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  1. [Editor's Note: At the time that this article was written, it had been announced that Josh Arieh had clinched the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year title. However, an online tournament result had not yet been included, leaving open the possibility for Ben Yu to win the POY on the last day of the series. We are leaving the article as written and today's events will be reflected in tomorrow's recap.] On a dramatic final day of the race to become WSOP Player of the Year, Josh Arieh finally saw off the dogged challenge of Phil Hellmuth as Arieh, a two-time WSOP bracelet winner in 2021 and four-time bracelet holder in his career, earned the coveted title of 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. In additional action, the final high roller of the series found a familiar name at the top of the leaderboard as Michael Addamo took charge of the $100K NLHE headed into the final day of the series. Addamo Adds Up Chip Lead Once Again The final two events of the 2021 World Series of Poker are racing towards the line as Michael Addamo and Ben Yu have put themselves in pole position to win big as they take leads into the last two final tables of the WSOP in Las Vegas. The $100,000-entry Event #87 is a High Roller event that saw players able to late register up until the start of Day 2, and stars such as Brian Rast, Ole Schemion, Elio Fox, Stephen Chidwick, Dominik Nitsche, Mark Herm, Jason Koon, David Szep, Sean Perry, Jeremy Ausmus and Rok Gostisa all got involved before the first deal, with the field confirmed at 64 players in total, with just 39 remaining at the start of play. That number was reduced almost immediately, with Shaun Deeb crashing out to David Coleman and Brian Rast almost on the rail in his first hand as he shoved for 600,000 chips at blinds of 20,000/40,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"], a hand called by Cary Katz with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"] which held to double up and leave Rast on fumes. Rast, a five-time WSOP bracelet winner after his win earlier this series, would later rally, but still missed out on the money places, as did Phil Hellmuth, who quickly realized that he needed to win or come second in Event #88 to win the Player of the Year race. Hellmuth wasn’t the only one on the rail without money as David Peters, David Coleman, Jason Koon and the aforementioned Cary Katz all missed the money, along with Mark Herm, who was busted on the bubble in 11th place. Arieh wisely chose to give late-regging for $100,000 a miss. Fedor Holz was the first player to make money as he was eliminated in 10th place for $167,869 when his ace-high shove couldn’t hold against Sorel Mizzi’s king-queen, a queen on the river winning the Canadian the pot and sending the German to the rail. Addamo had the lead as the nine-handed final table kicked off, with 9.5 million chips to Sam Sovrel’s closest stack of just over 6 million. Bill Klein was the first player to depart the final nine as he busted with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"] to Addamo’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The money all went in on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2h"] flop, but neither the [poker card="6c"] turn or [poker card="8h"] river could save him and he cashed for $186,909 in ninth place. He won his first-ever WSOP bracelet earlier in the week, but he busted in eighth place for $217,274 when his shove with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] ran into Addamo’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"] to bust on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Ks"]. Sam Grafton was the next player to lose his stack as he busted in seventh place for $263,227. Calling a raise from Henrik Hecklen, Grafton went to a flop of [poker card="Th"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4s"] and both players checked it. Grafton checked the [poker card="9s"] turn too, but Hecklen didn’t, firing a bet that the British player called. On the [poker card="6d"] river, Grafton check-called Hecklen’s shove after using several time extension chips, but the Brit’s time was up as he called, showed [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9d"] for a pair of nines and was shown Hecklen’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="8h"] for a rivered straight. After an extended period of play where Addamo used his stack to chip up even more, Mizzi was the player to miss out on the final day as he shoved with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7c"] and was called by Addamo with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="7s"]. The board ran out [poker card="8h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"] as the unfortunate Mizzi saw his dominating hand overtaken on the turn to end play for the night and give Addamo a big lead heading into the final day, holding as many chips on his own as his four opponents do combined. WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 19,620,000 Henrik Hecklen - 5,445,000 Sam Soverel - 5,165,000 Kevin Rabichow - 4,250,000 Sean Perry - 3,920,000 Ben Yu Leads Final Day in $5,000 8-Handed Event #88 The drama was palpable in the $5,000-entry NLHE 8-Handed Event #88, the final live event on this year’s WSOP schedule in Las Vegas. Phil Hellmuth, who could not reach the latter stages of the $50,000 or $100,000 events of the past couple of days, needed a deep run in the event. In fact, once Arieh crashed out, Hellmuth quickly established what he needed to do. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463030770637754368 Arieh was still in the building and as the tension built, the leader of the POY race busted, giving him a chance to join the anti-rail. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463006906285391874 Sadly for Hellmuth and his many fans, the Poker Brat fell short as he called all-in with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5h"] on a board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"] against Jason Brazeau’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"] for a pair of eights. Hellmuth’s elimination saw the 16-time record WSOP bracelet winner concede defeat and congratulate Arieh on his victory. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463061249034358784 Arieh replied, “You're always gonna be the goat [Greatest of All Time] buddy! I appreciate you more than you know.”, tweeting a picture of the title celebrations. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463079737480253441 After Hellmuth’s departure, many big names fell, as players such as Faraz Jaka, Romain Lewis, Joao Simao, Andrew Kelsall, Dominik Nitsche, Justin Lapka, Justin Saliba, and Brandon Sheils all missed out on the final day. With just 30 players bagging up Day 2 chips from the 531 entries in total, Ben Yu (2,515,000) leads the final day field. Uri Reichenstein (2,070,000) is his closest challenger, while there are top 10 stacks for some of the best players to have sat down at the felt this World Series in Shaun Deeb (1,680,000), Ramon Colillas (1,500,000), and Alexandre Reard (1,048,000), who will shoot for his second 2021 bracelet tomorrow afternoon. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Ben Yu - 2,515,000 Uri Reichenstein - 2,070,000 George Wolff - 1,770,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,680,000 Matyas Kende - 1,635,000 Ramon Colillas - 1,500,000 Danny Wong - 1,330,000 Justin Liberto - 1,285,000 Clayton Maguire - 1,100,000 Alexandre Reard - 1,048,000 Daniel Negreanu’s World Series of Poker came to a close and ‘Kid Poker’ was happy to post his scores from his final rollercoaster ride at the Rio. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092 Owais Ahmed commented that “It's sick, almost unfathomable, how many final tables and top 3 appearances [Negreanu] has at the Rio, but never won a bracelet in the building. I'm sure he'll be happy to see a location change.” in a comment liked by Negreanu himself. Bring on Bally’s. Everyone has made the ‘walk of shame’ from the famous poker venue for the last 17 years, but for Martin Jacobson, the Swedish WSOP Main Event winner whose best result of his career came inside the Rio, it was emotional. https://twitter.com/Martin_Jacobson/status/1463073395499692039 Finally, not everyone is going to be sad to see trips to the Rio go down and the temperature go up from May next year at Bally’s and Paris. https://twitter.com/kittykuopoker/status/1462932645155782661
  2. This week the World Series of Poker Main Event, in all its glory, returns to the Rio for what is strongly rumored to be the very last time. Thousands of players - both pros and recs - will pony up the $10,000 buy-in in hopes that after more than two weeks, it will be they who will stand alone, earning life-changing prize money and be crowned the new World Champion. The Main Event is one of the most unique tournaments in all of poker. The payday alone is enough to bring out the masses. But when you add the prestige and tradition of the Main Event bracelet, just playing in the event has become part of the poker dream. And if we’ve learned anything over the 16 years that the Main Event has taken place at the Rio it’s that the spotlight of the Main Event is likely to feature players the greater poker world does not yet know. Perhaps it will be a young up-and-coming grinder who will take center stage or perhaps a recreational enthusiast who was bought in by their family looking to take their once-in-a-lifetime shot. This tournament has proved it’s impossible to predict what will happen and who will emerge, that’s what makes it special. That’s also why picking players who will go on deep run in the Main Event is equally impossible to predict. But that’s exactly what we’re going to do. Whether you are drafting a team with some friends, playing a little fantasy poker, or getting a little side hustle down on PokerShares you’re going to want to check out this list and consider adding them to your squad. We’re taking into account recent momentum, proven ability to navigate large-field tournaments, and the last half-decade of Main Event results. We’re also looking to see who’s already turned up at the WSOP this year and who may just sit out until 2022. So, enjoy. Here’s a special super-sized, special edition of First-Round Picks for the 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event. #1. Niklas Astedt Main Event Cashes: 2 Main Event Earnings: $59,420 The former longtime #1-ranked Niklas ‘Lena900’ Astedt is in Las Vegas and ready to make a run at the Main Event. Generally considered one of, if not the, greatest online poker player of all time, when this large-field tournament destroyer is in the field it makes him simply unable to pass up. The truth about Astedt is that he doesn’t have a lot of history with the WSOP, just seven total live cashes at the Las Vegas series. However, two of those came in the Main Event (2016, 2019) and he just made the money in the $10K Six-Max this year. Don’t be surprised if when the field narrows, Astedt is in the mix. #2. Paul Volpe Main Event Cashes: 5 Main Event Earnings: $635,129 Three-time WSOP bracelet winner Paul Volpe is no stranger to making deep runs in the Main Event. He has five Main Event cashes in the past 10 years including finishing in 192nd in 2011 ($47,107), 142nd in 2018 ($57,010), and 29th in 2016 for $216,211. His deepest Main Event run was back in 2012 when he finished in 20th place for $294,601. The fact is that in the Main Event (or any tournament, really) Volpe is as good a bet as there is. #3 Yuri Dzivielevski Main Event Cashes: 2 Main Event Earnings: $317,079 The current #1-ranked online player in the world, Yuri Dzivielevski, has been grinding the entire 2021 WSOP and has racked up six cashes to date. However, that’s just momentum headed into the Main Event where Dzivielevski is a proven large-field master. In 2019, he was one of the standout stars of the Main Event and, after being featured on the ESPN broadcast at the same table as Daniel Negreanu, he went on to finish in 28th place for $261,430. Read: Yuri Dzivielevski Enjoying Success, Freedom With Nothing Left To Prove #4. Alexandre Reard Main Event Cashes: 3 Main Event Earnings: $428,978 France’s Alexandre Reard is already having an outstanding 2021 WSOP, having won his first gold bracelet in Event #47 ($5,000 Freezeout) for $428,694. But the reason he’s such a high pick is his long history of crushing in the Main Event. In 2017, he finished in 16th for $340,000, and in 2018 he had another top 100 finish, ending in 92nd for $66,330. Having cashed in the Main in three of the last four years, Reard already knew what it took to make it deep and now he knows how to close out a bracelet event. #5. Andrew Moreno Main Event Cashes: 2 Main Event Earnings: $256,476 Andrew Moreno, the younger brother of "high-quality" poker vlogger Johnny ‘Vibes’ Moreno, is coming off an epic career score. He took down the $10,000 buy-in Wynn Millions in June for $1.46 million dollars and that was just two weeks after he closed out the $1,100 Ultimate Stack at the Venetian for $127K. Moreno has been seen in the WSOP payout lines, making the money in a number of 2021 events, and has a history of going deep in the Main Event, finishing in 28th in 2015 for more than $211,000. It seems the one-time cash game pro thrives when the stakes are at their biggest, making the Main Event a perfect situation for him. Also, Johnny’s not a bad choice either. #6. Daniel Lazrus Main Event Cashes: - Main Event Earnings: - Long Beach, New Jersey’s 31-year old Daniel Lazrus is entering the Main Event with a wave of momentum at his back. In July, he won the first bracelet of his career in the WSOP.com NLHE High Roller Championship for $205,347. Then he made his way to Las Vegas where he earned his second by taking down the massive 2021 Millionaire Maker for an even $1 million score. This would be the perfect time for Lazrus, who was leading the NLHE Player of the Year standings for a good portion of the first half of the series, to break out for his first (and possibly deep) Main Event cash. #7. Joao Vieira Main Event Cashes: 2 Main Event Earnings: $34,347 Current Online All-Time Money List leader Joao Vieira is looking to put his stamp on the Main Event. In 2019, he earned his first bracelet in the incredibly tough $5K Six-Max where he won $758,011. A great win to be sure, but Vieira is a world-class player and is looking for that televised result that will take his name to the next level. He has two previous Main Event results in Las Vegas, and a pair of cashes from WSOP Europe Main Event in both 2018 and 2019. He’s has all the skill one needs to survive to the endgame, the only question is - is it his time? #8. Kelly Minkin Main Event Cashes: 3 Main Event Earnings: $392,646 Kelly Minkin grabbed the title of Last Woman Standing in the Main Event in both 2015 and 2018, when in both years she finished inside the top 50. But one can’t help but feel like that title means little to Minkin who is pushing to always be the last person standing - full stop. In addition to her two deep runs, Minkin last made the money in the Main in 2019 and, with her doing what needed to be done in order to play this year, she’s in the perfect position to make a run at a final table...and more. #9. Adam Friedman Main Event Cashes: 4 Main Event Earnings: $373,989 Talk about a complete player, Adam Friedman proved that he's one of the best in today's game when he put on a historic performance in the 2021 $10K Dealers Choice, defeating Phil Hellmuth and winning the event for the third time...in a row. His $10K three-peat should be credentials enough to want to grab him in the Main Event, but a deeper looks shows that Friedman also crushes in the Main. He's cashing in the Main Event four times in his career with three top 200 finishes. If you add on the confidence he's going to feel heading into the Main, that makes him a top-tier choice to lead a squad. #10. Maurice Hawkins Main Event Cashes: 1 Main Event Earnings: $38,453 When it comes to the Main Event, Maurice Hawkins has the resume of the ideal player to succeed. He should be making deep run year in and year out. He’s the all-time leader in WSOP Circuit rings with 14 and knows how to battle against the type of player who comes to Las Vegas to take a shot in the Main Event. He’s a proven stack builder with more than $2.6 million in WSOP earnings. The interesting part about Hawkins is, when it comes to the WSOP Main Event, he’s had little success. He has a top 300 finish back in 2012 and nothing since. It’s surprising but perhaps he skipped a few, took some bad beats. Whatever has kept Hawkins from making his presence felt in this event we expect to end this year. #11. Tyler Cornell Main Event Cashes: 4 Main Event Earnings: $189,499 Early in the series Tyler Cornell captured his first WSOP bracelet when he took down the $25,000 High Roller for $833,00 - a career-high score. But prior to his early WSOP win, Cornell already had a stellar WSOP resume having cashed in the live Main Event four different times (2013, 2015, 2018, and 2019). Last year, he cashed in multiple online Main Events. First, he made the final table of the August GGPoker $5K Main Event in which he finished in 8th place for more than $328,000. Then in December, he tacked on another $35K with a deep run in the WSOP.com Main Event. #12. Faraz Jaka Main Event Cashes: 4 Main Event Earnings: $95,874 It’s hard to believe that Faraz Jaka has yet to win a WSOP bracelet, especially because of his reputation of being able to build mountains of chips in just about any tournament he plays. He has four career WSOP Main Event cashes (2014, 2015, 2017, 2019) and more than $1.5 million in WSOP earnings. If you take a close look at Jaka’s resume you can see just how many times he was on the verge of earning that career-defining score. This may be the year that this cashing machine makes headlines in the Main. Second Time Around It's one thing to make it to the final table of the Main Event once, it's remarkable to even consider doing it again (see: Mark Newhouse). While we didn't rank the following five players in our original twelve, it would be silly to sleep on any of these players in the Main Event. Phil Hellmuth Main Event Cashes: 8 Main Event Earnings: $1,333,618 Sixteen-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth has a knack for knowing how to play against recreational players. He’s the 1989 Main Event champ and has eight Main Event cashes in his career. Now, he’s only made the money once since 2015, but Hellmuth is on a heater in 2021 and this could be the year he returns with a deep run in the Main. Joe McKeehen Main Event Cashes: 2 Main Event Earnings: $7,707,826 Joe McKeehen has a reputation for being two things - one of which is being a master of navigating large field MTTs. Of course, everyone knows he won the Main Event in 2015 for $7.6 million. Since then he’s earned another two gold bracelets and made five World Poker Tour final tables. His latest WPT score took place earlier this year when he finished as the WPT Venetian runner-up for just over $490K. Of all the Main Event winners in the past 10 years, McKeehen might just be the favorite to make it back to the final table. Damian Salas Main Event Cashes: 5 Main Event Earnings: $2,493,281 Of course, Damian Salas might have something to say about which Main Event Champion is best suited to repeat. Salas, the winner of the 2020 online-live hybrid Main Event for a combined score of over $2.5 million ($1.5 million international, $1 million in the heads-up portion in Las Vegas) already had Main Event final table experience before his win last year. In 2017, Salas finished in seventh place for a $1.4 million score and he’s actually made the money in five of the last 10 Main Events which is more than enough proof that he’s always going to be a threat to make it back to a final table. READ: Desire To Remain Elite Drives New World Champ Damian Salas Cliff Josephy Main Event Cashes: 6 Main Event Earnings: $3,604,078 PocketFives Legacy Award winner Cliff Josephy is sometimes more well-known for his history of backing players during the online boom than his poker playing prowess. But make no mistake, Josephy has proven time and time again that he’s just as good at the game as those players he backed. Plus, he has a Main Event resume most would envy. He’s cashed six times since 2008 and made the final table in 2016 where he fell just two spots shy of being called a World Champion, earning $3.4 million for third place. He showed up for the Seniors Event this year, so we expect him to show out in the Main Event. Kenny Hallaert Main Event Cashes: 4 Main Event Earnings: $1,645,463 The ESPN story on Kenny Hallaert has been that he’s the tournament director who finally is getting the chance to show off what he can do on the felt. But those in the know understand that Hallaert has been beating online tournaments for years and cracked the worldwide top 20 back in 2017. He has nearly $6.8 million in online earnings and has earned partypoker POWERFEST and multiple PokerStars SCOOP titles. In the Main Event, he always brings his A-game. He’s cashed in the Main Event four times, three of which were top 125 spots and a peak performance of sixth-place in 2016 where he collected $1.4 million. - As we mentioned, there are going to be thousands of players in the Main Event, making it tough to narrow down our picks. Players like Antonio Esfandiari, Allen Cunningham, Davidi Kittai, Eoghan O'Dea, and Jake Schindler all have stellar records in the Main Event and would have likely been in contention to make the list, but it's hard to know if they'll show. So choose wisely and enjoy the next couple weeks of non-stop coverage of the return of the Main Event. The action kicks off with Day 1A on Thursday, November 4, and doesn't end until a winner emerges on Wednesday, November 17. (images courtesy: PokerGo)
  3. Tommy Le claimed his second $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship title on Day 27 of the 2021 WSOP as he saw off Jordan Spurlin heads-up to win the top prize of $746,477. Plus, two other titles were won on a day with seven bracelet events in progress at the Rio in Las Vegas. Tommy Le Scores Another PLO Win Tommy Le’s victory in the PLO Championship finale should come as no surprise, with Le also winning the event back in 2017. This time around, the champion defeated plenty of big names at the final table, including four-time WSOP winner Eli Elezra before the day had begun. Just five started in seats as Le took a large lead into the action. The first player to depart was WSOP bracelet winner Jeremy Ausmus, who busted in fifth place for $168,689 when his two pair couldn’t find running cars to top Chris Sandrock’s top set. That pot put Sandrock second in chips and suddenly in contention for the gold, but while Sandrock would take the lead, two hours of play without an exit saw the stacks see-saw wildly and it was during that period that Le took control. Ausmus voiced concerns about the playing cards used at the WSOP earlier the same day. https://twitter.com/jeremyausmus/status/1453076037185638411 Le’s high variance mastery has led to him winning this particular bracelet before and as Artem Maksimov busted in fourth place for $232,236, it wasn’t hard to see why. Piling up 15.3 million, Le’s challengers three-handed had a lot fewer chips, with Sandrock on 4.1 million and Spurlin totaling 1.3 million. If Sandrokc knew that attack was the best form of defense then he was prepared to display it too, taking the lead right back after surging through the next hour of play. PLO is known for wild swings, however, and within a few pots, the gregarious player was on the rail. Sandrock busted in third for $324,800 when his pocket kings in the hole lost to Jordan Spurlin’s aces after the board played out. Heads-up, Spurlin actually had a marginal lead with 10.8 million playing Le’s 9.8 million chips. Le, however, is imperious in the format and he took control before a Spurlin double-up hinted at a miraculous comeback. It was not to be, snuffed out by Le’s aggression and ability to play the variance like a rodeo cowboy mastering control of something so many others find hard to tame. The final hand saw Le river a full house after Spurlin had been all-in on the flop with bottom pair and Le’s top two had ridden the river home to improve even more. Le’s victory wasn’t just worth the top prize of $746,477, but the tile of double WSOP champion in an event so many top pros desire above most others. Spurlin’s consolation prize of $461,360 was not insignificant, but like every player at the final table of the PLO Championship in two of the last four occasions, he had to watch as Le took the gold and the glory. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 PLO Championship Final Table Results: Tommy Le - $746,477 Jordan Spurlin - $461,360 Chris Sandrock - $324,800 Artem Maksimov - $232,236 Jeremy Ausmus - $168,689 Eli Elezra - $124,508 Arthur Morris - $93,406 Ashly Butler - $71,242 Denove Wins Double Stack, Jeff Platt Finished 4th The $1,000-entry Double Stack Event #43 saw Anthony Denove outlast the mammoth field of 3,990 opponents as he closed out a memorable victory on the final day of the four-day event. The drama began with 17 players still in seats, but two big names never made it to the final table, with Jonathan Dokler (15th for $23,877) and Sejin Park (13th for $29,602) both eliminated before the business end of the event. Once the final table of ten players was reached, the bust-outs came quickly, with the first two departees going in the same hand. It was Denove who benefitted from the three-way all-in and emerged with 49 million chips, at the time a huge lead, as Matthew Raffoul was busted in tenth place for $36,949 and former chip leader at the start of the day Michael Wang went in ninth for $46,430. Denove held [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"], with Raffoul’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"] and Wang’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"] both committed pre-flop after much thought. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3h"] meant that Denove made top set on the flop and put paid to both player’s hopes of a miracle on the river. https://twitter.com/miw210/status/1453167299972661248 Out in eighth place for $58,735 was Joshua Harrison, who big blind all-in call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] came after Frank Lagodich had shoved from the button with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Td"] kept Harrison ahead, but the [poker card="Jh"] turn gave Lagodich Broadway and on the [poker card="5c"] river, the field was reduced to seven players. Out in seventh was Kennth Inouye, who won $74,796 when his shove with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"] ran into David Guay’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] with Guay making a full house on the turn. Inouye was followed from the felt by Steven Stolzenfeld as he busted in sixth for $95,878. Stolzenfeld’s all-in for 8.3 million chips equated to ten big blinds with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] and he was in good shape when Timothy Little called with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5d"]. That wasn’t the case after the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Td"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8d"] as Little flushed his opponent away along with his hopes of WSOP gold. Lagodich left in fifth place for $123,710 as he shoved on the river with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] on a board showing [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="5h"] as his two pair was trumped by Guay’s turned set of tens with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"]. Guay was to deliver another player from the table too as he next took out a man many on the rail were hoping would clinch gold. Jeff Platt, famous commentator of PokerGO streams and No Gamble, No Future co-host, busted in fourth place for $160,662. Moving all-in for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"] from under the gun, Platt saw Guay call with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jd"] and a disastrous flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"] set him behind. After the [poker card="Tc"] turn, only one of the three available aces would save Platt, but the [poker card="9s"] fell on the river to send him home in fourth and increase Guay’s lead over his two remaining opponents after back-to-back bust-outs. Some on the rail felt it was unfair to ask Platt to get in front of the camera to set up the final he was taking part in himself! https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1453129783890497539 Little couldn’t improve his stack in the next few hands and busted to Guay too. Little’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3c"] shove was dominated by Guay’s call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8h"] and after the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="9h"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="8s"] board rivered Guay the pot, play was heads-up, with Denove at only a slight disadvantage, holding 76.5 million to Guay’s 83.2 million chips. It took only a short time after a break to decide the winner, with Denore stealing the lead then four-betting all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"], gaining a call from Guay with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"]. The flop of [poker card="Js"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"] kept Denove in the lead and after the [poker card="8s"] turn and [poker card="Kd"] river, he was the champion and winner of his first WSOP bracelet and the $446,983 top prize, with Guay claiming $276,269 for second. WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Final Table Results: Anthony Denove - $446,983 David Guay - $276,269 Timothy Little - $210,004 Jeff Platt - $160,662 Frank Lagodich - $123,710 Steven Stolzenfeld - $95,878 Kenneth Inouye - $74,796 Joshua Harrison - $58,735 Michael Wang - $46,430 Matthew Raffoul - $36,949 Reard Freezes The Competition In Event #47, French player Alexandre Reard won the top prize of $428,694 after surviving a short but intense final day where five players were whittled down to one brand-new bracelet winner. Reard was the first player to bust another as he used his stack throughout the denouement of the event to keep his opponents at arm’s length. It was Qing Liu who busted first of the five, cashing for $97,238 after running [poker card="9s"][poker card="7s"] into Reard’s [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"], with two fours on the flop helping the eventual winner to add another scalp to his tournament haul. Just a few minutes later, play was three-handed as Conrad Simpson busted in fourth for $133,733 when [poker card="Kd"][poker card="2c"] couldn’t overtake Daniel Strelitz’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Three-handed, Strelitz and Reard seemed on collision course and that was borne out by the elimination of Ren Lin in third place for $186,803. Lin moved all-in for ten big blinds with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"] and Strelitz had to call with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"], the king-high board with no deuce giving Strelitz 10 million, just a little short of the 11 million in front of Reard as both rails cheered on their men. Heads-up, Reard got off to a strong start and after winning the opening exchanges and growing a big lead, had his opponent exactly where he wanted him. Strelitz was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"] and Reard called with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"], the board of [poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Kd"] confirming his victory for what his maiden WSOP bracelet. Strelitz, who was hoping to add another piece of poker history to his wrist, had to settle for the $264,953 runner-up prize. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Final Table Results: Alexandre Reard - $428,694 Daniel Strelitz - $264,953 Ren Lin - $186,803 Conrad Simpson - $133,733 Qing Liu - $97,238 Darren Grant - $71,827 Diogo Veiga - $59,913 Jamie Sequeira - $41,132 Ari Engel Makes Shootout Final Table In Event #48, the $1,500 Shootout saw just 10 players progress as eight 10-anded tables produced a winner. While recognized superstars such as Sam Grafton, Joe Cheong and Brian Yoon all failed to progress, others confirmed their greatness with their second single-table victory in two days. Easily the highest-profile of the 10 to make the final (each on roughly the exact same chips) is Ari Engel, who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn at the Rio and could be extremely hard to catch in the Player of the Year race should he win another. He’ll have some top competition tomorrow battling to stop him from achieving that, though with Orson Young, David Tran, Thomas Boivin and Jonathan Betancur amongst those who conquered their second set of nine opponents to reach the final table. Negreanu, Glaser To Battle At $10K 2-7 Final Table In Event #49, British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser collected the most chips as he goes into the final day of the $10,000-entry No Limit Hold’em 207 Lowball Draw Championship final with 2,101,000 chips. Johannes Becker (1,381,000) and Farzad Bonyadi (1,106,000) were Glaser’s closest challengers on the day, but the Brit has a huge lead and will be a big favorite to clinch what would be his fourth bracelet if he can get over the line tomorrow. Elsewhere, of the eight players remaining, the biggest name is without question Daniel Negreanu. Kid Poker bagged up 517,000 as he made it to the final table where his latest attempt at breaking his WSOP drought continues. Jake Schwartz wasn’t far behind Negreanu, taking 468,000 through to the final day, with Julien Martini the short stack on just 270,000. WSOP 2021 Event #49 $10,000 NLHE 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Table Chipcounts: Benny Glaser - 2,101,000 Johannes Becker - 1,381,000 Farzad Bonyadi - 1,106,000 Dustin Dirksen - 953,000 Ben Diebold - 522,000 Daniel Negreanu - 517,000 Jake Schwartz - 468,000 Julien Martini - 270,000 66 Left In Event #50 Event #50, the $600 Six-Handed PLO/No Limit tournament had a big turnout, with 1,569 entries whittled down to just 66 players by the close of play. It was the two-time WSOP bracelet winner Eric Froehlich who finished the day with the biggest stack, holding 2,550,000 chips at the day’s end. Froehlich was followed in the counts by Kristopher Burchfield (2,530,000) and Alejandro Jaureguireynoso (1,975,000), with players such as Justin Lapka (1,455,000) and Mark Seif (1,230,000) two more bracelet winners who made the top 10 chip counts. WSOP 2021 Event #50 $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Eric Froehlich - 2,550,000 Kristopher Burchfield - 2,530,000 Alejandro Jaureguireynoso - 1,975,000 Mario Arribas - 1,730,000 Michael Thomas - 1,620,000 Justin Lapka - 1,455,000 Hanan Braun - 1,255,000 Mark Seif - 1,230,000 Steve Westheimer - 1,190,000 Colten Yamagishi - 1,165,000 Brian Rast, Manig Loeser In $3K Six-Max Top 10 The final poker event to close down for the day was the $3,000-entry Six-Max Event #51, which enjoyed 997 entries with just 41 making Day 2 with 30-minute blinds throughout. Chip leader at the end of the opening day was Jun Obara from Japan, with Rostyslav Sabishchenko of Ukraine (2,020,000) and American Tuan Phan (2,000,000) rounding out a truly global set of podium positions. With players such as Brian Rast (1,665,000) Uri Reichenstein (1,660,000) and Jon Vallinas (1,655,000) all well positioned in the top 10, there’s every chance of high drama and quality on the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #51 $3,000 NLHE Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Jun Obara - 3,010,000 Rostyslav Sabishchenko - 2,020,000 Tuan Phan - 2,000,000 John Gallaher - 1,700,000 Brian Rast - 1,665,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,660,000 Jon Vallinas - 1,655,000 Matthew Schwagler - 1,475,000 Lachezar Petkov - 1,415,000 Manig Loeser - 1,375,000 If you see two grown men fighting on the back lot of the Rio close to the midday sun, be warned - it's a jungle out there. https://twitter.com/RemkoRinkema/status/1453217722301513730 Finally, no, it's not just you, Randy Ohel. Makes you wonder who could ever... finish him! https://twitter.com/randyohel/status/1452818949297504257  
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