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  1. The World Series of Poker’s $50,000 Poker Players Championship is heralded by many top-flight players in the poker world as the real championship event of the series. In order to lay claim to the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy, a player not only needs to have an expert-level mastery of the entire mix of games, but also needs to face down the "best of the best" in terms of competition. In short, it takes a well-rounded, complete player in order to win. The truth is, making picks for the $50K is a tough task - especially this year. Everything needs to be considered from a player’s history in the event to the momentum they have when it gets started. Plus, it's hard to know if some of the top talents that normally would never miss the PPC will even show up (ex. Phil Ivey). So, taking all of that into consideration, we’re shooting our shot and dropping the latest edition of First-Round Picks with the names and ranks of the players we think are most likely to not only run deep in 2021 but hoist the trophy when the last chip has been collected. These players are first-rounders for the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. #1. Shaun Deeb Unlike the Super High Roller Bowl, where Michael Addamo was sun running headed into the event, there’s no clear top pick when it comes to the Poker Players Championship. The field attracts an absolutely elite field of players who are proficient in all the games. Honestly, an argument can be made for a multitude of grinders to be ranked #1. Here’s why it’s Shaun Deeb. In the past five years of the $50K Poker Players Championship, only one player has made the money three times - Shaun Deeb. In 2017 he finished in seventh place for $164,286, in 2018 a 10th place finish brought him $111,447, and then in 2019, he made the final table falling in fifth for $232,058. History shows Deeb loves to compete in the PPC and the PPC has loved him back. An undeniable master of mixed games, Deeb has proven time and time again that he knows how to close. He’s a four-time WSOP bracelet winner with more than $5 million in earnings at the series alone and each of his bracelets has come in different disciplines. Impressive, but that's not all he brings to the table. To back that up take a look at what he’s done online. He holds five PokerStars SCOOP titles, all in mixed games and, even more impressively eight World Championship of Online Poker titles, only two of which are in NLHE. In summary, Deeb is dangerous in any tournament against any opponent. The 2018 WSOP Player of the Year is off to a fast start in terms of cashes in 2021, with nine at the time of this writing (tied for third overall), including a final table in the $1,500 Seven Card Stud. If there’s one thing going against him it's that while he’s racking up scores, he’s not really breaking through into the deepest parts of the tournaments yet. It’s unlikely he’s even close to satisfied right now. His goal of earning the 2021 Player of the Year title is going to require some stronger second-half results and the PPC could do just the trick to get him back in the thick of things. #2. Michael Mizrachi It feels silly to not have Mizrachi, the only player to win this event three times, as the top pick…after all, like we just said, he’s won it THREE TIMES. But one has to wonder just how lucky can one guy be. He first took the PPC down in 2010, earning a massive $1,559,046 payday. He did it again just two years later for another $1.4 million. Finally, in 2018, Mizrachi completed the hat trick and earned his third spot on the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy for more than $1.2 million. In addition, he also scored fourth place in the event in 2016 for another $380,942. He has a knack for owning this event and just last week he made an appearance at the 2021 series, finishing in 11th place in the Eight Game Mix. One should expect Mizrachi to find his way into this $50K and shouldn’t be surprised if he makes a deep run. But Mizrachi is also a high-risk, high-reward play because in addition to being one of the toughest players he’s also a blowtorch, and had been known to burn bright but flame out early. All eyes will be on the 3x champ to see what happens this year. #3. Brian Rast No matter how long Brian Rast is away from the poker tables, when he returns to them he’s as dangerous an opponent as you will find. A two-time winner of the PPC, Rast took it down in 2011 for $1,720,328 and then again in 2016 for $1,296,097. Rast also went deep in 2018 where he finished in 8th place for over $144,000. Additionally, he’s already found himself deep in a pair of Championship Events already. First, he finished in 15th place in the $10K Omaha 8 Championship for $18,750, and then just three days later, Rast nearly made the final table in the $10K Limit Hold’em Championship where he fell in 11th place for another $18,506. Add to that a cash in the NL 2-7 Lowball event and it feels like Rast is simply getting warm before making a big splash in the PPC. For Rast, the real question is - will he be in the field? The fact that he’s been playing in the series already is a good indication that he will, but with career earnings of more than $21 million (and we gotta assume a ton of BTC for as often as he tweets about it), perhaps he just wakes up and says “not today.” #4. Benny Glaser The UK’s young mixed game phenom Benny Glaser has all the makings of a PPC champion. The three-time WSOP bracelet winner almost exclusively plays non-NLHE variants with his WSOP wins coming in Omaha 8 and Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw. In addition, Glaser has come very close in a number of other WSOP mixed game events including a runner-up finish this year in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. bringing him a $341,274 payday. His WSOP resume reads of a player who excels at any game that involves any number of cards. The warning signs in picking a crusher like Glaser are that his last bracelet win was back in 2016, however his 2018 fifth-place finish in the PPC shows he’s more than capable of getting to the end. #5. Phil Hellmuth After capturing his record-extending 16th WSOP gold bracelet in Deuce to Seven Hellmuth declared that the $50K PPC title is what he wanted next. The truth is, in previous years Hellmuth wouldn’t be in the top 10 first-round picks, much less the top 5. But this is 2021 and The Poker Brat is on a mixed game sun run that no one could have predicted. You’ve already heard the stats: five final tables, all in mixed games, with a bracelet in hand. He’s off to the best start to a WSOP in his lengthy career and is currently sitting atop the Player of the Year race at the halfway point in the series. Sure, he has his doubters and they would be quick to point out that Hellmuth’s only cash in this event came back in 2011 (when he finished in 2nd place for more than $1 million) and that this field will be the elite of the elite. But isn’t that who he’s been playing in the series so far? So, it may be risky picking Hellmuth this high, but in 2021 it’s an even riskier proposition not to. #6. Dan Zack Dan Zack may be the savvy pick at number six. He’s another one of the crop of young crushers who consistently proves he has a mastery of all the games. He also hasn’t kept it a secret how much he’d love to win Player of the Year, for which he currently is sitting in 12th place. He's just one big score away from being in the thick of it. At the time of this writing, Zack leads all cashes in 2021 with 11 total, including a final table in the $1,500 Eight Game Mix and a (soft) final table bubble in the $10K Stud where he finished in 10th place. He won his first gold bracelet in 2019 in the $2,500 Limit Mixed Triple Draw, but doesn’t have a history in the PPC. Expect that to change. #7. Daniel Negreanu There’s nothing Daniel Negreanu would love more than to win a bracelet and the trophy in this particular event. He’s stated it so many times that, along with the Player of the Year title, this is the tournament he consistently looks forward to the most. There’s no need to expand on the six-time WSOP bracelet winner’s resume except to note that in the past five years, Negreanu has made the money twice (including a final table in 2017) for a total of just under $400,000. The real reason “Kid Poker” is so high on this list is, in addition to his skill of course, is his momentum. He has plenty of it headed into this event. Negreanu has cashed ten times in the series (thus far) including a final table in the $3K H.O.R.S.E. and a final table bubble in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. The question will be if with everything he has going on being one of the game’s biggest ambassadors, can he let everything else fall to the wayside and zero in on what he really wants. If he’s feeling it, and he wants it - he’s a legit threat to win it all. #8. Anthony Zinno What a year it’s been already for Anthony Zinno who is currently the only two-time bracelet winner of the series. In back-to-back fashion, Zinno famously earned gold in the $10K Stud for $182,872 after being the subject of a classic Hellmuth rant. Then he came right back and took down $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. for another $160,636. In non-mixed game news, Zinno reminded people that’s he’s also a No Limit Hold’em crusher with a 12th place finish in the $50,000 High Roller for another $80,000, making it six cashes for the series. And if you hadn’t heard, Zinno created a club of which he’s the only member. With four WSOP bracelets and three World Poker Tour titles, he proved he’s one of the best in the game today and he heads into the PPC with a massive wave of momentum. Looking for action in the $50K PPC? Check out PocketFives Stakingwhere we will be selling pieces for Daniel Negreanu, Josh Arieh, Felipe Ramos, Matt Glantz, Daniel Weinman, and more. Sign up today and get in the action (many at no markup!) Sleeper Picks Julien Martini France’s mixed game master may be well-known for his runner-up finish at the PokerStars PSPC, but he’s also one of the more coveted players for WSOP $25K fantasy due to his ability to grind the entire schedule. While he’s off to a slow start at this year’s WSOP (3 cashes so far), don’t be surprised to see him turn it around in the PPC. David ‘ODB’ Baker Baker just got off a deep run in the $1,500 Razz where he finished in fifth place for $20,732. A two-time bracelet winner, one for a $2,500 8-Game Mix, Baker’s big question mark is if he’ll come out to play or prefer to sweat college or pro football with the tournament starting on the weekend. Ben Yu Three-time bracelet winner Ben Yu has been racking up cashes this year, with a total of 9 as of this writing. He finished in 7th place in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. for more than $75,000 and busted in 20th in the $5K Six-Max for another $21,838. He’s been making the money consistently, now it’s just time for him to break through and capture bracelet number four. The $50K Poker Players Championship gets underway on Sunday, October 31 and the final table will be played out live PokerGO on Friday, November 5.
  2. It’s hard to believe but the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event is right around the corner. In less than two weeks, the hallways of the Rio will be packed with players hoping to be crowned the new World Champion. But for many recreational players, Week 4 of the WSOP features their own personal Main Event as a pair of the most popular, rec-friendly tournaments of the schedule highlight the coming week. In contrast, it should be expected that a number of big names will also be collecting some new hardware in the next seven days or so with two more Championship events and a $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha all ready to go. So, let’s break down everything you need to keep an eye on in Week 4 of the 2021 WSOP. Spotlight Tournament Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship For many of poker’s elite, if you asked them they would say that the $50K Poker Players Championship is the tournament they really want to win each and every year. It’s the biggest buy-in mixed game event on the schedule, testing skill in all the games against the toughest competition. In 2019, Phillip Hui outlasted the 74 entry field to win $1.1 million. The final table included a murder’s row of talent including Josh Arieh, John Esposito, Bryce Yockey, Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates, Phil Ivey, and Shaun Deeb. READ: First-Round Picks: The 2021 WSOP $50K Poker Players Championship One should expect just as many superstars to enter the event this year. While the fields have been down due to COVID, don’t be surprised to see this event come close to its 2019 size as the $50K PPC is just one of those events that people force into their schedule. Storylines will include how Hellmuth, Zinno, and Negreanu do, what effect, if any, the PPC will have on the incredibly tight Player of the Year race, and if any big names that haven’t been in the Rio (Ivey) will make a showing. The action kicks off on October 31 and everyone can tune into the finale next week on November 5 on PokerGO. Complete WSOP Week 4 Schedule [table id=268 /] The Rio Is A Rec Center Event #55 - $400 COLOSSUS When the Colossus first debuted in 2015, it was a massive hit. It broke records for the largest live tournament ever held and it made a name for Cord Garcia when he outlasted the 22,374 other runners to turn his $565 ticket into a $638,880 score. In subsequent years, the WSOP dropped the price to $400, making it the most inexpensive buy-in for a live bracelet event on the schedule. While over the years, attendance for the event continued to decline, the field was still massive. In 2019, 13,109 players pushed the prize pool to more than $4.3 million and Sejin Park earned $451,272. What we’re getting at is that even under the current conditions, the recreational player will likely be ready to come out in force to turn a couple of hundred bucks into a (potentially) life-changing payday. Again, field size for this one is likely to take a hit, but it does have the potential - with two starting flights and one re-entry per flight - to crack the 10K runner mark. Event #52 - $1,000 Seniors Event The 50+ crowd will be coming to town this week with the start of the very popular Seniors Event. Not only is the Seniors Event often packed with players but those longtime grinders often spill over into the Daily Deepstacks making the prize pools of side events surge even more than normal. The combination of the Seniors Event and the Colossus (even though they are two days apart) could make for an extremely busy week in terms of getting and waiting in lines, so here’s a reminder to choose off-peak times to register if you aren’t using a credit card and a kiosk. Plus, make sure to have all your vaccination status sorted and the CLEAR app installed if you plan on using that as well. Big Stars, Huge Paydays Event #53 - $25,000 High Roller Pot-Limit Omaha There are so many events that could be the “one to watch” this week, but Event #53 ($25,000 High Roller PLO) has all the makings of one that’s guaranteed to have an action-packed ending. In 2019, Stephen Chidwick bested the 278-entry field for a massive $1,618,417 score and topped a final table packed with star power including Erik Seidel, Robert Mizrachi, and Matthew Gonzales among others. It will be interesting to see if the field attracts enough runners to promise a million-dollar payday for the winner, but one thing is for sure and that’s the best and brightest “great game” players will be bringing their A-game for a shot at the one of the biggest PLO event so of the year. The action kicks off on Wednesday, October 27 with the final table being available to watch on PokerGO on Saturday, October 30. Event #56 - 6-Handed NLHE Championship Next week, the official “Mini Main Event” will kick off, but if you want to see players splashing around in a $10K tournament then you are in luck when the NLHE wizards come out to play in the 6-Handed NLHE Championship. It’s hard to imagine anything other than a who’s who of poker’s best battling in what is almost sure to have a final table full of crushers.
  3. It was a packed house in the Amazon Room on Saturday at the 2021 World Series of Poker as three more gold bracelets were awarded, two of which were handed out to players who were celebrating their third career WSOP victory and another who reached a career-high score in their first series victory. Gerhart Wins Third Career Bracelet The final table of Event #40 ($10,000 H.O.R.S.E.) played out on Saturday and in the end it was Kevin Gerhart who galloped his way to the third gold bracelet of his career and the $361,124 first-place prize. “If you look at just the final nine or even the last 16, there are so many names, so many bracelets, so many top-level players,” Gerhart told PokerNews after the win. “I am so happy that I get to prove myself year and year after year with three bracelets and hopefully be considered among the top in the world right now.” Gerhart outlasted Marco Johnson in heads-up play to win the title. For his part, Johnson was forced to settle for a $223,194 payday for second place. Eddie Blumenthal claimed the bronze for $155,971 while Bryce Yockey latest final table brought him $111,701 for fourth. Brandon Shack-Harris arrived at the final table of five as the short stack and was unable to ladder, finishing in fifth for $82,033. Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Payouts Kevin Gerhart - $361,124 Marco Johnson - $223,194 Eddie Blumenthal - $155,971 Bryce Yockey - $111,701 Brandon Shack-Harris - $82,033 Chris Vitch - $61,819 Jake Schwartz - $47,835 David Benyamine - $38,035 Carlos Chang Scores First Gold in $2,500 Freezeout A lengthy heads-up battle between Taiwan’s Carlos Chang and Brady Osterman ended with Chang emerging as the victor and claiming his first gold bracelet and hefty career-high cash of $364,589. The final eight players returned on Saturday to crown a winner. Quang Ngo, who started the day fourth in chips was the first to fall and he was followed to the rail by Gerald Cunniff in seventh place. Sung Joo Hyun’s pocket sixes fell to Arthur Conan’s ace-eight, to send him home in sixth place, and just minutes later Conan was out in fifth when his pocket seven were dominated by Adrian Delmas’ pocket nines. The final four battled for the better part of an hour before Spain’s Sergi Reixach was eliminated in fourth for a six-figure score. Finally, Adrien Delmas was forced to settle for the bronze, falling in third place for more than $161,000. After that Chang and Osterman battled back-and-forth for the better part of three-and-a-half hours with Chang eventually smashing a flush to Osterman’s two pair in a pivotal pot which sealed the deal. Event #41 $2,500 Freezeout Final Table Payouts Carlos Chang - $364,589 Brady Osterman - $225,333 Adrien Delmas - $161,731 Sergi Reixach - $117,650 Arthur Conan - $86,757 Sung Joo Hyun - $64,864 Gerald Cunniff - $49,179 Quang Ngo - $37,820 Ruben Tops Tough Razz Final Table For 3rd Career Bracelet Just seven players remained when the Event $42 ($1,500 Razz) returned on Saturday to play down to a winner. Bradley Ruben, who started the day seventh in chips, climbed his way up the chip counts and secured the win for his third career gold bracelet and a $99,188 payday. Some mixed games masters had made the final table including David ‘ODB’ Baker (5th, $20,732), worldwide online #1-ranked crusher Yuri Dzivielevski (4th, $29,089), and Matt Grapenthien who wrapped up in third place for $41,758. Charles Sinn, who started the day as the chip leader, wound up as the runner-up and took home $61,303 for his efforts. Event #42 $1,500 Razz Final Table Payouts Bradley Ruben - $99,188 Charles Sinn - $61,303 Matt Grapenthien - $41,758 Yuri Dzivielevski - $29,089 David ‘ODB’ Baker - $20,732 Brett Fledman - $15,127 Alex Livingston - $11,305 Double Double The field size of Event #43 ($1,000 Double Stack) more than doubled in size on Day 1B as 2,054 players jumped in for a total of 3,991 runners which created a prize pool of more than $3.5 million and a first-place score of $446,983. Terry Presley took full advantage of all the chips in play and ended the night with 828,000, more than enough to allow him to top the leaderboard of both opening flights. A number of notables worked their way into the top 10 of Day 1B including popular poker vlogger Matt Vaughan (4th), Asi Moshe (5th), Millionaire Maker champ Daniel Lazrus (6th), and Eric Baldwin (10th). The two fields will merge on Sunday with another long day of play, with the money bubble expected to burst in the middle of the day Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Day 1B Top 5 Chip Counts Terry Presley - $828,000 Sylvain Naets - 710,000 Ting Ho - 580,500 Matthew Vaughan - 545,500 Asi Moshe - 462,00 Ten Left In $3K Limit There are just 10 players left in Event #44 ($3,000 6-Handed Limit Hold’em) with Kenny Hsiung min-betting his way to the chip lead. He’s followed closely by Kevin Erickson and Ryan Hansen in second and third place respectively. The money bubble popped with just 25 players remaining and it looked like a number of big names would be battling for the bracelet. It wasn’t meant to be though as JJ Liu (24th, $4,830), WSOP Main Event Joe McKeehen (23rd, $4,830), former worldwide online #2-ranked Ivan Zufic (22nd, $4,830), and Nick Schulman (21st, $5,597) all fell outside the top 20. There was a time that Dan Zack held the chip lead, but he also busted before the end of the night falling in 19th for $5,597 and was followed by Mike Matusow who bowed out in 16th for $6,668. The final 10 players will return on Sunday to play down to a champion. Event #44 $3,000 6-Handed Limit Hold’em Final 10 Chip Counts Kenny Hsiung - 1,171,000 Kevin Erickson - 1,139,000 Ryan Hansen - 1,115,000 John Hoang - 783,000 Steve Chanthabouasy - 744,000 Kosei Ichinose - 499,000 Justin Moeller - 378,000 Ken Deng - 321,000 John Cavanagh - 207,000
  4. It was a familiar scene on the set of the 2021 World Series of Poker $50,000 High Roller. With four players left and over $1.1 million up top, Australian sensation Michael Addamo held a massive chip lead over his final three opponents and looked to be cruising to yet another seven-figure victory. But Erik Seidel had other plans. With 40 big blinds and pocket eights in the small blind, he completed, perhaps anticipating some aggression from Addamo in the big blind. “If you’re a balanced player like Seidel, then you will have some limps from the small blind with strong hands,” said Maria Ho, who was calling the action. Addamo indeed did put in a raise, a hefty one. And after a few moments, Seidel three-bet shipped his remaining 40 big blinds only to be snap-called by Addamo holding ace-king. Seidel was ahead. Winning this hand would put the nine-time WSOP bracelet winner in the chip lead and in a position to make a little history. But Addamo is not simply running hot. He’s on a high-stakes sun run few have enjoyed and overcoming that has proven to be a tall task. “Seidel has 55%, but if I were Seidel I would feel like I have 20% against the way Addamo’s been running,” Ho said with a laugh. Almost as soon as she finished talking the dealer put a king on the flop with little-to-no help for Seidel. Even behind his mask, Seidel looked visibly annoyed. With just two outs left and headed to the river, Seidel began sliding his stack into the middle, resigned that today wasn’t his day. Once again this year, it was Addamo’s day. As Seidel grabbed his jacket and walked away, perhaps somewhere in the back of his mind he remembered when those looks of annoyment were directed at him. When it was he who was the high-stakes sun runner, on a seemingly unstoppable rampage through some of the biggest tournaments on the circuit. It was January 2011 and Seidel made the trip to the Aussie Millions in Melbourne. It was just months before Black Friday, and the Aussie Millions was preparing to run some of the biggest nosebleed tournaments ever held. Seidel, coming off a fourth-place finish in the PokerStars PCA $25K High Roller, hit a string of results that took the poker world by storm. First, he finished in third place in the Aussie Million A$100,000 for a $618,139 payday. Less than a week later he defeated a 20-runner field and took down the A$250,000 Super High Roller for $2,472,555, a win that remains his career-high score. From there, Seidel took down the 2011 LAPC High Roller, the $25,000 NBC Heads-Up Championship for $750,000, and, in May, bested another $100,000 Super High Roller in Las Vegas for another seven-figure score. Already a Poker Hall of Fame member, Seidel’s high-stakes dominance during this time captivated the poker public, it was called “The Year of Seidel” by PokerNews and it earned him more than $6.5 million - second only to WSOP Main Event winner Pius Heinz that year. In fact, it was such a phenomenon that in April of that year, there was a music video made in ‘Seiborg’s honor. Many thought we’d never see a high-stakes heater like that again. But, of course, we did. And a decade-long passing of the sun run crown began. A young, 23-year old seemingly serious media-shy Daniel Colman came out from behind his online grind in 2014 to shock the poker world. First with a win in the PokerStars EPT Monte Carlo €100,000 High Roller for $2.1 million and months later defeated Daniel Negreanu heads-up at the final table of the WSOP’s $1,000,000 Big One For One Drop for another $15 million victory. That was just the start for Colman. In August of that year, he grabbed back-to-back seven-figure scores with a runner-up finish in the EPT Barcelona €50,000 High Roller and then a signature big-field win in the $5,300 SHRPO Main Event. At the time Colman appeared to be the king of the high rollers desperate to abdicate, conflicted about the complexities of playing a game that meant when you win, someone loses. But by the end of the year, Coleman cashed in for an astounding $22,389,481, which, at the time, pushed him into the top 10 on the All-Time Money List. While Colman continued to crush, proving himself to be one of the all-time best, another young grinder began to turn heads as well. At the end of 2015, 22-year old Fedor Holz announced the start of his sun-running reign with a victory in the World Poker Tour $100,000 Alpha8 at the Five Diamond Classic in Las Vegas. The $1.5 million score was the first seven-figure win of his career and from that launch point, Holz went on a seemingly unstoppable tear through the high stakes. Weeks later Holz won again, this time in the 2016 Triton Super High Roller Series for just over $3 million. He took second in that year’s Super High Roller Bowl, won three high rollers at the Aria, and then picked up a gold bracelet in the 2016 $111,111 High Roller For One Drop for another $4.9 million. The massive scores were seemingly neverending. Months later he won again at EPT Barcelona. Even when he didn’t win, Holz was making final tables at nearly every stop he attended, ending the year with astounding $16 million in earnings and an article about him in Forbes Magazine to go with it. The rise of the German contingency, led by Holz, felt like a new era in poker, one that perhaps couldn’t be stopped or topped. However, in 2018, Justin Bonomo, who has long been considered one of the game’s best, with his origins in the online streets, emerged from the lab on an entirely different level. Prior to that year, Bonomo had always been successful and even had one seven-figure win in his career, back in 2012 - a resume-topping win for him. But in 2018 everything changed as Bonomo earned four million-dollar scores, all in spectacular fashion. A runner-up finish in January at the PokerStars PCA $100,000 for $1 million was just the start. In March he took down the Super High Roller Bowl China for a massive $4.8 million, a new career-high at the time. Two months later he repeated the feat, winning the $300,000 Super High Roller Bowl in Las Vegas for $5 million - another new high. Even that was eclipsed by his win in the 2018 WSOP $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop for a massive $10 million score. Staggering results from an inconceivable run. But Bonomo’s heater wasn’t limited to million-dollar scores, he outright won 10 different events that year, all high rollers, all for six figures or more. Bonomo, virtually unrivaled, earned more than $25.4 million that year alone as he took over the All-Time Money List lead from Daniel Negreanu. Bonomo’s stoic table demeanor and spot-on decisions were in stark contrast to the flash brought about by Bryn Kenney. In 2019, Kenney picked up the high-stakes heater torch and ran wild. Always a tough contender, Kenney hit a string of results at the right time when the stakes were at their highest. Between March and May of that year, Kenney lit up the Triton Poker Series. He scored a fourth and second-place finish in a pair of tournaments in Jeju for more than $3.5 million total. Then in May, he went back-to-back in Montenegro for a total of more than $4.1 million. Of course, Kenney’s streak peaked in August of that year when he posted the €1,050,000 buy-in for the Triton Million for Charity in London and ended up winning it all for a record $20,563,324 payday, more than enough to lift him to the top of the All-Time Money List. Kenney ended that year with more than $30 million in tournament earnings, accepting his newfound GOAT status. — In 2019, Michael Addamo already racked up a number of impressive scores, including a WSOP bracelet win. It’s safe to say that he wasn’t yet on a recreational player’s radar, he was more like an up-and-coming elite player poised for a breakout. In early 2020, at the Australian Poker Open, Addamo took down a pair of high rollers for a total of $1.5 million. He also picked up a pair of Super High Roller Bowl Online wins and a runner-up finish in the $100K Main Event for $1.187 million. To go with it, Addamo was (and still is) regularly killing the GGPoker Super MILLION$ online where he became the first player to win it all twice, then three times, then four. Now it’s late 2021 and Addamo has ascended. The new recipient of the high roller hot streak. An amazing barrage of wins that started just days after arriving in Las Vegas to play in the Super High Roller Bowl. Addamo first won the Poker Masters $50K for $680,000 and the subsequent $100K for another $1.16 million. Two days, $1.8 million in earnings. While waiting for the Super High Roller Bowl, Addamo scored a runner-up finish in an Aria High Roller for $322K and then, remarkably, dominated this year’s Super High Roller Bowl IV and defeated three-time SHRB champ, Bonomo, for a career-best $3.4 million score. He’s earned more than $7.2 of his live career $15.5 million in cashes in roughly one month. Like Seidel before him, Bonomo knows what’s it like when talent, preparation, and a little good fortune shines on you. And like Seidel just an hour earlier, Bonomo found himself all-in against a player who seemingly can do no wrong. Bonomo moved all-in with ten-nine off suit, likely hoping for a fold. But Addamo called with his king-jack suited and a massive pot with all the chips in this bracelet event was in the middle. When the turn hit, Bonomo's hand improved to trips and he simply needed to fade six outs on the river. But this is Addamo and this is now. So when an ace ripped off on the river to give Addamo the straight, the win, his third gold bracelet, and another seven-figure score Bonomo could only sigh, nod his head and congratulate his opponent. Afterward, when asked by reporters how all this success is coming to him, Addamo replied “I guess mostly luck. Obviously, there is some skill involved but winning this much, you can only really attribute it to luck in the end. So I’m very fortunate.” And there’s no telling just when (or if) that incredible good fortune will subside. So for now, Addamo, like others before him, enjoys the ride and will see where his talents, hard work, and good luck will take him. But whether Addamo leaves it, or it leaves Addamo, history has proven that a sun run will shine upon another high stakes player out there - as yet known or unknown - and the poker world will again be amazed by the results.
  5. The Rio was buzzing on Friday for the World Series of Poker as six different events were taking place in various parts of the Amazon Room, Brasilia, and Pavilion. However, all eyes were on the final table of the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha where longtime WSOP mixed game grinder Josh Arieh, went the distance in commanding fashion, besting the final table of five and picking up $204,766 and the gold bracelet. At the same time, the $10K. H.O.R.S.E. brought back a stable full of bracelet winners to see who would make the prestigious final table and another two events kicked off to keep the action going throughout the weekend. Josh Arieh Wins Third Career Gold Bracelet The final day of Event #39 ($1,500 Pot Limit Omaha) brought back the final six players to determine who would walk away with the $204,766 first-place prize and gold bracelet. In the end, it was PocketFives own Josh Arieh who dominated the entire final table and earned the third gold bracelet of his career - his first since 2005 - and the sixth-largest WSOP cash of his career. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451684995471319042?s=20 “I mean, I don’t know, I think I’m really good, just like everybody else,” he told PokerNews. “But I haven’t won a bracelet in 15 years. I’ve come close. I think I have three or four seconds in the last six years and I ****ing dog it, like I choke, and I started feeling that pressure again right at the beginning. But I was lucky enough to hold some cards and fought through the mental weakness I guess.” Bracelet winner Tommy Le, finished in second place for $126,549 and Robert Blair took home the bronze for $89,968. “I’m a gambler at heart and I gamble at anything that I feel like I have an edge or I gamble at anything that’s close to 50-50 because I feel like I’m lucky,” Arieh continued. What's more, is that Arieh sold pieces to this bracelet victory on right here on PocketFives and 10 backers turned $15 (1%) into a $2K score. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451934444831457283?s=20 He also noted that he’s planning on trying to win bracelet #4 in the $10K Pot Limit Omaha. The new WSOP bracelet winner has routinely been selling action (and will continue to) in the new PocketFives Staking marketplace - so sign up right here. Event #39 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Payouts Josh Arieh - $204,766 Tommy Le - $126,549 Robert Blair - $89,968 Ivan Deyra - $64,890 Gabriel Andrade - $47,492 Kevin Gerhart Leads Final Five in $10K H.O.R.S.E The final 16 players returned to play to a final table in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. and it was packed with former bracelet winners. Eleven of the 16 returning had earned at least one bracelet in the past, making it an especially tough day to make the final table. Kevin Gerhart tops the final five returning for a shot at the $361,124 payday up top, followed closely by Eddie Blumenthal. Previous WSOP bracelet winners Marco Johnson, Bryce Yockey, and Brandon Shack-Harris round out the table which should make for exciting viewing when it's broadcast on PokerGO on Saturday. Eric Rodawig (16th, $20,272) and Max Pescatori (14th, $20,272) hit the rail early. They were eventually joined by Kevin Song (13th, $22,685), Jerry Wong (12th, $22,685), and GGPoker ambassador Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, who busted in 10th place for a $26,171. Three-time WSOP bracelet winner Benny Glaser fell in ninth place for $31,110, while David Benyamine (8th, $38,035) and Jake Schwartz (7th, $47,835) managed to ladder. Two-time bracelet winner Chris Vitch fell on the televised final table bubble in sixth place, taking home $61,819. Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Chip Counts Kevin Gerhart - 2,720,000 Eddie Blumenthal - 2,400,000 Marco Johnson - 1,840,000 Bryce Yockey - 1,445,000 Brandon Shack-Harris - 540,000 Eight Left In $2,500 Freezeout Just eight players remain in the tough field of Event #41 ($2,500 Freezeout) with Carlos Chang holding the overnight chip lead. When the final eight return they'll be battling for a $364,589 first-place prize, with the final four all hauling in no less than six figures. Brady Osterman is not far behind in second position and he'll be joined by Arthur Conan, bracelet winner Sung Joo Hyun, and Sergi Reixach. On Day 2, 135 players made it into the money and there were plenty of notable names who fell short of the final table but still managed to make the money. Sam Grafton (127th, $4,009), Kevin Martin (115th, $4,385), and Frank Marasco (105th, $4,385) were a few of the players who made an early exit. Andre Akkari (73rd, $5,306), Ali Imsirovic (45th, $7912), Daniel Lazrus (29th, $9,112), and Jeremy Ausmus (29th, $9,112) all managed to ladder as well. Event $41 $2,599 Freezeout Final Eight Chip Counts Carlos Chang - 8,140,000 Brady Osterman - 7,690,000 Arthur Conan - 4,800,000 Quang Ngo - 4,300,000 Gerald Cunniff - 2,000,000 Sung Joo Hyun - 1,815,000 Adrien Delmas - 1,400,000 Sergi Reixach - 1,190,000 Dzivielevski, David 'ODB' Baker Make $1,500 Razz FT A number of big names remain in the final seven players of Event #42 ($1,500 Razz). Charles Sinn holds the chip lead headed into the final table but he'll have to contend with the likes of Matt Grapenthien, #1-ranked Yuri Dzivielevski, Alex Livingston, a short-stacked David 'ODB' Baker among others. Just 98 players from a field of 311 returned to have a shot at the $99,188 first-place prize, but a little over half the Day 2 field would leave empty-handed. That was not the case for David 'Bakes' Baker (46th, $2,4310, four-time bracelet winner Anthony Zinno (41st, $2,431), and 2019 Player of the Year Robert Campbell (39th, $2,659) all of whom managed to sneak into the money. Ryan Reiss (27th, $3,039), Julien Martini (24th, $3,376), and Frank Kassela (23rd, $3,376) managed a pay jump or two while Perry Friedman (18th, $4,376) and Bryan Micon (13th, $4,537) managed to make their way into the top 20. Event #42 $1,500 Razz Final Table Chip Counts Charles Sinn - 2,345,000 Brett Feldman - 1,230,000 Matt Grapenthien - 1,215,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 1,015,000 Alex Livingston - 860,000 Bradley Ruben - 855,000 David 'ODB' Baker - 180,000 $1K Double Stack Kicks Off With 1937 Runners Event #43 ($1,000 Double Stack) brought out a large field of NLHE experts and by the end of the day, it was Alexander Farahi who grabbed the chip lead, followed closely by Bay Area grinder Alex Greenblatt in second position. The field drew 1,937 runners and just 506 found a bag with plenty of notables coming back for a shot at running it up including Barry Greenstein, Ian Steinmann, Jonathan Dokler, Jeff Platt, Daniel Smiljkovic, Ryan Leng, Maria Konnikova, and Ryan Hagerty among many. Day 1B will get started on Saturday. Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Day 1A Top 5 Chip Counts Alexander Farahi - 742,500 Alex Greenblatt - 617,500 Alexander Tafesh - 601,000 Eduardo Amaral - 596,000 Alex Kulev - 591,500
  6. Day 22 of the 2021 World Series of Poker was highlighted by the high-stakes rematch between two of poker’s elite talents. Michael Addamo and Justin Bonomo met at the final table of the $50K High Roller with Addamo to battle another major title, which ended with Addamo earning more than $1.1 million and claiming his third career gold bracelet. Additionally, the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha played down to a final table, with Josh Arieh taking the chip lead into the final five, the $10K H.O.R.S.E. wrapped packed with big names headed to Day 3, and another spat between The Poker Brat and Anthony Zinno took place in the $1,500 Razz. Addamo Wins $50K High Roller, 3rd Career Bracelet Michael Addamo faced off against Justin Bonomo at the end of Event #38 ($50,000 High Roller) marking the second time in less than a month that these two high-stakes heavyweights battled heads up for a major title. In the end, Addamo took out all four of his final table opponents including Chris Hunichen (5th for $266,031), Erik Seidel, who was playing for his 10th career gold bracelet (4th for $358,665), Gal Yifrach ($495,305), and Bonomo who finished as the runner up for a $700,228 payday. For a full recap of the final table: Michael Addamo Bests Bonomo To Win WSOP $50K High Roller for $1.1 Million, Third Career Gold Bracelet Event #38 $50,000 High Roller Final Table Results 1.Michael Addamo - $1,132,968 2. Justin Bonomo - $700,228 3. Gal Yifrach - $495,305 4. Erik Seidel - $358,665 5.Chris Hunichen - $266,031 Josh Arieh Leads $1,500 PLO Final Five Day 2 of Event #39 ($1,500 Pot Limit Omaha) started with just 58 returning players from the original field of 821 runners and a goal to play down to the final five. PocketFives own Josh Arieh started the day as the chip leader and battled atop the chip counts for the better part of the day. It was up and down for Arieh, but in the end, he ended the day with the chip lead and will be playing for his third WSOP bracelet and more than $204,000 up top. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451445632888020992?s=20 Joining him at the final table is bracelet winner Tommy Le, Ivan Deyra, Robert Blair, and Gabriel Andrade. The final table also included Ashor Ochana who ended in 9th place for $15,842 and was followed to the rail by Charles Wilt (8th, $20,371) and Lior Abudi (7th, $26,603). When Nitesh Rawtani was felted in 6th place for $35,278, play ended for the day. Other notables to fall short of the final table included Christian Harder (27th, $5,740), 2021 WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Leng (25th, $5,740), Dan Zack (17th, $6,803), and Ari Engel who wrapped up in 15th place for $8,200. Maxx Coleman was the final table bubble, falling in 10th place for $12,715. Ben Yu was the first elimination of the day, finishing in 58th for $3,463, and was joined by Amnon Filippi (55th) and Tyler Cornell (53rd) on the rail in early action. Craig Varnell (39th) and Adam Hendrix (37th) were able to ladder a pay grade to $4,927. Event #35 Final Table Chip Counts 1. Josh Arieh - 6,330,000 2. Tommy Le - 5,300,000 3. Ivan Deyra - 5,110,000 4. Robert Blair - 2,450,000 5. Gabriel Andrade - 1,400,000 Kevin Gerhart, Benny Glaser Top $10K H.O.R.S.E. Day 2 Day 2 of the popular $10K H.O.R.S.E. brought back a total of 71 runners and nearly two-thirds of the field would have to be eliminated before the money started rolling in. By the end of the day just 16 remained with WSOP bracelet winner Kevin Gerhart holding a slim chip lead over three-time WSOP champ Benny Glaser headed into Day 3. Joining the pair in the top five are Chris Vitch, David Benyamine, and Marco Johnson. In fact, it’s a who’s who of mixed game mastery moving on to Day 3 including GGPoker ambassador and Poker Hall of Fame nominee Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Brandon Shack-Harris, Bryce Yockey, Jake Schwartz, and four-time bracelet holder Max Pescatori among them. The money bubble burst with just 23 players remaining which meant that Scott Seiver (22nd, $16,218), Nate Silver (21st, $16,218), former WSOP Player of the Year Mike Gorodinsky (20th, $16,218)m and newly minted bracelet winner Dylan Linde (19th, $17,738) were able to cash before hitting the rail before the end of the day. But not all of the big names in this event were able to find a bag including defending $10K H.O.R.S.E. champion Greg Mueller who was felted just outside of the money in 46th place and was joined by 2019 Player of the Year Robert Campbell, current #1-ranked Yuri Dzivielevski, Nick Schulman, and Shaun Deeb. Early eliminations included Brock Parker, Allen Kessler, and recent bracelet winners John Monnette and Adam Friedman, who just one day before completed one of the most difficult accomplishments in WSOP history by three-peating the $10K Dealers Choice. Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 5 Chip Counts Kevin Gerhart - 1,075,000 Benny Glaser - 1,045,000 Christopher Vitch - 945,000 David Benyamine - 710,000 Marco Johnson - 665,000 Nearly 900 Show Up For $2,500 Freezout A field of 896 runners on Day 1 of Event #41 ($2,500 Freezeout) played down to just 135 who will return on Day 2 with Lithuania Dominykas Mikolatitis holding the overnight chip lead having just touched 1 million in chips. Arthur Conan wrapped the day second in chips and was closely followed by Christoper Basile, Julian Milliard-Feral, and Spaniard Vicent Bosca Ramon. There are plenty of other notable names to have made Day 2 including Alan Sternberg, Sergi Reixach, Andre Akkari, Daniel Lazrus, Ali Imsirovic, Jeremy Ausmus, Sam Grafton, and Kevin Martin among them. All 135 of the remaining players have made the money with payouts starting as soon as the first player hits the rail on Day 2. Event #41 $2,500 NLHE Freezeout Top 5 Chip Counts 1. Dominykas Mikolatitis - 1,000,000 2. Arthur Conan - 787,000 3. Christopher Basile - 766,000 4. Julian Milliard-Feral - 742,000 5. Vicent Bosca Ramon - 711,000 David ‘ODB’ Baker, Frank Kassela In $1,500 Razz Top 5 How low can you go? That’s the name of the game in Event #42 ($1,500 Razz) as just 98 players from an original field of 311 remain after Day 1. Ariel Shefer will return with the chip lead on Friday but keeping it close is Todd Dakake who is second in chips, followed by David ‘ODB’ Baker, Steven Cage, and former WSOP Player of the Year Frank Kassela in fifth. Razz drew in plenty of big names including 16-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth who wanted to take the day off but couldn’t help but register “his best game.” In a scene we’ve seen before Hellmuth and four-time WSOP champ Anthony Zinno got wrapped up in a big hand with Zinno coming out on top, eliminating Hellmuth and Hellmuth giving his friend an earful. According to PokerNews, “That’s the worst ***ing play I’ve ever seen. I can tell you play Razz a lot,” Hellmuth said to Zinno who, once again, got the better of the Brat. While Hellmuth didn’t make Day 2, plenty of other notables return to battle for the bracelet. Among them include Bryan Micon, Perry Freidman, Julien Martini, the aforementioned Anthony Zinno, Yuri Dzivielevski, Robert Campbell, Ryan Reiss, Poker Hall of Fame nominee Ted Forrest, and Daniel Negreanu. Event #42 $1,500 Razz Top 5 Chip Counts Ariel Shefer - 254,000 Todd Drake - 231,500 David ‘ODB’ Baker - 205,000 Steven Cage - 197,000 Frank Kassela - 181,000
  7. Less than one month ago, Michael Addamo and Justin Bonomo, two of the most respected nosebleed tournament players in the game today, faced off heads-up at the end of Super High Roller Bowl VI. On that day, Addamo walked away with the win and the $3.4 million prize. On Thursday at the 2021 World Series of Poker, the two heavyweights made it to the end of Event #38, the $50,000 High Roller, and faced off again for a high-stakes rematch - this time with a WSOP bracelet at stake. And once again, it was Addamo who came out on top, besting Bonomo and the 81 player field to walk away with another seven-figure score of $1,132,968. For the better part of two days, Addamo dominated the event. He held a healthy chip lead at the end of Day 1, aggressively extended it into Day 2, and started the final table with nearly 50% of the total chips in play at his disposal. Although Addamo did not go wire-to-wire at the final table, losing the chip lead to Bonomo for a brief period, he did ultimately eliminate all four of his final table opponents in order to take home the third gold bracelet of his career. Chris Hunichen started the final table as the short stack but managed to find a double against Justin Bonomo in the early goings and then again against Addamo. However, he was unable to keep the momentum when he squared off again against the chip-leading Addamo. With the blinds at 60,000/120,000 (120,000 bb ante). Addamo put in a raise to 200,000 on the button with [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"] and with roughly 12 big blinds Hunichen defended his big blind holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"] giving Addamo top pair and Hunichen an over and backdoor draws. Hunichen checked and Addamo continued for a small bet which Hunichen called. When the [poker card="8h"] fell on the turn, Hunichen open-shipped for his final 10 bigs and Addamo made the call. Hunichen was looking for a heart, a ten, or a queen to survive, however, the river was the [poker card="jd"] giving Addamo trips and sending ‘Big Huni’ out in fifth place for $266,031. A big clash between Addamo and 9-time WSOP gold bracelet winner Erik Seidel took place just 40 minutes later. The action folded to Seidel in the small blind who just completed holding [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. Addamo, in the big blind, made it 480,000 with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"]. Seidel then shipped his last 40 big blinds and Addamo made the call. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="js"][poker card="3s"] giving Addamo a huge lead in the hand. Seidel needed an eight and an eight only to survive. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and before the [poker card="qs"] even completed the board Seidel was shipping his chips into the middle for Addamo. Seidel’s quest for bracelet #10 ended in fourth place for which he collected $358,655. Addamo held a massive chip lead but then something a little unexpected took place. Bonomo doubled through Addamo, and moments later Gal Yifrach did as well and for the first time in days, Addamo lost his chip lead as Bonomo became the big stack. However, that didn’t last long. Shortly after the three players returned from a break, with the blinds up to 80,000/160,000 (160,000 bb ante) Yifrach and Addmo played yet another big pot only this time, Addamo came out on top. After Bonomo folded his button, Yifrach limped in from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"]. Addamo, holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8d"], put in a raise to 520,000 in the big blind. Just like Seidel did in his bustout hand, Yifrach three-bet shipped his final 23 bigs and Addamo made the call with his pocket pair. The flop came [poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3s"] keeping Addamo’s eights in the lead but giving Yifrach a gutshot straight draw to go along with his one overcard. The turn was the [poker card="ks"] and Yifrach was left looking for an ace. The river was an ace, but it was the [poker card="as"] bringing in a flush for Addamo and ending Yifrach’s run in third place for $495,305. This set up what many people were hoping for, a rematch of the Super High Roller Bowl heads-up finale between Addamo and Bonomo, this time with a bracelet on the line. Addamo’s elimination of Yifrach helped him take back the chip lead, however, the difference in chips between the two was just four big blinds. Heads-up play wasn’t nearly as extensive as it could have been with both players sitting with more than 70 big blinds each. Bonomo grabbed an early lead and Addamo closed the gap. Addamo took a small lead before the final hand took place. On the button, Bonomo raised to 450,000 holding the [poker card="td"][poker card="9s"] and Addamo three-bet to 1.8 million from the big blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"]. Bonomo then three-bet shipped for more than 11 million and Addamo, after a brief time in the tank, Addamo called for it all. "This is a big hand," Bonomo said as an understatement. "It's for all the chips basically," Addamo replied with a smile on his face. "How many bracelets do you have?" Bonomo asked. "Two. You?" "Three." "Get it even? Three each?" Addamo said. "I don't know if I agree to those terms," Bonomo joked right before the dealer fanned the flop. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"] bringing Bonomo bottom pair and a straight draw and giving Addamo middle pair and a straight draw as well. The turn was the [poker card="ts"] giving Bonomo trips and a chance to cripple Addamo. However, the river was the [poker card="ac"] bringing in Broadway for Addamo and eliminating Bonomo as the runner-up for a $700,228 score. Addamo picked up a career-high WSOP score of $1,132,968 (the 4th largest of his career) and his second WSOP gold bracelet. WSOP $50K High Roller Final Table Payouts Michael Addamo - $1,132,968 Justin Bonomo - $700,228 Gal Yifrach - $495,305 Erik Seidel - $358,665 Chris Hunichen - $266,031
  8. For years, Ari Engel was one of the most consistent players on the poker circuit, final tabling and winning major tournaments all around the country, and the world for that matter. However, before 2019, the former #1-ranked online player on PocketFives simply couldn’t produce the same results at the World Series of Poker. He had never even made a final table after years of playing there until 2019, where he won his first WSOP final table in a $2,500 Event, earning over $427,000. Well, that seems to have triggered something in Engel. Last week, he made it two bracelets in as many series, when he won the $10,000 Omaha Hi/Lo Championship Event. An appreciative Engel pointed out how the bracelet in 2019 was different than this one. “I had a long drought at World Series where I didn’t get a top nine for various reasons. That was a big mental hurdle because I was thinking is it the desert, the weather, what am I doing wrong because I was winning at other places but not in Vegas?” Engel went on to explain that this bracelet brought different feelings for him for different reasons. “This one, I really enjoy O8 so winning after spending a ton of COVID time playing O8 was a very nice feeling. Different for sure the first one is more special like that, but winning a $10k Championship is nice.” Engel has been largely known as a No Limit Hold’em player, but he shared with us that in recent years, he has been playing more Omaha Hi/Lo. He starting grinding PLO8 in 2008, and made Supernova in 2009 grinding six to eight tables at a table. Interestingly enough, Engel barely got into the No Limit bracelet event that he eventually won in 2019, and said that since he was playing so much O-8, he couldn’t handle simply playing one game of live hold’em. “I was playing PLO8 all day in 2019 and just max late regging events. I showed up at 7 PM for the noon event and I couldn’t stomach it, I had to play more PLO8 so I just grabbed my laptop and played while I played the bracelet event I won. I really enjoy O8 at this stage.” It is no surprise that the final table of this $10,000 Mixed Game Event was stacked with bracelet winners and high-roller regulars. Engel bested a final table that included Robert Mizrachi (7th), George Wolff (6th), Phil Hellmuth (5th), and Andrew Yeh (3rd). Engel, the 2018 recipient of the PocketFives Legacy Award, confessed that while he had plenty of experience playing Omaha-8, he wasn’t sure how he would stand up against some of the best players in the world. “All of these guys were pretty great. I wasn’t sure how I would stack up against them and I still don’t know, because one tournament doesn’t tell you that much, but they are clearly phenomenal players. It’s very exciting to play against legends of the game. I’m a fanboy too in addition to being a player.” Engel also pointed out that while this was a different game, his years of final table Hold’em experience helped him in certain spots, as much of the ICM strategy is still the same. “I understand table dynamics and leverage from other tournaments I’ve played so getting the stack was the luck part.” The seven-hour heads-up battle was made a bit easier, or at least more exciting, because of a raucous rail that was cheering Engel on. Some of the railbirds were betting on whether the flops would come out red or black, adding some entertainment to the long grind of heads-up play. Engel was appreciative of the support after his win. “Awesome having a great rail to support you. I had the same at Aussie Millions. My first bracelet, I didn’t have a strong rail. It doesn’t happen often, so when it does it makes it more special. It makes it more fun and enjoyable from a life perspective. If I had lost maybe it would be more painful, but it hasn’t happened yet, so I’m not sure.” Engel adds another $317,000 and change to his already robust poker resume, but for Engel, it doesn’t change much about his plans this summer. In fact, Engel confessed that he doesn’t even have a schedule planned out, instead opting to wait until the day of to decide what to play. “I never have a schedule for the WSOP. I’ve never had one. I came into this one planning to play more mixed games but I wasn’t sure what to an extent. I will be playing any and all Omaha Hi/Los. Not sure about the other games.” Engel did say that he is certainly enticed by playing at the high level of the $10k WSOP champions events, so expect to see him there for sure. “At the 10k level, I’m not sure where I stand on a lot of mixed games, but I’m happy to gamble and find out and maybe get better by playing against better players. We’ll see what happens. I’ll be playing more tournaments than cash, but I’m never really sure where I’ll be playing on a given day.”
  9. The theme for Week 3 of the 2021 World Series of Poker was making history. This year’s series was already going to be a historic one with it being held in the fall and the “current conditions” under which it is being held. But this week, all of the drama and history were made on the felt. This week was all about superstars of the game showing off their elite skills. Phil Hellmuth added a major chapter to his legacy, Anthony Zinno built himself a clubhouse for one, and Adam Friedman pulled off what was previously thought impossible. So, check out what went down this week with the five biggest storylines from Week 3 of the World Series of Poker. Everything’s Coming Up Hellmuth It’s been nearly impossible not to see Phil Hellmuth in WSOP headlines over the past two weeks. Between his deep runs, final tables, and his troubling tirades this has no doubt been a Hot Hellmuth Autumn. Well, if last week we saw the breakdown, this week we saw the break out as Hellmuth ended up taking down Event #31 ($1,500 No Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw) for $84,851 and his record-extending 16th gold bracelet. “I’ve been fighting so ****ing hard for this bracelet for so long,” Hellmuth said right after his emotional win. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1450005818854699012?s=20 But he also said he’d get back to the bracelet chase “immediately” and that’s exactly what he did, jumping in the $10K Dealer Choice tournament. Two days later, Hellmuth found himself at his fifth final table, with the chip lead, and ready to go back-to-back to win bracelet #17. Unfortunately for The Poker Brat, he got heads-up against the current king of the $10K Dealers Choice, Adam Friedman, who eliminated Hellmuth as the runner-up. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1451134173314367490?s=20 Although Hellmuth didn’t instantly win #17, it’s undeniable that Hellmuth is having one - if not the - best World Series of Poker of his career. With five final tables and a bracelet to show for it, he’s currently in prime position to compete for the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year and he’s put to bed the narrative that he’s just a “one trick pony” (as Norman Chad might say) as a NLHE large field specialist. With Second Series Bracelet Anthony Zinno Starts His Own Club Just days after being berated by Phil Hellmuth and clinching his third career gold bracelet in the $10K Stud event, Anthony Zinno went on another run in Event #27 ($1,500 H.O.R.S.E.). In the end, Zinno bested the 594-player field and became the first double bracelet winner of the 2021 WSOP, adding another $160,636 to his bankroll. “I’m very proud that hard work has put me in a position to allow this to happen,” Zinno said after the win. “It’s completely unexpected.” https://twitter.com/AntZinno/status/1449591570420752388?s=20 Zinno has indeed put in hard work, in 2016, just ahead of that year’s World Series of Poker, Zinno told PocketFives that he was putting in hard work learning mixed games. And all of those years of hard work are indeed paying off. Now Zinno is the lone member of an exclusive club. He’s the only player to have won four World Series of Poker bracelets and three World Poker Tour titles helping him arrive as one of the most decorated players in the game today. Adam Friedman Does The Impossible It’s tough enough to win one World Series of Poker tournament. Imagine winning that same tournament in back-to-back years. That's incredible. Now, do that…take a year off for COVID…come back and do it again. Simply impossible. But that’s exactly what Adam Friedman did in the $10,000 Dealer Choice and he’s the only player in history to do it. https://twitter.com/AdamFriedman119/status/1451245908847325191?s=20 “I waited 28 months to play this tournament,” Friedman said to PokerGO moments after making history. “All I kept saying was just get me to Day 2 and I just want a chance. I don’t need to win this tournament. I’ve got nothing to prove. I’ve got literally nothing to prove.” Making it an even bigger accomplishment, the $10K Dealers Choice is considered one of the toughest tournaments in both quality of competition and skill level needed to win. Players need to know roughly 20 games that can be picked at any given time. Friedman, now a four-time bracelet winner, has written a chapter of WSOP history that is unlikely to ever be matched and in a couple of hundred days, he’ll have a chance to expand on his legacy by defending his title for a record third time. The Main Event Pivots For International Travelers A late-night tweet said it all. With the hopes of attracting (vaccinated) international players when the U.S. eases up on travel restrictions on November 8, WSOP officials have added two additional starting flights for the 2021 Main Event. The Main Event, which officially kicks off on Thursday, November 4 with its first opening flight, now has a total of six starting days, two Days 2’s, and, as usual, the entire field will meet for the first time on Day 3 which is on Thursday, November 11. There are some things to note depending on what flight a player decides to enter. For example Day 1A, 1B, 1D all play Day 2 together while Day 1C, which plays on Saturday, November 6 will wait a full four days before joining Day 1E and 1F on Day 2 on Wednesday, November 10. What’s a little more confusing is that as of this writing, nearly a full week after it was announced, the website has yet to be updated with the new schedule. But not to worry, all the details can be found right here on this tweet: https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1449228022226112514?s=20 Poker Hall of Fame Finalists Announced Finally, the ten finalists for the Poker Hall of Fame were announced this week with three first-time nominees and a host of legends of the game vying for this year’s single induction. Michael Mizrachi, Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, and the late Layne Flack have all made the shortlist for the first time. For Mizrachi and ‘ElkY’, their first nomination comes with their first year of eligibility. It’ll be a tough choice for living members of the Hall with other notable players including Ted Forrest, Eli Elezra, Mike Matusow, Antonio Esfandiari, and Chris Ferguson also on the ballot. Joining them from the “builder” category is Matt Savage (his sixth nomination) and PokerStars founder Isai Scheinberg. The Poker Hall of Fame adds a new member on November 17. https://twitter.com/GregFBT/status/1450918819497709573?s=20
  10. Adam Friedman made history at the 2021 World Series of Poker on Wednesday night after winning the $10,000 Dealer Choice event for the third straight year, becoming the first player ever to win a single event three times in a row. In order to do it, had to best a completely stacked final 10 players that included Daniel Negreanu, Mike Matusow, and Phil Hellmuth, who was at his fifth final table and playing for back-to-back bracelets himself. Friedman Finishes Hellmuth For Unprecedented Third Title With the tournament being six-handed, two five-handed tables kicked off the action on the final day. Phil Hellmuth began his quest for glory in familiar company, sat alongside Daniel Negreanu and, Mike Matusow. Negreanu left the party early, busting in ninth place for $25,741, but Matusow lasted beyond Mike Gorodinsky’s elimination in eighth place for the same amount and Matt Glantz going out in seventh for $32,746 after making the unofficial final table. With the final six players gathering, it seemed a three-way battle from the off, with back-to-back $10K Dealers Choice champ Friedman, Jake Schwartz, and Hellmuth himself all above 1.3 million chips, with Carol Fuchs (570,000), Matusow (390,000), and Andrew Kelsall (320,000) all seemingly scrabbling for the next three eliminations. That’s exactly how it turned out, with Kelsall busted by Matusow in sixth place for $42,646 before Matusow himself heading to the rail in fifth place for $56,826. It was Hellmuth himself who busted his friend away from the felt, proving poker is a game without the boundaries of friendships at the felt and the two men exchanged a warm embrace as Matusow left the arena. Soon after, Carol Fuchs was of contention in fourth for $77,437 when she lost a hand of 2-7 Pot-Limit Triple Draw to Friedman. In winning his 16th bracelet earlier this week, Hellmuth beat Schwartz heads-up, but this time Schwartz could only last to the first of the three podium places, busting in third for $107,861. A fairly ridiculous stat for the now three-time reigning champion showed just how difficult it is to beat Adam Friedman in the Dealer’s Choice format. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1451102842622668809   So those omens proved as Friedman, who went into heads-up play with a slight deficit to make up, remained unbeaten to conquer the current king of the World Series under the lights. After the event, Hellmuth himself tweeted to update his fans that he’s about to take a well-deserved break for a couple of days after an epic three weeks at the felt yielded five final tables and a WSOP bracelet. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1451134173314367490 WSOP 2021 Event #36 $10,000 Dealer's Choice Final Table Results: Adam Friedman - $248,350 Phil Hellmuth - $153,493 Jake Schwartz - $107,861 Carol Fuchs - $77,437 Mike Matusow - $56,826 Andrew Kelsall - $42,646 Addamo Crushes High Roller Field to Lead Final Five It goes without saying that Australian high roller Michael Addamo has enjoyed an incredible year at the felt. No one has won more consistently and for such large amounts than he has in online tournaments, but Addamo is not satisfied with dominating the online scene. With five players remaining in the WSOP Event #38, the $50,000 NLHE High Roller, Addamo has almost as many chips as his four remaining opponents put together. Heading into Day 2, Addamo had a significant lead over the field, with more chips than the places between 3rd and 6th combined. Only Erik Seidel was keeping pace with the Aussie in any way, and that situation stayed the case as play found its way to a final table of nine players. At that stage, Addamo had grown his stack to 6.8 million chips, with only Seidel (4.2 million) and Sam Soverel (3.5m) anywhere near him. The first player to leave the nine-handed final table was German player Leonard Maue, who was short-stacked and all-in for eight big blinds with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"]. Bin Weng made the call with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"] and on a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="4c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] sent Maue home for a result worth $103,635. Next to go was Italian player Mustapha Kanit, who earned $126,141 in eighth place when he busted to Gal Yifrach, one of the four opponents Addamo will face on the final day. Kanit moved all-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"], but ran into Yifrach’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"], which held with ease on the [poker card="6c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="4c"] board. Play went on for some time before Sam Soverel was eliminated in seventh place for $157,666. Soverel moved all-in from the small blind with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Th"] but was at risk when Seidel called with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"]. The flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"] gave Soverel bottom set, but on the [poker card="Jd"] turn, Seidel made a Broadway straight and after the [poker card="7h"] completed the board, Soverel was on the rail. It was Bin Weng who busted next, calling Justin Bonomo’s three-bet all-in pre-flop. Weng had pocket eights, but Bonomo held pocket nines and no danger on the board saw the man who sits second on the all-time money list double-up, with Weng busted in the next hand to the same opponent. With Addamo involved too, the three-way pot saw Weng eliminated with bottom pair on the flop after Bonomo had flopped a top pair of kings. With Weng’s elimination earning the American $202,236, the final five places were set, with Addamo holding a huge lead over four remaining players, with one super-short opponent Chris Hunichen remaining confident of victory. https://twitter.com/BigHuni/status/1451007106820108290 WSOP 2021 Event #38 $50,000 NLHE High Roller Final Table Chipcounts/Results: Final Day Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 11,475,000 Justin Bonomo - 4,975,000 Erik Seidel - 4,335,000 Gal Yifrach - 3,160,000 Chris Hunichen - 405,000 Final Table Results: 6th - Bin Weng (U.S.A.) $202,236 7th - Sam Soverel (U.S.A.) $157,666 8th - Mustapha Kanit (Italy) $126,141 9th - Leonard Maue (Germany) $103,635 Josh Arieh Leads $1,500 PLO Just 58 players survived Day 1 of the Pot Limit Omaha Event #39, which cost $1,500 to play and had 821 entries. A mammoth 14 hours of play saw Josh Arieh (1,000,000) finish ahead of players like Ivan Deyra (635,000) and Craig Varnell (566,000) in the top 10 chip counts. Players such as Ryan Leng (847,000) and Robert Blair (852,000) will feel most confident of taking down Arieh on Day 2, as they are closest to the leader, with players like Robert Mizrachi and Shaun Deeb unable to survive the day. WSOP 2021 Event #39 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Top 10 Chipcounts: Josh Arieh - 1,000,000 Robert Blair - 852,000 Ryan Leng - 847,000 Fred Goldberg - 653,000 Gabriel Andrade - 645,000 Ivan Deyra - 635,000 Dien Le - 627,000 Craig Varnell - 566,000 Nitesh Rawtani - 563,000 Zachary Bergevin - 512,000 Seiver, Silver Make $10K H.O.R.S.E. Top Ten Event #40 saw players such as David Williams pony up $10,000 and take their chances in the H.O.R.S.E. event, and there was an air of ambition around the Rio in the early levels, as Williams himself exuded.... even if he was a season out. https://twitter.com/dwpoker/status/1450982507751436290 With 139 entries, just 71 players survived, with legends such as Daniel Negreanu, Anthony Zinno, Eli Elezra, and Paul Volpe all busting, while Qinghai Pan (373,000), Scott Seiver (261,000), Randy Ohel (219,500), and David Benyamine (219,000) all piled up top stacks. WSOP 2021 Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Qinghai Pan - 373,000 Scott Seiver - 261,000 Andrew Yeh - 229,500 Randy Ohel - 219,500 David Benyamine - 219,000 Marco Johnson - 218,000 Jerry Wong - 217,500 Brett Richey - 215,500 Jesse Klein - 199,500 Nate Silver - 197,000
  11. It was a busy day inside the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino on Tuesday with three gold bracelets being won and a constellation of poker stars battling in the Amazon room. Michael Noori, David 'Bakes' Baker, and Anthony Koutsos all won gold. At the same time, high roller superstar Michael Addamo took the lead in the $50K High Roller, and both Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu made the final 10 in the $10K Dealers Choice event. Michael Noori Earns Monster $610K Score After four days of relentless poker, 3,520 entries played down to a winner in the Thunderdome as Michael Noori won the $1,500-entry Monster Stack for $610,437. Taking down the final table, Noori triumphed against Ryan Leng heads-up after a stunning comeback from less than two big blinds earlier in the day. Heading into the final table, Noori was some way back from the leaders, with Leng leading the way with 57 big blinds to Noori’s 26 big blinds. With ten players at the felt, the man at the top of the leaderboard was Jaesh Balachandran, but he busted in 10th place for $51,286. Balachandran shoved with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qc"] and was called by Mordechai Hazan with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"], with a board of [poker card="9s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] reducing the field to nine. It was Anthony Ortega who busted next as his [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kh"] wandered into a massive clash against Christopher Andler’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"], with a seven-high board sending Ortega home for $64,490. Ortega was followed from the felt by Johan Schumacher who busted in eighth place for $81,573. Schumacher raised then called off his four big blind stack pre-flop with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="6s"] but was well behind Rafael Reis’ [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"]. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5c"] saw Schumacher catch a Broadway draw from the flop but he couldn’t find a queen to save his stack. Reis took the lead with that hand, and at that point Noori was struggling on just 13 big blinds, second last on the leaderboard. The eventual winner dropped to short stack when Daniel Fortier was busted in seventh place for $103,784 with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"] committed pre-flop against Mordechai Hazan’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"]. Fortier was drawing dead from the turn on a board showing [poker card="8h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Ts"]. Noori needed a double desperately, and it was Hazan who would oblige when Noori three-bet shoved with pocket sevens and was called by Hazan’s pocket jacks. Noori needed help and got it on the [poker card="9c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7c"] flop, but still needed to sweat a ten that would have given Hazan an unbeatable straight. However, the [poker card="4d"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river saw Noori double up and that began his epic run to victory. Hazan’s stack was mortally damaged, and he busted next for $132,812 in sixth place. Hazan moved all-in with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qs"] and was called by Leng with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"]. The board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Tc"] saw Hazan on the rail and Leng moved into the lead with 75 million chips, with Noori (45m) his closest challenger at that stage. Charlie Dawson busted in fifth place for $170,943 when his all-in with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"] was called by Leng with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"]. The flop of [poker card="Th"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"] saw Dawson remain in the lead, and that stayed the case with the [poker card="Jc"] turn, but the river of [poker card="Ad"] flipped the script and sent Dawson home in fifth. There was an extended period of play that followed without anyone busting, but eventually, Andler met with defeat for $221,289. He was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="2d"] and in real trouble against [poker card="Th"][poker card="Td"] after a board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="7d"] played out. Noori winning that hand was vital, with the American vaulting over Reis in the chip counts, though Leng had a massive lead at the time with double his two opponents’ stacks. Reis would bust in third place for $288,101 as he pushed his final eight big blinds over the line with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Ts"] and was called by Noori with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="7d"]. With a flop of [poker card="8h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3h"] keeping Reis ahead, the [poker card="7s"] turn changed that and put Noori in command of the hand and the [poker card="4s"] river ended the hand with the Brazilian heading to the cash desk. Heads-up began with Leng holding an almost exact 2:1 chip lead. That was not the case for long, however, as Noori was all-in just ten minutes into the duel with a turned straight topping Leng’s flopped top two pair. Over the next few hands, Leng battled back, but Noori grew his lead after winning some small bets to increase his lead to 3:1 ahead of the final hand. After a board of [poker card="Th"][poker card="6h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="7c"] arrived by the turn, Leng attempted a value bluff, raise-shoving [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8c"]. Noori, however, held [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"] and made the call, needing to fade kings, nines, fives and clubs to become a first-time WSOP champion. Noori needed to fade a massive 18 outs, but that was exactly what happened when the [poker card="7h"] river eliminated Leng in second place for $377,220 and he fell just short of his second live WSOP bracelet of the 2021 World Series. Noori was the titleholder instead, winning the $610,437 top prize and grabbing gold for the first time in his career, celebrating on the rail with his friends as Leng was left with a rueful smile about what might have been. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Final Table Results: Michael Noori - $610,437 Ryan Leng - $377,220 Rafael Reis - $288,101 Christopher Andler - $221,289 Charlie Dawson - $170,943 Mordechai Hazan - $132,812 Daniel Fortier - $103,784 Johan Schumacher - $81,573 Anthony Ortega - $64,490 Jaesh Balachandran - $51,286 'Bakes' Scores Gold In Event #34 Event #34 saw David ‘Bakes’ Baker take down the $1,500 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw final table after toppling overnight chip leader Peter Lynn heads-up. Six players returned to the felt as Baker, the most experienced player at the table had work to do in order to capture the crown and his third WSOP bracelet. Baker, the only former winner at the final table, used all his experience to get the job done and win his first bracelet in nine years. Afterward, Baker described how desperate he was to win, and ultimately, a combination of his determination and mixed game skills managed to conclude the event in his favor. With play very even between the top stacks during the first three eliminations, Baker really kicked in after play went three-handed. Baker took over and when Stephen Deutsch lost out in third place for a career-high score of $37,194, Baker was better than 6:1 up in chips, closing out the win for a famous victory. WSOP 2021 Event #34 $1,500 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Final Table Results: David 'Bakes' Baker - $87,837 Peter Lynn - $54,286 Stephen Deutsch - $37,194 Kristijonas Andrulis - $25,971 Marc Booth - $18,488 Mark Fraser - $13,423 Koutsos Freezes Out The Competition It was a recreational player’s victory in Event #35, the $500-entry Freezeout event, with real estate agent Anthony Koutsos claiming gold after an epic three-hour heads-up match against Charbel Kanterjian. Both Kanterjian and Koutsos started the 10-handed final table as the top two stacks and would eventually take care of most of their opposition between them to get to that epic heads-up battle. After Gilad Grinberg lost a coinflip to bust in 10th place for $12,944, Fausto Valdez did the same. It was Kanterjian who won that hand, pocket sevens flopping a set against jack-ten suited for the chip leader to increase his power at the table and send Valdez home for $16,324. The legendarily named John Moss busted in eighth place for $20,753 before he was joined on the rail by Ronald Ibbetson (7th for $26,595) and Jacob Rich (6th for $34,353). By that stage, Dongsheng Zhang was one of the most powerful players at the table, and he busted Sundiata DeVore in fifth place for $44,725 when Zhang’s [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Tc"] held against DeVore’s [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"]. Down to four, the next player to go was Jonah Lopas, who moved all-in pre-flop with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="3d"] but was called by Koutsos with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Js"] and couldn’t catch him on the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="9d"] board. Lopas cashed for $58,685 in fourth and he was joined on the rail by Zhang in third for $77,600 when Zhang’s shove with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="9c"] was doomed by Koutsos’ [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"] on an eight-high board. Heads-up swung this way and that for a full three hours until the average stack was worth less than 20 big blinds. Koutsos had [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qs"] and had an easy call when Kanterjian shoved pre-flop with [poker card="8h"][poker card="6c"]. The flop of [poker card="6d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3c"] gave Kanterjian hope of a miracle by pairing his six, but after the [poker card="4s"] turn, the [poker card="Ks"] river saw Koutsos take the title and massive $167,272 top prize. Kanterjian took $103,402 for coming second, with Koutsos winning his first-ever WSOP title after his biggest previous cash was for just $5,000 before this defining poker result of his life. WSOP 2021 Event #35 $500 Freezeout NLHE Final Table Results: Anthony Koutsos - $167,272 Charbel Kanterjian - $103,402 Dongsheng Zhang - $77,600 Jonah Lopas - $58,685 Sundiata DeVore - $44,725 Jacob Rich - $34,353 Ronald Ibbetson - $26,595 John Moss - $20,753 Fausto Valdez - $16,324 Sereika Battles Padilha For Super Turbo Bounty Win Karolis Serieka won the fast and furious $1,500 Super Turbo Bounty Event #37, which took just one day to play out to a winner in the early hours at the Rio. With Pedro Padilha bettered heads-up by Sereika, other players such as Pierre Calamusa (4th for 88,436) and Lorenzo Adams (3rd for 88,435) Karolis Serieka won the fast and furious $1,500 Super Turbo Bounty Event #37, which took just one day to play out to a winner in the early hours at the Rio. With Pedro Padilha bettered heads-up by Sereika, other players such as Pierre Calamusa (4th for $65,494) and Lorenzo Adams (3rd for 88,435) coming close but failing to get over the line. WSOP 2021 Event #37 $1,500 Super Turbo Bounty Final Table Results: Karolis Sereika - $195,310 Pedro Padilha - $120,700 Lorenzo Adams - $88,435 Pierre Calamusa - $65,494 Steve Buell - $49,033 Alec Gould - $37,114 Romuald Pycior - $28,406 Alexander Norden - $21,986 Wing Yam - $17,211 Rupesh Pattni - $13,628 Addamo Takes Charge In $50K High Roller A busy first day of action in the $50,000-entry Event #38 saw Australian Michael Addamo bag the chip lead with 5,150,000 chips. His mammoth stack was three times that of anyone other than Erik Seidel (3,730,000), with Gal Yifrach (1,405,000), Dan Smith (1,085,000), and Mustapha Kanit (1,060,000) rounding out the top five chip counts with considerably fewer chips than the dominant Aussie, who has enjoyed a ridiculously successful 2021. With 72 total entries and only 21 survivors, 50 bullets were fired off in vain as players such as recent bracelet winner Jason Koon, former WSOP Main Event winner Joe McKeehen, David Peters, Yiming Li, Cary Katz, Vanessa Kade, Tyler Cornell, Rok Gostisa, Ali Imsirovic, and Jake Daniels all departing without making the Day 2 seat draw. WSOP 2021 Event #38 $50,000 High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 5,150,000 Erik Seidel - 3,730,000 Gal Yifrach - 1,405,000 Dan Smith - 1,085,000 Mustapha Kanit - 1,060,000 Chris Hunichen - 995,000 Bin Weng - 975,000 Johan Guilbert - 940,000 David Coleman - 640,000 Leonard Maue - 625,000 Negreanu, Hellmuth Make Final Day of $10K Dealers Choice Adam Friedman has put himself in a terrific position to claim a third win in the same bracelet event after going into the final day with the chip lead in Event #36, the $10,000 Dealers Choice Championship. Last year, Friedman took down the Dealers Choice Championship, and amazingly, the same man is in a position to repeat the trick, going into tomorrow’s final day second in chips with just less than Jake Schwartz. Schwartz led the final day for the longest time and bags up a deserved lead with 1,380,000, but Friedman isn’t far behind on 1,329,000 chips and will be hopeful of what would be an incredible achievement. If Friedman is to fail, it will almost certainly be due to the quality of opponent he faces tomorrow, as both Daniel Negreanu (457,000) and Phil Hellmuth (424,000) hover in his rear-view waiting to pounce. With 22 WSOP bracelets between them, Kid Poker and the Poker Brat will share the felt when their table kicks off tomorrow, with Mike Matusow for company on what looks to be an explosive seat draw with all three men sitting in a row. On the other table, both chips leaders are next to each other, so expect final day drama. WSOP 2021 Event #36 $10,000 Dealer's Choice Championship Chipcounts: Jake Schwartz - 1,380,000 Adam Friedman - 1,329,000 Mike Gorodinsky - 465,000 Daniel Negreanu - 457,000 Phil Hellmuth - 424,000 Mike Matusow - 410,000 Matt Glantz - 343,000 Andrew Kelsall - 324,000 Carol Fuchs - 260,000 Joao Vieira - 182,000 Finally, the World Series of Poker has announced that the 10 final nominees have been announced for the 2021 Hall of Fame entries. Who's your pick? https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1450635341325430786
  12. The World Series of Poker’s Poker Hall of Fame announced the list of 10 finalists that will be considered for induction in 2021. The 32 living members of the Poker Hall of Fame will cast their vote from the shortlist, with just one earning the honor of induction on November 17. This year’s shortlist includes (in alphabetical order): Eli Elezra A businessman and four-time WSOP bracelet winner, Elezra has proven himself to be a world-class competitor in both high-stakes tournaments and cash games. He has more than $4.1 million in total live tournament earnings as well as a World Poker Tour title to his name. Additionally, Elezra built a reputation in the Las Vegas cash games and made appearances on High Stakes Poker and Poker After Dark. Antonio Esfandiari Nicknamed “The Magician”, Esfandiari became one of the more popular personalities of the poker boom (along with his then partner-in-crime Phil Laak). He has three WSOP gold bracelets, two World Poker Tour titles, and is also well-known as the winner of the first-ever $1 million buy-in Big One For One Drop for which he earned more than $18 million, helping push his lifetime earnings to more than $27 million. Chris Ferguson As a six-time WSOP bracelet winner (including the 2000 Main Event), the 2017 WSOP Player of the Year, and with a total of 142 WSOP cashes for more than $6.8 million Ferguson has one of the best resumes in WSOP history. However, his reputation off the felt took a critical blow in the aftermath of Black Friday as one of the primary parties of Full Tilt Poker and the debacle that followed when players were unable to get paid. Layne Flack Six-time WSOP bracelet winner Layne Flack is receiving a posthumous nomination after his sudden passing away in July of 2021. Flack was given the nickname “back-to-back” after winning two consecutive events in the 1999 Legends of Poker, and then picked up two bracelets in 2002 and again in 2003. Flack earned more than $5 million in lifetime tournament earnings as well as a World Poker Tour title. Ted Forrest The third six-time bracelet winner on this list is Ted Forrest who has 39 WSOP cashes for just over $2 million. Additionally, Forrest has a World Poker Tour title and a reputation as being an important personality in the early poker boom as well as a member of The Corporation, who took on billionaire Andy Beal made poker famous as The Suicide King in Michael Craig’s book The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King: Inside The Richest Poker Game of All Time. Bertrand “ElkY” Grospellier One of the original online poker celebrities, Grospellier currently sits 47th on the All-Time Money List. With two WSOP bracelets and a WPT Championship victory in 2008, ‘ElkY’ has amassed more than $14 million in live earnings. However, with just one person making it into the Hall of Fame each year, Grospellier may be a long shot to get inducted in 2021. Mike Matusow Mike ‘The Mouth’ Matusow is one of poker’s most colorful characters but in addition to his polarizing personality, he boasts a decades-long resume of accomplishments. He’s a four-time bracelet winner with just under $10 million in career live earnings and he’s still ever-present at the WSOP today. Matusow’s strength is the impression he left and continues to leave on poker fans worldwide. Michael Mizrachi The top line of Mizrachi’s poker resume reads “Three-time $50,000 Poker Players Champion.” It’s an incredible feat and ’The Grinder’ is the only player to have pulled it off thus far. He’s a five-time WSOP bracelet winner, two-time WPT champion, and has accumulated over $17 million in live earnings and, at just 40 years old, is nominated in his first year of eligibility. Matt Savage The Executive Tour Director for the World Poker Tour, Savage is the most well-known TD in the game today. Nominated as a builder, Savage has been integral to the Tournament Directors Association helping shape the way that tournaments are played today. Isai Scheinberg PokerStars founder Isai Scheinberg is one of the most influential businessmen from the poker boom era, getting much of the credit for helping drive the success of online poker both through marketing and the development of his platform. Also nominated as a builder, Scheinberg was key in helping U.S. players get refunded from a defunct Full Tilt Poker and now, with his legal troubles vs. the U.S. government behind him, he’s nominated for the second year in a row. The criteria for nomination into the Poker Hall of Fame remains that players must be 40 years of age, player for high stakes against acknowledged top competition while gaining the respect of their peers. They also need to have stood the test of time. In the builder category, they are judged on the overall growth and success of the game while providing indelible positive and lasting results. The enshrinement ceremony will be held on November 17 to coincide with the final table of the 2021 WSOP Main Event.
  13. The 2021 World Series of Poker kicks into high gear in its third week with three Championship bracelet events, another tough $5K No Limit tournament, and a high roller that’s certain to be packed with some of the biggest names in the game. Here’s everything you can look forward to in Week Three of the WSOP. Spotlight Tournament Event #38 - $50,000 High Roller There are so many big events taking place in Week 3, but the $50,000 NLHE High Roller is the biggest. The promise of a massive payday for those who make it deep will attract an array of the poker world's top-tier pros plus a few wealthy shot takers. The $50K is the biggest buy-in of the series to date and is one of just six tournaments on the schedule that has a price tag of this amount (or higher). If the field of week one's Event #6 ($25,000 High Roller) is any indication, this $50K will see all the nosebleed names you enjoy watching battle lining up to register. This should include the likes of Daniel Negreanu, Michael Addamo, Jason Koon, David Peters, and many, many more. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see the field size dip below 100 (the first $50K of the 2019 series hit 110 runners), but one should expect around 70 runners to create a prize pool that will award first-place prize that ranks among the top three of the series thus far. Plus, you can watch all the action go down as the final table is broadcast on PokerGO on Thursday, October 21. Complete WSOP Week 3 Schedule [table id=267 /] Championship Events Event #36 - $10K Dealers Choice There’s no doubt about it, the $50,000 Poker Players Championship is one of the most prestigious events on the schedule. However, the $10,000 Dealers Choice Championship could be considered, by some, a baby version of the event. It’s the highest price point for an event where all the games are on the table. The big difference is, there are more games up for grabs. It's up to the players to decide what will be played and what will be left on the sidelines. With that being the case, you have to know how to play all the games in order to have the best shot at winning. In 2019, the event drew just over 120 runners and had a final table that included Nick Schulman, Matt Glantz, and Shaun Deeb. In the end, it was Adam Friedman who took home the gold and the $312,417 first-place prize. Which mixed-game master will it be this year? Event #40 - $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. What to know who will be playing the $10K H.O.R.S.E.? Just take a look at who busted early from the tournament above and everyone who battled in Event #2 ($25,000 H.O.R.S.E.). This means it’s going to be a who’s who of the mixed game community. The five-game rotation is a staple of the series and this year will likely see 100 of the game’s best battling for the six-figure score. Greg Mueller is likely to be on hand to defend his 2019 title which brought him $425,347. Plus, expect some of the players who ran deep in the $25K, including Chad Eveslage and Benny Glaser, to try and make it back to another H.O.R.S.E. final table. Spend your Saturday (October 23) tuning in to the $10 H.O.R.S.E. final table on PokerGO. Event #45 - $10K Pot Limit Omaha The third and final Championship Event of the week is the $10K Pot Limit Omaha. A favorite among action seekers, the $10K PLO promises to be one of the more unpredictable events of the week as well as having the largest field size of the three. The Championship for the "Great Game" will, like those $10K’s before it, also be attracting the big names and well as some specialists who might only make it out in these non NLHE events. Tune in next week, on Tuesday, October 26, to watch the action unfold at the final table. One More To Watch Event #47 - $5K NLHE Freezeout Last week, the $5K Six-Max, one of the toughest tournaments of the series, took place. This week there’s another $5K, but this time it’s an eight-handed freezeout. These $5Ks have some of the most shark-infested fields of any series. The NLHE wizards who aren’t yet rolled for $10K plus usually find a way to get themselves involved in a $5K making for a registration list filled with some of the game’s best-known talent mixed with a healthy dose of up-and-coming talent. Keep an eye on this one.
  14. The robust crowd cheered as Phil Hellmuth rose from his seat and raised his arms in victory. He had finally done it, Hellmuth just won his record-extending 16th World Series of Poker gold bracelet after taking down Event #31 ($1,500 No Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw) for $84,851. But when it was all said and done, the money was the last thing on his mind. “I’ve wanted a Deuce To Seven bracelet ever since the 1980’s since it was the coolest bracelet to win because it’s the one tournament that Chip [Reese] and Doyle [Brunson] showed up for. All the big-name poker players, Billy Baxter, all the champions showed up for that,” he said. “And I wanted that bracelet so badly.” “And so I’ve been fighting so ****ing hard for this bracelet for so long in the Deuce to Seven…but yeah, it feels really good.” Hellmuth weaved his way through the 272-entry field, to make his fourth final table of the series. He started the day second in chips and battled through an up-and-down day in the chip counts. Once the final table of eight players was set, he outlasted the likes of Dario Sammartino, Rep Porter, and Chris Vitch until he was finally heads-up with Jake Schwartz, who was playing for his first bracelet. Hellmuth started heads-up at a slight chip deficit but quickly managed to turn the tide and grab a commanding four-to-one chip lead. The two agreed to take a 45-minute break and when they returned Hellmuth went to work, chipping away at Schwartz's stack and, roughly 20 minutes later, ended Schwartz's run in second place. Hellmuth then stood and lifted two fists in the air, made his way over to the rail where his wife and longtime friend Mike Matusow were waiting to congratulate him. Nearly two dozen fans snapped photos and cheered as Hellmuth basked in the victory. He then returned to the poker table, and as he prepared to take a barrage of winners photos, it looked as if a wave of emotion came over him. He sat center stage and held his head in his hands. “I told myself if I ever won a Deuce bracelet, I thought maybe I’d cry afterward,” he said, reflecting on that moment. “Because I wanted this Deuce bracelet so badly and because of the extreme effort I’ve put in this year.” It was a week of roller-coaster emotions for Hellmuth, one that started out with him making a deep run in the $10K Stud. But after a pivotal hand against Anthony Zinno, Hellmuth lost his temper, and his alter-ego, “The Poker Brat”, burst onto the stage. Hellmuth’s extended tirade, one of the most explosive of his career, made the rounds on social media and had players talking at the tables in the Rio for days. Hellmuth then spent the better part of the next 24 hours tweeting apologies, making amends, and insisting he could do better. And he did do better. It didn’t take long for Hellmuth to regroup from that chaos and get back to work with a renewed focus on his mantra of positivity. “I told myself no swearing tirades, no threats…now I swore a little bit and I’m sure the camera caught it but it was a lot mellower because I went too far the other day.” When reflecting on what took place over the past week, Hellmuth likened the uproar to his 2018 feature table clash with James Campbell. In that, an angry Hellmuth “folded kinda out of turn” and it cost Campbell an important hand. To make up for it, Hellmuth bought Campbell into the Main Event for the next year. “There were like 2000 negative tweets about what an asshole I was,” he said. “It was a record. And then four days later I won a bracelet and there were 3000 positive tweets. So I told my wife, I said ‘Honey, all this negative press it feels like 2018' where I’m just going to pop a bracelet and turn most the stuff back to positivity.” “And that’s what happened…but I think it’s kind of weird.” With Hellmuth finally breaking through for number 16, he insists that he’s going to spend very little time before working on what’s next. He’s planning on taking a day off, showing up for a bracelet ceremony, and then getting back to the bracelet chase “immediately.” “I’ve always said I’m going to win 24 bracelets. I started saying that in 1993 and then [Phil] Ivey said he might win 30. I just have this weird sense that I’ll win at least 24 bracelets…but they’re not that easy to win in the mixed games." Hellmuth throws out Ivey’s name as, maybe, the one player with a shot to catch his WSOP gold bracelet record. However, it will likely take a great deal of time before any player even makes a credible push in that arena, if ever. Of course, Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey, and Johnny Chan each have 10 bracelets, but Brunson is effectively retired from playing WSOP events and Chan is not as active as he once was. There was speculation that Ivey might (and still may) show up to this World Series of Poker now that his legal troubles in the U.S. are behind him - but he has yet to make an appearance. Those factors make Hellmuth’s 16th an even bigger gap for those who would have an eye on catching him. With five cashes, four final tables, and a bracelet in hand, Hellmuth states that this “has to be” the best start to a series in his career. And, that in addition to getting to work on number 17, he’s going to take aim at the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year title. It’s something he thinks is well within reach, especially with his recent success in mixed games. “I think because I don’t have enough mixed game bracelets, I haven’t really been getting my due in these games,” he said. “You know, I’ve just kind of exploded in the last 10 tournaments.” “I’m showing everybody, hey, I’m pretty good.”
  15. It took just one week for the 2021 World Series of Poker to settle into a routine. After the initial chaos of the early events with their long lines and sometimes slow-paced verification processes, the vibe at the Rio found its stride with big names winning bracelets, shot takers living their dream, and a historic blow-up we all saw coming. Week two brought back a very familiar feel to the WSOP, even under the “current conditions.” From packed fields of poker's brightest stars to an old-fashioned dose (or two) of drama, things remained lively throughout the week. With that, let’s check out the five biggest storylines from Week 2 of the World Series of Poker. #1. Hellmuth Melts Down, Wants To Burn It Down The question of whether Phil Hellmuth would win WSOP gold bracelet #16 before he lost control has been answered. This week, Hellmuth was at the third final table of his first five events and took the chip lead into the final day of the $10K Stud. The entire poker world tuned in to see if he would make history - and he most certainly did. Just not by winning a bracelet. Hellmuth saw his chip lead slip away and, as his stack tumbled, his #POSITIVITY absolutely crumbled. Then it happened - he finally freaked out. (Note: there’s an eff-ton of eff-bombs in this video so fair warning) https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1447982387619528709?s=20 After losing a key pot to eventual winner Anthony Zinno, Hellmuth had a full-on meltdown. Hurling insults, swear words, and a few self-congratulatory comments. He jokingly threatened to “burn this motherf***ing place down” if he didn’t end up winning. He even re-introduced himself to the table, asking if this table even knew who he was?! For poker purists, like commentator Norman Chad, Hellmuth clearly crossed the line. https://twitter.com/NormanChad/status/1447979843811823619?s=20 For pure entertainment value, it was a historic, epic Hellmuth “Poker Brat” moment. It was an all-timer for sure and “burn it down” is going to rival “idiot from Northern Europe” in future memes. https://twitter.com/HunterGrouse/status/1448075867004022787?s=20 Once he calmed down, Hellmuth took to Twitter, issued as much of an apology as he could muster, and took his medicine. He even retweeted some of the harshest comments directed at him (see above). But for poker as a whole, this is another love-it-or-hate-it moment from the WSOP. And wherever you fall, this is for certain, this moment is one we won’t forget anytime soon. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1448431418762088448?s=20 https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1448544952162553856?s=20 #2. Misguided Man Enters the Ladies Event In case you hadn’t seen our op-ed published earlier - here’s a link. The facts are that a poker player from Minneapolis decided to be the sole man to pay the $10,000 entry fee and play the Ladies Event. He claimed it was all to raise money for unspecified women’s charities, even though in order to make any money, he would have needed to have a final table finish of eighth place or better. As should be expected the decision was met with plenty of backlash, including from some of the women who played in the event. The player ended up not making the money and according to reports, the announcement of elimination was met with plenty of cheers. As of this writing, the player has not spoken more about his experience or if he plans on making donations to women’s charities despite finishing out of the money. More importantly, the event drew a field of 643 women, including top-tier pros Jennifer Shahade, Sofia Lovgren, Jamie Kerstetter, Melanie Weisner, Elena Stover, and J.J. Liu who made the final table. https://twitter.com/JenShahade/status/1447642272221184001?s=20 https://twitter.com/thegroupie/status/1447682599426531328?s=20   The final table of the Ladies Event can be watched for free on YouTube. #3. Big Names Add Bracelets To Resume The deeper into the series, the most notable names have been emerging with new gold bracelets to add to their trophy case. Over the course of the past seven days, John Monette picked up his fourth career WSOP victory after besting Nate Silver in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship for $245,680. Days later it was Anthony Zinno grabbing his third bracelet in the aforementioned $10K Stud where he overtook a talented final table including Hellmuth, Poker Hall of Fame member Jack McClelland, and Stephen Chidwick. Zinno took home more than $182K with the win. Mixed game specialist Dylan Linde can be taken off the “best without a bracelet” list as he grabbed gold in the $1,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo for $170,269. Finally, longtime grinder DJ Alexander found a way to to the end of the $1,000 Flip & Go to earn some hardware of his own plus the $180,655 first-place prize. That’s leads us to… #4. Flip and Go Madness For the better part of two days, you couldn’t look at social media from the World Series of Poker without seeing the crowds that gathered in the single table satellite area of the Pavilion, hoping to flip their way into the money of the $1,000 Flip and Go event sponsored by GGPoker. READ: Fast and Furious Flip and Go Event Incites Action At The WSOP Daniel Negreanu lit the fuse and soon thereafter people were lining up to pay $1,000 to try and win a single hand in order to advance to the money round. For some, it was one and done. But for a couple of big-name pros, the quest to win the flip became costly. The event was polarizing with plenty of detractors feeling like it was a rake trap and added to the narrative that the WSOP was cheapening the brand by allowing people to “flip for a bracelet.” However, there were also plenty of accounts of people embracing the madness and adrenaline that came with leaning into the luck factor in order to advance. #5. Drama Returns to the Rio The World Series of Poker is in full swing so is the drama that comes with it. Of course, there’s the aforementioned Hellmuth explosion and “Man Entering Ladies Event”, which are their own stories. However, other mini-drama bombs have gone off this week, some of which have serious implications, some of which are just reminders of the kind of spats that take place when highly competitive players are fighting for massive prize pools. The first took place when poker pro Adam Hendrix tweeted out an issue that he heard about where an unnamed poker pro was entered in an event, sat down, and was waiting for the event to start but decided to unregister. Then later, that player re-registered (which is standardly against the rules). When that player turned out to be Kelly Minkin who unreg’d for a variety of reasons and only re-registered hours later, the air was cleared and the social media spat was squashed. Here’s a taste of the back-and-forth: https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446585726372499456?s=20 https://twitter.com/The_Illest/status/1446595732065042436?s=20 https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446656678041055235?s=20 While that gave Poker Twitter some good reads for a few hours, Shaun Deeb encountered a much more serious scenario when he woke up, with what he said, was someone in his hotel room. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1447215029758033922?s=20 Deeb’s been mum about the incident since, not saying what if anything was taken. Thankfully, he’s fine and was spotted at the tables soon thereafter.
  16. Chance Kornuth won his third World Series of Poker bracelet as the self-confessed Short Deck novice won the $10,000-entry event to claim the $194,670 top prize. With a talented selection of six top players returning to the felt in the Thunderdome for the final table, Kornuth got the better of Chad Campbell heads-up as the final duel ended in the poker professional and coaching expert’s favor in dramatic fashion. Kornuth Claims Dramatic Victory Against Campbell The final table of six kicked off with Kornuth in a slim lead over Chad Campbell as the half dozen final table players battled to a winner under the lights. There was a quick bust-out to kick the action off as Thomas Kysar, who came into the action with the shortest stack, busted in sixth place for $32,437 with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Td"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"] as the board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] gave the chip leader two pair to further boost his stack ahead of just four remaining opponents. Next to go was Joao Vieira as the Portuguese player was eliminated by Campbell just a few hands later. Vieira jammed with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] and was called by Campbell with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"]. On the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"], Campbell made two-pair and Vieira missed turn and river to bust for $42,885 in fifth place. With four players remaining, a lot of play took place without anyone losing their stack. Kornuth and Campbell traded places at the top, but neither Dan Shak or fourth-place finisher Moshe Gabay could make any in-roads into their advantage and it was no surprise when Gabay lost his stack next for $58,601. The manner of Gabay’s exit was, however, a shock. Calling Shak’s shove, Gabay was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="As"] and ahead of Shak’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] was a sensational one, however, as while it kept Gabay ahead, it offered Shak the chance of a straight flush, which he duly hit on the [poker card="8c"] turn. The [poker card="Jh"] was insignificant in the extreme and Shak chipped up at Gabay’s expense. Despite winning that hand, Shak couldn’t threaten the leaders and bowed out in third after a courageous run. All-in with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="Js"] gave Kornuth a vital pot to send him into heads-up with a lead of 2.6 million chips to Campbell’s 1.4 million. Shak, meanwhile, went to the rail with a score of $82,678. Heads-up, Kornuth took very little time to emerge victorious, after the shortest battle of the final table. On a board showing [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"], Campbell raise-shoved with [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"] and Kornuth called with a flopped full house, holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"]. The river of [poker card="7d"] ended the event and Kornuth could celebrate his third WSOP title with the bracelet and $194,670 top prize, while Campbell commiserated himself with the runner-up result worth $120,316. Kornuth’s title will feel even sweeter as he proved to his wife Emily that he was able to do it based on some YouTube learning. https://twitter.com/Srirachaaa/status/1449597512495419398 WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Final Table Results: Chance Kornuth - $194,670 Chad Campbell - $120,316 Dan Shak - $82,678 Moshe Gabay - $58,601 Joao Vieira - $42,885 Thomas Kysar - $32,437 Dylan Weisman Gets His First Gold In Event #28, Dylan Weisman sealed a memorable victory in the $1,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha tournament for a top prize of $166,461. Weisman is a name well-known to PLO players, coaching on the popular Upswing Poker site and he utilized his stack advantage over the field to maximum effort in winning his debut WSOP bracelet. Just five players came back to the final table to play out the conclusion of the event, with Weisman holding a big lead coming into the action. Weisman had almost as many chips as his two closest challengers combined and ran over the table to become champion. Before long had elapsed, Weisman had half the chips at the table and watched on as Tim Van Loo busted Ran Niv of Israel in fifth place for $40,109. Van Loo might have been hoping to put those chips to good use, but he was the next to leave, ousted by Alexander Yen in fourth place for $54,230. It was a remarkable run for Van Loo, as not only was it his first appearance at a WSOP final table, but his first World Series cash of any kind, and the young German will be one to watch based on this event. His conqueror in the final hand, Yen, busted in third place for $74,239 in the pivotal hand of the final. Yen’s set of eights was crushed by Weisman’s set of nines and when both players improved to a full house on the board, Weisman knocked out his more dangerous rival in terms of chips. Craig Chait only had 1.7 million to Weisman’s stack of almost 20 million, so it was no surprise when Chait was busted in the runner-up position for $102,884. Weisman’s victory was worth $166,461 and in taking down the tournament, he won his first-ever gold bracelet, to the delight of his many fans and friends on the rail. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Dylan Weisman - $166,461 Craig Chait - $102,884 Alexander Yen - $74,239 Tim Van Loo - $54,230 Ran Niv - $40,109 Chase Fujita - $30,040 Manan Bhandari - $22,787 Youness Barakat - $17,510 Hellmuth In Position For 4th Final Table Phil Hellmuth will go into his fourth final day of an event this World Series, and with the Poker Brat holding over a million chips, there’s a chance the controversial star wins bracelet #16 tomorrow. With only Rep Porter (1,129,000) bagging up more chips than Hellmuth, who totalled 1,016,000 at the close of play, the Poker Brat will be putting on a charm offensive ahead of the final day. A little further back sits Dario Sammartino (800,000) who finished as runner-up in the last live, authentic Las Vegas WSOP Main Event in 2019. Sammartino isn’t the only other big-name chasing down Porter and Hellmuth at the top of the leaderboard. Chris Vitch (447,000), Jake Schwartz (398,000) and Ryan Riess (266,000) will all harbor hopes of victory as they battle for the bracelet on the final day of another prestigious mixed game event, with stars such as Rok Gostisa, Ali Imsirovic and Melanie Weisner all missing out during Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #31 $1,500 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Day Chipcounts: Rep Porter - 1,129,000 Phil Hellmuth - 1,016,000 Kenji Faris - 840,000 Dario Sammartino - 800,000 Jason Papastavrou - 666,000 Jason Lipiner - 663,000 Kevin Gerhart - 581,000 Chris Vitch - 447,000 Jake Schwartz - 398,000 Ryan Riess - 266,000 Ryan Leng, Dylan Linde Score Monster Stacks The massive Monster Stack field was grown to a total of 3,520 players on Day 1b, with 1,219 players making the Day 2 seat draw through both Day 1a (518) and Day 1b (701). The biggest chipstack on Day 1b belonged to Rajaee Wazwaz (510,500), with Pavel Plesuv (483,500) and 2021 bracelet winner Ryan Leng (473,000) the nearest to overtaking the leader at the close of play. Others such as Dylan Linde (443,000), Andrew Neeme (304,500), Upeshka De Silva (219,000), Jesse Sylvia (129,000), Cate Hall (125,000), Ari Engel (108,000) and Ronnie Bardah (75,000) all making the cut. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Rajaee Wazwaz - 510,500 Pavel Plesuv - 483,500 Ryan Leng - 473,000 Mitchell Collins - 465,000 Dylan Linde - 443,000 Francois Pirault - 440,500 Joshua Gordon - 440,500 Yeon Bae - 433,500 La Sengphet - 428,000 Matthew Eng - 424,500 Brian Hastings, Maria Ho In $3K H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Finally, in Event #32, 154 players survived from a Day 1 field of 282 who took part. Lithuanian player Vincas Tamasauskas leads the way with 197,000 chips, from top 10 players such as Brian Hastings (178,400), Maria Ho (169,400), and David Williams (168,900). Elsewhere, John Monnette (120,600), Yuri Dzivielevski (105,800), Ari Engel (95,100), Ryan Laplante (59,000), and John Racener (52,500) all made Day 2 in good chip health, while players such as Frank Kassela, Shaun Deeb, Norman Chad, Mike Matusow, and Chino Rheem all crashed out before the end of the first day. WSOP 2021 Event #32 $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Vincas Tamasauskas - 197,000 John Fahmy - 188,700 Brian Hastings - 178,400 Daryl Aguirre - 174,600 Sachin Bhargava - 173,300 George Alexander - 169,700 Maria Ho - 169,400 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 169,400 David Williams - 168,900 Paramjit Gill - 139,500 Maria Ho, who made it through in seventh place on the leaderboard, revealed her tactics as she made her way from the Rio after a successful day’s work at the felt. https://twitter.com/MariaHo/status/1449534894325977090 Finally, it’s still a few weeks until the WSOP Main Event kicks off, but Phil Hellmuth has kicked off some speculation about his ‘entrance outfit after posting this picture of some old classics. We’ll take some action on a green-blue tracksuit with the number ‘456’ in the corner. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1449148701247639559
  17. On Friday night, the World Series of Poker announced two new starting flights for the 2021 Main Event have been added to the schedule as a response to the news that the United States will be easing international travel restrictions on November 8. Earlier in the day, it was reported that fully vaccinated international travelers, who have previously been unable to enter the country without a two-week quarantine in another country, will be able to directly enter the U.S. starting on November 8. The re-opening of U.S. travel includes international flights as well as being able to cross the border via Mexico or Canada by land. With the proposed reopening planning at, essentially, the same time as the Main Event, WSOP officials reacted swiftly. https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1449222309277933575?s=20 The first of the flights will take place on Monday, November 8 (Day 1E) with a start time of 11 AM. The final starting flight kicks off on Tuesday, November 9 (Day 1F) at noon local time. However, late registration is available all the way through 3:40 PM on Wednesday, November 10 (Day 2CEF). Of course, players are required to be fully vaccinated. They need to provide proof for both international travel as well as to participate in the series. Additionally, international visitors will also need to provide a negative coronavirus test three days prior to travel. Full vaccination is achieved two weeks after receiving the second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or two weeks after the single Johnson & Johnson shot. For a look at the complete new Main Event schedule, click here. https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1449228022226112514?s=20
  18. Two new WSOP bracelet winners were crowned as Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Championship and Dalibor Dula won a $1,000 Freezeout event, with more gold grabbed by first-timers in both cases. Eisenberg Stages Epic Comeback to Triumph Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Event final table as she triumphed as an against-the-odds short stack to defeat Debora Brooke heads-up for the title. The final day began with just five players remaining, but JJ Liu left the action early. Liu moved all-in on the turn of a board showing [poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Jc"] with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Js"] but was called by Brooke with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jd"] and the [poker card="Th"] river couldn’t save her, leaving Liu to collect her $26,458 prize. Diane Cooley busted in fourth place for $36,269 after her shove on the turn ended in failure to double. The board was [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="6s"] when Cooley pushed all-in with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"], but Lara Eisenberg had turned the flush with [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] and after the [poker card="4c"] river, held the chip lead. In the commentary booth, WSOP legend Lon McEachern shared the mike with Jamie Kerstetter and Hollywood actress Jennifer Tilly, who also knows a thing or two about winning at poker. https://twitter.com/JenniferTilly/status/1448847044651601928 Next to go was the overnight chip leader Mikiyo Aoki, who had doubled up Eisenberg when her ace-queen was shot down by the eventual winner’s ace-king. Aoki was on the rial in third place for $50,525 when her shove with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"] was called by Eisenberg with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] and the board played out [poker card="Td"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"]. Heads-up, Eisenberg had almost double her opponent’s chips, and gradually increased her lead until Brooke had just 1.8 million to the leader’s 11.1 million. At that point, Eisenberg shoved on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="2s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Tc"] with Brooke calling and showing down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"]. Eisenberg had [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"], however, and that kicker played to leave Brooke with the runner-up prize of $71,507 and Eisenberg holding the bracelet and winning the top prize of $115,694. WSOP 2021 Event #22 Ladies Championship Final Table Results: Lara Eisenberg - $115,694 Debora Brooke - $71,507 Mikiyo Aoki - $50,525 Diana Cooley - $36,269 JJ Liu- $26,458 Qing Lu - $19,619 Marle Cordeiro - $14,791 Cherish Andrews - $11,341 Tiffany Lee - $8,847 Thi Nguyen - $7,023 Dalibor Dula Wins Against All-American Opponents Just one player wasn’t American who reached the final table of Event #26, the $1,000-entry freezeout, but that player - Dalibor Dula from the Czech Republic - won the bracelet and $199,227. With only nine players making the final table, Maurice Hawkins and Levi Klump were both eliminated in the same hand as Hawkins shoved for less than a big blind with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jd"], Maxx Coleman re-shoved with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] and Levi Klump called off his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"] immediately put Coleman into the lead and it stayed that way through the [poker card="7h"] turn and [poker card="5s"] river, seeing Hawkins win $17,270 and Klump claim $22,080 for making it one rung higher up the ladder. Just a couple of minutes later, Nicolo Audannio was on the rail in seventh place for $28,565. Audannio moved all-in pre-flop for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8c"] and was called by the initial raiser in the hand, Cole Ferraro with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="9d"] provided no salvation for Audannio and he left as play went six-handed. Anthony Askey was busted in sixth place for $37,393 when his [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"] were up against Edward Welch’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] and saw a flop of two kings and a jack decimate his stack. In the next hand, Askey’s few remaining chips went in with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] and lost to Cole Ferraro’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4h"]. It was high roller Maxx Coleman who busted in fifth place for $49,519 when his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Th"] was shot down by Ferraro’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"] on a board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] which gave the latter a flush on the turn, while Guowei Zhang busted in fourth for $66,335 when he lost tow coinflips in a row to depart, with Dula winning the first and most valuable one wit [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] hitting against Zhang’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. Three-handed play saw Welch eliminated with his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2d"] dominated and defeated by Ferraro’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ts"], with the board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"] cruelly offering Welch hope on the flop then denying him on 4th and 5th streets. Both men held the lead during a rollercoaster heads-up battle, but eventually, Dula led and Ferraro and he were both under 20 big blinds. When Dula moved all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"], Ferraro called it off with just [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8c"], but couldn’t get lucky on the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qc"] board. WSOP 2021 Event #26 $1,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Table Results: Dalibor Dula - $199,227 Cole Ferraro - $123,142 Edward Welch - $89,875 Guowei Zhang - $66,335 Maxx Coleman - $49,519 Anthony Askey - $37,393 Nicolo Audannio - $28,565 Levi Klump - $22,080 Maurice Hawkins - $17,270 Jaffe, Racener, Hall Make $5K Six-Max Final Table The final table of the $5,000-entry Six-Handed Event #25 has been reached and after a day of drama, it was Eric Tsai (8,040,000) who grabbed the chip lead by the close of play. Tsai finished just a short distance ahead of Scott Ball, who bagged up 7,820,000, with Jonathan Jaffe coming into the final third in chips with 6,170,000. Bin Weng (3,980,000), Galen Hall (2,245,000), and John Racener are all a little shorter-stacked, but all have a wealth of experience to draw on as the final six race to a winner on Friday. Elsewhere in the event, players such as Yuri Dzivielevski (30th for $17,995), Frank Kassela (25th for $17,995), Daniel Negreanu (22nd for $21,838) and Nick Petrangelo (13th for $27,150) all made the money but not the business end of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #25 $5,000 Six-Handed NLHE Final Table Chipcounts: Eric Tsai - 8,040,000 Scott Ball - 7,820,000 Jonathan Jaffe - 6,170,000 Bin Weng - 3,980,000 Galen Hall - 2,245,000 John Racener - 1,950,000 Anthony Zinno Leads $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. On Day 2 of the $1,500-entry H.O.R.S.E. Event #27, Anthony Zinno performed at a high level to dominate the day at the felt. Zinno built a massive chip lead with 18 players remaining, with 2,565,000 chips putting him in a commanding lead at the end of the day’s play. At one point, Zinno had twice his nearest challenger’s chips, but Kao Saechao caught up a little to end the day second in chips on 1,495,000, while others to make the top half of the chip counts included Randy Ohel (1,040,000) and Max Pescatori (850,000). With players such as former WSOP Main Event winner Joe McKeehen (835,000) and Ari Engel (300,000) both on Pescatori’s table on Day 3, the action will be intense as players battle towards the top prize of $160,636. With the bubble bursting on Day 2, some players weren’t lucky enough to make any profit or claim vital WSOP Player of the Year points, with Phil Hellmuth, Chino Rheem and Barry Greenstein all finishing outside the money. Others, such as Shaun Deeb, Brian Hastings, Jason Somerville, and Allen Kessler all made the money places but failed to reach the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #27 $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Anthony Zinno - 2,565,000 Kao Saechao - 1,495,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,355,000 Darren Kennedy - 1,330,000 Paul Holder - 1,160,000 Randy Ohel - 1,040,000 Michael Rosenberg - 930,000 Christopher Adams - 920,000 Max Pescatori - 850,000 Joe McKeehen - 835,000 $1K PLO Gets Underway Two more events took place at the Rio on Day 15, with Event #28, the $1,000 PLO 8-Handed tournament seeing 14 hours of gameplay across a mammoth Day 1. With 1,069 total entries, just 59 players ended the night with chips after over 94% of the field fell by the wayside. Ryan Gibson grabbed the chip lead and will go into the second and final day with high hopes of winning the bracelet, piling up 1,940,000 chips as the leader. Alex Yen is Gibson’s closest challenger on 1,314,000 chips, with Jonathan Therme (1,033,000) third in chips. With such a fast-paced day, a lot of players busted before the 161st place player began to earn money. Luminaries such as Daniel Negreanu, Tom McEvoy, Ryan Laplante, Dylan Linde and Sam Razavi all cashed, but missed out on the second day. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 PLO 8-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Gibson - 1,940,000 Alexander Yen - 1,314,000 Jonathan Therme - 1,033,000 Dylan Weisman - 937,000 Michael Perrone - 750,000 Casey Carroll - 680,000 Craig Chait - 664,000 Tegnear Butler - 553,000 Gabe Ramos - 550,000 Youness Barakat - 539,000 Kornuth, Koon Make $10K Short Deck Day 2 Ye Shen bagged the chip lead with 361,400 chips after eight levels of play on the first day of Event #29, with players such as Dan Shak (320,500), Chance Kornuth (262,000), and Jason Koon (235,400) all making the top 10 chip counts on a busy Day 1 in Event #29. With 59 entries being reduced to just 19 players, there are five former WSOP bracelet winners in the hunt for another, with Joao Vieira (199,100), Dan Zack (125,800), Stephen Chidwick (119,500) Daniel Negreanu (95,000), and Ben Yu (73,000) all hoping to go for gold again. WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Top 10 Chipcounts: Ye Shen - 361,400 Young Ko - 340,000 Chad Campbell - 326,300 Dan Shak - 320,500 Chance Kornuth - 262,000 Moshe Gabay - 251,100 Jason Koon - 235,400 Thomas Kysar - 231,000 Joao Vieira - 199,100 Daniel Zack - 125,800 Finally, players of all levels meet and greet at the 2021 World Series of Poker and to prove it, Kid Poker himself, Daniel Negreanu, showed what happens when you meet someone with a common interest. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1448832619790036992
  19. This article is an op-ed. The opinions expressed in this article are the author’s own. I was surprised, but not shocked, on Monday when I saw on social media that a man decided to play in this year's World Series of Poker Ladies Event. Minnesota-based poker player Tom Hammers paid the $10,000 entry fee (rather than the discounted $1,000 buy-in available to women) to take a seat so he could, in his words, play for charity and “help women in general.” However, even if Hammers had good intentions by circumventing the obvious will of the WSOP and entering the Ladies Event, his misguided action reeks of condescension, bringing negative attention to an otherwise traditionally fun event, and leaves him as an outlier sucking up the spotlight. While one can’t be certain, it’s safe to say that if the law would allow, the World Series of Poker would restrict the Ladies Event to women and those who identify as such. The law in Nevada prohibits the WSOP from exclusion based on gender so in order to try and de-incentivize men from playing, a few years back they raised the buy-in to $10,000 and give women a discount to $1,000. As if the fact that it’s called the Ladies Event weren’t enough, the 10x buy-in for men should be a clear signal that, like the Seniors Event, the series would like to have this event be a special one for a specific group. I have yet to hear of a compelling reason to have a male enter the Ladies Event. Prop bet? Unfunny. Sexist? Sad. Nothing else to play that day? Lazy. Now, charity. Who doesn’t love charity? Charity sounds great. And Hammers laid out a plan in which he would play to raise money with any potential winnings for two unspecified woman’s charities “One for a battered women’s shelter, and maybe a homeless women’s type thing..”. No guarantees. As if a surefire $10,000 donation wouldn’t be enough. Hammers, who has Hendon Mob results dating back to 2004 and is a longtime member of the poker community, must have thought that his entering the Ladies Event was worth so much more than the $10,000 he had in hand. He must have thought that he should spend the $10k to enter the event - being well aware of how it would be perceived and the headlines it would bring - in order to make even more (which would require him to make the final table, finishing in at least 8th) which he would then donate. He was the guy to do this. He must have thought that disrupting the event, even disrupting the experience in the slightest for the women who played it, was going to be worth it. Or maybe he didn't think about any of that. Many on social media vouch for Hammers as being one of poker’s good guys. He’s called a “super nice guy”, “literally one of the best possible humans anyone could meet”, and a “true gentleman.” And perhaps he is. Which would make his decision even more confounding. Is that why he thought it was ok? He’s so well-known, well-liked that women - who are expecting that in just one tournament in the entire 98 bracelet event schedule, they could have a single event to themselves - would grant him the exception and be so stoked to have him. Is it a win-win because of the $10,000 juicing of the prize pool? Was that a donation? If so, he could have bought in and blinded off. Just walked away and thanked the women for being a part of the poker community. He could have offered a cash prize to the winner or an extra $1,000 to the final ten. He never had to play a hand. Am I wrong? I’m happy to be wrong here. Help me understand where the selflessness comes in. Help me understand how there are not five different ways Hammers could have chosen the platform of the Ladies Event to contribute or bring awareness to women’s causes without being a disturbance to the event. Without having to play. The notion that “not everyone was thrilled” or that him playing for charity brought "different vibes" is downplaying the insult that some of these women must feel whenever a man ignores the title of Ladies Event and opts to put themselves above that community just because they can - even if it’s “all in the name of charity.” https://twitter.com/KatieStonePoker/status/1447786587199348737?s=20 In the end, Hammers busted. Sorry charity, no winnings this year. But I have hope that Hammers is the good guy that his friends vehemently support and that when all is said and done he will find another way, perhaps while the event is still going on, to research the women’s charities “type things” he’s passionate about and make an actual donation in the name of the Ladies Event.
  20. The latest winner of a WSOP bracelet is Dylan Linde after the mixed game specialist and author of books on the subject proved he knows how to use those skills in real life too. Linde triumphed in the $1,500-entry Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Event #21 to bag his first WSOP gold bracelet and the top prize of $170,269. Dylan Linde Scores First Bracelet Heading into the final table, Linde had the shortest stack of the eight players, with Hernan Salazar the leader. That change across a lengthy final table, where Linde went from short stack to bracelet winner. Michael Lim busted in eighth place for $14,104, before a protracted period saw a lot of chip movement and a dinner break for the remaining seven players. When play resumed, Salazar had a massive lead. Post-dinner, however, things were about to get much busier and players such as Lance Sobelman (7th for $18,740), Ryan Roeder (6th for $25,424), and Damjan Radanov ($35,204) all lost their route to WSOP glory. With four players remaining, David Matsumoto lost his tournament life in Big O as Linde chipped up again with a full house of tens full of fours. That gave Linde the chip lead, and while Hernan Salazar managed to go into the heads-up battle with 6.7 million chips after taking Day 1 and 2 chip leader Scott Abrams out in third place, Linde had almost 9.3 million chips and won pot after pot to conquer his opponent with a brief but dominant heads-up display. WSOP 2021 Event #21 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Final Table Results: Dylan Linde - $170,269 Hernan Salazar - $105,235 Scott Abrams - $71,651 David Matsumoto - $49,733 Damjan Radanov - $35,204 Ryan Roeder - $25,424 Lance Sobelman - $18,740 Michael Lim - $14,104 Final Five In The Milly Maker In the $1,500 Millionaire Maker, the final 20 players played down to just five final table players, with tomorrow’s final table set to make one of the finalists an overnight millionaire. It is Daniel Lazrus who leads the field with a massive stack of 60 million chips, almost double his nearest challenger as the popular American looks to bag his second bracelet of 2021 after conquering the WSOP Online Series earlier this year. Of the five remaining players, only Belgium’s Michael Gathy has won a WSOP bracelet before, but he will be a big danger to the other four players, having won four bracelets in his career to date. Day 4 took just under six hours to reduce the field by 75%, and early bust-outs were commonplace. Players such as Li Zhou, Nabil Cardoso and Luis Zedan busted after no time at all, with both Gathy and Lazrus eliminating a player each. Another player to thrive on Day 4 of the mammoth event was Ignacio Moron, thanks in no small part to a stunning hand where he was all-in pre-flop with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kc"] against Dien Le’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"]. The board of [poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="Kh"] saw Moron make a set of kings on the river to prevail and at that point, he drew almost level with Lazrus at the top of the leaderboard. It continued in that fashion for some time, with Lazrus and Moron continuing to battle with each other as they both built stacks bigger than anyone else. Lazrus briefly lost the lead, but grabbed it right back as he busted Arie Kliper in 12th place for $53,245, Lazrus’ [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qd"] triumphing against [poker card="As"][poker card="Th"] when a queen on the flop gave him a set and Kliper whiffed two streets at Broadway. From there, Lazrus piled up the overwhelming chip lead that he had into the final with, but there was a big win elsewhere as the Day 1b chip leader Stephen Song was ousted from the tournament by four-time winner Gathy. Song was all-in from the small blind with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] and Gathy called from the big blind with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"] to see a ten-high board land him an important pot. Gathy would win another big pot with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="9s"] on a board showing [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="5s"][poker card="8s"] as he bet-caled Philip Verel’s shove with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"], Gathy fading the [poker card="4h"] to eliminate the Day 3 chip leader in stunning fashion. With Gathy eventually bagging up 21.9 million, he is followed in the counts by Jeffrey Gencarelli (13.5 million) and Day 2 chip leader Darryl Ronconi (7.4 million). WSOP 2021 Event #17 $1,500 Millionaire Maker Final Table Chipcounts: Daniel Lazrus - 60,200,000 Ignacio Moron - 30,600,000 Michael Gathy - 21,900,000 Jeffrey Gencarelli - 13,500,000 Darryl Ronconi - 7,400,000 Event #22, otherwise known as the Ladies Championship, saw 10 levels of play leave just 10% of the 170-player field still in seats by the close of play, with Mikiyo Aoki (1,764,000) in the lead. Following her at the top of the leaderboard were JJ Liu (1,511,000), Crystal Marino (1,349,000) and Cherish Andrews (1,200,000), all of whom will be hoping to overtake the leader as the remaining 17 players race to the final table. Other players were not so fortunate to survive, with stars such as Day 1 chip leader Angelina Rich, Katerina Lukina, Jacquelyn Scott, Marsha Wolak, and Jamie Kerstetter all busting on Day 2. There will be a new bracelet winner whoever takes down the $115,694 top prize from here, with no former WSOP bracelets still in with a chance of victory. Patrick Leonard commented with an interesting take on the fact that a male player (Tom Hammers) played the event on Day 1 and planned to donate any money he won to a women’s charity. READ: There’s Never A Good Reason For A Man To Enter The Ladies Event https://twitter.com/padspoker/status/1448034206035103749 WSOP 2021 Event #22 Ladies NLHE Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Mikiyo Aoki - 1,674,000 JJ Liu - 1,511,000 Crystal Marino - 1,349,000 Cherish Andrews - 1,200,000 Lara Eisenberg - 1,049,000 Debora Brooke - 713,000 Marle Cordeiro - 685,000 Thi Nguyen - 659,000 Victoria Livschitz - 604,000 Amanda Baker - 568,000 Drinan In The Hunt For Second Series Bracelet Just 10 players will return to the Rio to battle for the bracelet in Event #23, the $1,500-entry Eight Game Mix, which plays out six-handed to the winner. Two tables of five will reconvene with Ryan Hughes in a commanding lead, holding 2,534,000 chips. Hughes leads from a man who has already won a WSOP bracelet this series, with Connor Drinan bagging up 1,990,000 chips. Elsewhere in the final day chip counts, Brett Shafer (800,000) and Daniel Zack (384,000) will begin knowing that their stack needs to grow quickly for them to have a chance of winning the gold. Players such as Michael Mizrachi, Yuri Dzivielevski and Scott Bohlman missed out on the final day, with five-time WSOP winner Mizrachi crashing out in 11th place $8,167) in Pot Limit Omaha when his straight draw didn’t make it against Drinan’s two-pair. WSOP 2021 Event #23 $1,500 Eight Game Mix 6-Handed Final Day Chipcounts: Ryan Hughes - 2,534,000 Connor Drinan - 1,990,000 Schuyler Thornton - 1,505,000 Tyler Willse - 1,165,000 Hunter Mcclelland - 1,110,000 George Alexander - 936,000 Brandon Bergin - 934,000 Brett Shaffer - 800,000 Ryan Leng - 770,000 Daniel Zack - 384,000 Liang Leads $600 PLO Deepstack In the $600-entry PLO Deepstack event, a massive field of 1,572 entries was whittled down to 236 players by the time the money bubble burst. Of those players, only 68 made it to Day 2, with Shen Liang (2,285,000) marginally ahead of the other big stack Ahmad Shiraz (2,165,000) at the top of the chip counts. Players such as Greg ‘Fossilman’ Raymer and WSOP Main Event runner-up David Williams also made the money, but couldn’t survive to Day 2, with only Joao Simao (510,000) and Andrew Donabedian (420,000) of the remaining players having won a WSOP bracelet before. Plenty of superstars who are yet to strike gold so far in their careers remain in the hunt, with YouTuber Andrew Neeme (440,000) just one of the five dozen still in seats and dreaming of glory. WSOP 2021 Event #24 $600 Pot Limit Omaha Deepstack Top 10 Chipcounts: Shen Liang - 2,285,000 Ahmad Shiraz - 2,165,000 Michael Prendergast - 1,890,000 Eric Polirer - 1,515,000 Donnie Phan - 1,515,000 Bosu Avunoori - 1,445,000 Daniel Wasserberg - 1,420,000 Maxx Coleman - 1,355,000 Emanuel Santiago - 1,350,000 Anthony Plotner - 1,295,000 $5K Six-Max Brought Out The Stars In Event #25, the $5,000-entry six-handed NLHE event that closed out the action on Day 13, a large number of well-known pros escaped the day to become one of the 192 players who survived from 578 entries. It was Scott Drobes who piled up the biggest pile of chips, sitting with 692,700 by the close of play. He was followed in the counts by Yosif Nawabi (490,100) and Antoine Goutard (477,500), both of whom will hope to eclipse the leader when play resumes. Other luminaries of the felt who survived included Jonathan Jaffe (425,000), Daniel Negreanu (245,000), Erik Seidel (130,300), Faraz Jaka (121,700), David Benyamine (101,100) and Maria Ho (57,000), with a stellar Day 2 packed with stars on the horizon. WSOP 2021 Event #25 $5,000 Six-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: Scott Drobes - 692,700 Yosif Nawabi - 490,100 Antoine Goutard - 477,500 Erwann Pecheux - 476,000 Jonathan Jaffe - 425,500 Arie Kliper - 417,500 Chance Kornuth - 388,300 Bin Weng - 374,100 Steven Morris - 357,100 Vincent Huang - 328,400 Phil Hellmuth faced something of a backlash on Day 13 of the 2021 World Series of Poker, with his outbursts on Day 12 provoking a complicit statement from The Poker Brat. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1448048708264742912 Finally, John Monette may have won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn already, but try telling his wife to be satisfied, especially after she spent so long rooting for him to win! https://twitter.com/DianaMonnette/status/1448088602844487682
  21. The World Series of Poker’s debut of the popular GGPoker Flip and Go format took place this weekend and, love it or hate it, the tournament and its opening flights brought some old-school action back to the players in the Rio. For the uninitiated, Event #20 ($1,000 FLIP & GO) worked like this: eight players at a table are each dealt three hole cards. Next, the dealer puts out the flop. After seeing the flop, every player chooses one card to throw away, leaving themselves with the two cards they think will have the best chance of surviving to the end. Once discarded, most players turned their hands face up as the dealer delivered the turn and the river. The best hand of the eight wins and that player advances into the money. If there’s a chopped pot, those players run it back until there is a single winner. From there, the tournament is played like a traditional event. Some call the quick-paced prelims the ultimate rec-friendly tournament, removing all of the time-intensive early play hurdles while delivering the thrill of late-stage play and the promise of a payday within minutes. Others, however, call it “flipping for a bracelet." Whichever side of the fence you sit on, it’s hard to deny that the Flip & Go brought a buzz to the Pavilion. At first glance, many thought that players had just a couple of shots at winning their flips. The two flights of the tournament on the official starting day, Sunday, October 10. But in reality, the Flip and Go played more like a Phase Tournament - whenever eight players were interested in flipping, they could get together in the single table satellite area of the Pavilion and hold their own opening stage. In fact, these on-demand flights were offered very early on in the series - as early as October 1. However, the word didn’t really get around until GGPoker ambassador Daniel Negreanu rallied the troops and decided to spend some time taking shots in them. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1446339035169886209?s=20 Like many other online Phase tournaments, where players are able to fire in as many opening flights as they’d like in order to bag chips for a Day 2, bankroll is a big consideration here. The consistent firing of on-demand tables had the look of the old school bracelet rebuys of years ago, back when Negreanu - with a virtually unlimited bankroll - would fire, take thin (or even -EV spots), and just to go broke so he could snap rebuy in order to get more chips on the table to win back later. It’s not apples-to-apples here. Once you advance you start equal to everyone else, but there is a bankroll threshold in this particular Flip and Go of just how many times will it take before you win that 8-handed all-in. And, for a recreational player, how many flips can you lose before they can no longer take any more shots. Once Negreanu sat down, the action heated up as captured by WSOP Social Media guru Kevin Mathers. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1446606036027117569?s=20 It was clear that once people got going, they were having a good time. Enough to want to take more shots. The fast-paced action is packed with adrenaline, knowing that if you win this one flip you are already in the money. But trying to get to the money phase turned out to be costly for a number of high-profile pros who found themselves on the negative side of variance and ended up being too long to be wrong. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1446620888816750597?s=20 https://twitter.com/KevinRobMartin/status/1446614893877084164?s=20 The criticism of bringing Flip & Go’s to the WSOP was not unexpected and, for traditionalists, understandable. For some, removing the skill edge and nuances of navigating the early stages of large-field tournaments and leaving it up to luck may feel like a betrayal of the game. However, to say that strategy is out the window in the first phase of a Flip & Go wouldn’t be accurate. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1447078276569055232?s=20 When all was said and done on Sunday, 155 players advanced. With a total of 1232 entries at $1,000 a pop, the prize pool swelled to just over $1.1 million. An impossible number without having run the on-demand single tables for days in advance. Estimates have it that in the two scheduled Sunday flights roughly 50 people advanced as compared to over 100 who advanced by grinding the single tables between Thursday through Sunday. https://twitter.com/dwpoker/status/1447343223844728832?s=20 The min-cash was $2,000, double your money. But for some, that’s barely going to make a dent in the damage it took to get there. For a player like David Williams, who, as noted above fired 19 times, nothing less than the final table in the Flip & Go was going to get him even. Unfortunately for him, while it goes down on record as a cash, a 117th place finish for $2,155, Williams will have to rely on his second-place finish in the $1,500 Seven Card Stud for $50,842 to get him out of the flippin’ hole. At the end of Day 1, just 23 players remained in the Flip & Go Event. The remaining runners will play down to a winner on Monday, October 11 with a first-place prize of more than $180,000. https://youtu.be/EVxoBPCGNP8
  22. Phil Hellmuth missed out on gold as another multiple bracelet winner got the better of him in the Seven Card Stud Championship, as Anthony Zinno won his third WSOP gold. Zinno’s victory for $182,872 saw him overtake the only man above him in the chipcounts, Phil Hellmuth, as the man going for title #16 crashed out in fourth place on a day of drama at the Rio. Zinno Wins Third Bracelet at Poker Brat's Expense Play got underway in the $10,000-entry Seven Card Stud Championship with Hellmuth holding the most chips, but it was a lead that would constantly change hands for some time. James Chen grabbed it by busting Jason Gola early in proceedings, Chen’s two pair good enough to oust the American in seventh place for £24,601. There was a prolonged period of play that saw no eliminations but was a huge factor in deciding the destiny of the gold. During it, Phil Hellmuth lost not only most of his stack but his temper too, as the newest chip leader three-time bracelet winner Anthony Zinno saw Hellmuth skitter his cards across the felt after Zinno made a flush. Clearly outraged, Hellmuth needed all of his powers of recovery to maintain his composure. After Stephen Chidwick busted in sixth place for $30,842, Jack McClelland’s run to fifth place saw the WSOP legend leave for a result worth $40,284. At that point, James Chen was looking like Zinno’s biggest threat, but Zinno was pulling away and when Hellmuth busted in fourth place for $54,730, bringing his series winnings up to over $235,000, Zinno had double the chips of both his opponents combined. Three-handed play lasted a long time, with both Chen and Jose Paz-Gutierrez jockeying for position behind the dominant Zinno. Eventually, it was Paz-Gutierrez who was defeated in third for $77,227 after his pair of nines couldn’t beat Chen’s flush. That sent Chen into the heads-up against Zinno for the bracelet, with the former bidding to equalize Zinno’s total of two WSOP titles. Instead, Zinno became the winner of his third WSOP gold bracelet when he got the better of Chen heads-up, after never relinquishing his lead to triumph and take the $182,872 top prize. Chen won $113,024 for finishing as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #19 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Results: Anthony Zinno - $182,872 James Chen - $113,024 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - $77,227 Phil Hellmuth - $54,730 Jack McClelland - $40,284 Stephen Chidwick - $30,842 Jason Gola - $24,601 After the action, Hellmuth paid tribute to Zinno’s success at the felt. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1447859654059433986 Peck Takes Heads-Up Victory Vladimir Peck won his first-ever World Series of Poker bracelet after the conclusion of the delayed Event #18, the $2,500-entry Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event. With both men ending an exhausting day at the felt on Sunday night with the final heads-up battle in the balance, it was Venkata Tayi who came into the final fight with the lead, holding 5,575,000 with Peck on 3,275,000 chips. Play began with more of the same as Tayi held Peck largely at arm’s length over the opening exchanges. That wasn’t the case when Peck made a wheel in A-5 Triple Draw, however, Peck’s hand turned the game around and a follow-up win in Badugi gave Peck a commanding 2:1 chip lead. Tayi slipped lower, doubled up but then found himself in the same position when he lost the final hand in 2-7 Triple Draw, seeing Peck win with a jack-low to seal the bracelet and finally eliminate the versatile and dogged Tayi at the last. Tayi cashed for $83,056 for finishing as runner-up, but it was Peck who won the $134,390 top prize and his debut WSOP gold bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #18 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Final Table Results: Vladimir Peck - $134,390 Venkata Tayi - $83,056 Joao Vieira - $57,558 Aaron Rogers - $40,443 Brian Yoon - $28,818 Hal Rotholz - $20,828 Carlos Rodriguez - $15,272 DJ Alexander Scores First Gold Bracelet in Flip & Go In Event #20, the first WSOP Flip & Go event saw plenty of drama as 23 players were reduced to a worthy winner as Dejuante ‘DJ’ Alexander took down the debut tournament and won his first bracelet to go with the $180,665 top prize. For much of the final day, it looked like American David Peters was on his way to what would have been a fourth WSOP bracelet. His exit, however, was one of a number of entertaining moments that completed the inaugural Flip & Go event in dramatic fashion. The day began with 23 players, but the field was swiftly reduced to a handful of hopefuls over a frenetic few opening exchanges. Players such as Alex Epstein, Jesse Solano, Krista Farrell, Elio Fox and Daniel Weinman all busted early on. WSOP Main Event final table player Vojtech Ruzicka busted in 10th place for $13,460 and the final table was set with Peters holding the chip lead. It was Koveh Waysei who busted first, his [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] unable to hold against Corey Bierria’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] after the flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qd"] turned around the hand. After the [poker card="9d"] turn and [poker card="Qh"] river, Bierria’s full house saw Waysei waylaid in ninth place for $16,895. It soon a seven-handed battle for the bracelet. Fred Goldberg lost his seat in eighth place for $21,435 when he correctly called off David Peters shove pre-flop. Peters had [poker card="Kh"][poker card="7s"], with Goldberg’s [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] a favorite to double up. But the board of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Th"][poker card="7d"] saw Peters river trips to eliminate Goldberg and further strengthen his grip on the chip lead. Rok Gostisa busted in seventh place for $27,495 when he lost a race with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"] against Jake Schwartz’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"], two kings coming on the flop to end the Slovenian’s chances of victory. Gostisa was closely followed from the room by Bierria, whose [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qx"] was no match for Jason Beck’s [poker card="Ac"][Qx], with a queen-high board insufficient for Bierria’s need to overtake his rival in order to survive. Bierria had cashed for $35,645 and the money was going up rapidly. Huy Lam had led the field into play but went in fifth place for $46,695 as his pocket nines were overtaken by Schwartz’s pocket threes as the American flopped quads to bust the Australian in brutal fashion. Four then became three when David Peters was taken out by the eventual winner, with the hand later identified as pivotal by the victorious Alexander. Peters moved all-in under the gun with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jc"] and it was Alexander who had a tricky call to make with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] in the big blind. If he had lost the pot, Alexander would have been left with just four big blinds, but he managed to make the call and won across a ten-high board to oust perhaps his most dangerous opponent at the perfect time, vaulting to a big chip lead in the process and leaving Peters on the rail with $61,815. Schwartz lost his tournament life in third place for $82,675 after his second pair was trumped by Beck’s turned flush, which gave Beck the lead heads-up, as he played 13.5 million to Alexander’s 11.3 million. It was a close fight, however, and it took almost no time at all to crown a winner. Beck’s three-bet to 3 million with [poker card="As"][poker card="4h"] saw Alexander move all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"] and when Beck made the call, he would need a lot of help to survive. The flop of [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="2h"] gave Beck no hope, but while the turn of [poker card="Ts"] gave his opponent Broadway, it opened up the chance of split pot if Beck could call in Alexander’s card of a jack. That didn’t happen, however, as the [poker card="5h"] river ended the event in Alexander’s favor, giving Beck the runner-up prize of $111,715 and crowning Alexander as the champion, with a top prize of $180,665 to go with his newly-acquired gold. WSOP 2021 Event #20 No Limit Hold'em Flip & Go Final Table Results: Dejuante Alexander - $180,665 Jason Beck - $111,715 Jake Schwartz - $82,675 David Peters - $61,815 Huy Lam - $46,695 Corey Bierria - $35,645 Rok Gostisa - $27,495 Fred Goldberg - $21,435 Koveh Waysei - $16,895 Milly Maker Down To 20 The Millionaire Maker field was trimmed from 170 to just 20 players on its Day 2 at the Rio, with Philip Verel bagging up the biggest stack and a massive 12,655,000 chips. Verel sits a short amount ahead of Daniel Lazrus, who has already won a WSOP bracelet in this summer’s online series and will be looking to fly high again when play resumes. Faraz Jaka was one of many players to bust later in the day, but was excited about crossing a million chips earlier in the event, summing up the excitement felt by every player who plays at the world Series of Poker. https://twitter.com/FarazJaka/status/1447414869242761217 Elsewhere in the event, players such as former four-time bracelet winner Michael Gathy survived with 9.8 million chips, while others such as Craig Varnell, Tristan Wade and Ryan Riess all departed. WSOP Event #17 $1,500 Millionaire Maker Top 10 Chipcounts: Philip Verel - 12,665,000 Daniel Lazrus - 11,795,000 Adam Sherman - 10,875,000 Michael Gathy - 9,800,000 Ignacio Moron - 9,585,000 Arie Kliper - 9,580,000 Jeffrey Gencarelli - 8,980,000 Stephen Song - 7,650,000 Todd Saffron - 6,400,000 Luis Zedan - 5,835,000 Daniel Negreanu In The Mix in Event #21 In the Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship, Scott Abrams bagged the chip lead with just 27 players left overnight. Abrams totalled 1,675,000 at the close of Day 2, leading the field just like he did at the end of Day 1 and was followed in the chipcounts by Jordan Spurlin (1,370,000) and Hernan Salazar (1,230,000). Elsewhere in the event, Daniel Negreanu made the cut, with Kid Poker bagging up 535,000 chips, while mixed games poker author and specialist Dylan Linde (470,000) and Ari Engel (305,000) both joined him in the Day 3 Seat Draw. Engel is looking to become the first player to win two of this year’s live WSOP 88 bracelets on offer with over 75% of the events taking place after this event he remains in. WSOP 2021 Event #21 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Scott Abrams - 1,675,000 Jordan Spurlin - 1,370,000 Hernan Salazar - 1,230,000 Ryan Roeder - 1,005,000 Charles Coultas - 985,000 Kosei Ichinose Japan - 890,000 Damjan Radanov - 850,000 Robert Redman - 840,000 Garrett Garvin - 730,000 Michael Kim - 710,000 Angelina Rich Leads The Ladies Event In the Ladies Championship, 644 entrants took to the felt with just 170 making it through to Day 2 of the popular annual event. Angelina rich (301,000) leads the ay from Lily Keletto (265,000) and Michell Ferranted (215,100), while other big names with stacks include Cherish Andrews (185,000), Jamie Kerstetter (160,000), and Ebony Kenney (91,000). Other hopefuls weren’t so fortunate to make it through to Day 2, such as Karina Jett, though the atmosphere in the event was cause for her and hundreds of others to post about the event on social media, identifying the unique appeal for poker fans of both sexes of this respected event on the schedule. https://twitter.com/KarinaJett/status/1447633740310597632 WSOP 2021 Event #22 Ladies NLHE Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Angelina Rich - 301,000 Lily Kiletto - 265,000 Michelle Ferrante - 215,100 Christina Gollins - 202,100 Dusti Smith - 197,400 Cherish Andrews - 185,000 Courtney Webb - 178,100 JJ Liu Taiwan - 168,000 Britt Williams - 155,600 Brittne Zobrist - 155,600 $1,500 Eight Game Mix Kicks Off Finally, Event #23 got underway, with the $1,500-entry six-max Eight Game Mix event seeing Sachin Bhargava bag the biggest stack, as he ended the day with 273,400 chips. Other players to bag a top 10 stack included former WSOP bracelet winner - and four-time runner-up - David Williams (175,200), with Michael Mizrachi (178,700) once again proving that mixed games are definitely his bag. Players to bust this event included Mike Gorodinsky, Daniel Ospina, Barry Greenstein, Robbie Strazynski, Greg Raymer, Connor Drinan, Jeremy Ausmus, and Calvin Anderson. WSOP 2021 Event #23 $1,500 Eight Game Mix Six-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: Sachin Bhargava - 273,400 David Gee - 237,200 Jay Kerbel - 231,600 Sean Perry - 189,000 Vasu Amarapu - 180,400 Michael Mizrachi - 178,700 David Williams - 175,200 Kevin Brewer - 171,600 Bradley Bragg - 171,300 David Prociak - 171,000 Finally, on a more serious note, former WSOP Player of the Year Shaun Deeb highlighted the importance of security after being awoken in the middle of the night by an unwelcome intruder. Keep those latches as tightly done up as your bag of chips at the end of the night. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1447215029758033922
  23. Phil Hellmuth is in pole position to make it ‘sweet sixteen’ as he has made it to the final table of the 19th event of the 2021 World Series of Poker with a chip lead in the Seven Card Stud Championship. Hellmuth, otherwise known as ‘The Poker Brat’, bagged up 751,000 to lead the final seven, with Anthony Zinno close behind him in the counts on 730,000 chips. Hellmuth, Chidwick, McCelland Make $10K Stud Final Table It’s not only Hellmuth who will go into the final day of action as a recognized face looking to win more gold. Stephen Chidwick (266,000) and Jack McClelland (185,000) may have fewer chips, but anything can happen and the chips can change very quickly in mixed games. With James Chen (660,000), Jose Paz-Gutierrez (586,000) and Jason Gola (542,000) all still in contention, it is bound to be an entertaining final session on Monday evening. On Day 2, just three players made the money as the top 10 were paid with Daniel Zack busted in 10th place by Stephen Chidwick for a result worth $16,262, George Alexander eliminated in 9th place for $17,828, and Scott Bohlman losing his tournament life in 8th place for $20,480. Both Alexander and Bohlman were taken out by Jason Gola as the night wound to a close. WSOP 2021 Event #19 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Phil Hellmuth - 751,000 Anthony Zinno - 730,000 James Chen - 660,000 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 586,000 Jason Gola - 542,000 Stephen Chidwick - 266,000 Jack McClelland - 185,000 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Event in the Balance as Early Hours End Play The $2,500-entry Mixed Triple Draw Lowball saw what should have been its final day end with heads-up on hiatus as Vladimir Peck and Venkata Tayi ended the action locked in a battle for the WSOP bracelet. The day began with 12 still in seats. Once play was down to the seven-handed final table, Brian Yoon had the chip lead, and several players were very short stacked. The lowest of the low was Carlos Rodriguez, who busted almost immediately in seventh place for $15,272 in A-5 Triple Draw, losing his stack to Joao Vieira. Hal Rotholz was the next player to depart, losing in 2-7 Triple Draw in a hand against Yoon and Venkata Tayi for a sixth-place prize of $20,828. He was followed from the event by Brian Yoon, but it was a protracted period of play that lasted beyond a dinner break and ended in a Badugi bust-out for $28,818 as Vieira again came out on top in the clash between the two remaining bracelet winners in the field. It was Badugi again that delivered Aaron Rogers from the event, as the American player fell victim to Vieira in fourth place for $40,443. Despite winning that hand, however, Vieira himself fell in third place for $57,558, albeit over an hour later. Losing in A-5 Triple Draw, Tayi was again the beneficiary, claiming a pot that gave him the leads heads-up with 5.3 million chips to Vladimir Peck’s 3.5 million. The heads-up battle that followed was so long that with the time approaching 3 am, both Peck and Tayi were asked if they wanted to play one more level or come back the next day. That level concluded with Peck on 3,275,000 chips, with Tayi in the lead on 5,575,000. Play will resume - and doubtless conclude - on Day 12 when the gold is finally won. WSOP 2021 Event #18 $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Final Table Results: 3rd - Joao Vieira - $57,558 4th - Aaron Rogers - $40,443 5th - Brian Yoon - $28,818 6th - Hal Rotholz - $20,828 7th - Carlos Rodriguez - $15,272 The Field Narrows on Millionaire Maker Day 2 The Millionaire Maker has become one of the signature events on the WSOP calendar in Las Vegas and this year’s return to Rio has seen a total of 5,330 entries and a prize pool of just under $8 million. As the event name tells you, that means a million up top and after Day 2 trimmed the remaining 1,174 players down to just 170 hopefuls, it was Darryl Ronconi who bagged the biggest stack. Ronconi’s chip mountain of 2,545,000 is a three-bet and a call ahead of both Apolinario Luis (2,345,000) and Thomas Eychenne (2,275,000), both of whom have terrific stacks with which to attack Day 3, but they’re not the only ones. In the top 10 alone, there are some fearsome players armed to the teeth with raising chips, with Shahar Levi (1,955,000) and Faraz Jaka (1,625,000) standing out as ones to watch. A little further back in the field, Ryan Hagerty (1,100,000), Tristan Wade (1,500,000), Craig Varnell (765,000) Yiming Li (595,000), Stephen Song (1,385,000) all bagged up stacks at the close of play. So too did Vanessa Kade (1,520,000), who knows all about winning over a million after taking down the Sunday Million earlier this year. Kade detailed her personal experience of a fairly sour end to Day 1a on Twitter that has definitely seen some karma come her way on Day 2. https://twitter.com/VanessaKade/status/1446740649005367302 Every tournament win is a battle but perhaps never more so than at the World Series of Poker, with Ari Engel, who has already won a bracelet this series admitting it was some time before he hit his stride. https://twitter.com/AriEngelPoker/status/1447301982876626946 WSOP 2021 Event #17 Millionaire Maker Top 10 Chipcounts: Darryl Ronconi - 2,545,000 Apolinario Luis - 2,345,000 Thomas Eychenne - 2,275,000 John Fagg - 1,970,000 Shahar Levi - 1,955,000 Michael Mcnicholas - 1,670,000 Faraz Jaka - 1,625,000 Arie Kliper - 1,615,000 Luis Zedan - 1,570,000 Jeffery Wakamiya - 1,555,000 David Peters Survives Flip & Go Day 1 The $1,000-entry Flip & Go event, Event #20, saw just 23 players survive from a starting field of 1,232. David Williams had more tries than most at making the money in Event #20 and was applauded by most for his efforts on Twitter. https://twitter.com/dwpoker/status/1447343223844728832   When the dust settled, there were plenty of big names still in with a chance of adding what is a unique WSOP bracelet to their collection. Huy Lam (3,150,000) bagged up by far the biggest stack of the day and leads from Corey Bierria (1,880,000) by some distance. Players such as Rok Gostisa (1,115,000) and David Peters (1,105,000) will look to use all their experience to put themselves in contention for the top prize. Others, such as Daniel Negreanu, Shaun Deeb, and Gal Yifrach all busted before the close of play. WSOP 2021 Event #20 $1,000 Flip & Go Top 10 Chipcounts: Huy Lam - 3,150,000 Corey Bierria - 1,880,000 Krista Farrell - 1,700,000 David Towson - 1,600,000 Mark Ingram - 1,385,000 Joao Valli - 1,350,000 Fred Goldberg - 1,245,000 Roman Hrabec - 1,200,000 Rok Gostisa - 1,115,000 David Peters - 1,105,000 Daniel Negreanu, Ari Engel Bag Chips In $1,500 Mixed Omaha 8 There were 640 players who took on the $1,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better event and after a long first day of the tournament, only 199 players zipped up chips. It is local Henderson, Nevada-based player Scott Abrams who leads the pack with 275,000 chips, but plenty of other big players are still in with a great chance of a deep run, with Ari Engel (238,000) going for his second bracelet this live series. Others such as Daniel Negreanu (147,000), John Monnette (103,500), Randy Ohel (83500), Dylan Linde (106,500), and Derek McMaster (162,500) all bagged up chips, with stars such as Eli Elezra, Mike Matusow, Nathan Gamble, Jake Daniels, Ken Aldridge, Ben Yu, and Barry Greenstein. WSOP 2021 Event #21 $1,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Scott Abrams - 275,000 Ari Engel - 230,000 Nathaniel Katzoff - 222,500 PJ Cha - 215,000 Cody Scherer - 207,000 John Cernuto - 178,000 Yonatan Smith - 177,500 Edward Han - 167,000 Derek McMaster - 162,500 Julien Martini - 150,500 Chance Kornuth isn’t just a former WSOP bracelet winner but would not stand by and watch a dealer getting berated. The comments section on his latest act at the poker table tell how most players and fans back his actions. https://twitter.com/ChancesCards/status/1447361730598748166 The spirit of fun seems to have taken over players of the highest standard, with poker legend Erik Seidel joking about a ‘ruff’ time over at his table. https://twitter.com/Erik_Seidel/status/1447470233166307334 Finally, he may not be at the World Series of Poker yet, but if the Rio does play host to Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates, then it could be the closing story we all need. Just... unique. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1447263387541557249
  24. The second full week of the 2021 World Series of Poker promises plenty of action with events that guarantee some of poker’s brightest stars will make an appearance at the Rio. It’s a healthy schedule of mixed games, marquee recreational events, and, perhaps, one of the toughest tournaments of the series. Here’s what you can look forward to in Week Two of the WSOP. Spotlight Tournament Event #25 - $5,000 Six-Handed NLHE The $5K Six-Max could be the toughest tournament of the entire series. Traditionally, it brings out the best and brightest young wizards in search of a fast-paced, massive payday. The $5,000 buy-in tends to keep most recreational players at bay but is also cheap enough to attract top-tier talent that has padded their bankroll with wins but aren't rolled for $10K+ high rollers. In the 2019 WSOP, the $5K Six-Max drew 400 runners and had an elite final six that included Russian online destroyer Arsenii Karmatckii, Maria Ho, Ali Imsirovic, Serbian pro Ognjen Sekularac, Shannon Shorr, and, eventual winner Daniel Strelitz who took home $442,385 for with the win. The field may be down a little this year, as many fields are, but a talent-packed final table is guaranteed. Tune in to PokerGO on Friday, October 15 to see how it plays out. Complete Weekly Schedule [table id=266 /] Other Events To Keep An Eye On Event #22 - $10K ($1,000) Ladies NLHE Championship The Ladies NLHE Championship will kick off the week. Often touted as one of the most fun events of the series, all women receive a $9,000 discount on the $10,000 posted entry making it a $1K for most. It’s a celebration for the women who help make the game great. With some luck, this year there won’t be the random player (who doesn’t identify as a woman) looking to pony up the full $10K in order to get in a tournament where they clearly don’t belong. Event #29 - $10K Short Deck Another tournament that is likely to be packed with pros is the $10,000 Short Deck. The variant at one time looked like it was going to be the new hot ticket, however over the past year or so the hype on the game has trended towards the game being an action variant that attracts high rollers. And those high rollers are likely to turn out for this one - names you might see in the field include new GGPoker Global Ambassador Jason Koon, Andrew Robl, Galen Hall, and Kane Kalas. In 2019, 114 runners took a shot in this same event with Alex Epstein winning it all for $296,227. This year, don’t be surprised to see a drastic decrease in field size with travel restrictions keeping many players where Short Deck is extremely popular from attending. Event #30 - $1,500 MONSTER STACK A top-tier tournament for the Weekend Warrior, the $1,500 Monster Stack gives players heaps of starting chips, hour-long levels, and two starting days to choose from. It’s a pure freezeout and, as we’ve said in the past, is probably the tournament most comparable to the Main Event with a lower buy-in. This one attracts recreational players and pros alike. The recs love the slow play as it makes them feel they get better “bang-for-the-buck” in terms of playtime. Mid-tier pros enjoy it because the longer they play, the more they get to extract their edge. The downside to the Monster is…it’s a long tournament. If you play Day 1A and win the event it’s a full six days. The upside, in the past it’s made someone a millionaire. In 2019, Kainalu McCue-Unciano bested a field of 6,035 runners to take home just over $1 million. This year's first-place is unlikely to be $1 million but will still be close to $600,000 if the current trend in attendance stays the course.
  25. The latest round of action saw two more bracelet winners take down titles and earn gold as Rafael Lebron conquered the final six of the Seven Card Stud Event #14, beating David Williams heads-up for the bracelet and Harvey Mathews also took gold on a busy day at the felt. Rafael Lebron Outlasts Shaun Deeb, David Williams For Event #14 Title Lebron’s achievement was a stunning one, as despite coming into the final table with the chip lead, he faced five experienced opponents including Shaun Deeb, the former WSOP Player of the Year. Deeb, however, was unable to really get going despite this positivity before the table kicked off. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1446406630396989441 Declaration of intentions might be more of a Negreanu-style tweet, but the former #1-ranked Deeb was unfortunate to slide out in fifth place after Nicholas Seiken busted first. With four players left, Christina Hill, who had come into the day very short-stacked, managed to get up to a cash worth $25,344. It was the turn of David Moskovitz to go in third place before Lebron got to take on a player he credits as having helped him get into the game. Heads-up was an imbalanced fight from the beginning of the battle, with Lebron having used his stack to accumulate plenty of chips more than David Williams, with a chip lead of around 3:1. He put that lead to good use, getting over the line to win the second WSOP bracelet of his career, in doing so denying Williams the same achievement. The former Magic the Gathering player has now finished as runner-up in a WSOP event for a fourth time. WSOP 2021 Event #14 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Final Table Results: Rafael Lebron - $82,262 David Williams - $50,842 David Moskowitz - $35,521 Christina Hill - $25,344 Shaun Deeb - $18,475 Nicholas Seiken - $13,766 Maurizio Melara - $10,490 Hal Rotholz - $8,179 Steven Albini - $6,528 Mathews Claims $3K Freezeout Event #13 also concluded on Friday night, with Harvey Mathews the winner of what was his first-ever bracelet. The final day began with just seven players in seats and it wasn’t long before that number was reduced to six. Craig Mason busted first on the day for $49,238 when his [poker card="5h"][poker card="5c"] was looking good on the [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="5d"] flop and all the money went in on the [poker card="Td"] turn with Girish Apte holding just [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"]. But the Broadway straight came in on the gutting river of [poker card="Kd"] for Mason in every sense. It wasn’t long before two more bust-outs sent the table even shorter handed. David Lolis cashed for $65,072 in sixth place after calling off a couple of big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2d"] and losing to Mathews [[poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"] had Lolis crushed to a chop from the turn. Brandon Caputo had led the field into play, but he departed in fifth place for $87,288 when his [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"] was overtaken by Mathews’ [poker card="7d"][poker card="2d"] on a board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="Qd"] which flushed him away on the river. Apte would join him on the rail with $118,815 just a few minutes later when his last three big blinds went into the middle with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9c"] only to be dominated then defeated by Michael Gathy’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9s"]. Gathy was the table’s most decorated player by far with the Belgian having won four WSOP bracelets in a stellar career. He would eventually bust in third place for $164,083 when [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8d"] couldn’t overtake Mathews’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"]. The board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="8s"] has Gathy drawing dead from the turn. Heads-up, Mathews had a better than 4:1 chip lead against Gabriel Andrade, and although Andrade almost levelled up the stacks at one point, he eventually slid back to the same level he started the duel with to bust. Andrade called off his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="9d"] and couldn’t hold against Mathews’ [poker card="Kh"]Td], the board of [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Ks"] ending the tournament on the river. Mathews won his first bracelet at $371,914, while Andrade had to settle for just $229,848 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #13 $3,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Day Results: Harvey Mathews - $371,914 Gabriel Andrade - $229,848 Michael Gathy - $164,083 Girish Apte - $118,815 Brandon Caputo - $87,288 David Lolis - $65,072 Craig Mason - $49,238 https://twitter.com/kuufer/status/1446683409535832070   There was controversy on Poker Twitter, where, in the six-handed Event #15 professional player Adam Hendrix posted on Twitter that a ‘well-known pro’ asked to be unregistered then re-registered the same event. https://twitter.com/AdamHendrix10/status/1446585726372499456 The context for this was duly supplied by the pro in question, Kelly Minkin, whose explanation not only satisfied the original poster but most fans who arrived to find out the truth. https://twitter.com/The_Illest/status/1446595732065042436 As Day 2 played down to a final two tables of eight players, it was Jeremy Malod who led the last eight players with a stack of 7,570,000, while Bradley Jansen was his closest challenger on just over six million chips. WSOP 2021 Event #15 $1,500 NLHE Six-Handed Final Table Chipcounts: Jeremy Malod - 7,570,000 Bradley Jansen - 6,075,000 Jesse Yaginuma - 5,415,000 Ryan Andrada - 4,495,000 Ryan Pedigo - 4,270,000 Mark Liedke - 2,950,000 Jon Baylor - 2,130,000 Sean Hegarty - 1,450,000 John Racener, Jason Somerville, Terrence Chan Make $10K Limit FT A whole host of familiar names grace the final table of Event #16 ($10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship) with former Main Event final tablist John Racener leading the way as the only player with over 1 million in chips. He's joined by Jason Somerville, who has come out of semi-retirement to make an appearance, Nater Silver, and Limit Hold'em legend Terrence Chan. WSOP 2021 Event #16 $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship Final Table Chipcounts: John Racener - 1,090,000 Eric Kurtzman - 975,000 Jason Somerville - 670,000 Scott Tuttle - 650,000 Kevin Song - 515,000 Nate Silver - 440,000 Terrence Chan - 350,000 Ray Dehkharghani - 315,000 John Monnette - 270,000 Christopher Chung - 250,000 Would-be Millionaires Kick Off Event #17 The popular $1,500 Millionaire Maker got underway on Friday with 2568 runners taking a shot at the $1,000,000 guaranteed first-place prize. By the end of the night, just 567 remained with Yiming Lee holding the chip lead, followed closely by Donovan Dean, and Mark Dube. The $1,500-entry Millionaire Maker saw 2,564 players reduced to only 567 players as Yiming Li bagged up the biggest total of 487,000 chips. That was some way clear of Donavan Dean (391,500) and Mark Dube (375,000) who will go into Day 2 second and third in chips respectively. With players such as Chance Kornuth (324,000), Kitty Kuo (276,500), Anton Wigg (178,500), Shannon Shorr (101,000), Ryan Riess (97,000), and Adrian Mateos (70,000) all making the cut, another massive day will take place on Saturday as Day 1b brings thousands more players into what could be a record-breaking field in the event which guarantees the winner will become a millionaire. WSOP 2021 Event #17 $1,500 Millionaire Maker Top 10 Chipcounts: Yiming Li - 487,000 Donavan Dean - 391,500 Mark Dube - 375,000 Shan Jing - 374,500 R.A. Villaluna - 366,000 David Siegel - 363,000 Nicholas Lebherz - 360,000 Frank Bonacci - 352,500 Keyu Qu - 347,500 William Nguyen - 341,000 The final event of the day to kick off was Event #18, the $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event, which enjoyed a showing of 253 entries overall. Of those, just 104 players made it through to Day 2, with only 38 of those going to cash. Robert Mizrachi bagged up the chip lead of 201,000 chips, but he is joined by some legends of the felt, with last year’s winner of this event, Dan Zack, taking through 127,500 and other luminaries of live poker such as Julien Martini (180,000), Scott Seiver (177,000), Benny Glaser (129,000), David Benyamine (112,000), Daniel Negreanu (61,000) and Steve Zolotow (37,500) all zipping up their chips and preparing for a push towards the final table on Day 2. Mizrachi, Martini Mix it Up in Triple Draw A star-studded field took their seats for Event #18 ($2,500 Mixed Triple Draw) on Friday with Robert Mizrachi bagging up the chip lead at the end of the day. Right behind him was PSPC runner-up Julien Martini and high-stakes crusher Scott Seiver. WSOP 2021 Event #18 $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Mizrachi - 201,000 Julien Martini - 180,000 Scott Seiver - 177,000 Carlos Rodriguez - 174,500 Domnick Sarle - 173,500 Brian Tate - 173,000 Philip Sternheimer - 168,000 Schuyler Thornton - 166,500 Craig Love - 161,000 Steve Lee - 160,000 Finally, Anton Wigg isn’t just a poker boss at the felt, he’s picked up on one of the most satisfying moments in the game whether you’re at the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas or just your home game. https://twitter.com/Anton_Wigg/status/1446605905395478528
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