite group of players who have won a bracelet on three different continents. You could easily make the argument that at #22, he gets the short end of the stick." - Lance Bradley #21 - Ted Forrest BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 38 $2,055,472 23 Ted Forrest also has six WSOP gold bracelets and he is also a player who can claim to have won three gold bracelets in a single year. Forrest achieved the feat in 1993, when he stormed onto the poker scene with three gold bracelet wins in three different games. First, he won the $5,000 Seven-Card Stud tournament. Then, he won the $1,500 Razz event. He followed that up with a victory in the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Low tournament. In 2004, Forrest was back winning multiple bracelets in the same summer, taking home two that year. He'd add his sixth in 2014. Forrest has always been a feared player at the table, and when he reaches the money he's playing to win, as evidenced by his 38 WSOP cashes resulting in 23 top 10s. In addition to his six gold bracelets, Forrest has reached the top three of a gold bracelet event on five other occasions.
  19. One month away from the 50th annual World Series of Poker, tournament officials released news about several new additions for the 2019 version of the WSOP. In addition to more starting chips, big blind ante, and new events such as the 'Big 50,' here is what players can look forward to at the 2019 WSOP. Main Event Seat Giveaway In celebration of the 50th annual WSOP, the organization is giving away five WSOP Main Event seats through a drawing held on July 1, 2019. To receive a free entry to the drawing, players simply have to swipe their Caesars Rewards card at the Rio Caesars Rewards desk. Additional entries can be awarded based on tournament play in gold bracelet events. Play in two different gold bracelet events, earn a second entry to the drawing. Then for every additional gold bracelet event that someone plays, he or she will earn another entry to the drawing with a maximum of five entries to the drawing allowed. $500 Hot Seat Promotion During the summer, The Rio's Pavilion Ballroom is always packed with cash game tables, otherwise known as "live action tables" or "live action games." Starting June 3 and running to July 9, the WSOP will draw a random seat every hour of the WSOP and the player in that seat will receive $500 in cash value casino chips. There's 864 hours in that span, meaning you have up to 864 chances to win. It also means the WSOP could be giving away $500 864 times for a total that could reach $432,000. According to the promotion's official rules, a "drawing will be held each hour on each day starting at 12 am only in the event that there is an eligible poker game running." A $1 jackpot promotional rake will be taken from each pot that reaches $10 or more at eligible live action tables. Tournament Registration Updates For the 2019 WSOP, players can put funds into an account and then have options to register for events online or via a mobile device. Using this method, players can also print seat cards and tournament receipts at one of the several kiosks around the WSOP tournament area. Also for the 2019 WSOP, players can use credit and debit cards right at the WSOP Main Cage. What could previously be done online only is now allowed to be done in-person, adding more payment options for players looking to enter WSOP events. Fees do apply, and you can visit WSOP.com/registration for more. Automatic Shufflers, Mid-Stakes Cash Section One hundred automatic shuffling machines will be added to the Rio's Amazon Room. In past years, only a handful of tables in the Amazon Room had automatic shufflers. As mentioned above, the Rio's Pavilion Room is home to cash games. In 2019, this room will have a dedicated mid-stakes section featuring 30 high-end Gorilla Gaming tables. The enhanced tables feature automatic shufflers, mobile device charging, and upgraded chairs. Gavin Smith Memorial Poker Tournament On May 28, the WSOP will host a $200 buy-in memorial tournament to benefit the family of Gavin Smith. The event will be rake-free and start at 6 pm PT. From each $200 buy-in, $100 will go to the prize pool and $100 will be donated to the Gavin Smith Trust. Ladies Warm-Up Tournament The 2019 WSOP Ladies Championship kicks off on June 20. The day before, June 19 at 6 pm, the WSOP will host a special, one-day, non-bracelet Ladies No Limit Hold'em Warm-Up event with a $150 buy-in. Seniors and PLO Deep Stack Events Every Wednesday from May 28 to July 10, the WSOP will host special seniors-only (50+) one-day, deep-stack, No Limit Hold'em tournaments. These tournaments will start at 9 am PT. Every Sunday from June 2 to July 14, the WSOP will host special one-day, deep-stack, Pot Limit Omaha tournaments. These tournaments will start at 5 pm and have a $250 buy-in. As always, stay tuned to the PocketFives 'Everything You Need To Know About the 2019 WSOP' article for more.
  20. The 2006 World Series of Poker Main Event was a watershed moment for the game. A record number of players - 8,773 to be exact - entered the event that year. Thanks to legal efforts in the United States though, the Main Event has never gotten close to that number again. With the 2019 World Series of Poker just hours away, PocketFives editorial staff have put together their picks for who will make the most out what should be an incredible summer. Here they discuss what the field sizes might look like in some of the more talked-about events on the schedule, including the Main Event. The Big 50 Possibly the most talked about event in WSOP history, the Big 50 offers players incredible value and a chance to help celebrate the 50th year of WSOP action. “I think the Big 50 is going to be massive. Players in my local card room, who have never been to the World Series of Poker, are making the trek this year because it feels like the best value tournament of the summer. While my gut says that this would be a complete sellout Friday - Sunday with 5,800 players in each (if that information is accurate) with the opening flight on Thursday reaching 2,500 runners. I feel like the only thing keeping this from eclipsing Colossus I is the rate at which people will or will not be busting. With 50K in chips and 50-minute levels, it’s a recreational players dream scenario (just in terms of a slow rate of play) and I can see people camping in their seats for the day making it hard for late-registrations to get involved. I'm going with 19,200 runners.” - Jeff Walsh, Senior Writer "For the Big 50, I don’t see it breaking the record for largest live tournament ever set by the 2015 WSOP Colossus that generated 22,374 entries, but it will be big. I think we’ll see something more in the 18,000-entry range." - Donnie Peters, Managing Editor "Everybody and their (service) dog is going to be playing the Big 50 and I'm surprised to see my colleagues thinking there isn't going to be a 20,000+ player field. I get that a Thursday starting day isn't ideal for those coming in to cross something off of their bucket list, but a good number of those are going to want to get in early to avoid any potential sellouts for Friday, Saturday, Sunday. If the capacity truly is somewhere around 23,200, I feel like 21,500 is a reasonable estimate." - Lance Bradley, Editor in Chief The Mini Main Event Another new "gimmick" event, the Mini Main Event comes in at $1,000 buy-in and the same structure as the Main Event. Players coming into town looking to throw some chips around could use this one to get themselves ready for the Main Event. “I could be totally off, but despite a great gimmick name - one that I had attributed to the Monster Stack for the past few years - I’m not sure if players are going to be eager to fire $1K into a tournament with 30-minute levels. The structure is great, of course, mirroring that of the actual Main Event, and 60K is plenty of chips with which to blast off but for those value-hunters, there are better options. Plus some of those who might play this may also opt to register for a mega to the actual Main Event. That said, I could be totally wrong, 4,000 runners will pile into the registration line and next thing you know this 2-day event will have to stretch in Day 1A of the Main Event." - Walsh "The $1,000 Mini Main Event is an interesting one. Albeit 30-minute levels, it has a decent structure and provides a nice lead-in for the WSOP Main Event. If you’re playing the WSOP Main Event and coming into Las Vegas for that, what’s a couple of extra days and an added $1,000 buy-in event? It’s the perfect warm-up and the WSOP may very well have its hands full with the event being scheduled for just two days. I think it will draw around 3,000 entries and be a little too much for the two-day window to handle." - Peters "Before partypoker swooped in with their MILLIONS Las Vegas event, I had a much bigger number in mind for this. It's not that I think the rec players are going to go across town and play a $10,000, but I think a good chunk of the WSOP grinders who would have taken a shot here, will have to go play for a $5M guarantee at Aria. Still, this thing looks like a lot of fun and I don't see why it can't pull at least 3,300 players." - Bradley The Main Event “For me, the only real number to consider is 8,000. Will the WSOP eclipse the 8K plateau for the first time since Jaime Gold’s historic Main Event victory in 2006, where he defeated 8,773. 2018’s registrants were the 2nd largest in the event’s history and my feeling is we only go up from here. Although I’m not as confident as some of my colleagues, I do think that we’ll see an increase and that registration will land between 8,000-8,100.” - Walsh "Interestingly, the field size trend for the WSOP Main Event closely mirrors that of the Aussie Millions Main Event that takes place each year in January. It’s not exact, but it’s pretty darn close. When the Aussie Millions Main Event sees an increase in turnout, so does the WSOP Main Event. When the Aussie Millions Main Event sees a decrease, so does the WSOP Main Event. Back in January, the Aussie Millions Main Event drew 822 entries, which was up from the 800 the years before - a 2.8% increase. A 2.8% increase on the 2018 WSOP Main Event field size of 7,874 entries would make for a field of 8,090 in 2019. I’ll couple that with the fact that the WSOP Main Event field size has increased three consecutive years now and predict it will hit 8,400 entries. Truth be told, I’m pretty bullish on it and wouldn’t be totally shocked if the 2019 WSOP Main Event set a new record and surpassed the 8,773 entries from the 2006 WSOP Main Event." - Peters "Three straight years of increased attendance is a pretty good trend and I see no reason why it won't do it again. It's the 50th year, so there's increased hype and that has to be considered, but I think more importantly Bitcoin is trending up and is up 35% over the price on July 1, 2018. It's only a good sign for the Main Event if that number can hold or - gasp - even increase between now and the start of the Main. I'm really not seeing much in the way of obstacles to growth. A down year this year would be a massive shock to me. Given what I'm told will be a robust live satellite offering this year, I'm going to go with 8,600 players in the Main Event." - Bradley
  21. “It was impressive.” Ana Marquez’ reaction the first time she ever walked the halls of the Rio All-Suites Hotel and Casino and into the Pavillion for her first World Series of Poker is the same as thousands of first-timers every single year. “Walking up the stairs in the first door where it says ‘WSOP’ gave me goosebumps…it still does!” Marquez said. “Once inside, I had never seen such a big place full of poker tables and tournaments running. It was truly amazing.” The World Series of Poker has that effect on people. Marquez, an 888poker ambassador and a 10-year veteran of the live poker scene picked up her first cash in a $1,000 No Limit Hold’em Tournament back in 2011, finishing in 32nd place for $14,852. However, at her first WSOP, tournaments were not her main focus. She was busy taking advantage of the myriad of cash games that are always running 24/7. “I was playing more cash games during my first WSOP. I took some small shots and sold some action.” Marquez recounts. “Unfortunately, back in the day, I didn’t have the opportunity we have today with the super-value satellites to the WSOP that 888poker is offering right now.” Like many fans who make their way to the Rio for the first time, Marquez was simply happy to take all of the sights and sounds of the Amazon room in. “The whole experience was really cool,” she said. “But seeing legends like Phil Ivey was the most exciting moment.” Ivey sightings seem to get tougher every year, but still, to this day, players and fans who roam the halls of the WSOP will see some of the biggest stars of the poker world jumping in tournaments, taking their shots. Now, with over $1.3M in lifetime earnings, $168K of that coming in summer WSOP events, Marquez herself is one of those players that fans are looking to snap a selfie with. When those fans ask her for some advice as they take their seat in their first tournament she uses her own early WSOP experience to give them some words of wisdom. “Look at it like it’s just another tourney! We all know that the experience is too exciting to actually do that, so let's just say have loads of fun and enjoy it to the max!” But Marquez is quick to add that she learned that lesson herself in her first Main Event. “[I remember] to play them like any other tournament. I do not like how I played the Main Event my first time because my game was too passive. The tournament was so special to me that I was too cautious and didn’t get to do much with my stack.” It was clearly a lesson she takes to heart. In 2018 Marquez made the final table one of the toughest tournaments of the summer when he picked up over $67,000 in the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em Six Max event. This year, in 2019, Marquez bubbled the final table of the record-breaking $1,500 Millionaire Maker, finishing in 10th place for over $95,000. Ana Marquez and thousands more will make their way to play the 2019 Main Event when it kicks off on July 3.
  22. You can call it cliche if you want, but the World Series of Poker is where the best players in the game go to shine brightest. Phil Hellmuth, Daniel Negreanu, Shaun Deeb, Phil Ivey, and Alex Foxen all enter the 2019 WSOP with the spotlight firmly placed on them. PocketFives editorial staff give their thoughts on how each of these talented players will do this summer. Shaun Deeb "Shaun Deeb is making no secret he wants to go back-to-back as the WSOP Player of the Year. He’s going to be in the mix, but I think it’s going to be incredibly difficult to replicate his 2018 summer in 2019. Deeb is a crusher of all games and while I fully expect him to be in the POY conversation as well as make a mixed game final table to two, I think he’ll simply have to settle for a good, not great, 2019 WSOP." - Jeff Walsh, Senior Writer "For Deeb, 2019 is going to be a test to see if he can walk the walk after he's talked the talk. Well, we already know Deeb has the ability to walk the walk, as he's a highly talented, experienced player who puts in a ton of volume, but being on the bad side of tournament variance can come around at any time in a player's career. I expect Deeb to be a WSOP player of the Year contender once again and a big threat to win any bracelet event he enters. Look for Deeb to tally at least a dozen cashes and reach two or three final tables. Will he win a bracelet in 2019? Deeb has as good of a shot as any and I'll say yes, he will." - Donnie Peters, Managing Editor "It's almost impossible to look at Deeb's body of work and not just automatically assume that he'll be able to do it again. At some point though, he's going to have a stretch where things don't go well. Last summer he cashed 16 times, made 2 final tables and won a bracelet to jump out to a massive POY lead before heading to WSOP Europe. He's going to play every event he can this year in hopes of another bracelet and another POY title, but maybe 16 cashes and a win is too much to expect. I think Deeb will manage no fewer than 10 cashes, but I'd be surprised to see him pull off another win." - Lance Bradley, Editor in Chief Daniel Negreanu "The 2019 WSOP will be unlike any other for Daniel - new wife, no PokerStars, daily vlogs and tens of thousands of his fans money going along for the ride. I think he’ll rise to the occasion with a pair of deep runs and possibly even pick up bracelet number seven in one of the mid-stakes mixed game events." - Walsh "Negreanu has been all over headlines in the final days leading up to the WSOP. He got married to Amanda Leatherman, news dropped that he and PokerStars had parted ways, he’s been feuding on social media, and he sold a bunch of action for his 2019 WSOP slate to poker fans all over the world. The latter of that bunch could very well be what motivates Negreanu to crush this summer. With thousands of people invested in Negreanu, he should want to perform well for them. That last time he sold action in a headlining way was for the 2014 WSOP Big One for One Drop, and he placed second in that event for $8.288 million. Negreanu has adjusted his schedule for the 2019 WSOP and will be playing more low buy-in events because he has said he really wants to make a push for WSOP Player of the Year. With a big schedule planned, thousands of supporters he doesn’t want to let down, and motivation to really show out in his first WSOP in forever as an unsponsored player, it could be a huge summer for Negreanu, and that’s what I think we’ll be getting from him. The last time Negreanu won a gold bracelet in Las Vegas was way back in 2008. He’s due. I predict Negreanu will charge to a handful of final tables this summer and win at least his seventh WSOP gold bracelet, if not his eighth as well." - Peters "As my colleagues have already pointed out, Negreanu has been all over the place lately. While all of that stuff has prevented him from focusing on poker, all of that stuff happened so that Negreanu could turn all of his attention to the WSOP. Once the tournaments begin, he's got every reason in the world to be zoned in and focused. A third time Player of the Year title could very easily be in the works already and I think he's going to get himself at least one bracelet before the Main Event begins." - Bradley Phil Hellmuth "Everything is all lined up for Phil Hellmuth. It's been 30 years since his Main Event victory and the 50th Annual WSOP, it would be destiny for the all-time leader in gold bracelets to find the winner’s circle this summer. Now, I’m not a 'PHater', but it all feels a little too perfect and so...I am fading Hellmuth in 2019. While I think his rant game will be on point, he’ll have a mediocre series and need to get back after it in 2020." - Walsh "Hellmuth is 'Mr. WSOP.' He leads in the categories of most gold bracelets, most cashes, and most final tables at the WSOP, and he continues to put himself in position to win more and more at the Series each and every summer. Just look at 2018, when he cashed seven times and won his 15th bracelet at the WSOP. The year before that, he cashed nine times, when you include WSOP Europe and finished in the top 10 three times. Hellmuth is one of the hungriest players to win every summer and it shows because he wears his heart on his sleeve and hides nothing. The 2019 WSOP marks 30 years since he won the 1989 WSOP Main Event, so we should expect him to be going all out once again. With more events than ever, I predict Hellmuth will reach the top 10 in at least two events and win one gold bracelet." - Peters "Imagine betting against Hellmuth at the WSOP? The spotlight on this year's WSOP will be heightened and that basically almost feeds into the "PH machine". He's also talked about wanting to win a Pot Limit Omaha bracelet and claims to have "shredded" the Razz events over the past few years. Sounds like he's going to be playing even more events this year. I don't think he's got any shot at POY, but he's leaving this summer with #16 stitched on the side of his hat and a new piece of jewellery on his wrist." - Bradley Phil Ivey "Now, for the other Phil, Phil Ivey. Ivey hasn’t been a massive success at the WSOP in recent years because he’s been very much out of competition. He just hasn’t played. His last bracelet came in 2014 and there was a gap in his résumé until the 2018 WSOP when he played a handful of events and cashed four times. With the release of Ivey’s MasterClass course, one would think he’ll be making the jump back into the WSOP waters in 2019. As for predictions, he’s become a very tough one to get a read one, much like he’s virtually unreadable at the poker table. I think he’ll play a bunch because he wouldn’t have released a MasterClass if he was still hiding in the shadows, so I’ll guess that we see him at a couple final tables and challenging for the winner’s circle once or twice. Whether or not he wins a bracelet is really up to Ivey. If he puts in the volume and gets down to business, he’ll win one. If he just shows up to put himself out there because of the MasterClass course, it’s going to be a real tease for poker fans everywhere." - Peters "As much as I’d like to see Ivey. I don’t think we will. Hope I’m proven wrong on Day 1." - Walsh "He ain't coming, kids. Let's just move on." - Bradley Alex Foxen "Alex Foxen is lining up those bracelet bets and I, for one, wouldn’t be betting against him. I’m not sure if he’s going to actually take down a gold bracelet this year but I have a feeling it’s going to a profitable summer for Foxen at the WSOP." - Walsh "As long as Foxen doesn't get sucked away by the big buy-in events at ARIA this summer, look out WSOP. With the added motivation of bracelets bets now on the table, I predict we'll see Foxen land himself in the WSOP winner's circle this summer. He's a no-limit hold'em tournament specialist and there are plenty of events right in his wheelhouse. For starters, Foxen will have two really good chances to win a bracelet in the first few days of the 2019 WSOP with the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty and the $50,000 High Roller. The $5,000 No-Limit Hold'em and $10,000 Heads-Up Championship, both of which take place in the first week of June, are also solid opportunities for Foxen." - Peters "When somebody puts it out there that they want to make bracelet bets against any and all comers, it tells you that they're ready for the grind that is the WSOP. History doesn't support his confidence though. Foxen has had just 25 cashes at the Rio over his career and three of them were final tables. Still, he's the GPI #1-ranked player for a reason and if he's got extra financial incentive to get his first bracelet, you know he's going to be less inclined to wander over to the Venetian or Aria to play their events. Deep runs almost feel like a given, but a bracelet? I'm not so sure." - Bradley
  23. The World Series of Poker has a history of making stars and has played a key role in solidifying the reputation of some of the game's biggest stars. Finding the players who could enjoy new success on the WSOP stage isn't an easy task but the PocketFives editorial staff has accepted the challenge. Jeff Walsh, Senior Writer You never really know who that "Breakout Player" will be but I’ve got a couple of players I’m keeping my eye on this summer that I think could take the next step and elevate their game. You might remember Ian Steinman from his hero fold against Joe McKeehan at the 2018 WPT Rolling Thunder Main Event when he spikes a set of kings on the river and after exhausting all of his time bank chips found an amazing fold. Well, Steinman is not only an accomplished online grinder, having won the WSOP.com online Player of the Year award in 2016 but a mid-stakes live beast. Like most amazing NLHE players, he’s fearless at the table and is able to accumulate chips in a hurry. Last year, Steinman barely missed out on his first gold bracelet falling to Eric Baldwin in heads up play in a $1,500 NLHE event, settling for a $197K score for second place. This could be the year he takes the experiences from all those big-time spots and puts it together to pick up his first WSOP win. It feels like it’s just a matter of time for this West Coast grinder and it may be this year. Speaking of big-time my second pick has already had plenty of time in the spotlight. You might remember Julien Martini from his runner-up finish at this year’s PokerStars Players Championship. Martini is a fantastic player who plays all the games and picked up his first bracelet event in 2018. So, with all these accolades how can he break out? I’m tracking Martini to pick up his second bracelet this year in one of the Championship events. He plays all the games and he’s bringing that PSPC bankroll boost to the summer series. I figure when all is said and done, his price in the 2020 $25K Fantasy Draft is going to go through the roof. Donnie Peters, Managing Editor Adam Owen is very much skilled in all poker variants and is known to put in a lot of volume. His name may be known around the poker community, but the Brit has yet to truly breakout. Not only has he not won a WSOP gold bracelet yet, but he’s never experienced a major tournament victory. Specific to the WSOP, Owen has a handful of final tables and a trio of top-three finishes. I’m going to say that 2019 is a huge summer at the World Series of Poker for Owen. He’ll win his first bracelet, rack up the cashes, and contend for WSOP Player of the Year. Ping Liu is another player who can be considered in a similar light as Owen is. Liu has gained some notoriety through his run on the World Poker Tour this season, and he’s challenging to win the WPT Player of the Year award. Like Owen, his best finish in a WSOP event is a third-place result and he’s still searching for his first major tournament title. Liu has been very much on form in recent months and earned some big scores. He closed out 2018 with a fourth-place finish in the WPT Five Diamond event for $600,000. With his padded bankroll and so many No Limit Hold’em events on the WSOP schedule, look for Liu to make a few big splashes this summer. I can easily see him winning his first WSOP gold bracelet if he puts in any sort of decent volume. Lance Bradley, Editor in Chief It's hard to pick players out of relative obscurity that might enjoy success at the WSOP. That's why the first player on my list is more of a known commodity that maybe anybody else listed here. Patrick Leonard is a former #1-ranked player on PocketFives, the current #3-ranked player in the world, and has a little more than $2.4 million in live earnings. Despite all of that, he's never really had a big WSOP. He only has seven WSOP cashes for $114,229 in earnings but he's never committed to a full schedule. That changes this year. Leonard is putting the online grind to the side for seven weeks to play a full WSOP schedule. He's an extremely talented player and will be free of the potential distraction of returning to the online felt. I expect Leonard's going to find his way deep in a number of events this summer and might finally find himself with a realistic shot at winning his first bracelet. Each year there's a handful of players who skyrocket into the public eye with double-digit level cashes after having previously found some success at the Rio. Last year, Lexi Gavin cashed seven times at the WSOP including a 12th place finish in a $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha. That doubles her lifetime career cashes and I don't see any reason why the upward trend can't continue. She's predominantly a No Limit Hold'em player and the WSOP schedule includes an almost endless number of opportunities for her to run up a stack and potentially make her first career final table.
  24. Five months ago, Jeremy Hilsercop became the center of the poker world's attention after his wife Randi posted a video showing Jeremy getting a WSOP Big 50 buy-in for Christmas. The video quickly went viral and in the 48 hours that followed, Jeremy ended up with a free seat in the $25,000 buy-in PokerStars Players Championship and had the entire poker world cheering him on. The chaotic days that followed included getting passports, airplane tickets, and planning for a trip to the Bahamas that was just a few days away. While the PSPC trip certainly had the makings of a potential fairytale, Jeremy busted out on Day 1, well before the money. With all of that now behind them, the Hilsercops are now in Las Vegas with Jeremy playing Day 1A of the Big 50. It's a completely different experience from what he went through in January and it's got very little to do with the difference in buy-in. "It's a lot different. I'm a lot more comfortable. I actually slept last night. It's not real hectic. I can just be myself and go play poker. It's 100% different this time," Jeremy said. "I'm calm, collected and just ready to play." Since leaving the Bahamas in early January, life has largely returned to its normal state for Jeremy. He's been working and focused on spending time with his family while also finding some time to play some cash games. That doesn't mean he hasn't had this day circled on his calendar since Christmas though. "This is what got me. This is my dream. My dream is to play at the WSOP and this is what I've always wanted to do," Jeremy said. He's got a huge virtual rail back home in Tennessee with nobody more excited than his two kids, Michael and Madison. The early bust out from PSPC was his first taste of a big buy-in live tournament action and while it didn't come with a Hendon Mob entry, he learned a thing or two along the way. He's brought those lessons with him to the WSOP and has a simple gameplan to make the most of this whole experience. "Play smart, keep my chips in front of me and get ready for Day 2," Jeremy said. During his time in the Bahamas, Jeremy got to understand a little bit of what it's like to be a well-known poker pro. Players at his table knew who he was and he was frequently asked about his story. He also got a fair bit of media attention. Returning to civilian life, Jeremy doesn't expect too many people are going to remember him and he's just fine with that. "Whether I get recognized or not, I'm not thinking about it. I'm just thinking about playing," Jeremy said.
  25. After months of the build-up for the 50th annual World Series of Poker, poker players and fans alike finally got to hear those four magic words on Wednesday that marked the beginning of seven weeks of poker at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas: "Shuffle Up and Deal!" Two events kicked off Day 1 on Wednesday: the $565 Casino Employees event, and the first open event of the year, the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty, which featured many of the world's best No Limit Hold'em players. Asher Conniff Bags Lead in $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty; Daniel Negreanu Makes Final Table Daniel Negreanu has been telling anybody and everybody that he was going to have a great WSOP. Wednesday he took the first step towards making that a reality by making the final table of the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty (Event #2) with a chance at bracelet #6 on Thursday. He's got his work cut out for him though. Negreanu bagged just over 1,000,000 chips which puts him behind Ali Imsirovic (2,180,000), Loren Klein (3,130,000), and overnight chip leader Asher Conniff (4,215,000). "First WSOP event, first final table, so far so good," joked Conniff. "It's 20-minute levels, so I basically just ran really well. Guess I didn't play terribly, but in these things you have to run incredibly well, win your all ins." Conniff, who won the World Poker Tour World Championship in 2015, has never made a WSOP final table in Las Vegas. He gives some of the credit to things going well for him away from the felt. "I've been working on my game, but not crazy-crazy - I've also been enjoying life and doing some other stuff," said Conniff. "Life is really good otherwise and that's always a good bellwether for success in poker when you have your affairs sorted." The two-day event attracted a 204-player field for a total prize pool of $1,917,600. This represents a 17% drop over the 243 players who played in 2018. Kenny Hallaert suffered the indignity of being the first player to bust on the bubble of a 2019 WSOP event. The Belgian was eliminated by Klein in a classic race situation as Klein's [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"] outran Hallaert's [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"]. Some of the notables who were eliminated post-bubble included Pennsylvania poker player Thai Ha, Erik Seidel, Byron Kaverman, Nick Schulman, Darren Elias, Ben Yu and Ben Lamb. Play resumes at Noon PT with action streaming on PokerGO. Final Table Chip Counts Asher Conniff - 4,215,000 Loren Klein - 3,130,000 Ali Imsirovic - 2,180,000 Daniel Negreanu - 1,015,000 Ping Liu - 990,000 Brian Green - 720,000 Bracelet Winner Jon Friedberg in Contention in Casino Employees Event The first official event of the 2019 WSOP was the $565 Casino Employees which saw 686 players enter. That's up 21% over the 566 players that entered last year and represents the biggest field since 2016 when 731 players entered. Cosmo Andoloro, out of Woodinville, Washington, ended Day 1 with the biggest stack at 650,000. Right behind him Christopher Bowen with 633,00. Jon Friedberg, who won a WSOP bracelet in 2006, finished with the eight best stack, putting 360,000 in the bag. The event, which is open to anybody who works for a casino, included PokerNews reporters Mo Nuwwarah and Chad Holloway, Dutch Boyd and poker media icon Kevin Mathers. Day 2 starts at Noon Thursday. Top 10 Chip Counts Cosmo Andoloro - 650,000 Christopher Bowen - 633,000 Miguel Cardenas - 512,000 Stephanie Otteson - 479,000 Bradley Helm - 465,000 Jorge Ruiz West - 426,000 Jesse Kertland - 398,000 Jon Friedberg - 360,000 Jeffrey Fast - 324,000 Austin Roberts - 324,000 Day 2 Schedule Along with the Noon restarts for Events #1 and #2, Thursday's action also brings the first flight of the Big 50. The $500 buy-in event is expected to attract a massive field over the fours starting day. Action begins at 11 AM PT. The $1,500 Omaha Hi/Lo 8 or Better (Event #4) starts at 3 PM PT.
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