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  1. “I feel good. Physically, I have recovered. I guess from an emotional standpoint, I don’t know that I still quite get what happened yet. Sounds a little weird but it’s still all surreal for me.” It’s been a month since George Holmes played in his second-ever World Series of Poker Main Event, the outcome of which was an experience he could have only dreamed of having. The 49-year-old father of two from Alpharetta, Georgia went on a once-in-a-lifetime run in the $10,000 televised tournament, one that turned him from an anonymous everyday recreational player into the “Home Game Hero”, battling in poker’s bright spotlight against some of the best in the business ended up finishing as the runner-up for an incredible $4,000,000 score. “But I feel good. I finally went back a week ago and kind of watched the stream of the final table. I think, for me, it’s about as good as it’s going to get as far as being able to put everything into perspective…it kind of is what it is,” Holmes said. “I’ve been, probably for the past week and a half, back in the normal swing. I came home, I went back to work the following week. I planned on working just because I enjoy what I do and it just gives me an opportunity to kind of take a step back and take my time and figure out what I want to do with all this money.” Holmes works as an executive for a company that helps merchants process payments. It’s currently offering him a sense of real-world stability as opposed to his whirlwind experience in the Main Event filled with the highs, the lows, the lack of sleep, and the pressure to perform. But Holmes, who presents as level-headed and as even-keel as they come, insists that while he’s still processing what took place, his return to reality took place rather quickly. “To know me, I’m pretty a pretty monotone, mellow person so I don’t get very high. I think coming back to Earth, for me, was a lot easier,” he said. “After the Main Event was over, it was probably eight o’clock. A bunch of my friends were still there from the rail so we went out to celebrate for a few hours. We hung out probably ’til midnight or one…we were all on a flight the next morning at six o’clock a.m. At that point, I wanted out of Vegas. “For me, a perfect stint in Vegas is three or four days. Being there for a week and a half, I mean I’m just spent and I’m ready to go. Especially with the schedule for the World Series. You don’t really get to do anything. It’s poker, sleep, get up, poker, and then sleep again and that’s basically it for a week and a half,” he said. “So, for me to come down, it didn’t take much, probably a couple of days. Physically, I was drained, I was tired. Mentally, I was spent from just sitting at the table, looking at hands nonstop. But after a few days back at home, I was fine. I was still trying to understand what all happened and I told a couple of friends this, I kind of which I could’ve experienced this somewhat from their perspective, just being on the rail. “But I was just playing, cameras in your face. Once you have that for a day or two, it’s normal. But I don’t know that I experienced it the way everyone else did. I mean, I’m hearing all these great stories, all these people that were cheering for me, but I don’t get to see any of the highs or the lows, I’m just kind of living in the moment I guess…kind of weird to explain.” One of those moments he lived in was the final hand of the Main Event, one of the most thrilling WSOP moments for fans in some time. In summary, after spiking top pair on the turn, and being checked to on the river, Holmes moved all-in for his tournament life. However, Koray Aldemir, his affable German heads-up opponent (and eventual 2021 WSOP Main Event champ) had flopped two pair and was deep in thought about whether to make the call that could end the tournament. “The longer he took told me that I did not want a call,” Holmes said. “I’m shoving, thinking I have the best hand. I would have never imagined [Aldemir] had such a miracle flop.” “But the longer he took, I started replaying things in my head like, ‘Well, maybe he has two pair.’ Initially, I thought maybe he has top pair and maybe a flush draw. We had such a great rapport at the table…he looks up at me as he’s thinking and he’s probably halfway through his tank and he’s like ‘This might be it. This might be the hand.’ “ It was the hand, Aldemir did put his chips in the middle and both hands were turned face up. Aldemir read the board instantly and knew he was the new World Champion. He threw his hands in the air, turned to his rail, and the celebration began as Holmes also stood and leaned over the table, taking a long second look at what had just happened. “To be honest, I don’t remember what I was thinking at the time,” Holmes said, reflecting on the moment. “I think I asked, because I wasn’t one hundred percent sure, if he had me covered at that point. I know I asked the dealer if he had me covered and to be honest, at that point, I did not care what happened.” --- Holmes is back home, back spending time with his family and gearing up for what is sure to be a special holiday season for his wife, 13-year old son, and 15-year old daughter. But Holmes is also back playing in the Atlanta home game he made famous on the WSOP coverage. It’s the one he’s been playing in for the better part of a decade. He’s come a long way since first getting into the game back in 1999, before No Limit Hold’em rose to power as the dominant variant of the game. Holmes says although he’s never been a serious student of the game, he’s loved poker since the moment he started playing it with co-workers regularly in 2000. Back then it was a ‘just for fun’ $0.25/0.50 game. But now he plays with a regular group of guys splashing around at $2/5. But Holmes is quick to clarify that “it plays a lot larger than a normal $2/5 game.” It’s the same group of guys who were on the rail rooting Holmes on in the Main Event, the same who are likely looking to see if some of that $4 million end up on the table in their own game, even if it is one small buy-in at a time. But Holmes insists that his newfound poker fame hasn’t changed the game in the least, “It’s a tough crew, man. I get razz no matter what.” One might think that there would be other opportunities for Holmes to flex his popular final table persona, but according to him he hasn’t received any invitations yet for shows like Poker After Dark or live-streamed games like Hustler Casino Live or Live At The Bike, at least not yet. “My phone hasn’t really been blowing up,” he said. Noting that he’s had a couple of promotional opportunities which he’s politely declined. “I get friends that ask me all the time ‘Have you had any sponsors reach out to you?’ and the answer’s been no. It’s been quiet.” But Holmes seems at peace with that quiet. He’s not the type to hit a big score, rearrange his life, and take to the circuit. But when pressed about whether a stint on a PokerGO cash game could entice him to make a trip back to Las Vegas sooner than later, a small smile appears. “That’d be interesting.” People would likely watch as Holmes understands he has fans well beyond the dozen of guys who were on his rail. His “Home Game Hero” storyline not only played well on the broadcast, but it’s the dream for a lot of recreational players who are just like Holmes. Those who were pulling hard for him to take it to the high roller pro, even as likable as Aldemir is. “I had been hearing the whole week, ‘You’re blowing up on Twitter.' And, at the time I didn’t have a Twitter account. But what I did feel, just in the Amazon room, was the love from the folks there…and it was amazing. It was absolutely amazing. Even the [media] that was there, when I busted out one of the camera guys stopped me and said ‘This might sound weird but we know your face. After a week of watching you we know your face better than you do and we just wanted to tell you from all the crew that we loved your game, we were rooting hard for you here in the room and in the trucks.’ And I thought that was pretty amazing. “I ran into a couple of folks at the airport the next morning. And when I tell you I had no regrets after that final hand, I honestly did not. But one regret would be just for the folks who were rooting for me,” he said. “There were so many folks saying ‘We were hoping you win the whole thing. We wanted you to take it down.’ And there was this story of like USA versus Germany and the UK…and that’s the only real regret I have, it’s not winning it for the folks that I didn’t know that had just jumped on and were rooting for me so hard.” In 2019 Holmes entered the Main Event and finished in 213th for over $50,000. His goal in 2021 was simply to beat his 2019 finish, which he clearly did. But where does that leave him moving forward? There’s not a lot of Main Event places he can improve to. “That’s a great question. Naturally, I will continue to play the Main Event and see how I can do. I hadn’t thought about it beyond knowing that I’m going to continue to play the Main and there are a bunch of circuit events that I will probably play one or two but I hadn’t thought much past that. I really haven’t.” “The odds tell me I should quit while I’m ahead…but I love playing the game too much.”
  2. The Czech Republic's Josef Gulas Jr. outlasted French high roller Johan Guilbert to win the World Series of Poker Europe Main Event title and €1,276,712 ($1,448,289) first-place prize at King's Casino in Rozvadov on Wednesday Night. Gulas leveraged every bit of his home-court advantage in a rollercoaster of a ride that had the "businessman and car salesman" starting the day as the overwhelming chip leader, slipping down to the short stack, and battling back - multiple times - to eventually take home the biggest payday of his career. "It's an incredible feeling. I am truly thankful and happy," said Gulas after his win. "It was a perfect tournament with a very nice structure in the best casino in Europe. Just incredible!" Although the final table took some time to complete, nearly nine hours and 139 hands, it took just 15 minutes for Thomas Denie's tournament to come to an end in a massive hand that sent him to the rail. Denie found himself all-in pre-flop with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"], way behind Athanasios Kidas with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"] and that stayed the case through the board of [poker card="Td"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="3h"][poker card="6s"] to make his way from the table for a result worth €163,434. Aleksandar Trajkovski was the next man to bust. With the blinds at 125,000/250,000 (250,000 bb ante) Guilbert opened to 500,000 under the gun holding the [poker card="ts"][poker card="7s"] and Trajkovski defended his big blind off the short stack with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"]. Trajkovski hit top pair on the [poker card="kc"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2s"] flop and checked it over to Guilbert who put in a small bet of just 250,000. Trajkovski then check-shipped his remaining five big blinds and was snapped off by Guilbert, looking to hit a flush or running cards. The turn was the [poker card="7h"], bringing Guilbert more outs. But it was the [poker card="9s"] river that sent Trajkovski to the rail in sixth place for €217,854. With five players left, only Stanislav Koleno was short-stacked and under pressure to make something happen. The Slovenian got his remaining chips into the middle on a flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3d"] holding [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Td"] but overnight chip leader Josef Gulas made the call with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kd"]. The [poker card="7d"] turn didn’t help Koleno other than adding a gutshot straight draw, but the [poker card="3h"] river ended those hopes, sending him to the cash desk for a fifth-place finish worth €292,862. With four players left, Guilbert doubled through Gulas Jr. (aces vs. kings) to grab a chip lead of 24 million, ahead of Athanasios Kidas with 17.4 million, Alexander Tkatschew (16.9m), and Gulas (10.3m) who slipped to the short stack. And for the best part of an hour, very little changed other than the stacks behind Guilbert evening up a little. That was not the case for the next hour. Tkatschew had the lead while Guilbert fought back. The home country’s hope in Gulas Jr. battled for his tournament life on more than one occasion. And, after an epic see-sawing of the chips, Greek player Kidas found himself on the outside looking in as the short stack. In the battle of the short stacks, Gulas was the aggressor as he shoved pre-flop for 22 big blinds with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qc"]. Kidas, down to just 13 big blinds, called off his stack with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Js"] and the pair watched as the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"][poker card="3c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="Tc"] sent Kidas out in fourth for a result worth €401,344. Germany's Tkatschew took over the chip lead for a short time until Guilbert was able to lift a big pot off him to reclaim the top of the leaderboard. Then, slowly, Tkatschew's stack began to shrink and for nearly two hours he navigated a stack of under 20 bigs. Eventually, though, Tkatschew could hang on no longer when he ran into Guilbert holding another big hand. With the blinds at 250,000/500,000 (500,000 bb ante) Guilbert put in a raise from the button to 1 million holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="2c"] and Tkatschew defended his big blind with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="td"]. The flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2h"], giving Tkatschew top pair and Guilbert the nut flush draw. Guilbert didn't have to wait long for his flush to come in as the turn came the [poker card="4c"] and now Tkatschew led for 1.3 million. Guilbert just called, leaving Tkatschew with roughly a half-pot bet behind. The river came the [poker card="7s"] and when Tkatschew moved all-in, Guilbert insta-called and showed Tkatschew the winning hand. Tkatschew made his way out of the tournament area, finishing in third place for €558,505. Guilbert had a two-to-one chip lead over Gulas Jr. headed into heads-up play but the momentum quickly shifted to Gulas when the pair got involved in an all-in confrontation with Gulas' [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"] holding against Guilbert's [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"]. After that, both players slowed the pace of play way down as they traded blows back and forth. Guilbert regained the lead when he rivered a flush versus Gulas' turned straight. Then Gulas took it right back when he flopped two pair with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="5s"] against Guilbert's [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"] on the [poker card="as"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5c"] flop. Eventually, Gulas took control and broke out into a large chip lead headed into what would be the final hand of the tournament. On the button, Gulas open-shipped his massive chip lead holding the [poker card="ad"][poker card="8s"] and Guilbert snap-called it off for just over 10 big blinds with his [poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="jd"][poker card="3h"], keeping Guilbert in the lead. The [poker card="7d"] turn changed nothing. But the river was the [poker card="8h"], giving Gulas a pair and ending Guilbert's tournament as the runner-up for €789,031. Gulas Jr. gave a fist pump as he secured the win, the WSOP Europe Main Event bracelet, and the €1,276,712 first-place prize. https://twitter.com/PokerroomKings/status/1468886306239307776?s=20 WSOP Europe Main Event Final Table Results Josef Gulas Jr. - €1,276,712 Johan Guibert - €789,031 Alexander Tkatschew - €558,505 Athanasios Kidas - €401,344 Stanislav Koleno - €292,862 Aleksandar Trajkovski - €217,854 Thomas Denie - €163,434
  3. The World Series of Poker Winter Online Circuit returns to GGPoker this month highlighted by 18 Circuit ring events and at least $100,000,000 in total guaranteed prize money up for grabs across all events. The series runs from December 12 through January 9 and encompasses hundreds of side events as well as the ring events, 13 of which come with a guarantee of $1 million or more. “WSOP Circuit events are great, they give every player the chance to win a big prize and a gold ring while enjoying a taste of the WSOP experience,” said GGPoker Global Ambassador Daniel Negreanu. “This time around, there’s also the not-insignificant matter of $100,000,000 in prizes to enjoy as well. It might be getting cold outside but the action is just heating up at GGPoker!” The series highlights include the BIG 50 MILLION$, a multi-flight $50 buy-in that comes with a $1 million guarantee. The $100 buy-in MILLION$ Mini Main Event with $2 million guaranteed. A special $3 million guaranteed $10,300 Super MILLION$ and a $1,050 GGMasters High Roller with $1.5 million guaranteed. The series will conclude with the $525 Main Event with a massive $5 million guarantee. Day 1 flights for the Main Event begin on December 27 with plenty of additional opportunities for players to make Day 2, which takes place on January 9. Satellites for most of the major events are running around the clock in the client and, for some events, start for as little as $0.50. In total, the 18 ring events account for more than $26 million of the total series guarantee. In addition to vying for a WSOP Circuit ring, there are plenty of other incentives on the line during the WSOP Winter Online Circuit. Every time a player participates in a ring event or side event (which makes up for the bulk of the schedule) leaderboard points are awarded. The top 100 players on the leaderboard will split $100,000 in added bonus prizes. Additionally, any player who wins a Circuit Event will automatically for the live WSOP Million Dollar Freeroll in Las Vegas (tie and date to be announced). The WSOP Million Dollar Freeroll is a change of format for the WSOP that, in the past, had awarded seats to the year-end WSOP Tournament of Champions to the top 100 players on the WSOPC yearly leaderboard with two seats at each live stop being awarded to the Player of the Series and the winner of the Main Event of any given Circuit stop. But now, any WSOP Circuit win - including one of the international Online variety - earns a ticket to the year-end event. Finally, for the fans, two of the 18 ring events will be a part of the GGPoker live stream schedule with Randy ‘Nanonoko’ Lew and Kevin ‘Rotterdam’ van der Kooi calling the action. Tune in on Tuesday, December 21 to catch the high rollers in action for the $3 million GTD Super MILLION$. Then, the final table of the $525 Main Event will play out on Saturday, January 15th. For a complete schedule of events, including all Day 1 starting flights for multi-flight events, visit GGPoker. WSOP Winter Online Circuit Ring Event Schedule [table id=278 /]
  4. It came down to the final week of the 2021 World Series of Poker but, in the end, Daniel Negreanu dug himself out of a half-million-dollar WSOP hole and booked a win for himself and more than 300 supporters who purchased a piece of his series-long staking package. “I give people a chance to take the ride.” Two months ago, Negreanu announced that he would, once again, be offering shares of his entire WSOP campaign. He was honoring a promise to those fans who missed out on his 2019 campaign and had yet to have an opportunity for a series-long sweat. He gave those people the chance to "take the ride" with him at the WSOP. And what a ride it was. Starting with WSOP Event #2 ($25,000 H.O.R.S.E.) Negreanu dedicated himself to a non-stop grind. He fired in 46 of the scheduled 88 live events, plus all 10 of the online events. He posted a total of $1,052,773 in buy-ins (of $1,627,484 potential) and, in the end, cashed in 18 of the 56 events - a 32% in-the-money record for the series. Daniel Negreanu’s 2021 WSOP Cashes [table id=276 /] The total of those cashes adds up to $1,451,297.68. But there’s a bonus $500 added in from a bounty captured from Event #71 making the total $1,451,797.68 - a profit of $399,024.68. When that is added to the unplayed amount collected at the beginning of the stake ($574,711) the end result is a profit for backers of 24.52%. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463675183202373635?s=20 So, for every $20 investment, there was $24.90 returned. For those who put in the maximum amount upfront of $1,000, they took home $1,245.18. [table id=275 /] The Million Dollar Swing When Negreanu first offered the action this year he decided to forgo the High-Medium-Low tier of investments that he used in 2019 because “I want all of us to win together, or…if I lose, we all lose together.” That turned out to be beneficial for all Negreanu’s backers. As the series was coming to a close, Negreanu was looking at a near half-million deficit. The entire stake was riding on a series of high rollers - two $50Ks, a $100K, and the $250K Super High Roller. The buy-ins alone could have pushed Negreanu under $1 million if he wasn’t able to make something happen. But after picking up a small cash in Event #80 ($3,000 PLO), Negreanu rode that momentum into Event #84 ($50,000 PLO High Roller). He busted his first bullet but fired again, and this time he shot straight. He took his second chance all the way to the final table. It looked like he might capture bracelet #7, but after some hands didn’t go his way, he bowed out in third place. His $519,764 score turned the tide for the stake and put him within $10,000 of being even. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1462831012145098753?s=20 He was right back at it the next day in Event #85 ($50,000 NLHE High Roller). There were 113 entries, but Negreanu only fired one shot. The momentum from the PLO High Roller carried over and the sweat became real as he made back-to-back final tables. Unfortunately, Negreanu fell in third place again, unable to break through to the bracelet. But he added a critical score of $661,041 to not only climb into the positive but ensure that he would be profitable with only four total events left on the schedule. It was a million-dollar swing in the course of 72 hours and for those following along, it was the reason for backing Negreanu in the first place. Not just the profit, which is of course nice, but the entertainment of being a part of an epic run with a fantastic finish. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092?s=20 The World Series of Poker may be over but keep your eyes on PocketFives Staking for plenty of future opportunities to be a part of the action of your favorite players.
  5. The 2021 World Series of Poker was a wild ride and not just for those players who made the trip to Las Vegas. As the schedule in the series began to wind down, the pressure ramped up for players to close out the fall with a nice score and, for many of those who chose to take the ride by picking up a piece of the action on PocketFives, there were some great gains to be made. Arieh Shares Sun Run With Supporters You don’t have to look further than newly crowed 2021 WSOP Player of the Year (and PocketFives own) Josh Arieh. Arieh was relentless on the felt and generous in offering pieces of his amazing sun run to his followers. For example, Arieh put up 5% of his $10,000 Main Event at zero markup. Clearly a favorite against the field, the 50 backers who were able to quickly snap up their .1% (just a mere $10 to get a sweat on) all saw a return of $30 - an ROI of 200% - when he finished in 411th place for $30,000. He was nowhere near finished. Arieh’s run to the POY included two more notable cashes, but the one his backers certainly appreciated was his final table finish in the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. Arieh had crushed every PLO tournament he played in this year, including famously helping some of his backers turn $15 into $2K. Another nice return was in order for the 141 backers who supported him. Arieh sold 10%, again at no markup, and ended up finishing in seventh place for $165,452. That’s an ROI of 230.90% with $16,545 headed back to his backers. If every backer had an equal share, that would look like a $35 stake yielding more than $117. He had another 200+% ROI in the $10K Stud 8 where 43 backers picked up 10% of his action and turned every $10 increment into just over $30 as well. https://twitter.com/robcpoker/status/1463094577083019266?s=20 RELATED: Negreanu, Arieh, and Glantz Help Backers Clean Up In WSOP $50K Poker Players Championship Seidel Just Hits Home Runs Erik Seidel was also a home run hitter down the stretch. The nine-time WSOP bracelet winner jumped on PocketFives to sell for just two events late in the schedule. Both times he sold out and both times he came through. He sold 50% of his action, strictly for the fans, in the same $10K Seven Card Stud 8 where Arieh finished in ninth. Seidel made it to the final table and ended up finishing in 7th place for $46,140. His ROI - 361.40%. Collectively, his 29 backers turned the $5,600 (Seidel sold at 1.12 markup) into $23,070 and every 1% of the stake ($56) turned into $230. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1460030971340734464?s=20 It worked so well in the Stud 8, Seidel picked up more run good by running it back in the $10K Razz Championship. Again he sold 50% and. again, he made a final table. In back-to-back tournaments, Seidel finished in 7th place and this time cashed out for $39,987. If each of his 35 backers had the same share, they’d have turned $160 into more than $570. Negreanu’s Fantastic Finish Right up until the last tournament, Daniel Negreanu was challenging Josh Arieh for WSOP Player of the Year. He finished the series second in total cashes with 18 and was selling action all along the way. After his deep run in the $50K Poker Players Championship, Negreanu booked four more cashes, but for backers, his deep run in the $50K Pot Limit Omaha was the most important, and perhaps the most surprising. In it, Negreanu made the final table and, once again, came so close to winning bracelet #7. Eventually, he bowed out in 3rd place which was good for $519,764. Unfortunately, since it was on his second bullet it didn't count for those who supported him as a single event. However, for the more than 300 backers of his complete package it brought him close to being even for the series. That score set him up for his biggest score yet. While he didn’t sell action explicitly for the $50,000 NLHE High Roller, this was a critical event for the hundreds of people who were involved in his series-long package. In the event, he made another sick final table run, again nearly locking down a bracelet, but ended up in third place for more than $660,000 and turned his total series package from negative to a huge profit. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092?s=20 [Correction: an earlier version of this article indicated that Negreanu had cashed in the $50K PLO for his single event backers, however, it was on his 2nd bullet which meant it only counted for the series long investors. We apologize for the error.] With that, the 2021 WSOP and the ride for investors came to an end. But be on the lookout for more from PocketFives Staking as the end is really just the beginning.
  6. After two more tournaments closed out the 2021 World Series of Poker, there was late drama across the Rio. Michael Addamo claimed the High Roller victory that confirms 2021 as the ‘Year of Addamo’, Boris Kolev won his first-ever bracelet and there was late drama in the WSOP Player of the Year race, which was over, not over, then done for good. Addamo Claims Huge High Roller Win Australian high roller crusher Michael Addamo won his fourth WSOP bracelet after taking down the $100,000-entry Event #87 High Roller after a final table performance that confirmed his greatness in 2021. Addamo has crushed the year, winning more in the past 11 months than many great players have in their entire careers. His quest for his fourth bracelet began looking down from a great height at the top of the leaderboard. Nevertheless, Addamo would have been surprised that his closest challenger when play began, Danish player Henrik Hecklen, busted in fifth place for $434,523. Sam Soverel had chipped up in the early exchanges at the table, and his raise pre-flop saw Hecklen call off his 14 big blind stack with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jd"]. Soverel called it off with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3d"] and managed to ride home his better hand, with the board playing out [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] for a flopped top pair to almost double his stack. Soverel was on a mini heater and doubled through the chip leader Addamo to take the lead when he was all-in and at risk with top pair against the Aussie’s two pair on the turn, only for the river to give him a better two pair and stun the table. If Addamo was running bad, could it be anyone’s tournament? Sean Perry certainly hoped so when he moved all-in with [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"] against the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] belonging to Kevin Rabichow. The board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] saw Rabichow make trips and slay Perry’s chances, the result worth $590,344. Down to three players, Rabichow was still the short stack, but over an extended period of play without an elimination, Soverel first spiked as chip leader, but then plummeted in two hands as Addamo delivered him from the tournament in brutal fashion, his [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] dominating Soverel’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Td"] on a board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Th"]Ks][poker card="2c"] and sending Soverel home with $830,992. Heads-up, it was that hand that propelled Addamo into a dominant position. With 28 million to Rabichow’s 5 million, the Australian needed no time at all to wrap up the event and claim his fourth WSOP bracelet of an already astounding poker career. Rabichow was all-in pre-flop for his last 12 big blinds with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"] and although he began the final hand ahead of Addamo’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2c"] the board of [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7h"] saw the most successful Australian tournament player in history add yet more glory to a stunning poker CV. Kevin Rabichow won over $1.2 million for a great run to runner-up but it was Michel Addamo who lost the lead yet won it all back and more to take down Event #87 and claim a famous victory worth $1.95m WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Results: Michael Addamo - $1,958,569 Kevin Rabichow - $1,210,487 Sam Soverel - $830,992 Sean Perry - $590,344 Henrik Hecklen - $434,523 Sorel Mizzi - $331,806 Sam Grafton - $263,227 Mikita Badziakouski - $217,274 Bill Klein - $186,909 Fedor Holz - $167,869 Kolev the King as WSOP Closes Rio Events With Maiden Win In the final event of the WSOP 2021, Boris Kolev became the answer to a thousand poker quizzes of the future as he won the last physical bracelet inside the Rio. Kolev had come into play just outside the top 10 chipcounts with 30 players remaining and for some time, the day was about Ben Yu in more ways than one. Yu, who led the field heading into the final day, was actually in the running to win the WSOP Player of the Year as Justin Bonomo of all people revealed. Eventually, thanks in no small part to Shaun Deeb’s amusing asides and general great play, Yu could not prevent Josh Arieh from celebrating - again - the Player of the Year title that was re-confirmed upon Yu’s exit in 10th place, as we wrote about right here in more detail. Yu’s exit in 10th place saw the final table of eight almost there and when Justin Liberto crashed out in ninth place with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"] unable to beat Niko Koop’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"] across a thrilling run out of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"] that gave the latter a full house on the river, the race was on to win the final bracelet of the series. Lee Markholt busted in eighth place for $49,107 when his shove with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] was overtaken by Kolev’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"] as the board played out [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Qs"]Kh] to give the eventual winner trips, and George Wolff lost his stack to Huy Nguyen when [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"] didn’t hold against Nguyen’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3d"] as a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Tc"] saw Wolff cash for $64,207. With six players remaining, Koop made his bow in sixth place for $85,411 as his shove with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"] ran into the dominating [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] belonging to Uri Reichenstein. The board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"] saw Reichenstein win that important pot to climb the ranks and send the dangerous Koop to the rail. It was the turn of Z Stein to bust in fifth place as his check-call for his stack on the turn of a board showing [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Qc"] doomed his [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8c"] with Reichenstein holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="9h"]. The river of [poker card="Jc"] confirmed a full house for the Israeli and sent Stein home with a result worth $115,558 his final result of the Autumn WSOP. It was some time before the next elimination, but when it came, it belonged to Ramon Colillas. The PokerStars player busted with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"] when Kolev’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] got there on a board of [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"], Colillas cashing for $158,972. It wasn’t long before Huy Nugyen was on the rail too, his short stack of 12 big blinds going into the middle with [poker card="KS"][poker card="Ts"] unable to hold against Reichenstein’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"]. The board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="8d"] was a killer, too, rivering Nguyen’s chances of a vital double and instead condemning him to a third-place finish worth $222,310. Heads-up, Kolev had a marginal lead over Reichenstein, the Bulgarian’s stack of 13.7 million a little ahead of Israeli Reichenstein’s 12.8 million. Kolev opened up a lead, however, and on a flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="As"], check-called to the turn holding [poker card="Jc"][poker card="6c"]. The turn of [poker card="Ks"] saw the same pattern, Kolev check-calling Reichenstein, who held only [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7s"] for a total bluff. Reichenstein ran that bluff for his whole stack on the river, but it was the [poker card="4c"] that came and Kolev called it off, showed his flush and became a first-time winner in the final ever WSOP Event at the Rio, winning the $511,184 top prize and leaving Reichenstein with another consolation prize of a deep run to a final table and $315,936. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Boris Kolev - $511,184 Uri Reichenstein - $315,936 Huy Nguyen - $222,310 Ramon Colillas - $158,972 Z Stein - $115,558 Niko Koop - $85,411 George Wolff - $64,207 Lee Markholt - $49,107 Justin Liberto - $38,222 With the final events playing out at the Rio, most of the players had left the building...but perhaps for some, most importantly, the car park. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1463271505911947269 Not everyone believes the Rio was the ideal place to play poker, of course, and they were nobly represented by the viral sensation of videos that has fuelled so many Twitter Poker laughs over the last years of the home of the WSOP. https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1463214257772761092 Matt Glantz neatly summed up Josh Arieh’s two-time triumph in the WSOP Player of the Year race. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321 Legendary WSOP font of all knowledge Kevin Mathers, known to us all as ‘Kevmath’ signed off his look at the old venue with one last short of the Rio’s lights burning bright as the shadows took the building one last time. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1463392728289406978 Finally, how could we close out the series without a glimpse into the bizarre, amazing world of Phil Hellmuth. Answer: we couldn't. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463277999353069568 It’s been an immense end to the World Series of Poker at the Rio and a WSOP never to be forgotten in 2021. The best news of all is that in six months time, the poker world will be ready to do it all over again at Bally’s and Paris... we can’t wait!
  7. For the better part of Monday night into Tuesday morning, the poker world celebrated the crowning of Josh Arieh as the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. By all accounts, Arieh clinched it when Phil Hellmuth busted out of the final event of the series, the $5K 8-Handed, leaving Hellmuth as the POY runner-up. Articles, like the one we published Tuesday morning, were written certain of Arieh’s victory. But, like in 2019 when Daniel Negreanu was usurped by Robert Campbell due to a point miscalculation, everyone was wrong. Everyone, except Justin Bonomo: https://twitter.com/JustinBonomo/status/1463258866871779328?s=20 Bonomo had it right. The results from WSOP Online Event #10 (which took place Sunday night) were not yet included in the Player of the Year calculations. So, understandably, when word got around that Arieh had won, well, it was reported he won. But in reality, with the missing point differential, Ben Yu, the chip leader headed into the final day of the $5K 8-Handed, actually had a chance to catch Arieh with an outright victory. And he looked poised to do it. So the sweat for Arieh was back on. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463275661074837505?s=20 The tournament started the day with just 30 left and with Yu in control. But Arieh had some help from the inside with his friend (and fellow POY competitor) Shaun Deeb still in the tournament. Deeb was looking for his second bracelet of the series and, maybe, an eye on not letting history repeat itself. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463272967777841152?s=20 For the better part of three hours, the updates kept coming and Yu remained in the tournament. But with just two tables in play, Deeb and Yu battled in a hand where Deeb took some very important chips off of Yu and left the four-time bracelet winner short stacked. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463278563331772419?s=20 Eventually, Deeb busted in 12th place. But the damage was done, Yu couldn’t recover. In the end, the popular Yu ended up finishing in 10th place for $30,286 just narrowly missing out on a last-minute capturing of the POY for himself. After an amazing series with 18 in-the-money finishes and a victory in the $10K Six-Handed Championship, Yu easily earned a 2021 WSOP resume worthy of Player of the Year. But now, finally, the drama came to an end and Arieh can safely celebrate, being officially crowned the 2021 Player of the Year for the 2nd time in 24 hours. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321?s=20 https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463256060546879490?s=20  
  8. [Editor's Note: At the time that this article was written, it had been announced that Josh Arieh had clinched the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year title. However, an online tournament result had not yet been included, leaving open the possibility for Ben Yu to win the POY on the last day of the series. We are leaving the article as written and today's events will be reflected in tomorrow's recap.] On a dramatic final day of the race to become WSOP Player of the Year, Josh Arieh finally saw off the dogged challenge of Phil Hellmuth as Arieh, a two-time WSOP bracelet winner in 2021 and four-time bracelet holder in his career, earned the coveted title of 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. In additional action, the final high roller of the series found a familiar name at the top of the leaderboard as Michael Addamo took charge of the $100K NLHE headed into the final day of the series. Addamo Adds Up Chip Lead Once Again The final two events of the 2021 World Series of Poker are racing towards the line as Michael Addamo and Ben Yu have put themselves in pole position to win big as they take leads into the last two final tables of the WSOP in Las Vegas. The $100,000-entry Event #87 is a High Roller event that saw players able to late register up until the start of Day 2, and stars such as Brian Rast, Ole Schemion, Elio Fox, Stephen Chidwick, Dominik Nitsche, Mark Herm, Jason Koon, David Szep, Sean Perry, Jeremy Ausmus and Rok Gostisa all got involved before the first deal, with the field confirmed at 64 players in total, with just 39 remaining at the start of play. That number was reduced almost immediately, with Shaun Deeb crashing out to David Coleman and Brian Rast almost on the rail in his first hand as he shoved for 600,000 chips at blinds of 20,000/40,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"], a hand called by Cary Katz with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"] which held to double up and leave Rast on fumes. Rast, a five-time WSOP bracelet winner after his win earlier this series, would later rally, but still missed out on the money places, as did Phil Hellmuth, who quickly realized that he needed to win or come second in Event #88 to win the Player of the Year race. Hellmuth wasn’t the only one on the rail without money as David Peters, David Coleman, Jason Koon and the aforementioned Cary Katz all missed the money, along with Mark Herm, who was busted on the bubble in 11th place. Arieh wisely chose to give late-regging for $100,000 a miss. Fedor Holz was the first player to make money as he was eliminated in 10th place for $167,869 when his ace-high shove couldn’t hold against Sorel Mizzi’s king-queen, a queen on the river winning the Canadian the pot and sending the German to the rail. Addamo had the lead as the nine-handed final table kicked off, with 9.5 million chips to Sam Sovrel’s closest stack of just over 6 million. Bill Klein was the first player to depart the final nine as he busted with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"] to Addamo’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The money all went in on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2h"] flop, but neither the [poker card="6c"] turn or [poker card="8h"] river could save him and he cashed for $186,909 in ninth place. He won his first-ever WSOP bracelet earlier in the week, but he busted in eighth place for $217,274 when his shove with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] ran into Addamo’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"] to bust on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Ks"]. Sam Grafton was the next player to lose his stack as he busted in seventh place for $263,227. Calling a raise from Henrik Hecklen, Grafton went to a flop of [poker card="Th"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4s"] and both players checked it. Grafton checked the [poker card="9s"] turn too, but Hecklen didn’t, firing a bet that the British player called. On the [poker card="6d"] river, Grafton check-called Hecklen’s shove after using several time extension chips, but the Brit’s time was up as he called, showed [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9d"] for a pair of nines and was shown Hecklen’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="8h"] for a rivered straight. After an extended period of play where Addamo used his stack to chip up even more, Mizzi was the player to miss out on the final day as he shoved with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7c"] and was called by Addamo with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="7s"]. The board ran out [poker card="8h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"] as the unfortunate Mizzi saw his dominating hand overtaken on the turn to end play for the night and give Addamo a big lead heading into the final day, holding as many chips on his own as his four opponents do combined. WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 19,620,000 Henrik Hecklen - 5,445,000 Sam Soverel - 5,165,000 Kevin Rabichow - 4,250,000 Sean Perry - 3,920,000 Ben Yu Leads Final Day in $5,000 8-Handed Event #88 The drama was palpable in the $5,000-entry NLHE 8-Handed Event #88, the final live event on this year’s WSOP schedule in Las Vegas. Phil Hellmuth, who could not reach the latter stages of the $50,000 or $100,000 events of the past couple of days, needed a deep run in the event. In fact, once Arieh crashed out, Hellmuth quickly established what he needed to do. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463030770637754368 Arieh was still in the building and as the tension built, the leader of the POY race busted, giving him a chance to join the anti-rail. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463006906285391874 Sadly for Hellmuth and his many fans, the Poker Brat fell short as he called all-in with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5h"] on a board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"] against Jason Brazeau’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"] for a pair of eights. Hellmuth’s elimination saw the 16-time record WSOP bracelet winner concede defeat and congratulate Arieh on his victory. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463061249034358784 Arieh replied, “You're always gonna be the goat [Greatest of All Time] buddy! I appreciate you more than you know.”, tweeting a picture of the title celebrations. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463079737480253441 After Hellmuth’s departure, many big names fell, as players such as Faraz Jaka, Romain Lewis, Joao Simao, Andrew Kelsall, Dominik Nitsche, Justin Lapka, Justin Saliba, and Brandon Sheils all missed out on the final day. With just 30 players bagging up Day 2 chips from the 531 entries in total, Ben Yu (2,515,000) leads the final day field. Uri Reichenstein (2,070,000) is his closest challenger, while there are top 10 stacks for some of the best players to have sat down at the felt this World Series in Shaun Deeb (1,680,000), Ramon Colillas (1,500,000), and Alexandre Reard (1,048,000), who will shoot for his second 2021 bracelet tomorrow afternoon. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Ben Yu - 2,515,000 Uri Reichenstein - 2,070,000 George Wolff - 1,770,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,680,000 Matyas Kende - 1,635,000 Ramon Colillas - 1,500,000 Danny Wong - 1,330,000 Justin Liberto - 1,285,000 Clayton Maguire - 1,100,000 Alexandre Reard - 1,048,000 Daniel Negreanu’s World Series of Poker came to a close and ‘Kid Poker’ was happy to post his scores from his final rollercoaster ride at the Rio. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092 Owais Ahmed commented that “It's sick, almost unfathomable, how many final tables and top 3 appearances [Negreanu] has at the Rio, but never won a bracelet in the building. I'm sure he'll be happy to see a location change.” in a comment liked by Negreanu himself. Bring on Bally’s. Everyone has made the ‘walk of shame’ from the famous poker venue for the last 17 years, but for Martin Jacobson, the Swedish WSOP Main Event winner whose best result of his career came inside the Rio, it was emotional. https://twitter.com/Martin_Jacobson/status/1463073395499692039 Finally, not everyone is going to be sad to see trips to the Rio go down and the temperature go up from May next year at Bally’s and Paris. https://twitter.com/kittykuopoker/status/1462932645155782661
  9. The worst kept secret in the poker world is now official news as the World Series of Poker announced that the 53rd annual WSOP will be moving to Bally’s and Paris Las Vegas Hotel & Casino when it takes place from May 31 - July 19, 2022. After 17 years at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino, the WSOP has found a new home on the Strip in Bally’s and Paris for 2022. “As we approach the Final Table, we look back on yet another successful Main Event that exceeds expectations,” said World Series of Poker Senior Vice President, Ty Stewart. “We are absolutely thrilled with this year’s turnout, both domestically and internationally. As we close out this chapter at the Rio, we are excited to have the iconic Vince Vaughn usher in a new era of WSOP at Bally’s and Paris next summer.” The announcement was made on Tuesday night during the early moments of this year’s WSOP Main Event final table when actor Vince Vaughn (“Wedding Crashers”, “Swingers”) turned up in his new role as the WSOP Master of Ceremonies and broke the news on the PokerGO live stream. “I have such a strong connection to Las Vegas and am honored to be selected as the Master of Ceremonies for what is set to be the most anticipated World Series of Poker tournament ever,” Vaughn said. “Poker has long been one of my favorite sports, so to be a part of something as historic as the WSOP finally moving to the Strip is an absolute dream. Vegas baby, Vegas!” It will be the shortest turnaround time between series in recent history with the opening weekend of the 2022 series kicking off just a little over six months after the end of the current one. The 2022 WSOP schedule of events is expected to be announced in January.
  10. With the World Series of Poker Main Event completed and a new World Champion in Koray Aldemir crowned, one of the last major awards of the series to be handed out this fall will be to the winner of the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. Headed into the last weekend of the 2021 schedule, there is plenty of drama left to be had as the final WSOP events to take place at the Rio all have the potential to shake up the leaderboard and provide a potential surprise ending to this year’s tightly-run race. One person, looking for as little drama as possible is current POY frontrunner (and PocketFives’ own) Josh Arieh. After a series performance that includes two bracelet wins and a final table appearance in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship, Arieh simply needs to hold in order to have his banner hanging in the halls of the new home of the WSOP when it moves to the Strip in the summer of 2022 READ: Q&A With Josh Arieh: Enjoying Life, Seeing Success At The WSOP While a nearly 600 point lead is substantial, it’s by no means insurmountable. He understood this when, earlier in the week he announced on Twitter that he had to make his way back to Atlanta and that his WSOP was over - meaning that he wouldn’t have an opportunity to improve his position. But days later, circumstances changed for Arieh and he booked a flight back to Las Vegas in order to try and regain the heat had throughout most of the series and lock down a place in WSOP history. One of those players Arieh needs to contend with is the 16-timer Phil Hellmuth who, after an in-the-money finish in the $777 WSOP Online event and a final table appearance in the $10K Razz Championship, has vaulted right back into the race. He currently sits in second place, and has made it well-known that he’s angling to win the POY award. Although he’s sitting in a solid position right now, the remaining schedule doesn’t quite favor Hellmuth. His reputation for being “less than” at mixed games has been obliterated during the 2021 series, but unfortunately for him, there are no more small field/big point mixed game Championships for him to run deep in. Now, in order to make up the points he needs to catch Arieh, he’s going to have to get back to basics and dominate in No Limit Hold’em. Of the nine events that he can still register for while in Las Vegas, eight are NLHE with the lone stand out being the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha. Perhaps the route for Hellmuth is to focus on grinding out a deep run in one of the larger field, smaller buy-in events like The Closer, the $1,000 Turbo, and the $5,000 8-Handed. This brings up another, and perhaps the most interesting aspect of the late POY race - the emphasis on High Rollers late in the schedule. Of those nine events, four have a buy-in of $50,000 or more. While both Hellmuth and Arieh are regular runners in the $50K PPC, playing in the NLHE shark-infested waters of the $50,000-$250,000 NLHE events is a totally different game. The fields will be replete with the biggest crushers in the game today, including the likes of Michael Addamo, Ali Imsirovic, and Justin Bonomo. Fields that some of those that are looking to close the POY race may not have a lot of experience against. There’s a lot of leaderboard points at stake in these remaining High Rollers and if someone can put together a run, as Michael Addamo did in PokerGO’s Poker Masters and Super High Roller Bowl prior to the WSOP, there’s plenty of points there to upend the POY leaderboard. That bodes well specifically for someone like Daniel Negreanu. Negreanu, sitting near the top of the Total Cashes leaderboard with 16 in the series, currently sits in 16th place on the POY leaderboard - one of the highest positions for the tight-knit crew of nosebleed MTTers. He’s 1,200 points behind Arieh and it would be a tough task to rack up that many points in such a short amount of time. However, in the $250,000 Super High Roller - in which he still has a shot to win - there are no less than 1,228 points for first place. There will likely be more than 1,100 points up for grabs for all of the High Rollers and should Negreanu keep cashing at his current pace it may just be enough to make a last-minute surge. Another player that the same scenario holds true for is Scott Ball. Ball, an NLHE specialist, has two WSOP bracelets - both won this series - and now has plenty of bonus bankroll to chase the POY. He took down the $5K Six-Max (one of the toughest tournaments of the series) for $562,667 and then best the massive field in the Little One For One Drop for another $396,445. He’s also proven he’s not afraid to fire $50Ks, scoring an 11th place finish an earlier $50,000 buy-in NLHE this series for $87,500. Ball, having a career series, is just over 700 points away from the lead and if his heater continues he could be a dark horse late in the race. Other storylines that have the potential to emerge include early POY favorite Anthony Zinno, making a deep run in the $50Ks, as we know he plans on playing them. Look to see if Aldemir, currently in fourth place, returns to the series well-rested after his marathon win in the Main Event to fire in high rollers which have been his bread and butter for years. Finally, Shaun Deeb, currently sitting in tenth place, would love nothing more than to make a deep run in the $50K PLO to upend one of his best friends in Arieh and make history for himself by becoming a two-time POY winner. The best part about this race is that it ends in Las Vegas. Despite WSOP Europe kicking off this coming week, the winner will be determined at the Rio, as it is meant to be. To view the current 2021 WSOP Player of the Year standing - click here.
  11. A fantastic day of action in the World Series of Poker saw three bracelets won by first-time winners as well as the first day of action in the $100,000 NLHE High Roller. Leo Margets was the first female player to win an open bracelet in the 2021 World Series of Poker as she closed out The Closer, winning $376,000 and claiming a maiden bracelet. Margets Makes History in The Closer With just 63 players remaining in the hunt for the bracelet, Margets began the day in the chasing pack as Alex Kulev of Bosnia led the field. That lead would be maintained for much of the final day of the event, but with a little luck and a lot of skill, Margets made good on her attempt to become the first female open event winner late in the 2021 World Series. The final table was reached in record time as just nine players remained, with Kulev still king in waiting. At that point, Margets had managed to get third on the leaderboard, but Kulev’s lead was such that she had just over half of his stack. Canadian player Ben Underwood busted in ninth place for $35,131 when his short stack shove with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="6s"] couldn’t get there against Aleksandr Shevliakov’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"] as the board ran out with queens on flop and river but low cards elsewhere. There was quickly another elimination as Chris Moorman, online poker legend and short stack heading into the final, busted with ace-high against Margets. Moorman’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5h"] started the hand behind against Margets’ [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"] and the board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="As"][poker card="Tc"] saw Margets’ kicker play to send Moorman out with a cash worth $44,740. In seventh, Shevliakov was the victim as the post-dinner session that would find a winner began with his elimination for $57,525. Shevliakov called off Kulev’s shove and was in horrible shape, holding [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qh"] against Kulev’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ks"]. The seven-high board sent the Russian home at the Bosnian’s expense as the chip leader took yet more control. In sixth place, Cherish Andrews earned $74,680 when her [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3h"] couldn’t catch Stephen Song’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"] as the board, which initially looked great for Andrews on the flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"], was fine on the [poker card="3c"] turn but took a turn for the worse on the [poker card="Qc"] river. With five players left, it looked like everyone was playing for second behind Kulev as he continued to dominate, busting two more players in a single hand as his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] held against Arturo Segura’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"], condemning him to a fifth-place finish worth $97,865 and Marc Lange, whose [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] was overtaken on the board of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="Qd"] board. Another queen on the river and another player out, Lange earning $129,460, the first six-figure score of the event, for crashing out in fourth. Three-handed, Kulev’s stack of 38 million dwarfed both Song (6 million) and Margets (4 million), but no limit hold’em being what it is, no-one’s lead is ever safe for more than a couple of all-in hands. Margets had chipped up a little to 7 million by the time Song departed in third for $172,855, but Kulev, whose pocket nines beat Song’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"] shove, was up to 40 million and looking like it was a matter of time before he booked a first WSOP win. Heads-up began with the stroke of luck Margets needed. Miscounting her stack to 2.5 big blinds rather than 7.5, she shoved with [poker card="9c"][poker card="4d"] and when Kulev called with the dominating [poker card="As"][poker card="9s"], she looked doomed. But the board had other ideas, coming [poker card="Js"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="8c"] to double her up in fortuitous fashion and give her 15 bigs to play with. Suddenly, Margets had all the momentum, and 3:1 down in chips, she doubled again when her shove with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="4c"] held in spectacular style when Kulev’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="8h"] was shot down by quad fours after the board played out. Grinding to level up the chips, Margets had a slim lead by the time the pair saw a flop of [poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3s"] and all the chips went into the middle. Kulev held [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9d"] for top pair, top kicker, but Margets had the flush draw and bottom pair with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"]. The turn of [poker card="5c"] gave her trips and holding through the [poker card="Th"] river, her miraculous comeback was complete as Spanish pro Margets won her first-ever WSOP bracelet in the most dramatic of circumstances. WSOP 2021 Event #83 $1,500 The Closer Final Table Results: Leo Margets - $376,850 Alex Kulev - $232,920 Stephen Song - $172,855 Marc Lange - $129,460 Arturo Segura - $97,865 Cherish Andrews - $74,680 Aleksandr Shevliakov - $57,525 Chris Moorman - $44,740 Benjamin Underwood - $35,131 Badziakouski Wins Brilliant First Bracelet in High Roller In Event #85, the $50,000-entry High Roller, it was Belarussian poker crusher Mikita Badziakouski who reigned supreme and took the title and his first WSOP bracelet. Badziakouski had a huge task on his hands to do so, with one of the toughest final tables in this or any World Series to negotiate. However, from being one of the shortest stacks when the final table began, the Belarussian modern poker legend added another reminder to others of his poker prowess with an impressive performance. Ryan Leng was the first player to leave the nine-handed final table and it came as no surprise purely due to the 2021 WSOP powerhouse entering play with seven big blinds. Most of them went into the middle before the flop, with a little going in on the flop with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"], but Ren Lin had [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"] and the cowboys shot down Leng’s hopes on a board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"]. Leng cashed for $131,982. In eighth place, it was the turn of Joao Vieira to depart, earning $167,152 for his run to the final table. All-in pre-flop for just a couple of blinds, Vieira had [poker card="Ah"][poker card="4h"], but he was called by both Carlos Villamarin with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"] and Jason Koon with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"]. The board of [poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="2s"] saw a little more money go in, but it eventually went to showdown and Villamarin’s pocket fives - of course - won the day. Shortly after that hand, Villamarin himself was on the rail. All-in pre-flop with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"], he was in horrible shape against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] belonging to Stephen Chidwick and the Brit held with ease across the [poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="9s"] board to leap up the leaderboard and leave Villamarin on the rail with $214,496. With six players left, Chidwick held the lead, but not for long. Badziakouski took over and grabbed the chip lead. It was one he would not relinquish easily, as Ali Imsirovic busted in sixth place for $278,840 when Ren Lin’s [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"] got there against Imsirovic’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qd"] on a board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="7s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Tc"], with Lin’s middle pair on the flop surviving two streets of outs including two overs and any diamond. At this stage, Mike Matusow was singing the praises of Daniel Negreanu’s late registration...well, kind of. https://twitter.com/themouthmatusow/status/1462634694315438082 Stephen Chidwick had been left super-short by the chip leader and departed in fifth place for $367,153. Chidwick’s [poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"] couldn’t catch against Koon’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5c"] with all the chips in pre-flop and a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="4h"][poker card="6d"] playing out. Koon was the next to bust, crashing out in fourth place for $489,585 when his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] couldn’t find any help against Badziakouski’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. The eight-high board sent the GGPoker ambassador out before the podium places and while the Belarussian Badziakouski led, hopes were high for both Negreanu and Lin to make a comeback. Those hopes were to be ruthlessly dashed by the champion in waiting. Negreanu was eliminated by Badziakouski next as the Belarussian went about taking down his final three opponents in a brutal display of poker dominance. The Canadian shoved with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="5h"] and Badziakouski called with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"], the board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="Ad"] delivering Kid Poker from the competition for another great score of $661,041, but missing out on the bracelet once again. Heads-up could have been a non-event, Lin trailing Badziakouski as he did by almost four-to-one in chips. Despite that opening deficit, however, Lin chipped up to take the lead, and for a while, it looked like Badziakouski might struggle. But the partypoker pro is made of strong stuff and he railed to lead once again before the final hand. Li, short-stacked, shoved for just under seven big blinds with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="7s"] and Badziakouski called it off with [poker card="As"][poker card="5h"]. The board of [poker card="8h"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9c"] saw the Belarussian emerge from one of the toughest final tables of the Autumn the winner and the proud owner of his first-ever WSOP bracelet, along with the $1.46 million top prize. Li, defeated, had to settle for the runner-up prize of $903,610. WSOP 2021 Event #85 $50,000 NLHE High Roller Final Table Results: Mikita Badziakouski - $1,462,043 Ren Lin - $903,610 Daniel Negreanu - $661,041 Jason Koon - $489,585 Stephen Chidwick - $367,153 Ali Imsirovic - $278,840 Carlos Villamarin - $214,496 Joao Vieira - $167,152 Ryan Leng - $131,982 [caption id="attachment_637303" align="alignright" width="700"] Mikita Badziakouski won his first WSOP bracelet too, claiming a terrific victory in the $50,000 NLHE High Roller[/caption] The final event of the night to conclude produced a winner inside 14 hours of play as Michael McCauley won his maiden bracelet in the $1,000-entry Event #86, the Super Turbo event. In an event where the great and good took to the felt, some stars busted out early, such as Phil Hellmuth, Shau Deeb and Barny Boatman, whose tale of disaster started with such positivity... https://twitter.com/barnyboatman/status/1462472736895242244 ...but ended in a cold as ice defeat. https://twitter.com/barnyboatman/status/1462529376059154433 Others were running hot and chief amongst them was the leader of the WSOP Player of the Year race, Josh Arieh. Having seen the Poker Brat bust earlier, Arieh dug in his spikes and stuck around all the way to 10th place, earning $10,604, but most importantly, more points to go next to his name on the POY leaderboard. Others to cash but miss out on the final table included Ryan Riess (152nd for $1,606), Landon Tice (130th for $1,606), and Michael Lech (124th for $1,757). Down to the final table, Dara O’Kearney was the first player to bust when his queen-jack couldn’t catch Andrew Wilson’s ace-four. After Marc Lomeo lost a coinflip with pocket fives against Luigi Curcio’s ace-king, Curcio himself busted when he and Filippo Ragone bothlost out to McCauley in a double elimination. With just five players left, only the Israel player Yuval Bronshtein had won a WSOP bracelet before, but he crashed out in fourth after Rajvir Dua had departed in fifth. Indian player Neel Joshi had led for a long time in the run-up to the final table but could last no longer and left in third place when his start-stack shove with king-deuce ran into McCauley’s pocket sixes. Wilson was only a little shorter than the chip leader, but he was on the rail when his shove for 15 big blinds with [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"] saw a call from McCauley with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"] and the board of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="8d"] gave the American player his first-ever WSOP bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #86 $1,000 Super Turbo Final Table Results: Michael McCauley - $161,384 Andrew Wilson - $99,742 Neel Joshi - $72,031 Yuval Bronshtein - $52,679 Rajvir Dua - $39,022 Filippo Ragone - $29,282 Luigi Curcio - $22,263 Marc Lomeo - $17,153 Dara O'Kearney - $13,395 Holz Leads The $100K On Day 1 of the $100,000-entry High Roller, Fedor Holz showed once again why he is still one of the most dangerous high stakes players in the world as he topped the 28 players who survived from 53 entries. Holz’ stack of 3,415,000 was marginally ahead of David Peters’ 3,305,000 as a top-quality field produced some big stacks belonging to superstars with plenty of bracelets between them. Oddly, however, while there are 8 bracelets between the top 10 players, only three players of that number have won one, with Michael Addamo (3) coming into Day 2 sixth in chips with over 1.8 million, behind Holz (2) and Peters (also 3). With big names such as Sam Grafton (2,120,000), Sorel Mizzi (1,380,000), Sam Soverel (1,070,000), Dan Smith (665,000), and Ben Heath (610,000) all in the Top 20, the potential late registration of both Phil Hellmuth and Josh Arieh could yet decide the destiny of the WSOP Player of the Year title. Players such as Darren Elias, Stephen Chidwick, and Jason Koon all busted on Day 1 but will have the chance to rebuy before the first card hits the felt on Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 NLHE High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Fedor Holz - 3,415,000 David Peters - 3,305,000 Orpen Kisacikoglu - 3,040,000 Sam Grafton - 2,120,000 Bill Klein - 1,885,000 Jonathan Little - 1,625,000 Seth Davies - 1,260,000 Laszlo Bujtas - 1,240,000 John Lilic - 1,190,000 Michael Addamo - 885,000 Finally, we stay with Koon as the GGPoker ambassador and first-time WSOP bracelet winner this series paid tribute to a great player given little credit apart from in the past few days. Sincerity rocks, people. https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1462499757369139201  
  12. A dramatic day at the felt in two big tournaments saw history made inside the Rio Hotel & Casino as two more WSOP bracelets were won in two of the biggest tournaments of the Autumn. A Career-High Score For Adrian Mateos In Event #82, the $250,000-entry Super High Roller, Adrian Mateos went wire-to-wire as he took down the spectacular buy-in event for a top prize of $3.2 million and his fourth WSOP bracelet at the age of just 27. Just five players began the final day, with Mateos’ stack almost as big on its own as the four others combined. After a period of play that saw Keith Tilston drop down the ranks, the American was the first player to bust when his shove with [poker card="As"][poker card="3s"] over the opening bet from Mateos saw the Spaniard call it off with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"]. The board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] gave Mateos a turned straight and sent Tilston home for a result worth $632,124. With four players left, Mateos now had more than the rest of the table combined. It was Ben Heath who busted the next player, however, as Seth Davies busted in fourth for $930,791. Davies shoved from the small blind with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7c"] and Heath called it off from the big blind with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"]. The ten-high board produced no drama and play was three-handed. After a period of play that saw Heath and Mateos battle for the lead, trading it on several occasions, Kincaid hit the rail when his [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"] was no match for Mateos’ [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ah"] on the ace-high board. Kincaid, who had been a lot shorter earlier in the event, cashed for an impressive $1.3m. Heads-up, Heath was looking at a 2:1 deficit to overcome, but he was unable to do so in a final hand that saw Mateos’ [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Tc"] good on a board of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="2s"] against Ben Heath’s [poker card="5d"][poker card="3d"]. Heath cashed for $2 million, but Mateos’ victory was worth $3.26 million, the biggest cash of an already astounding career at the live felt where he has now won over $25 million. WSOP 2021 Event #82 $250,000 Super High Roller Final Table Results: Adrian Mateos - $3,265,262 Ben Heath - $2,018,148 John Kincaid - $1,370,575 Seth Davies - $930,791 Keith Tilston - $632,124 Ausmus Denies Bracelet To Both Hellmuth and Negreanu A ding-dong battle saw Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu both just miss out on glory as Jeremy Ausmus won his third WSOP bracelet at the direct expense of his two highly-decorated opponents. The final table of nine kicked off with the departure of Veselin Karakitukov, who was the first player to win a six-figure score for their efforts, his cash worth $108,753. After the exit of Ben Lamb in eighth place, Josh Arieh busted in seventh, meaning he needed Hellmuth not to win in order to maintain his place at the top of the WSOP Player of the Year leaderboard. That happened, but not before a period of play when players were three-handed where each man had the lead. Hellmuth seemed to have all the momentum at one stage, but Daniel Negreanu was the thorn in his side. The same was true in reverse as at one point, Negreanu only needed to fade the river to eliminate his old frenemy in third place. Instead, the Poker Brat survived with a miracle on the river, leading to Hellmuth going to his rail whooping in the Thunderdome. Negreanu, frustrated at the missed opportunity, tipped his chair over in disgust. The Canadian would bust soon after, but Hellmuth still had work to do in order to claim the bracelet. He was unable to do so, getting it all-in with two pair on a flop of [poker card="9c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"] where Ausmus had flopped the straight. That held through turn and river as Hellmuth saw his hopes of a full house disappear and dreams of that 17th WSOP bracelet go with it. The race for 2021 WSOP Player of the year looks likely to go to the final event, with Arieh making Day 2 of the $50,000 NLHE Event and Hellmuth needing to late reg and run deep to take the top of the leaderboard. WSOP 2021 Event #84 $50,000 PLO High Roller Final Table Results: Jeremy Ausmus - $1,188,918 Phil Hellmuth - $734,807 Daniel Negreanu - $519,764 Alexander Pedersen - $376,376 Laszlo Bujtas - $279,168 Jared Bleznick - $212,223 Josh Arieh - $165,452 Ben Lamb - $132,370 Veselin Karakitukov - $108,753 Jason Koon Leads The $50K High Roller In the $50,000-entry NLHE High Roller Event #85, Jason Koon bagged the biggest stack as some superstars of the felt gathered in his slipstream. With 35 players surviving from the 101 entries that took part, Koon’s stack of 2,405,000 is ahead of fellow first-time WSOP bracelet winner in 2021, Ole Schemion (1,760,000). With greats such as Stephen Chidwick (1,700,000), Shaun Deeb (1,650,000), Dan Smith (1,450,000) and Mikita Badziakouski (1,325,000) all in the top 10, there are going to be fireworks on Day 2, with Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu both likely to register as part of the late reg frenzy that is possible before Day 2 starts. With Michael Addamo (1,145,000) eight in chips and former WSOP Main Event champ Joe McKeehen (610,000) and WSOP Player of the Year leader Josh Arieh (570,000) all in with a great shout of victory sitting in the top 20 stacks, there was no place in the Day 2 seat draw for Nick Petrangelo, Elio Fox, Sergio Aido, Dario Sammartino, Anthony Zinno, Brian Rast, Dominik Nitsche, Ben Heath, Scott Seiver, Sam Grafton or Fedor Holz. WSOP 2021 Event #85 $50,000 NLHE High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Jason Koon - 2,405,000 Ole Schemion - 1,760,000 Stephen Chidwick - 1,700,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,650,000 Ranganath Kanchi - 1,565,000 Dan Smith - 1,450,000 Mikita Badziakouski - 1,325,000 Michael Addamo - 1,145,000 Darren Elias - 1,144,000 John Brooks - 1,085,000 The Closer Prepares To Shut It Down Finally, on Day 1b of The Closer, the $1,500-buy-in event saw Alex Kulev bag the biggest stack with a mammoth stack of 2,685,000. He’s clear of Giorgiy Skhulukhiya (2,425,000) in second place but even further ahead of Marc Lange (1,320,000) in third place. Players such as Leo Margets (1,300,000), Ryan Riess (1,070,000), Cherish Andrews (600,000), Landon Tice (330,000), and Melanie Weisner (280,000) all made the cut for Day 2, which will see 61 players fight all the way from seven tables to the bracelet, with stars such as Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Ari Engel, Felipe Ramos, and Joseph Cheong all missing out on grabbing end-of-day stacks on Day 1b of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #83 The Closer Day 1b Top 10 Chipcounts: Alex Kulev - 2,685,000 Giorgiy Skhulukhiya - 2,425,000 Marc Lange - 1,320,000 Steven Steinmetz - 1,300,000 Leo Margets - 1,300,000 Ryan Riess - 1,070,000 Noah Bronstein - 1,010,000 Michael Wang - 1,010,000 Jonathan Borenstein - 960,000 Mitchell Halverson - 930,000 Landon Tice grabbed a bag, and while he was doing so, he couldn’t help but admit to being a fan of the Poker Brat. https://twitter.com/LandonTice/status/1462269836512292867  
  13. British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser won his fourth WSOP bracelet of a career defined by his World Series of Poker greatness as he closed out the heads-up battle to seal victory in the $10,000-entry Razz Championship. Glaser the Closer as Carlton Finally Overcome Taking his seat on the final day of the event, Glaser had only one opponent to topple, after Everett Carlton had fought so hard yesterday that the finale had to be delayed by 24 hours. But in the end, there was no denying the British pro, who bagged his fourth WSOP bracelet after an hour-long rollercoaster heads-up battle to the finish. Carlton took Glaser’s lead at one point and threatened to put himself in a dominant position for victory. Instead, Glaser chipped away at his opponent before taking the lead back and grinding his opponent down to the point where he had simply no chips left to fight with. It was a powerful display of exactly the skills that Glaser has established over so many years playing specifically WSOP Events at the Rio. After the win, Glaser thanked his supporters online as he celebrated his latest incredible mixed game victory. https://twitter.com/BennyGlaser/status/1461897898124353537 WSOP 2021 Event #78 $10,000 Razz Championship Final Table Results: Benny Glaser - $274,693 Everett Carlton - $169,773 Yuri Dzivielevski - $123,254 Erik Sagstrom - $90,859 John Monnette - $68,025 Yehuda Buchalter - $51,739 Erik Seidel - $39,987 Phil Hellmuth - $31,411 Schemion Wins First-Ever Bracelet After Long Wait Ends in Style German poker superpower Ole Schemion won his first-ever WSOP bracelet in the $1,979-entry Poker Hall of Fame Bounty event. At a final table where he went into play with a huge lead, Schemion used his stack and his considerable skills to get the job done in stunning fashion in the Thunderdome at the Rio. With six players making the final day, it didn’t take long for that number to be reduced. Jerry Wong busted in sixth place to Schemion when Wong shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"] and Schemion called with [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"]. The board of [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Ac"] saw Schemion win another important hand and increase his lead over the remaining four players. James Alexander busted in fifth place for $37,965 when he moved all-in pre-flop with [poker card="As"][poker card="7s"] and Marc Rivera called with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"]. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="6s"] saw Alexander exit, but his conqueror only laddered one more rung, busting in fourth for $52,569. Rivera’s final hand was a call from Schemion’s shove with [poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"]. Rivera was way ahead with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"], but while the flop of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"] kept him ahead and the turn card of [poker card="Qd"] was safe, the [poker card="4h"] on the river gave Schemion the straight and sent the Philippines player home. Minutes later, Giovani Torre busted in third place to send play heads-up. Schemion shoved once again, moving all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] and getting a call from Torre with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"] looked to have all but locked the hand up apart from diamonds for the Portuguese player, but an incredible runout of a [poker card="Ts"] turn and [poker card="Tc"] gave Schemion trips instead to send Torre to the cash desk with a payout slip worth $73,175. Heads-up, Schemion had eight times his opponents stack, and it took no time at all after a short break for the event to conclude in the German’s favor. Canadian player Ben Underwood had made it all the way to second place, but his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jd"] couldn’t catch Schemion’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5s"] as a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"] gave the German the top prize of $172,499 and Underwood a runner-up result worth $106,618. WSOP 2021 Event #79 $1,979 Hall of Fame Bounty Final Table Results: Ole Schemion - $172,499 Benjamin Underwood - $106,618 Giovani Torre - $74,175 Marc Rivera - $52,569 James Alexander - $37,965 Jerry Wong - $27,951 In Event #80, the third bracelet of four to be won on a mammoth day of action went to Robert Cowan as an all-British heads-up played out in the Amazon Room at the Rio. At the six-handed final table, reached after the elimination of WSOP 2021 Event #80 $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Robert Cowan - $280,916 Robert Emmerson - $173,613 Uri Reichenstein - $116,106 Dylan Weisman - $79,368 William Benson - $55,485 Karel Mokry - $39,688 An exciting conclusion to the $800 Deepstack Event #81 saw Jason Wheeler take home his first-ever WSOP bracelet after many years on the professional poker circuit. On a day where Will givens held the lead going into the action, 121 players played down to a winner in dramatic fashion. After players such as the aforementioned Givens (39th for $4,605) joined other like Justin Lapka (47th for $3,920) and Melanie Weisner (66th for $2,933) on the rail, the unofficial final table was reached in record time, with Wheeler the shortest stack of ten. Doubling up quickly with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] of Antoine Goutard, however, Wheeler grabbed some chips and more importantly momentum as he began his ascent to the top of the leaderboard. After Maxwell Sabel busted in 10th place, Robert Hill busted in ninth place for $18,968 when his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jd"] couldn’t catch the pocket kings of Julian Velasquez on a queen high board after the chips all went in pre-flop. John O’Neal busted in eight for $24,165 when Goutard held again, his [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] standing up to O’Neal’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kd"]. When Ralph Massey busted to Velasquez in seventh place, his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6s"] dominated and defeated by the Colombian’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"], an ace and two queens on the board saw Velasquez take the lead, but with players like Garry Gates and Wheeler himself chipping up, the power dynamics at the table were shifting every orbit. Shelok Wong busted in sixth place for $40,376 when his ace-high couldn’t top Velasquez’ top pair on the turn, and Goutard busted very soon after when his [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"] was shot down by Diogo Veiga’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qd"], leving the French player on the rail in fifth for $52,943. Garry Gates knows plenty about finishing fourth in a major tournament, as he came in that exact position in the Main Event just a couple of years ago, but he will regret this bust-out almost as much. ‘Not finishing fourth again’ was never said by Gates, however, and it was a good job as his [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] was shot down by Velasquez’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"] on a board where an ace on the turn ended the drama before 5th street fell. Gates cashed for an impressive $70,077, and he was joined on the rail soon after by Veiga, whose third-place finish earned him $93,627. Veiga’s [poker card="Ac"]6c] didn’t hold as Wheeler’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="9s"] flopped the world on a board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"]. Heads-up, it was Velasquez who took an early lead, but Wheeler was not to be denied, getting there with an all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="4c"]. Velasquez called with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and was favorite to lift the title, but a board of [poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="4d"] saw Wheeler jumping for the ‘wheel’ straight he made on the river. Shortly afterwards, Wheeler’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="As"] held with ease against Velasquez’ [poker card="Ah"][poker card="2c"] as an ace on the turn ended all hope the Colombian had, his tournament devastated by the closing two major hands of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #81 $800 Deepstack Final Table Results: Jason Wheeler - $202,274 Julian Velasquez - $126,252 Diogo Veiga - $93,627 Garry Gates - $70,077 Antoine Goutard - $52,943 Shelok Wong - $40,376 Ralph Massey - $31,087 John O'Neal - $24,165 Robert Hill - $18,968 In the $250,000 Super High Roller event, just five players made the money and lasted to the final day’s play, with Spanish sensation Adrian Mateos a runaway chip leader with more chips than his four remaining opponents combined. With a busy day of action in the event that the elite of poker will be talking about for weeks, Adrian Mateos took the lead and dominated the latter stages as just five players made the money, with over $3 million up top for tomorrow’s winner. Michale Addamo led the field when Day 2 kicked off, but he and Ali Imsirovic saw their control of the field evaporate as the Spanish pro Mateos took over. With Ben Heath maintaining third place from Day 1 by the end of Day 2, he and the other three opponents, Keith Tilston, Seth Davies and John Kincaid, will all be threats to Mateos. Right up until German crusher Christoph Vogelsang’s elimination on the money bubble in sixth, though, Mateos was in control. It will take some performance to stop the young European superstar winning what would be his fourth WSOP bracelet at the age of just 27 years old. WSOP 2021 Event #82 $250,000 Super High Roller Final Table Chipcounts: Adrian Mateos - 25,500,000 Keith Tilston - 8,900,000 Ben Heath - 6,500,000 Seth Davies - 4,550,000 John Kincaid - 3,925,000 A Day 1a of drama in the Closer saw Turkish player Osman Ihlamur bag the chip lead with 1,765,000 chips by the end of play. With players such as Dimitar Danchev (1,635,000) and Wesley Belding (1,620,000) on his tail, Ihlamur will not have it easy on Day 2, but with just 25 players surviving from 802 entries, it was a fast-paced finish to the action as 121 players cashed. Big names such as Kenny Hallaert (1,250,000) and Chris Moorman (1,250,000) will be a threat when Day 2 takes place, but before that happens, there is tomorrow’s Day 1b to consider, where some players who busted bigger buy-in tournaments over the last couple of days will be doing everything they can to bag up one last Day 2 stack and close out the 2021 World Series of Poker in style. WSOP 2021 Event #83 $1,500 The Closer Top 10 Chipcounts: Osman Ihlamur - 1,765,000 Dimitar Danchev - 1,635,000 Wesley Belding - 1,620,000 Chris Moorman - 1,250,000 Kenny Hallaert - 1,250,000 Gergely Kulcsar - 1,200,000 Martins Adeniya - 1,190,000 Joao Simao - 1,100,000 Bin Liu - 1,000,000 Stephen Song - 940,000 An exciting first day of action in the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha Event #84 saw Hungarian player Laszlo Bujtas (1,980,000) bag up the chip lead as Josh Arieh (1,355,000) continued his heater in pursuit of the WSOP Player of the Year title. Ben Lamb (1,755,000) is second in chips, but it is the appearance of Arieh in fourth place of the 33 survivors from 85 entries that catches the eye. The level of players in this $50,000-entry event is really high, and players like Jake Schindler, Dan Shak and Mark Herm all busted along the way as players such as Daniel Negreanu (1.12m) and Dan Cates (1.045m) both made the top 10. With others such as Chance Kornuth (625,000), Shaun Deeb (520,000) and Anthony Zinno (420,000) all still involved, players will battle attempt to win what will be a prestigious bracelet to claim late in the 2021 World Series of Poker. WSOP 2021 Event #84 $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha Top 10 Chipcounts: Laszlo Bujtas - 1,980,000 Ben Lamb - 1,755,000 Alexander Petersen - 1,355,000 Josh Arieh - 1,355,000 Jared Bleznick - 1,270,000 Alex Aleksandrovski - 1,130,000 Daniel Negreanu - 1,125,000 Jeremy Ausmus - 1,125,000 Scott Seiver - 1,070,000 Dan Cates - 1,045,000 After a stunning Main Event win, the new world champion Koray Aldemir tackled some of the fans’ thoughts in an intriguing post on Twitter. https://twitter.com/kooraay90/status/1461900448646848514 Phil Hellmuth is determined to chase down the top of the Player of the Year leaderboard and claim one of the only titles the ‘Poker Brat’ hasn’t won in what has been a glittering career. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1461670956775051270 He’s not going to have it easy, however, after the man at the top of the chart came out of 2021 WSOP ‘retirement’ to make a sprint for the line with just a few days of competition left. Can you imagine if these two are heads up for a bracelet late in the series? We can dream!
  14. Mixed game specialist Benny Glaser had struck out on a few occasions during the 2021 World Series of Poker. After consistently putting himself in the position to dominate in the mixed game events he knows so well, however, the British player is just one player from victory in the $10,000 Razz Championship at the Rio in Las Vegas. Heads-Up For $10K Razz Championship As the final table of nine was set, both Seidel and Hellmuth had spun up their small stacks. Glaser had added a little to his pile, but remained some way behind the chip leader, who at that stage was John Monnette, who already has a 2021 WSOP bracelet to his name. He added a bit more when he eliminated Brad Ruben in ninth place for $25,086, before Hellmuth exited in eighth place, with Yehuda Buchalter’s nine-six the winning hand. Despite winning that hand, Buchalter was still short, but it would be the nine-time WSOP bracelet winner Seidel who was the next player to hit the rail. Busting after a period of play that saw Glaser rise through the ranks and take the chip lead, Seidel lost out to Dzivielevski before Buchalter busted to the Brazilian too. At the next break, it was Swedish player Erik Sagstrom who led the final five, but that situation flipped as Glaser took control of the table, constantly putting pressure on all four players to the extent that one hour later, he had 3.7 million chips, more than double Dzivielevski’s total and vastly more than anyone else, with the other three remaining players super short. John Monnette busted in fifth place, and shortly afterward, Sagstrom was following him to the rail, the second victim in a row of Everett Carlton, who was the player pushing for victory. Dzivielevski busted in third place after Carlton took him out, but the winner of that hand was still well behind Glaser. That was until a series of pots balanced things out and with Glaser holding a slim lead, that was where play ended for the night as the two men agree to come back to the Rio at 3pm local time to conclude the battle for the bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #78 $10,000 Razz Championship Chipcounts Benny Glaser - 3,990,000 Everett Carlton - 2,570,000 Prizes 3. Yuri Dzivielevski - $123,254 4. Erik Sagstrom - $90,859 5. John Monnett - $68,025 6. Yehuda Buchalter - $51,739 7. Erik Seidel - $39,987 8. Phil Hellmuth - $31,411 9. Brad Ruben - $25,086 Schemion Takes Massive Lead In Hall of Fame Bounty The final six players have been reached in the WSOP Hall of Fame Bounty event, which costs $1,979 to enter, and featured players who had won the WSOP Main with a year-appropriate bounty on their heads. With the final table playing out tomorrow, it is the German player Ole Schemion who lead the way, with a big lead of 6.9 million to his nearest rival Giovani Torre, who has 2.7 million. With every other player having 1.5 million or less, Schemion has a huge lead, and is on the brink of winning what would be his first-ever WSOP bracelet despite a career that has seen him win $16m in live events alone. It’s not only Schemion who would be winning his first bracelet as all six remaining players have yet to win gold. On the penultimate day, players such as Michael Gathy, Christian Pham, Maria Lampropulos, and Joao Vieira all busted, so missed out on the $172,499 top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #79 $1,979 Hall of Fame Bounty Final Table Chipcounts: Ole Schemion - 6,905,000 Giovani Torre - 2,720,000 James Alexander - 1,530,000 Jerry Wong - 1,200,000 Benjamin Underwood - 975,000 Marc Rivera - 755,000 Addamo Ahead After $250K Super High Roller Day 1 In the $250,000-entry Super High Roller event, there were 25 total entries, including two rebuys from Jason Koon and Justin Bonomo as Koon bust but Bonomo survived to a top ten finish. In all, 10 levels of play saw just 15 players with their names already in the seat draw for Day 2 after completing Day 1, with Michael Addamo (4,965,000) and Ali Imsirovic (4,875,000) clear at the top. Elsewhere in the top ten, Ben Heath bagged up 3,545,000 as he spent much of the day in pursuit of whichever leader was wearing the metaphorical yellow jersey at the time. Daniel Negreanu (2,305,000) had a strong day at the felt, with Stephen Chidwick doing the same, bagging up slightly more with 2,540,000 chips. Players to bust included the luckless Koon, who sunk $500,000 but ended the day with nothing, while John Lilic busted first and didn’t re-enter. Dan Smith was one of the leaders at one point but lost his stack to Ali Imsirovic late in the day. WSOP 2021 Event #82 $250,000 Super High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 4,965,000 Ali Imsirovic - 4,875,000 Benjamin Heath - 3,545,000 Adrian Mateos - 3,420,000 Timofey Kuznetsov - 2,890,000 Christoph Vogelsang - 2,860,000 Stephen Chidwick - 2,540,000 Daniel Negreanu - 2,305,000 Justin Bonomo - 2,285,000 Sam Soverel - 2,190,000 Weisman, Coleman, Rheem Crack $3K Top 10 In Event #80, Robert Cowan grabbed the lead as the British player bagged up 140 big blinds with which to attack the final day of the $3,000 Pot-Limit Omaha showdown. With players such as Dylan Weisman (1,475,000), David Coleman (1,250,000), and Chino Rheem (1,000,000) all in the top seven, it is sure to be a very exciting final day, where the winner will receive $280,916. With 122 players starting the penultimate day, only 75 made the money. Those landing on the wrong side of that divide included Ari Engel, Jake Schwartz, Esther Taylor, Ali Imsirovic, Brett Richey, Noah Bronstein, and Mark Birdsall, with both final two players on that list bubbling when they exited the event in the same hand. All of the following made money, as Daniel Negreanu, Phil Laak, Christian Harder, Ben Yu, and Gabriel Andrade all claimed profit but missed a very deep run in the event, which has seen 496 players put up the $3,000 buy-in, creating a prize pool worth over $1.3 million. WSOP 2021 Event #80 $3,000 PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Cowen - 2,800,000 Steven Forman - 1,685,000 Dylan Weisman - 1,475,000 Karel Mokry - 1,475,000 David Coleman - 1,250,000 Raphael Schreiner - 1,210,000 Chino Rheem - 1,000,000 Robert Emmerson - 915,000 Jered Bettencourt - 840,000 Senovio Ramirez III - 730,000 One Last Deepstack To Go In the $800-entry Deepstack event, Will Givens bagged the lead as he totaled a whopping 140 big blinds by the close of play. His stack of 2,440,000 chips looked down from a great height on Marc Lange (1,865,000) and William Blais (1,500,000) in his slipstream, while Jason Wheeler (1.27m) also made the top 10. Just 289 players made the money and 121 survived the 1,921 entries, meaning players such as Pat Lyone, Brett Apter, 2021 bracelet winner DJ Alexander, Joseph Cheong, Shaun Deeb and last year’s world champion Damian Salas all bowed out. WSOP 2021 Event #81 $800 Deepstack Top 10 Chipcounts: Will Givens - 2,440,000 Marc Lange - 1,865,000 William Blais - 1,500,000 Jonathan Press - 1,470,000 Christine Park - 1,460,000 Nikolay Yosifov - 1,380,000 Eduardo Amaral - 1,310,000 Serhii Holodiuk - 1,305,000 Jason Wheeler - 1,270,000 John O'Neal - 1,210,000 Landon Tice had some words for anyone complaining about how long the WSOP Main Event final table players took over their decisions on Tuesday and Wednesday night. https://twitter.com/LandonTice/status/1461380100075655168 Have you ever wondered what it’s like to wake up as the world champion? Koray Aldemir can tell you. https://twitter.com/kooraay90/status/1461437559825833984
  15. Koray Aldemir, the 31-year-old professional tournament grinder from Germany, outlasted the field of 6,550 runners in the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event to win his first career gold bracelet, the enormous $8 million first-place prize, and the title of World Champion. For the better part of three days, Aldemir was in control of the final table. He finished Day 7 with a healthy chip lead and only extended it during the first day of the final table as the final nine played down to three-handed. It wasn’t until heads-up play against eventual runner-up George Holmes that he lost the lead for the very first time. But after a back-and-forth battle with Holmes, it was Aldemir who relied on his extensive experience in high-pressure spots to make a tough call to walk away as the World Champion. “It means a lot as you can tell,” an emotional Aldemir said immediately after his win. “It’s the dream of every poker player. I don’t know what to say, it feels great.” Although he was obviously thrilled to celebrate the win, Aldemir was quick to praise Holmes in the aftermath. “George was so tough to play against, he played really, really well so I’m very happy that I could beat him,” Aldemir said. “It was an incredibly stressful week for all of us, I think. I’m sure I made a lot of mistakes, everybody did probably, but I just tried to stay calm and play as good as possible.” As the runner-up, Holmes earned his fair share of fans over the course of his time in the Main Event with fearless plays and his “home game hero” persona. “Unbelievable,” George Holmes said of his runner-up finish. “I still can’t put it into words. Maybe a week from now I’ll be able to tell you how I feel. It’s been a grueling week-and-a-half and [Koray Aldemir] was amazing, tough all night. That’s about it.” The final table action started on Monday evening and it was just five hands into play before the first elimination of the night took place. With the blinds at 400,000/800,000 (800,000 ante), Jack Oliver opened to 1.6m holding the [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"] and George Holmes called from the small blind. Then Chase Bianchi three-bet jammed his final 9.7m in from the big blind with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"]. Oliver, four-bet shipped forcing Holmes to fold and the cards were on their backs. The board ran out [8d[poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="td"][poker card="jc"] shipping the pot to Oliver and sending Bianchi home in ninth place for an even $1 million. The very next hand, PocketFiver Jareth East open-shipped his final eight big blinds holding [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"]. This time Holmes wouldn’t fold as he three-bet shipped his stack with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="qc"]. Holmes spikes a set on the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="7h"] flop and it held through the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="6c"] river. East was eliminated in eighth place for $1.1 million. The next bust out will be one that will be discussed for quite some time. Nearly two hours after East departed, a clash between the two of the biggest stacks at the table got set the poker world abuzz. The blinds climbed to 500,000/1,000,000 (1,000,000 ante) and Alejandro ‘Papo MC’ Lococo made it 2,000,000 to go with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"]. From the cutoff, Aldemir made it 5,600,000 to go with his [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] and Lococo called. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"] giving Aldermir a flopped full house. Aldemir fired 3,900,000 on the flop and Lococo made the call with his tens. The [poker card="8h"] hit the turn and Lococo added a straight draw to his outs. Lococo checked it over to Aldemir who continued to fire, this time for 11,400,000 and again Lococo called. The [poker card="3d"] completed the board and after Lococo checked for the third time, Aldermir shipped enough to put Lococo all-in for his remaining 46 big blinds. In an instant, Lococo called it off and was shown the winner. Aldemir soared to more than 220 million in chips and Lococo exited in seventh place for $1,225,000. Aldemir went back to work in the next level. After a short break, the blinds were at 600,000/1,200,000 (1,200,000 ante) and Day 6 chip leader Hye Park was down to under 20 big blinds. When it folded to Park in the small blind, he completed holding [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] and was quickly raised by Aldemir in the big blind to 3,800,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. Park then three-bet shipped for just over 20,000,000 and Aldemir quickly called putting Park at risk. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2d"] keeping Park in the lead. But the [poker card="qh"] on the turn, flipped the script. When the [poker card="9d"] came on the river, Park was saying his goodbye, eliminated in sixth place for $1,400,000. Ozgur Secilmis had a wild ride in the Main Event, from his instant classic quads-over-quads hand right before the money bubble to nearly being eliminated on multiple occasions only to hit the very card he needed to stay alive. It looked like he was on the verge of another dramatic comeback when he got his [poker card="ks"][poker card="kc"] in against the [poker card="td"][poker card="9d"] of Joshua Remitio, but after the board ran out [poker card="ts"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="jd"][poker card="ad"], Secilmis was on the short stack instead of the ladder up. Just a few hands after that clash, Secilmis found himself all-in preflop with [poker card="kh"][poker card="5h"] against Aldemir’s [poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"]. He showed some life after the [poker card="ad"][poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"] flop. But the heart draw was taken away with the [poker card="as"] on the turn. It was all over when the [poker card="8c"] hit the river and the jovial Secilmis’ run ended with a fifth-place payday of $1,800,000. Play was supposed to end for the night with four players remaining, but WSOP officials insisted that the four complete the level. After a short break it was determined that the four would play on. In the extra time, with the blinds at 800,000/1,600,000 (1,600,000 ante) a huge hand took place. Oliver moved all in from the cutoff holding the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9d"] for 20,500,000. Remitio reshoved from the small blind for just over 27,000,000 with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="js"]. Then Aldemir woke up with [poker card="qs"][poker card="qh"] and, covering the table, also moved all-in with the opportunity for a double knockout. The flop came [poker card="td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"] giving Oliver middle pair and an open-ended straight draw. Remito held the same straight draw and an overcard while Aldemir kept the lead with his pocket queens. The [poker card="3d"] turn, added a flush draw for Oliver which came in on the [poker card="7d"] river. Oliver tripled up, but the river gave Remitio a straight so he was left with a short stack. The very next hand, Oliver took Remitio out when they got their stacks all-in preflop. Remitio held [poker card="jh"][poker card="7h"] and Oliver had him covered with his [poker card="as"][poker card="2c"]. The board ran out [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2c"] ending Remitio’s tournament in fourth place for $2,300,000 and it ended play for the rest of the night. The final three players returned the next afternoon to determine a winner with Aldemir holding a massive chip lead. The three players finished off the level from the night before, plus another two hours after which Oliver has slipped to just under 20 big blinds. The end for Oliver came just a few hands after the first break when, with the blinds at 1,000,000/2,000,000 (2,000,000 ante), he open-shipped his final 35,700,000 holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"] from the small blind and Holmes opted for a call with his [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"]. The flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"] giving Oliver top pair, but leaving Holmes with two overs and a backdoor flush draw. When the [poker card="jc"] came on the turn, Holmes improved to top pair and left Oliver looking for help to survive. However, the river was the [poker card="9h"] and Oliver’s dream of being the first Main Event champion from the UK came to an end in third place for a massive $3,000,000 payday. “I can’t complain can I?” Oliver said in his exit interview. “There are six thousand something other people that didn’t make it this far so what have I got to complain about? I think I played well and that kind of all that matters really. That’s all you can do in this game.” At the start of heads-up play, Aldemir held a two-to-one chip advantage over Holmes. But it wasn’t long before Holmes closed the gap and took over the chip lead. After that, it was hours of back-and-forth play with each player taking turns seizing control of the chip lead. With the blinds at 1,200,000/2,400,000 (2,400,000 ante) and Aldemir with a slim lead, Holmes opened to 6,000,000 off his 94 million chip stack with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"]. Aldemir made the call and the pair took a flop of [poker card="th"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2h"]. Aldemir checked and Holmes slid out another 6,000,000. Aldemir check-raised to 19,000,000 and, after a moment, Holmes made the call. The [poker card="ks"] hit the turn and Aldemir put out 36,500,000 and, now having top pair, Holmes again called. The river came the [poker card="9c"] and Aldemir checked it over to Holmes who moved in for the remainder of this stack. Aldemir spent roughly three minutes in the tank before deciding to call for it all. As Holmes turned over top pair, Aldemir showed down his two pair, and just like that it was all over. An emotional Koray Aldemir ran to celebrate with his rail as the new WSOP Main Event World Champion and winner of the $8 million first-place prize. Aldemir returned to shake hands with George Holmes whose incredible run fell just one spot short, finishing as the runner-up for $4,300,000. 2021 WSOP Main Event Final Table Results Koray Aldemir - $8,000,000 George Holmes - $4,300,000 Jack Oliver - $3,000,000 Joshua Remitio - $2,300,000 Ozgur Secilmis - $1,800,000 Hye Park - $1,400,000 Alejandro Lococo - $1,225,000 Jareth East - $1,100,000 Chase Bianchi - $1,000,000
  16. With just nine players remaining, the WSOP Main Event final table is set, and it is German player Koray Aldemir who will go into the final two days of the biggest poker tournament in the world with a huge chip lead. Here's Your November Nine With players such as Chance Kornuth, Andreas Kniep, and Jesse Lonis busting across a dramatic day at the felt, the final table of the WSOP Main Event was reached in the early hours of the morning, with Matt Berkey looking like a savant when he called the time and was just a few minutes out. https://twitter.com/berkey11/status/1460464671073341440 It didn’t take long from the kick-off of the day’s action for the bust-outs to keep coming, with Chance Kornuth’s one of the biggest of the day. Kornuth’s conqueror, George Holmes ended the day second in chips with 83.7 million chips, but at one point had less than two big blinds to his name, spinning his stack up to eventually knock out the most experienced player in the field when his [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] triumphed against Kornuth’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"]. The final hand of the day played out when Canadian player Demosthenes Kiriopoulos bubbled the final as his [poker card="As"][poker card="3s"] lost out to the chip leader’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"], with Aldemir’s fans on the rail going crazy when the board of [poker card="Qs"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="Jc"] gave the German another knockout and the overwhelming chip lead heading into the final nine. Only one player already has a WSOP bracelet to their name and that man is Chase Bianchi (12,100,000), who couldn’t be more excited about the potential checking off of one of his life’s goals. https://twitter.com/Chase_Bianchi/status/1460563523960934408   With two British players also surviving, Jack Oliver (30,400,000) and Jareth East (8,300,000) will both be hoping to become champion in two days time just as all the nine finalists will. Tomorrow at 4 pm local time, the final table begins. It will end in two nights time with a new world champion. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Final Table Chipcounts: Koray Aldemir - 140,000,000 George Holmes - 83,700,000 Alejandro Lococo - 46,800,000 Joshua Remitio - 40,000,000 Jack Oliver - 30,400,000 Ozgur Secilmis - 24,500,000 Hye Park - 13,500,000 Chase Bianchi - 12,100,000 Jareth East - 8,300,000 Six Remain In Crazy Eights In the Crazy Eights tournament, just six players remain from a field of 237 who started the penultimate day of the event. It is Leonid Yanovski who leads the final table, with a whopping 62.2 million chips, some way clear of closest challengers David Moses (49.1 million) and Paul Fehlig (48.7 million). On a busy day for final tables that should see four tournaments conclude and the Main Event reach three players, Yanovski will also face the challenge of short-stack Timo Kamphues (7.4 million), as well as former bracelet winners Georgios Sotiropoulos (21.8 million) and Sejin Park (14.6 million). WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Final Table Chipcounts: Leonid Yanovski - 62,200,000 David Moses - 49,100,000 Paul Fehlig - 48,700,000 Georgios Sotiropoulos - 21,800,000 Sejin Park - 14,600,000 Timo Kamphues - 7,400,000 $10K Stud 8 Needs One More Day In the $10,000-entry Event #73, the Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship, Yuval Bronshtein leads the final four combatants after the final table was started but abandoned halfway through the story being told. It’s some story, as with four remaining, Bronshtein (3,320,000) is shooting for another WSOP bracelet, with two of his three opponents each holding bracelets in their back catalogs too. With nine players remaining, WSOP Player of the Year leader Josh Arieh bowed out, before being followed from the event by Gary Benson and Erik Seidel, who missed the chance to capture his tenth WSOP crown. After the elimination of John Monette in sixth place, Marco Johnson was the final player to miss out on the denouement of the tournament. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Results: 5. Marco Johnson - $79,073 6. John Monnette - $59,545 7. Erik Seidel - $46,140 8. Gary Benson - $36,821 9. Josh Arieh - $30,290 The four remaining players share nine bracelets between them, with only Ian O’Hara (2,120,000) yet to win one. Scott Seiver (1,665,000) is aiming for his fourth title in WSOP history, with Brian Hastings going for his fifth gong. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Yuval Bronshtein - 3,320,000 Ian O'Hara - 2,120,000 Scott Seiver - 1,665,000 Brian Hastings - 1,535,000 Denis 'aDrENalin710' Strebkov Leads $2,500 Big Bet Mix In Event #74, the $,2500-entry Big Bet Mix, Denis Strebkov of Russia took a massive chip lead into the final day with just 14 players remaining. Strebkov piled up over 1.4 million chips to lead by a big margin from Shanmukha Meruga (877,000) and Scott Bohlman (827,000), with every other one of the 11 players having less than half of Strebkov’s chips with one day to play out. Just 91 players started the day, but 77 busted, with James Chen, Yuri Dzivielevski, John Racener, Matt Waxman, Ryan Laplante, Eli Elezra, and Chris Brewer among them. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Top 10 Chipcounts: Denis Strebkov - 1,402,000 Shanmukha Meruga - 877,000 Scott Bohlman - 827,000 Hooman Nizad - 512,000 Patrik Ciklamini - 498,000 Anthony Ribeiro - 479,000 Noah Boeken - 455,000 Jon Turner - 415,000 Asher Lower - 375,000 Amnon Filippi - 371,000 $1,500 Freezeout Kicked Off In Event #75, Day 1 of the $1,500-entry Freezeout event took place, with Rennei Liu (889,000) also a big chip leader. Other prominent names such as Bin Liu (610,000), Asi Moshe (604,000), Artan Dedusha (504,000), Joe Serock (436,000), Nadya Magnus (414,000), Patrick Tardif (239,000), Gabriel Andrade (180,000), Sherry Hammers (139,000) and Angelina Rich (124,000) all remain in contention, while stars such as Barny Boatman, Daniel Strelitz, and Barry Greenstein exited before the close of play. WSOP 2021 Event #75 $1,500 Freezeout NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Rennei Liu - 889,000 Bin Liu - 610,000 Asi Moshe - 604,000 David Pham - 572,000 Stefan Reiser - 537,000 Armin Rezaei - 529,000 Kartik Ved - 523,000 Nicholas Hubers - 510,000 Naor Slobodskoy - 505,000 Artan Dedusha - 504,000 Chidwick, Sammartino, Timoshenko Survive Super Turbo Bounty Finally, seven players only remain in contention for the 76th WSOP event bracelet, namely the players who survived a brutal Day 1 of the $10,000-entry Super Turbo Bounty event. In what was a stacked field, Stephen Chidwick made up for busting out of the WSOP Main Event yesterday by racking up 2,270,000 chips, with the Brit only behind runaway leader Aditya Agarwal (8,750,000) and Barth Melius (3,550,000). Romain Lewis (2,050,000), Dario Sammartino (1,930,000), Uri Reichenstein (1,795,000), and Yevgeniy Timoshenko (1,065,000) all made the final table too as the overall field of 307 was reduced by 300 in one 10-hour shove fest marathon. With the $463,885 top prize one of the bigger prizes on offer in the Rio over the final few days of the 2021 World Series of Poker, finding out who wins is sure to be an exciting watch. WSOP 2021 Event #76 $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty Final Table Chipcounts: Aditya Agarwal - 8,750,000 Barth Melius - 3,550,000 Stephen Chidwick - 2,270,000 Romain Lewis - 2,050,000 Dario Sammartino - 1,930,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,795,000 Yevgeniy Timoshenko - 1,065,000 One person who sadly won’t be part of the commentary team for the final days of the WSOP Main Event is Nick Schulman, who tested positive for COVID-19. It appears he’ll miss Ali Nejad... well, a bit. https://twitter.com/NickSchulman/status/1460429518837936128 Finally, players were being careful and getting tested in general, but like every situation in poker, there’s always a player who takes it too far. https://twitter.com/_dmock9888/status/1460432721566584838  
  17. After Day 8 of the WSOP Main Event, overnight chip leader and German poker professional Koray Aldemir leads the final three players in their quest for the $8 million top prize. With a massive lead, Aldemir sits ahead of British pro Jack Oliver and George Holmes as the final day of this year’s Rio showstopper looms. Just Three Remain In The Main Event The final table of the WSOP Main Event began with nine players in seats, but it wasn’t long before Chase Bianchi departed in ninth place for $1 million. Bianchi was all-in for 9.7 million with the big blind at 800,000 with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qc"] but was called by British player Jack Oliver with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] and after the board played out [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Jc"], Bianchi was on the rail. Just a couple of minutes later, Jareth East was on the sidelines with just over a million bucks, too. East shoved with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jh"] and was called by the three-bet jam of George Holmes, which got folds from the rest of the table. Holmes had [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qc"] and the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="7h"] flop put his hand way into the lead, and nothing changed across the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="6c"] river. In seventh place, Argentinian DJ Alejandro Lococo made his departure, as a big hand went the chip leader’s way. Pre-flop, Lococo, holding [poker card="Tc"][poker card="Ts"], called a three-bet from Aldemir with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"], and a flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="9c"] saw Aldemir three-bet and get a call from Lococo. The turn card of [poker card="8h"] saw Aldemir bet 11.6 million and again Lococo called. On the [poker card="3d"] river, Aldemir fired out a pot-sized bet and Lococo called off his stack in seconds, shot down by Aldemir’s flopped full house and out for $1,225,000. It was Hye Park who busted in sixth place, earning $1.4 million when his [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] couldn’t hold against Aldemir in yet another flip that went the way of the German. Aldemir’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"] hit a queen on the turn of a board that showed [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="9d"] and sent Park, the former chip leader in the Main Event, home. Aldemir wasn’t just winning hands, he was winning every hand in an orbit as the massive chipleader continued to dominate his opponents and put them in ICM hell. That was only getting tougher, of course, with the escalating places and attendant prizes, so when Ozgur Secilmis of Turkey shoved with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="5h"], Aldemir had an easy call with [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"]. The board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="As"][poker card="8c"] saw the German add to his stack and sent his opponent home with a prize of $1.8 million. One more player needed to bust and while it looked like it might be the last remaining British player in Jack Oliver, that was not the case. As he rivered a miracle to stay alive and treble up with a straight, he and his British rail went crazy. https://twitter.com/euan_m_/status/1460886232523706372 Shortly afterwards, the final three were confirmed when Joshua Remitio busted with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7h"], called by Jack Oliver from the big blind with [poker card="As"][poker card="2c"] with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2c"] board sending Remitio home in fourth for $2.3 million. Three men remain, with a British, American and German player all hoping to top the 6,550- WSOP Main Event field and become world champion in the Thunderdome. Johnnie ‘Vibes’ knows who he is picking to go all the way and win the WSOP Main Event tomorrow evening. https://twitter.com/JohnnieVibes/status/1460771560734687234 Koray Aldemir might be most professionals’ pick, but Matt Affleck has a bone to pick. https://twitter.com/mcmattopoker/status/1460860047186010112 Whoever wins, the next 24 hours is about to change their life forever. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Chipcounts: Koray Aldemir - 264,600,000 Jack Oliver - 77,300,000 George Holmes - 57,400,000 Payouts: 4. Joshua Remitio - $2,300,000 5. Ozgur Secilmis - $1,800,000 6. Hye Park - $1,400,000 7. Alejandro Lococo - $1,225,000 8. Jareth East - $1,100,000 9. Chase Bianchi - $1,000,000 Moses Down Takes Crazy Eights There was a big winner in the value $888-entry Crazy Eights event as David Moses clinched victory after a heads-up win against Sejin Park saw him win his first-ever WSOP bracelet. Moses’ victory came after a rollercoaster final table reconvened. It was Leonid Yanovski who led the final table, but he busted in fifth place as others at the final table rose from lowly positions to ladder with care and daring in equal measure. German player Timo Kampheus began the day looking up at the field but finished third for over $200,000 before Moses finally got the better of the skilled and experienced Park in the final duel. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Final Table Results: David Moses - $888,888 Sejin Park - $400,888 Timo Kamphues - $200,888 Paul Fehlig - $134,888 Leonid Yanovski - $102,888 Georgios Sotiropoulos - $79,888 Joseph Liberta - $61,888 Farhad Davoudzadeh - $47,888 Brian Hastings Is A Five-Time Bracelet Winner In the $10,000 Stud Hi-Lo Championship, Brian Hastings won a fifth WSOP bracelet, putting him in the company of only 28 other players in poker history. Hastings came into the final day fourth of the four remaining players, but managed to triumph after a heads-up comeback against Ian O’Hara. With both Scott Seiver (4th for $107,967) and overnight chip leader Yuval Bronshtein (3rd for $151,460) bowing out before the showdown, only Hastings had previous WSOP success in terms of winning bracelets. O’Hara had the chip lead heads-up, but couldn’t seal the deal to win his debut bracelet, with Hastings triumphing in style as he made a flush and saw O’Hara pair an ace on the river to hand Hastings the title. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Stud Hi-Lo Championship Final Table Results: Brian Hastings - $352,958 Ian O’Hara - $218,144 Yuval Bronshtein - $151,460 Scott Seiver - $107,967 Marco Johnson - $79,073 John Monnette - $59,545 Erik Seidel - $46,140 Gary Benson - $36,821 At the final table of Event #74, the $2,500-entry Big Bet Mix event, Russian player Denis Strebkov went wire-to-wire in claiming his second WSOP bracelet and the $117,898 top prize. Jerry Wong was the unfortunate player to finish in second place after a run to the heads-up which saw both men outlast the field due to a mixture of chip dominance and daring. Wong went into the heads-up battle with a marginal lead but lost it almost immediately in a hand where he tried to bluff Strebkov off a flush and failed to do so. With the tournament ending a short time later, the Russian player had won a second WSOP bracelet and the only six-figure prize on offer, while Wong, like everyone else at the seven-handed final table, had to conceded to Strebkov’s dominance after he led from the start then closed out an impressive victory. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Final Table Results: Denis Strebkov - $117,898 Jerry Wong - $72,868 Pearce Arnold - $48,864 Richard Bai - $33,583 Shanmukha Meruga - $23,670 Patrik Ciklamini - $17,119 Hooman Nizad - $12,715 In the denouement of Event #76, the $10,000-entry Super Turbo Bounty event, just seven players entered the second and final day of play. When the dust settled, French poker professional Romain Lewis had won his first-ever WSOP bracelet and the top prize of $463,885. Heading into the action, Ukrainian player Yevgeny Timoshenko had just seven big blinds, and they went into the middle when he was dealt [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"] in early position. WSOP 2019 Main Event runner-up Dario Sammartino made the call with [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qc"] and stayed ahead through the board of [poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="9h"][poker card="Td"] as he busted his Ukrainian opponent and the Italian got a vital boost to his stack. Sadly for Sammartino, it was merely a stay of execution. Up to 15 big blinds, he hoped to make that 30 when he moved all-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6c"] pre-flop from the small blind. The Italian was in great shape to do so with Stephen Chidwick calling him with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3h"], but the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="Kc"] board put paid to his hopes and helped Chidwick chip up in the process. After Barth Melius busted in fifth place for $103,547 and Uri Reichenstein left in fourth for $142,840, Chidwick himself was eventually ousted in third for $200,598. The British poker legend and WSOP bracelet winner shoved from the small blind with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] but was behind Aditya Agarwal’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qd"] and stayed that way through the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"] board. Heads-up, Agarwal had a 3:1 chip lead, but Lewis won a crucial flip with pocket fives holding before the final hand saw the Frenchman triumph with [poker card="Th"][poker card="9h"] against Agarwal’s [poker card="As"][poker card="3c"], a ten on the turn clinching the debut WSOP victory and $463,885 top prize and sending the delighted professional’s rail into raptures. https://twitter.com/RomainLewis/status/1460813657739186178 WSOP 2021 Event #76 $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty Final Table Results: Romain Lewis - $463,885 Aditya Agarwal - $286,705 Stephen Chidwick - $200,598 Uri Reichenstein - $142,840 Barth Melius - $103,547 Dario Sammartino - $76,442 Yevgeniy Timoshenko - $57,489 Haribhai Gopaul - $44,060 In Event #75, Renmei Liu bagged the chip lead heading into the eight-handed final day of action as the $1,500 Freezeout’s penultimate day took place. Liu piled up 7.1 million chips, with others such as Nicholas Hubers (5.6 million) and Kaue De Souza (4.54million) also having great days at the felt. On a day when players such as David Pham, Simon Lofberg, Asi Moshe and Mike Watson all fell close to the final, play was fast and furious, with tomorrow’s final expected to be the same. We’ll find out who wins the $270,877 top prize and their first-ever WSOP bracelet tomorrow. WSOP 2021 Event #75 $1,500 Freezeout NLHE Final Table Chipcounts: Renmei Liu - 7,100,000 Nicholas Hubers - 5,600,000 Kaue De Souza - 4,540,000 Chad Himmelspach - 4,000,000 Tarun Gulati - 3,080,000 Ori Hasson - 3,020,000 Stefan Reiser - 1,985,000 Seth Evans - 925,000 In the penultimate tournament of eight to take place on Day 48, Ryan Depaulo bagged up the biggest pile of chips in the $1,500-entry FIFTY STACK event. With a total of 1,501 entries into the tournament, just 114 players survived to take on the next day’s play as Ryan Depaulo piled up 2,735,000 chips, a clear chip lead over Craig Burke (2,080,000) and John Gorsuch (1,525,000), with everyone outside the top eight players having less than half of Depaulo’s stack. WSOP 2021 Event #77 $1,500 FIFTY STACK Top 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Depaulo - 2,735,000 Craig Burke - 2,080,000 John Gorsuch - 1,525,000 Valentyn Shabelnyk - 1,490,000 Kevin Theodore - 1,410,000 Roongsak Griffeth - 1,375,000 Garrett Beckman - 1,375,000 Ron Moisescu - 1,375,000 Scott Hall - 1,280,000 Ryan Hiller - 1,275,000 With just eight days to play in the 2021 WSOP, the 78th event to begin was the $10,000-entry Razz Championship, with Jeff Lisandro leading the field after an entertaining Day 1 at the felt. The Australian’s stack of 270,500 dwarfs most, but Phil Hellmuth (237,500) and Brian Hastings (212,000) who sit second and third in chips respectively, will feel like they have a great shot at victory. Indeed, Phil Hellmuth is as positive as you can imagine at his chances. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1460925293875511300 WSOP 2021 Event #78 $10,000 Razz Championship Top 10 Chipcounts:   Jeff Lisandro - 270,500 Phil Hellmuth - 237,500 Brian Hastings - 212,000 Nicolai Morris - 209,000 Jordan Siegel - 200,000 Chip Jett - 184,000 Max Pescatori - 178,500 Adam Owen - 178,000 Erik Sagstrom - 175,500 Shane Littlefield - 173,000 Finally... what are you doing between May and July next year? Us too. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1460773316122210305
  18. High-stakes cash game pro and four-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Eli Elezra has been named as the 2021 inductee into the Poker Hall of Fame. At a ceremony just before the start of the Poker Hall of Fame Bounty tournament at the 2021 World Series of Poker, tournament director Jack Effel took the stage and made the announcement of Elezra induction. Elezra then addressed the players in the room and thanked those who have helped him along the way. “I landed in Las Vegas in 1987, back then I never could imagine or dream that my love for poker would land me in the Poker Hall of Fame,” Elezra said. “Everybody who knows me and has played a hand of poker with me knows how much I love this game. I’m 60 years old and I happen to be the 60th member of the Poker Hall of Fame. I’ve been playing six or seven days a week and I plan to keep on playing for many more years to come. "Twenty years ago, when I first sat down with my mentor the late Chip Reese and Doyle Brunson, who is here I know. I played with them the highest stakes cash game. I immediately knew that I wanted to be a professional poker player like them. To Chip and Doyle, I cannot thank you enough to teach this fish to swim with the sharks.” https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1461086482064543747?s=20 Elezra’s notoriety in poker flourished during the poker boom of the early 2000’s as a regular on the popular poker programming of the day. Elezra, often touted as a “businessman” back then, was a regular cast member on the first six seasons of High Stakes Poker and made numerous appearances on Poker After Dark high-stakes cash games. After Poker After Dark was resurrected by PokerGO in 2017, Elezra once again emerged as a go-to fixture for the show. At the same time, Elezra proved himself as a formidable tournament player, winning four WSOP bracelets, one in Seven Card Stud Hi-Low (2007), one in 2-7 Triple Draw Lowball (2013), and two in Seven Card Stud (2015, 2019). He’s earned more than $4.5 million in lifetime live tournament earnings over a career that spans 25 years. In that time he’s amassed 13 six-figure scores, including his recent 4th place finish in the 2021 WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $286,963. His tournament earnings are headlined by his 2004 win in the Mirage Poker Showdown where he bested Lee Watkinson heads-up for $1.024 million. Accolades aside, Elezra is perhaps best known amongst his peers as a fixture in “The Big Game” at the Bellagio where some of the biggest mixed games in the world take place inside the room best known as “Bobby’s Room.” Elezra concluded his speech with an eye on the future of the Hall of Fame. "I also wanted to say that there are so many deserving nominees who have worked hard to earn a place in the Hall of Fame. More and more great players and builders are starting to turn 40 years old. I really hope that the World Series of Poker begins to induct a couple more nominees each year." Elezra was the lone person elected to the Poker Hall of Fame after a nomination process that created a shortlist of 10 eligible persons and a follow-up vote by the 32 living members of the Hall of Fame.
  19. Only nine players remain in the hunt for the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event’s $8 million top prize. It’s not only life-changing money that's on the line for the players but also winning the Main Event locks up a spot in poker history. That’s what makes watching the Main Event so special - the stakes are sky-high. The excitement for us watching is seeing how it will play out and getting answers to the questions that have presented themselves along the way. And this year, there’s plenty of questions. Who will spin it up, who will have a meltdown, and ultimately what will be that history-making moment we'll talk about for years. There are plenty of final table details that make this year an interesting one, but with the start just hours away, here are five questions and storylines we’ll be keeping a close eye on during the rest of the 2021 WSOP Main Event. Can Koray Close? German MTT crusher Koray Aldemir is this year’s name pro at the final table and he’ll start the march to the $8 million with an enormous chip lead. Aldemir has 140,000,000 in chips, 35% of the total in play, meaning that it’s going to be very difficult for most of his eight opponents to wrestle that chip lead away from him. His 175 big blinds are really only challenged by that of George Holmes, who has 83,700,000 in chips and has proven to be on a bit of a heater. Should the two get into a massive all-in confrontation early, they could switch positions, but that seems incredibly unlikely given the steep pay jumps that can be won deeper in the final table. Recent history is on Aldemir’s side when it comes to taking down the Main Event. In 2019, Hossein Ensan sat down at his final table with an impressive chip lead and ended up winning it all. In 2018, it wasn’t the case for Nick Manion and Michael Dyer who started the day on the two biggest stacks (Tony Miles and eventual winner John Cynn played heads-up for the bracelet). But both Scott Blumstein (2017) and Joe McKeehen (2015) started their final tables with the lead and ended with the victory as well. With $12.3 in live tournament earnings and far-and-away the most time spent in poker’s spotlight, Aldemir is in a prime position to become the next World Champ. The only two questions are will the cards cooperate and can he close the deal? Will ‘Papo MC’ Drop A Beat? If you’ve been watching the coverage of the Main Event on PokerGO then you can’t help but know that Alejandro Lococo is also known by his rap moniker “Papo MC”. While Aldemir may be the best-known player from the poker world, it’s safe to say that the Argentinian musician is the best-known overall player in the group thanks to his music which has brought him more than 817,000 followers on Twitter. So, one can’t help but think what a win for Lococo could do for the game of poker in Argentina. Give it a boost? Certainly. A bonafide boom? Perhaps. But one look at some of his recent tweets, one in which he comes from behind holding the [ah][th] against the [qs][qh] of 11th place finisher Sean Ragozzini, has racked up over 11,000 likes. https://twitter.com/PapoMcArg/status/1460616250321735691?s=20 He’s got game, he’s got bars, and he’s got one of the best poker tattoos on his right hand that you’ll ever see. But does he have enough beats in him to rise up from third in chips (46,800,000, ~59 big blinds) to bring the Main Event bracelet, and a new wave of poker fans, to his native Argentina? Is Destiny Calling Ozgur Secilmis? Ozgur Secilmis will already go down inWorld Series of Poker history. His quads over quads win over Chang Liu just before the money bubble will go down as one of the toughest beats delivered in any Main Event. It’s the kind of hand that not only propels one's chip stack into the money but it's the kind of luck that makes one feel like they have the poker gods on their side. Secilmis proved to be a tough competitor over the next few days, being featured on the live stream throughout Day 7 as the field narrowed. He did his fair share of damage to get to the final table busting Mitchel Halverson in 15th place and PSPC winner Ramon Colillas in 14th. But earlier in the day, when he was sitting on a short stack, he was all-in and behind with one card to come. He was on the verge of hitting the rail when he spiked his saving card on the river and from there built his stack all the way back up from the felt to a seat at the final table. He’ll need some more help if he’s to spin his 31 big blinds up into a championship run, but if he continues to pick up the right card at the right time, Turkey could have its first Main Event champion. Is It Time For A British Invasion? There’s never been a WSOP Main Event winner from the UK, despite plenty of top-tier talents from across the Atlantic making it to the final table. This year, there are two young pros from the UK with a seat at the final table, both guaranteed to enjoy a new high mark in their careers. Jareth East, 31, has been playing the game since the day he was legal with Hendon Mob results dating back to 2011. But more telling as to his skill is his online results. Currently the #8-ranked pro from the UK (worldwide #154) East has more than $4.3 million in career online earnings including a PokerStars WCOOP title, a Full Tilt Poker FTOPS win, and a WPT Online DeepStacks victory for more than $557,000. East is the second short stack starting the day, with just 10 big blinds, but he might be the player with the best background to run it up. Joining East is his countryman Jack Oliver, 26, who is the youngest player at the final table. Oliver has $117,000 in live tournament earnings but more importantly, he’s got 34,000,000 in chips (43 big blinds) and a shot at bringing the Main Event bracelet home. Will Chase Bianchi’s Bracelet Run Cost Him? Chase Bianchi already has a gold bracelet on his resume, and he’s got the experience to turn his 18 big blinds into a run at the Main Event. But even before he has a chance to play for the $8 million (with $1,000,000 locked up), his newfound fame is already costing him dearly. https://twitter.com/Chase_Bianchi/status/1460600006801453062?s=20 Maybe not dearly, but for sure his landlord knows, right? All of these questions, and more, will be answered over the next two nights at the final table of the Main Event plays out on PokerGO.
  20. The final week of the 2021 World Series of Poker has arrived and the series is set to wrap up with some of the biggest action of the fall. In addition to the finale of the WSOP Main Event awarding its $8 million first-place prize and crowing a new World Champion, the homestretch of the schedule features a series of robust high rollers that could have a major impact on the Player of the Year race, the final Mixed Game championship event, and an event to celebrate the naming of a new member of the Poker Hall of Fame. Spotlight Tournament Event #79 - $1,979 Poker Hall of Fame Bounty Freezout To commemorate the origins of the Poker Hall of Fame in 1979 and to celebrate the latest induction (whoever that will be) the WSOP is holding the first-ever $1,979 Poker Hall of Fame Bounty tournament that gives everyone a chance to play with a poker legend. Every living member of the PHOF who decides to play will have a bounty on their heads equal to the year that they were accepted into the Hall. For example, 16-time gold bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth was voted into the Hall of Fame in 2007 and so whoever takes out The Poker Brat in this event will earn themselves a $2,007 bounty - pretty fun and straightforward. With some luck, many of the invited members of the PHOF will turn out and give fans a chance to see them up close. Legends likely to be in the field include Hellmuth, Daniel Negreanu, Erik Seidel, Johnny Chan, Mori Eskandani, and, perhaps, another appearance by Doyle Brunson. At the same time, the newest member of the Poker Hall of Fame will be revealed and, if they are in town, can join the proceedings with the biggest bounty of them all. The final table of this event will be available to watch on Thursday, November 19 on PokerGO. Complete WSOP Week 7+ Schedule [table id=273 /] Additional Highlights Event #82 - $250,000 Super High Roller Event #85 - $50,000 High Roller Event #87 - $100,000 High Roller There’s no reason not to lump these three events in with each other this week as all three will both bring out some of the WSOP’s biggest stars as well as, possibly, have a major impact on the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year race. It’s tough to gauge the field that might show up to play in the $250,000 Super High Roller. Perhaps eyeing the Super High Roller Bowl that took place just before the series provides the window as to who will pony up a quarter million. Names like Stephen Chidwick, Justin Bonomo, and Michael Addamo should be in the field. Fedor Holz is planning on playing and Jake Schindler should be in as well. Plus, perhaps a couple of the upcoming crop like Ali Imsirovic and Chris Brewer with fire away. Whoever is in, the final table of this major event can be watched on PokerGO on Saturday, November 20. It’s a similar situation for the $100,000 but with a few extra names in the mix. We already know that a number of the Player of the Year contenders, including current leader Josh Arieh and his friend Shaun Deeb will be jumping in the field to try and rack up some POY points. In general, this should have a constellation of poker stars looking to both hit a huge payday and, for some, save their series. In 2019, Keith Tilston took home the top prize of $2,792,406 in a field of 99 runners. Daniel Negreanu finished as the runner-up for more than $1.7 million, bringing his investors a nice ROI. With field sizes being down roughly 35% this series, one can still expect 60-70 runners and one of the richest top prizes of the fall. Watch this final table when it takes place on the final day of the series, Tuesday, November 23. Finally, the $50,000 High Roller may be the most exciting as even more elite players find their way into the registration line. In 2019, the last $50K of the series drew 123 runners as Danny Tang booked a $1.6 million victory over runner-up Sam Soverel who won $994K. But one doesn’t need to look back to 2019 to get a feel for what this might look like. Earlier in the series Michael Addamo took down the first $50,000 High Roller for $1.1 million in a field of 81 and, although not a direct comparison, Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates won the $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $954,020 in a field of 63 runners. On Monday, November 22, the final table will crown a winner live on PokerGO. Something to keep an eye on for all three of these events is the influx of international players that made their way to the Main Event once travel restrictions to the United States were relaxed earlier in November. Some of these events may benefit by a few percentage points by those last-minute travelers looking to play big having missed out on much of the series. Plus, also note that the Player of the Year points assigned to each of these contests is massive. Even small fields in these big buy-ins have the ability to switch the narrative on who will walk away with the 2021 POY awards. One Last Championship Event Event #78 - $10,000 Razz Championship It’s the final $10,000 Championship event of the series and, like many of the final big buy-in events, has a real chance of making an impact on who will walk away with the Player of the Year title. Razz likes to keep it low, and with so many events taking place this week, the field is likely to remain right around 90-100 players, but it should be a lineup of well-known mixed game crushers who enter including Scott Seiver who will be looking to defend his 2019 title for which he won just over $301k.
  21. The latest action in the 2021 WSOP Main Event saw several big names make dramatic exits on Day 6 as the 96 players who started the day were whittled down to just 36 survivors by the close of play. On a day where Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura won his first-ever WSOP bracelet, the Main Event was the main attraction at the Rio in Las Vegas. Park Takes Main Event Lead, Kornuth and Aldemir Still Crushing It didn’t take long for there to be big drama on Day 6 of the WSOP Main Event, with players like Stephen Chidwick heading to the rail. Dragana Lim was the final female player sitting, but her chances ended when her [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"] was overtaken on a cruel river by Mikiya Kudo’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qs"] when the board played out [poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Qh"] after all the chip had gone in pre-flop. Nicholas Rigby continued to grab headlines and baffle his fellow players as time and again he played the hand he referred to as the ‘dirty diaper’, deuce-three. It was good enough to take down a massive pot with a bluff right here: https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1460094277027917829 Other big names fell, such as British pro Alex Goulder, whose pocket eights weren’t enough to hold against Spanish player David Cabrera’s pocket jacks. Goulder was the last player of the night to depart, cashing for $163,900 in 37th place. Other big names, however, thrived on a day where over half the remaining field was trimmed. With 36 players still in the hunt for the $8 million top prize and the WSOP Main Event bracelet worth $500,000 alone, it is Hye Park who leads the Main Event after six days at the felt with stack of 29,500,000 chips. He’s some way ahead of Demosthenes Kiriopoulos (24,905,000) and Joshua Remitio (21,490,000), who are second and third in chips respectively. Elsewhere, there are some very big players with chipstacks, as Chase Bianchi 920,765,000) and Koray Aldemir (18,905,000) round out the top five, PokerStars players Ramon Colillas (18,200,000) and Alejandro Lococo (17,950,000) both make the top ten and both David Cabrera (14,530,000) and Chance Kornuth (13.6 million) remain in with a great chance of victory. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Hye Park - 29,500,000 Demosthenes Kiriopoulos - 24,905,000 Joshua Remitio - 21,490,000 Chase Bianchi - 20,765,000 Koray Aldemir - 18,905,000 George Holmes - 18,425,000 Ramon Colillas - 18,200,000 Alejandro Lococo - 17,950,000 Ozgur Secilmis - 14,700,000 David Cabrera - 14,530,000 Okamura Wins First Ever Gold In Event #72, the only bracelet of the day was won by Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura as he triumphed against the overnight chip leader Rafael Mota of Brazil. With eight players kicking off the $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO action, Tim Grau of Austria busted first for $20,737 in PLO, before Marc Lange went out in seventh just a few minutes later for $27,088. Lange was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="2s"] but lost out to Leonid Yanovski’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qs"] after the ace-high board provided no hope for the unfortunate Lange. He was joined on the rail by Jordan Spurlin when the American’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] couldn’t hit against Nick Yunis’ [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"] on a seven-high board after all the chips had gone into the middle pre-flop. Spurlin had won $35,942 with his run to the top six and it was Mike Takayama who went one step higher up the ladder as he busted in fifth for $48,428. Takayama was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="7c"], but couldn’t catch an ace to overtake Yunis, who this time had [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] and held on the paired board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"]. Yanovski ran short to bust in fourth place for $66,249 before Yunis himself found himself on the rail. Moving all-in for his last six big blinds, Yunis needed help as his [poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"] was some way behind Okamura’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"] in no limit hold’em. He couldn’t find it on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2h"] board and cashed for $91,989 in third place. Heads-up, Okamura had a strong chip lead, playing over 12 million to Mota’s 8 million and sealed the deal when he won in PLO with a full house of queens over tens to beat Mota’s pocket kings. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO Final Table Results: Motoyoshi Okamura - $209,716 Rafael Mota - $129,621 Nick Yunis - $91,989 Leonid Yanovski - $66,249 Mike Takayama - $48,428 Jordan Spurlin - $35,942 Marc Lange - $27,088 Tim Grau - $20,737 A huge final Day 1 flight in Event #70 saw the Crazy Eights field final reach Day 2 after a cancelled Day 1a and three Day 1 flights thereafter. Day 1d saw a massive 2,241 players take part, with only 337 of them making the money. When the dust settled at the end of the day, Farhad Davoudzadeh (2,410,000) had the chip lead, with a slight lead over both Miklos Zsuffa (2,405,000) and Cole Ferraro (2,290,000), who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn in Las Vegas. Others to make the cut included Jason Wheeler (2,100,000), Philip Tom (1,045,000), Kenny Hallaert (590,000) and Cate Hall (310,000), while others such as Barny Boatman, Ryan Depaulo, Bruno Lopes, Pamela Balzano, Chris Moorman, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Blair Hinkle and Jeremy Ausmus all fell short of the next day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Day 1d Top 10 Chipcounts: Farhad Davoudzadeh - 2,410,000 Miklos Zsuffa - 2,405,000 Cole Ferraro - 2,290,000 Leonid Yanovski - 2,205,000 Jason Wheeler - 2,100,000 Timo Kamphues - 2,055,000 Lipei Xu - 1,975,000 John Simonian - 1,850,000 Pierre Merlin - 1,850,000 Joseph Liberta - 1,835,000 Erik Seidel Plays For Bracelet #10, Another Deep Run for Arieh In the $10,000-entry Seven Card Stud Championship, there are a number of different narratives lining up to play out on the final day of the event. Event #73 has some big, big players still in the hunt for the bracelet and $352 958 top prize, with Marco Johnson (1,400,000) top of the shop and in line for his third WSOP bracelet. Further down the final 11 players, Erik Seidel (994,000) will shoot for the 10th WSOP bracelet of his career tomorrow, which would put him second on the all-time bracelet winners list with Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey and Johnny Chan. Josh Arieh (535,000) seeks another deep run to the podium places in order to further stretch his WSOP Player of the Year lead after an amazing 2021 World Series of Poker so far. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $888 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Day Chipcounts: Marco Johnson - 1,400,000 Yuval Bronshtein - 1,332,000 Brian Hastings - 1,093,000 Erik Seidel - 994,000 Ian O'Hara - 975,000 Scott Seiver - 783,000 John Monnette - 657,000 Josh Arieh - 535,000 Gary Benson - 351,000 Ahmed Mohamed - 273,000 Brett Richey - 192,000 Finally, in Event #74, the $2,500-entry Big Bet Mix event, 212 entries led to 10 hours of poker reducing the field to just 92 in the mix for Day 2. Of the survivors, Jarryd Godena (1,400,000) has the lead with the Australian bagging slightly more than Brazilian player Yuri Dzivielevski (1,332,000) and Ismael Bojang (1,093,000). With players such as Chris Brewer, Yueqi Zhu, Mike Matusow, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Benny Glaser, Jake Daniels, Paul Volpe and Ben Yu all departing on the first day’s play, players will likely battle down to a final table and one step closer to the $117,898 top prize on tomorrow’s Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Top 10 Chipcounts: Jarryd Godena - 1,400,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 1,332,000 Ismael Bojang - 1,093,000 Asher Lower - 994,000 Yik Chiu - 975,000 Richard Bai - 783,000 Anthony Ribeiro - 657,000 Scott Bohlman - 535,000 Jon Turner - 351,000 Maury Barrett - 273,000
  22. Day 2cef of the WSOP Main Event saw strong performances from many big names as the field narrowed and some former champions enjoyed revisiting the WSOP felt on Day 2 of the Main Event for the first time in over two years. Moneymaker and Nguyen Among Former Winners to Star on Day 2cef Chris Moneymaker was one of the standout performers on Day 2cef as the 1,807 surviving players from Days 1c, 1e, and 1f combined to play out a dramatic day at the felt. Moneymaker, who now represents America’s Cardroom after over a decade at the felt wearing the PokerStars patch, had an incredible session of five two-hour levels, running up a huge stack of over half a million chips as he ended the day with 531,600 chips. Moneymaker's surge to the top of the chip counts came on two critical hands, both against the same opponent, Bryan Reyes. In the first, Moneymaker flopped a set of deuces against Reyes' pocket aces for a pure double. Then when holding the bigger stack, the pair clashed again. The cameras caught up with the action with the blinds at 800/1,600 (1,600 ante) after Moneymaker raised holding [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] and Reyes put in a three-bet to 14,600 holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"]. Moneymaker went with the in position four-bet to 40,500 and after a trip in the tank, Reyes made the call. The flop came [poker card="qs"][poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Reyes checked it over to Moneymaker who put in a small bet of 25,000 and Reyes again made the call. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] and Reyes, checked again. This time Moneymaker slid out 65,000. With 200,000 left in his stack and after giving it a thought, Reyes moved all-in sending Moneymaker into the tank. An anguished Moneymaker stood and paced, concerned that Reyes flopped a set of queens. "It's no fun when the rabbit has the gun," he said. Then suddenly Moneymaker called and the cards were on their back. The river came [poker card="td"] and Reyes hit the rail and Moneymaker shot to the top of the chip counts. https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1458655860960411650?s=20 https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1458665926191054848?s=20 Moneymaker may have made the top 10, but he doesn’t lead the Main Event at this stage. That honor is reserved for Conrad De Armas, who bagged up an incredible 744,000 chips, and that’s enough for the overall lead above Day 2abd conqueror Rameez Shahid (731,000). Hot on De Armas’ heels are several big names, with Adam Walton (673,100), Keyu Qu (664,900), Cameron Mitchell (642,000), and Daniel Lowery (625,200) the closest to De Armas’s stack. Behind them lurk dangerous top 10 chip stacks belonging to Matt Glantz (580,000), Artem Dedusha (577,100), Daniel Soltys (540,700), and the aforementioned Moneymaker, who won the 2003 WSOP Main Event 18 years ago. Outside the top dozen players, big names are armed to the teeth with raising chips, with Tyler Cornell (487,000), 2016 world champion Qui Nguyen (479,100), Jake Daniels (340,000), Robert Campbell (327,000), Robert Mizrachi (311,300) and Liv Boeree (289,500) all finishing inside the top 50 players on Day 2cef. Phil ‘The Poker Brat’ Hellmuth was able to make Day 3, but only with a short stack of 25,400 and will return to a battle to make the money, let alone push for another deep run this World Series. With 1,810 players taking to the felt on Day 2cef, just 915 players survived to Day 3, and they’ll join the 1,440 who made it through yesterday for a total field of 2,355 players who’ll play to the money tomorrow. With the World Series of Poker announcing that 1,000 places will be paid, here are the amounts paid out to the final nine players who reach the final table: WSOP 2021 Main Event Final Table Payouts: $8,000,000 $4,300,000 $3,000,000 $2,300,000 $1,800,000 $1,400,000 $1,225,000 $1,100,000 $1,000,000 While all those players will be looking towards Day 3 with determination to dominate the money bubble, plenty of big names on the rail will be looking at the next day’s play with only envy for what might have been. Vanessa Kade was an early bust-out, the popular player moving all-in on the river of a double-paired nine-high board with seven-four off-suit only to be called and eliminated by Jorge Ribeiro with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Js"] in a pot worth over 100,000 chips. Sam Greenwood was another to crash out early, his turned trip tens losing out to Abbas Moradi’s trip tens, with Moradi’s king kicker ahead of Greenwood’s jack. Plenty of other legends of the felt joined Kade and Greenwood on the rail too, as 2019 WSOP Main Event winner Hossein Ensan, Dash Dudley, Paul Volpe, Brandon Cantu, Kevin MacPhee, 1998 world champion Scotty Nguyen, Brandon Adams, Erik Cajelais, David ‘ODB’ Baker, Nathan Gamble, 2018 Main Event runner-up Tony Miles, Mike Watson and 1988 Main Event runner-up Erik Seidel all busted on Day 2cef. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 2cef Top 10 Chipcounts: Conrad De Armas - 744,000 Adam Walton - 673,100 Keyu Qu - 664,900 Cameron Mitchell - 642,000 Daniel Lowery - 625,600 Jorge Arriola - 594,200 Matt Glantz - 580,000 Artan Dedusha - 577,100 Aristeidis Moschonas - 555,400 Daniel Soltys - 540,700 Brian Rast Among Big Stacks on Day 1c of Little One for One Drop Event #68, the $1,111-entry Little One for One Drop, saw a dramatic Day 1c play out with Brian Rast near the top of the chip counts at the close of play. It was Oscar Alache (518,800) who grabbed the chip lead by the end of the third and final Day 1 flight, but Charles Lee (504,400), Thomas Eychenne (429,600), and Rast (459,000) will all hunt down the leader with hope and chips in equally large measure. Others to survive the Day 1c action included Jason Wheeler (210,000), Kevin Song (206,500), Lily Kiletto (140,000), and Asi Moshe (49,700), all of whom will be hopeful of running up a stack on Day 2 with which to attack the later levels. Some who fell by the wayside on Day 1c and therefore won’t have the chance to do so include David Liu, Arash Ghaneian, and James Adkins. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Day 1c Top 10 Chipcounts: Oscar Alache - 518,800 Charles Lee - 504,400 Brian Rast - 459,500 Paul Lee - 443,700 Thomas Eychenne - 429,600 Idris Ambraisse - 379,400 Tomoya Matsumura - 376,800 Sunny Wong - 376,700 Peter Cross - 363,700 Liran Betito - 322,200 Deeb, Leng, Racener all Survive Day 1 of Event #69 A busy day at the felt on Day 1 of Event #69, the $1,500-entry Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better event, saw players such as five-time bracelet winner Shaun Deeb, John Racener and Ryan Leng all make the cut to escape a day of terrific action. With 372 entries in total, only just under half the field would make the cut, with players such as Benny Glaser, Brandon Shack-Harris, Joao Vieira, John Cernuto, David Williams, Gershon Distenfeld, Frank Kassela, and Scott Bohlman all failing to survive across a cut-throat session of poker. Others thrived, however, with Jermaine Reid the pick of them, piling up 208,500 chips by the close of play, followed in the counts by James Hoeppner (167,000) and David Martin (166,000) who ran in second and third in chips respectively. Shaun Deeb (143,000) ended the day in the top 10, along with Mike Watson (137,000) and Matt Savage, the legendary poker tournament director bagging 126,000 by the end of Day 1. Other big names hover ominously in Reid’s wake, with stars of the 2021 WSOP such as Ryan Leng (112,500), John Racener (109,500), and Brian Hastings (96,500) all chasing yet another deep run. Former bracelet winners Andrew Kelsall (40,000) and Ari Engel (32,000) have work to do but the skills to make up for a slower starting day when Day 2 kicks off tomorrow. WSOP 2021 Event #69 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Jermaine Reid - 208,500 James Hoeppner - 167,000 David Martin - 166,000 John Hoang - 165,000 Susan Genard - 165,000 Eric Crain - 153,000 Chip Jett - 148,000 Shaun Deeb - 143,000 Mike Watson - 137,000 Matt Savage - 126,000 Michael Gagliano tweeted about a rather awkward situation in which standing up to take a stretch at the poker table led to laughter all round. https://twitter.com/Gags30poker/status/1458580622566248448 Alex Livingston may have made the Day 3 seat draw already, but don’t let that make you think he isn’t already thinking of the final table. Quite a lot. https://twitter.com/rumnchess/status/1458702536173441027 Finally, after winning the WSOP Main Event and seeing his name - well, his 2003 name - give birth to an ‘Effect’, Chris Moneymaker is just like the rest of us and gets excited about a double-up in the Main Event. Who wouldn’t? https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1458655860960411650
  23. The WSOP Main Event made the money on Day 3 as 2,362 players were whittled down to just 1,000 as the clock ticked down hand-for-hand in the final level of the day. With players such as Chris Moneymaker, Stephen Song and Chris Dowling all bagging million-plus stacks, it was a dramatic day of action at the Rio in Las Vegas. Bubble Bursts at the Last in Las Vegas The WSOP Main Event money bubble is a special atmosphere, the kind that has to be experienced to be believed, but for the 1,000 players who made the cut on Day 3, it was unforgettable. https://twitter.com/JohnnieVibes/status/1459078055117287424 The day began with the elimination of Phil Hellmuth in a hand that was brutal for the 1989 champion to take, his pocket jacks all-in and at risk against pocket eights only for his opponent to hit and the Poker Brat to depart. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1458880964881305600?s=20 Some time before the actual bubble, one of the most incredible hands of this or any WSOP Main Event took place live on the PokerGO stream at the feature table. Five players went to a flop of [poker card="6h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] and it was checked through, despite Ugur Ozgur Secilmis holding [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] and Chang Liu holding the nuts with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"]. the turn of [poker card="6c"] gave Secilmis quad sixes in an amazing turnaround, but despite this, all five checked again to the [poker card="5s"] river. On the river, Secilmis led for 55,000 and when Liu raised to 225,000, raised to set Liu all-in. The American made the call quickly, flipping over quads and expecting to scoop a vital double-up. Instead, as his Turkish opponent turned over pocket sixes for quads over quads, the table was stunned as Liu busted with quads in the WSOP Main Event. https://twitter.com/pokergo/status/1459040437788762113?s=21 As ever, the real drama came in the hands just before the bubble burst. One in particular saw the rollercoaster of emotions that players feel writ large as Sebastian Gahl was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="5c"] on a board showing [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="2d"] against Randy Ohel’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. On the dramatic river card of [poker card="Qc"], nearby players cheered in the mistaken belief that Ohel’s rivered set of queens was the winning hand without spotting that it was a club and therefore gave Gahl the flush. Once players were told of this, the Amazon Room was a chorus of boos instead. When it was over, the ‘bubble boy’ was Kevin Campbell, who was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"] against Chris Alafogiannis’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9c"], which managed trip nines on a dramatic board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9s"] that sent the Rio into raptures. As the room reacted with whoops and cheers, Jack Effel offered Campbell a chance to play the WSOP Main Event in 2022 and one player had the temerity to capture the moment in a slightly different way. https://twitter.com/PaulShadyoda/status/1459095275629207559?s=20 https://twitter.com/dklappin/status/1459090407674060800 With everyone locking up $15,000 min-cash, the chip leader at the close of play ended up being Jessica Cai, who bagged up 1,796,000 chips, marginally more than Thailand's Phachara Wongwichit (1,773,000). Players such as Stephen Song (1,557,000) and Chris Moneymaker (1,432,000) will both be hoping it is their year, with the latter going for the title 18 years after his era-defining victory of 2003. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1459221310454865920?s=20 Plenty of big names busted before the bubble burst, with Anthony Zinno, Justin Bonomo, Ben Lamb, Ole Schemion, Greg Mueller, Faraz Jaka, Andy Black, Niall Farrell, Jerry Yang, Liv Boeree Yevgeniy Timoshenko, Pat Lyons, Joseph Hebert, and Chris Hunichen WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 WSOP Main Event Top 10 Chip counts: Jessica Cai - 1,796,000 Phachara Wongwichit - 1,773,000 Joshua Paige Remitio - 1,671,000 Ehsan Amiri - 1,574,000 Stephen Song - 1,557,000 Neel Choksi - 1,552,000 Andreas Kniep - 1,509,000 Chris Dowling - 1,485,000 Chris Moneymaker - 1,432,000 Johan Martinet - 1,365,000 Solitro, Alache, and Jackson Star on Day 2 of Little One for One Drop A busy day of action on Day 2 of the Little One for One Drop event saw three Day 1 flights combine into a massive second day of action. With the $1,111-entry event seeing the 3,797 field reduced to just 229 players, with some superstar names at the top of the leaderboard. Mathew Solitro (2,300,000) bagged up the chip lead, closely followed by Day 1c chip leader Oscar Alache (1,980,000) and David Jackson (1,935,000), with players like Sorel Mizzi (1,280,000), Melanie Weisner (610,000) and Joe Cheong (510,000) not too far back. With other legends such as Phil Laak (500,000), 2019 WSOP Main Event winner Hossein Ensan (345,000), and 2021 bracelet winner DJ Alexander (320,000) all making Day 3, there are sure to be some very exciting moments as the next day of action brings us closer to finding out who the next bracelet winner will be. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Top 10 Chipcounts: Mathew Solitro - 2,300,000 Oscar Alache - 1,980,000 David Jackson - 1,935,000 Jan Wagner - 1,720,000 Idris Ambraisse - 1,605,000 Lingkun Lu - 1,590,000 Chris Vickrey - 1,565,000 Edward Pak - 1,475,000 Masaki Nakamura - 1,450,000 David Singontiko - 1,450,000 Event #69 Sees Dozen Remain in Bracelet Hunt The $1,500-entry Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Event #69 has just 12 players remaining in the hunt for the latest WSOP bracelet and bracelet winners John Racener (1,220,000) and John Monette (1,165,000) who lead the way heading into the final table of the event. With other bracelet winners of the past Carol Fuchs (940,000) and Norwegian player Espen Sandvik (255,000) still in the hunt, a dramatic final day is in the offing on Friday night as the final dozen will return to battle for the bracelet and $113,459 top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #69 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: John Racener - 1,220,000 John Monnette - 1,165,000 Esther Taylor - 1,100,000 John Hoang - 1,065,000 Peder Berge - 962,000 Carol Fuchs - 940,000 Jermaine Reid - 725,000 Joseph Ranciato - 705,000 Espen Sandvik - 255,000 Joseph Kupresanin - 240,000 Negreanu Loses to Royalty, Calvin Anderson Sits Top 5 Daniel Negreanu suffered a bad beat as he busted from the $1,500-entry Bounty PLO Event #71. All-in with two pair, the Canadian busted to Colossus winner Anatolii Zyrin. The Russian had a flush draw and got there on the turn, but even worse/better was to come for the video blog-filming Kid Poker, as the ten of diamonds on the river gave his opponent a royal flush. At the end of play, Mourad Amokrane held the chip lead, with 1,066,000 the only seven-figure stack in the room. Jaime Lewin (712,000) and Nikolay Yosifiv (674,000) were Amokrane’s nearest challengers, with Calvin Anderson (525,000) the biggest name in the top 10 on a day when players such as Ryan Laplante, Ryan Hughes, Ian Steinman and Avi Cohen all missed out on bagging an end-of-day stack. WSOP 2021 Event #71 $1,500 Bounty Pot Limit Omaha Top 10 Chipcounts: Mourad Amokrane - 1,066,000 Jaime Lewin - 712,000 Nikolay Yosifov - 674,000 Miltiadis Kyriakides - 578,000 Calvin Anderson - 525,000 Paulo Villena - 483,000 Ryan Coon - 468,000 Matthew Mlsna - 465,000 Blake Napierala - 461,000 Manuel Ruivo - 448,000 Jon Aguiar highlighted the difference between a 40 big blind stack in 2008 and 13 years later in 2021. https://twitter.com/JonAguiar/status/1458964113497808898 GGPoker ambassador may have lost the last longer bet for the remote control against his wife, Natalie Hof Ramos, but he couldn’t help wishing his love good luck as the German progressed to Day 4. https://twitter.com/FelipeMojave/status/1458920630909222943 Finally, few of us will ever get to experience it, but for everyone feeling a little FOMO at not being in Vegas, we’d look away now if we were you. This is how it feels to make Day 4 of the Main Event, whoever you may be. https://twitter.com/ChancesCards/status/1459092723957260293
  24. The money bubble burst at the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event and the top 1000 players will get to go to bed secure in the knowledge that they have secured at least $15,000 in a min-cash and dream of spinning it up to the $8 million first-place prize. But for a couple of unfortunate players, their dreams of becoming a World Champion turned into an absolute nightmare on Day 3 as the game delivered a couple of very nasty, very memorable beats that demonstrates just how devastating this game can be. Death By Quads “Death By Quads” is often used when a player is eliminated when their opponent makes quads. It’s rarely used when the player felted is holding quads themselves. The action as recounted by Ali Nejad went as follows: with the blinds at 2,500/5,000 (5,000 bb ante) Vito Distefano opened to 11,500 holding the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"], Omer Gabay called with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"] as did William Benson with the [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"]. That brought Ugur Secilmis with the [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] from the small blind and the Bay Area’s Chang Liu in the big blind with the [poker card="4c"][poker card="4h"]. The dealer put out a flop of [poker card="6h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] giving Liu quads, and visions of winning a bracelet no doubt. But it also gave Ugur Secilmis a flopped full house and some ideas of his own. It looked like the action checked around on the flop. Then the turn came the [poker card="6c"], bringing in top quads for Secilmis. Again the action checked around, leaving the pot at 62,500. When the [poker card="5s"] hit the river, Secilmis went into action betting 55,000. Next to act was Liu, who quickly made it 225,000 to go. “You just hate to see something like this,” Nick Schulman commented before the action returned to Secilmis. “Good game, sir.” “It is going to be showers for Chang Liu,” Nejad replied. “As a virtual certainty.” The rest of the field got out of the way and Secilmis took in the moment. After a little more than a minute, Secilmis lowered the boom and moved all-in and was snapped off by Liu’s lesser quads. “Get a look at the coldest of all decks,” Nejad said. Liu, pushed back, stood up, and said, “Quads?! What the ****!” It was a moment reminiscent of Bryce Yockey’s vicious bad beat at the hands of Josh Arieh in 2019. A different event and a different game for Yockey, but the improbability and the destruction the cards brought felt familiar. Watch the whole hand play out right here: https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1459040437788762113?s=20 There's Always A Sweat There’s probably little comfort for Liu, but if one was to look on the bright side, when he busted making the money was not a certainty with several hundred people left to bust before bubble burst. For Kevin Campbell, his bad beat turned him sent him out the door as the last person to not get paid. On the stone bubble, Campbell was all-in and at risk with the best starting hand in poker [poker card="ah"][poker card="ad"] and was called by Chris Alafogiannis holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"]. Campbell was in the perfect position to double up and make Day 4. The poker gods had other ideas. Mike Matusow, who was seated at the table, exclaimed: “There’s always a sweat.” The dealer manifested Matusow’s words and put out a flop of [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"] keeping the pocket aces in the lead but opening the door for Alafogiannis. The energy at the table ramped up as the [poker card="7c"] peeled off on the turn. But when the dealer quickly put the [poker card="9s"] on the river - the table, and the room, exploded. “Are you kidding!” Matusow said, leaning over the table. Alafogiannis who delivered the blow, sat unfazed and Campbell could just stand, shake his head, and walk away. https://twitter.com/PaulShadyoda/status/1459095275629207559?s=20 “Sh** hurts, trust me,” he told PokerNews moments after busting. “But I’m just so tired right now that I don’t care.” Campbell will have another shot at the Main Event in 2022 receiving a free seat into the tournament as a consolation prize for being the bubble boy. https://twitter.com/Donnie_Peters/status/1459122277493080066?s=20 Day 4 kicks off on Friday at 12:00 pm Pacific.
  25. A monumental day at the felt on Day 4 of the WSOP Main Event saw just 292 players remain from 1,000 who began the day. When the dust settled, Ramon Colillas was the chip leader with a massive stack of 5,000,000 chips, with some big names not too far behind in his wake. Stephen Chidwick and Ramon Colillas Crack Top 5 With everyone on Day 4 of the WSOP Main Event guaranteed a return of at least $15,000, players had made the money on the final hand of Day 3, so came into today’s play desperate to chip up and make a push towards the latter stages of the world’s biggest poker tournament. Because of this, plenty lost their seats early, with Garry Gates, Kevin Gerhart, and Harrison Gimbel all on the rail before the field was reduced by over 70%. Late in the day, players got into pre-flop clashes that may yet shape the destiny of this year’s spectacular Main Event bracelet. Amid the chaos, several prominent British professionals finished high up the counts, with Stephen Chidwick (4,328,000), Alex Goulder (2,957,000), and Toby Lewis (2,637,000) all finishing way over the average stack. The chip leader at the close of play may have been Colillas, but other major forces hover close by. Matthew Jewett (3,398,000) Fernando Rodriguez (3,442,000), Dragana Lim (3,801,000), and Jason Osser (3,907,000) all finished in the top 10, while Stephen Song (4,417,000) and Demosthenes Kiriopoulos (4,500,000) both got closest to Colillas’s stack. Some players loved the glow of the limelight at the feature table, others, not so much... https://twitter.com/ChancesCards/status/1459444755440435200 ...while Matt Berkey saw a little sunlight in the serendipity. https://twitter.com/berkey11/status/1459444365462433796 Players to bust on Day 4 included Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Billy Baxter, Chris Sandrock, Anton Wigg, JJ Liu, Marle Spragg, Joao Simao, and Ben Yu, with Day 5 sure to bring the number down to less than 100 players as everyone can now legitimately start dreaming of banking that $8 million top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 4 Top 10 Chipcounts: Ramon Colillas - 5,000,000 Demosthenes Kiriopoulos - 4,500,000 Stephen Song - 4,417,000 Stephen Chidwick - 4,376,000 Zachary Mcdiarmid - 4,093,000 Jonathan Dwek - 3,955,000 Jason Osser - 3,900,700 Dragana Lim - 3,801,000 Fernando Rodriguez - 3,442,000 Matthew Jewett - 3,398,000 26 Remain In Little One Event #68 saw the penultimate day of the $1,111 Little One for One Drop take place, with just 26 players surviving a day that began with 229 players in seats. At the close of play, Michael Shanahan (13,465,000) led the field from Brekstyn Schutten (11,305,000) and Scott Ball (10,550,000), with other big names in the top ten including Canadian Sorel Mizzi (6,686,000). Plenty of big names fell by the wayside throughout the day, with Justin Lapka, DJ Alexander, Mukul Pahuja, Alexandre Reard, Carlos Chang, Phil Laak, and Joseph Cheong all falling short of bracelet glory. With just 26 players remaining, the race is now on to claim the WSOP bracelet and top prize of $396,445, with only three bracelet winners remaining of the 26 hopefuls. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Shanahan - 13,465,000 Brekstyn Schutten - 11,305,000 Scott Ball - 10,550,000 Mathew Solitro - 8,500,000 David Jackson - 8,180,000 Derek Gregory - 7,310,000 Sebastian Medina - 7,205,000 Petro Zakusilov - 7,040,000 Ronnie Ballantyne - 7,000,000 Sorel Mizzi - 6,686,000 Jermain Reid Scores Stud Gold In Event #69, Jermaine Reid won the bracelet and $113,459 top prize as the mixed game player conquered the final day of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better. In a thrilling close to the tournament, Reid toppled Peder Berge heads-up to relegate Berge to a cash worth $70,126. On a day where both John Monnette (4th for $33,734) and John Racener ($10,095) fell short of glory that many predicted would be a battle between that pair, Reid took the first bracelet of his career as the Day 1 chip leader rallied late in the tournament to ‘top and tail’ the event and snatch gold. WSOP 2021 Event #69 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Final Table Results: Jermaine Reid - $113,459 Peder Berge - $70,126 John Hoang - $48,138 John Monnette - $33,734 Esther Taylor - $24,145 Carol Fuchs - $17,658 Espen Sandvik - $13,202 John Racener - $10,095 Joseph Ranciato - $7,900 Perry Friedman - $6,330 Let's Go Crazy (Eights) The delayed Day 1 of the $888-entry Event #70, titled ‘Crazy Eights’, is one of the most value events left on the schedule, with Joseph Herbert leading the way at the close of play with a mammoth 2,100,000 million chip-stack. With Tijan Tepeh (2,050,000), Thomas Larson (1,825,000), Kyle Montgomery (1,420,000) and Sejin Park (1,350,000) in the top 10, it’s a stacked top section of the leaderboard. With 1,104 entries and just 166 players making the money, it took 14 hours of players for just 50 players to remain in the event by the close of Day 1b. With Day 1 canceled yesterday, play goes directly to Day 1c tomorrow as more players will put up $888 and play some Crazy Eights action. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Top 10 Chipcounts: Joseph Hebert - 2,100,000 Tijan Tepeh - 2,050,000 Adam Croffut - 1,975,000 Josue Aguirre - 1,930,000 Thomas Larson - 1,825,000 Wilbert Chun - 1,660,000 Jacob Rich - 1,550,000 Kyle Montgomery - 1,420,000 David Moses - 1,395,000 Sejin Park - 1,350,000 Bounty Hunters Come To Play Event #71, the $1,500-entry Bounty PLO event saw Matt Mamiya grab the overnight chip lead with 3.1 million chips as 94 players took part on the penultimate day of action and played down to just 15 final day survivors. With Kao Chieng Saechao (2,000,000) still in contention after a great series so far, the top prize of $132,844 will be battled for between just over a dozen hopefuls, all of whom have never won a bracelet as Nick Guagenti’s exit provoked before the final few eliminations reduced the field to just two tables. WSOP 2021 Event #71 $1,500 Bounty PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Matt Mamiya - 3,100,000 Mourad Amokrane - 2,960,000 Paulo Villena - 2,080,000 Kao Chieng Saechao - 2,000,000 Gabe Ramos - 1,600,000 Rodney Horton - 1,595,000 Todd Jacobs - 1,360,000 Ronald Larsen - 1,205,000 Ryan Terpstra - 1,140,000 Matthew Humphrey - 1,075,000 Arieh Busts Main, Bags Big Stack In Event #72 Lastly, Day 1 of the $1,500-entry Mixed NLHE/PLO Event #72 took place, with Canadian player Nohad Teliani (1,107,000) ending the day as a huge chip leader with almost double the stack of second-placed Paul Saso (583,000). With Josh Arieh having busted the WSOP Main Event on Day 4, the Player of the Year contender bagged up a top-six stack of 503,000 chips as he continues to roar through the late stages of the 2021 World Series of Poker in imperious form. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE/PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Nohad Teliani - 1,107,000 Paul Saso - 583,000 Mihai Manole - 578,000 Karan Mehta - 567,000 Kosei Ichinose - 508,000 Josh Arieh - 503,000 Bernard Larabi - 491,000 Mariia Levseieva - 481,000 Rishi Makkar - 459,000 Richard Dixon - 442,000 Finally, everyone is hoping for victory in the Main Event, but Drew ‘BetonDrew’ Gonzalez might have the biggest rail of all if he can turn his 2.1 million chips into a final table stack in the Main Event. It’s fair to say he’s pumped for the next day’s action. https://twitter.com/BetOnDrew/status/1459435621416538112  
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