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Found 8 results

  1. A dramatic day at the felt saw Kevin Gerhart claim his fourth WSOP bracelet with his second of this World Series in Event #62, the $1,500-entry Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better. Elsewhere, the Poker Players Championship reached its final five players as Eli Elezra grabbed the chip lead heading into the final day and there were bracelet wins for both Eelis Parssinen and Cole Ferraro. Kevin Gerhart Wins Second Bracelet of the Series It was all about Kevin Gerhart in Event #62 as the popular young pro won his second bracelet of the 2021 WSOP and the fourth of his career. Heading into the final table, the chips were remarkably even, with Gerhart marginally ahead of both Matthew Kaplan and Sterling Lopez at the top of the eight-man leaderboard. The first player to bust at the official final table was Dylan Wilkerson as Kaplan, who led the field coming into the final day, vaulted back into the lead when his full house sent Wilkerson out for $18,278 in eighth place. It took no time at all for the next player to leave the action, as Michael Trivett was shot down by Gerhart almost immediately for a score of $23,891 in seventh place. That hand gave Gerhart the lead back and he further strengthened his advantage of the rest of the field when he eliminated Roman Hrabec in sixth place for $31,733 when Gerhart won his second bust-out pot in a row with two-pair. At that stage, Gerhart’s closest rival was hard to pick, with each of the other four men each sitting on roughly 60% of Gerhart’s stack, but Dustin Dirksen stepped forward as the likeliest heads-up opponent after busting Alexandr Orlov in fourth for $42,823. Orlov’s exit was enough to propel Dirksen off the bottom of the counts, but he had slipped slightly by the time he risked it all to double through Gerhart. Once Dicksen doubled, the pressure ramped up on the other remaining players, and Lopez busted in fourth place for $58,695 as a result. Lopez was followed from the felt by Kaplan, as both of Gerhart’s earlier rivals moved to the rail, Kaplan cashing for $81,696. Gerhart took on Dicksen and had a strong lead going into the heads-up battle, with 12.1 million chips playing Dicksen’s 6 million. Although Dicksen took the lead after some early pots, Gerhart grabbed a marginal advantage back by the time the final hand happened and virtually all of the chips were in the middle of the table. Gerhart’s pair of kings was good enough against Dicksen’s jacks, which saw Gerhart’s rail celebrated a fourth WSOP bracelet title, the luckless Dicksen was commiserated in second by the runner-up prize of $115,440. Gerhart had prevented him winning a first-ever bracelet with the hand and took the top prize of $186,789 in the process. WSOP 2021 Event #62 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Final Table Results: Kevin Gerhart - $186,789 Dustin Dirksen - $115,440 Matthew Kaplan - $81,696 Sterling Lopez - $58,695 Alexandr Orlov - $42,823 Roman Hrabec - $31,733 Michael Trivett - $23,891 Dylan Wilkerson - $18,278 Elezra Takes The Lead In $50K PPC After an entertaining day where 10 players dropped to five, Eli Elezra finished the action top of the leaderboard with one day to go in the Poker Players Championship. The $50,000-entry event, which will conclude on Friday, November 5th after a day’s break, began the day with ten top players, all of whom had made it into the money. Mike Wattel was the first player to be busted, exiting proceedings in 10th place for a min-cash worth $82,623 when he lost out to Paul Volpe and it wasn’t long before Daniel Negreanu busted too, leaving in ninth place for $91,595. ‘Kid Poker’ lost with pocket aces again after doing so on a dramatic Day 3, this time being shot down by Ryan Leng’s set of jacks. With eight players left, Nick Schulman, who earlier in the day had spoken out against a perceived slowroll from Negreanu, who later tweeted about how he was happy the hand played out as it did. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1456021223859650562 Schulman’s exit for $106,120 in eighth took place against Chris Brewer, who seemed to grow in power throughout the day, while Matt Glantz, who busted in seventh for $128,256, may have gone out in a split pot by Leng and Elezra, but he was trolled by Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates on his way from the event. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456034289796141064 That left just one man to leave the party and miss out on the final five. Unfortunately for him and his many fans and investors, that was Josh Arieh, who left in sixth place another great score of $161,422 when his pocket queens in PLO were toppled by Elezra’s two-pair tens and sixes on the turn. With five men remaining, here are the payouts for the players who made it all the way to Day 4 of one of the most difficult tournaments this year’s WSOP will host. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Results: 6th - Josh Arieh - $161,422 7th - Matt Glantz - $128,256 8th - Nick Schulman - $106,120 9th - Daniel Negreanu - $91,595 10th - Mike Wattel - $82,623 Of the five remaining players, it is Elezra who has the chip lead going into Friday’s showdown for the gold. With a massive 10 WSOP bracelets already won by the five players who will compete to get their name on the Chip Reese Trophy, Elezra’s four is one ahead of Volpe and Leng, each of whom has three to their name. Neither Cates nor Brewer have won WSOP gold so far in their careers but now sit just four opponents away from doing so. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Eli Elezra - 4,620,000 Paul Volpe - 4,360,000 Chris Brewer - 4,325,000 Daniel Cates - 3,875,000 Ryan Leng - 1,625,000 Ferraro Digs Deep To Win Deepstack Championship In Event #61, Cole Ferraro completed a massive comeback win to claim his first WSOP title and the top prize of over a quarter of a million dollars. Eclipsing the others at a dramatic final table, Ferraro’s victory came after the 22-year-old finished second in an event earlier this series. Heading into the final table, Ferraro had a slight chip lead, but that was overtaken by Richard Dixon very quickly as he took out Ronald Slucker in ninth for $25,359. Slucker shoved on a flop of [poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4h"] with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"] for a flopped middle set. Dixon made the call with his overpair [poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"], but that improved to a straight on 5th street as the [poker card="As"] turn was followed by a [poker card="8d"] on the river. There was a period of no eliminations, but as the blinds rose, that was followed by a number of quick bust-outs. Rubin Chappell left in eighth place for $32,169 when his pocket eights were topped by Bart Lybaert’s pocket queens, before Xiangdong Huang busted in seventh for $41,108 when his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8s"] couldn’t win a flip against Dixon’s [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"]. With six players remaining, Edgardo Rosario busted for $52,914 when he got unlucky post-flop having had the better of it before the community cards fell. Rosario’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"] was well ahead of Dixon’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6d"] but the board of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6s"] managed to offer Rosario a flush draw from the flop yet instead give Dixon trips on the river. It wasn’t long, however, before Dixon himself was on the rail, busting in fifth place for $68,604. All-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"] on a queen-high flop Ferraro had found [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kc"] and held through turn and river to win with a set of kings and sneak up on Sami Rustom, who had taken the chip lead. Out in fourth for $89,587 was Bart Lybaert, the Belgian player heading home after he thought he was bluff-catching with third pair on a king-high board but saw Ferraro turn over aces in the hole to go into three-handed play with a strong lead. Play was soon heads-up, as Sean Dunleavy was done and left in third place for $117,822. Dunleavy shoved on the river of a hand against Rustom with a set of jacks, but his opponent had rivered a runner-runner flush to take the lead right back. With Rustom holding 70 million chips to Ferraro’s 47 million, it took a comeback win for the bracelet. Ferraro won a handful of important hands where he had to make tough calls before the final hand saw him taking a lead into the action at the crucial moment. Rustom shoved with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"], and after a long time taking consideration of all factors, Ferarro called with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"]. After the board played out [poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Th"], Ferraro had the win and a history-making first-ever bracelet, with the 22-year-old the youngest player to enjoy a first and second so far in the 2021 World Series of Poker. While Rustom won $156,056 for finishing as runner-up, Ferraro’s top prize of $252,491will see him in huge profit for the series and playing the Main Event later in the week. On this form, who would want to face him across the felt? WSOP 2021 Event #61 $600 Deepstack Championship Final Table Results: Cole Ferraro - $252,491 Sami Rustom - $156,056 Sean Dunleavy - $117,822 Bart Lybaert - $89,587 Richard Dixon - $68,604 Edgardo Rosario - $52,914 Xiangdong Huang - $41,108 Ruben Chappell - $32,169 Ronald Slucker - $25,359 Eelis Parssinen Wins First WSOP Bracelet Event #64 saw Finnish online crusher Eelis Parssinen claim a first-ever WSOP bracelet victory as he took the top prize at a final table including players such as Niklas Astedt and Joni Jouhkimainen. With just eight players making the final table, it wasn’t long before the first player busted, with a fast structure to the $5,000-entry event throughout. Parssinen got off to the best possible start when he made quads in a PLO pot to double through Jouhkimainen and move up the ranks, and instead of the Finn floundering, he would continue to rise up the leaderboard during the remainder of the final day. Vikranth Anga was the first player to leave the final table as he lost out with ace-king to Jouhkimainen’s pocket kings when all the chips went into the middle pre-flop. Anga’s exit was worth $53,824 and he was soon joined on the rail by Swedish online sensation Niklas Astedt in seventh place for $70,367 when his [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"] couldn’t catch Noah Bronstein’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"], a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="7h"] sending Astedt home. After Kyle Arora went out in sixth for $93,425, Jouhkimainen busted in fifth for $125,940. The Finn called off his stack from the big blind with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7s"] only for Ezra Abu Gazal’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] to eliminate his micro stack. Soon, only three remained after the overnight chip leader, David Prociak, busted for $172,332. Gazal would bust in No Limit Hold’em, when his [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"] lost to Parssinen’s [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] on a nine-high board, with the American earning $239,231 for the run to the podium places. That gave Parssinen 20.6 million chips, almost three times as many as Bronstein who had 8.4 million. Heads-up was a short affair as the Finn wrapped up victory with a flopped set of sixes good enough for Parssinen to claim gold and the top prize of $545,616, while Bronstein cashed for $337,216 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #64 $5,000 NLHE/PLO Mix Final Table Results: Eelis Parssinen - $545,616 Noah Bronstein - $337,216 Ezra Abu Gazal - $239,321 David Prociak - $172,332 Joni Jouhkimainen - $125,940 Kyle Arora - $93,425 Niklas Astedt - $70,367 Vikranth Anga - $53,824 In Event #63, the $500-entry Salute to Warriors, just nine players remain from 169 combatants on the penultimate day of the event. Bradley Rogoff leads the final table with 8,800,000 chips, a fair distance ahead of Eric Zhang with 7,175,000. Elsewhere at the final table, there were stacks in bags for Chris Corbo (4,475,000) and Chulhan Choi (3,900,000) among others, but some weren’t so fortunate as to make the final day, with stars of the game such as Taylor Pollard, Lisa Roberts and Chris Bibb all going close to the final day but eventually missing out. WSOP 2021 Event #63 $500 Salute to Warriors Final Table Chipcounts: Bradley Rogoff - 8,800,000 Eric Zhang - 7,175,000 Guy Hadas - 5,500,000 Christopher Corbo - 4,475,000 Mitch Garshofsky - 4,475,000 Chulhan Choi - 3,900,000 Hlib Kovtunov - 3,475,000 Anthony Mccurdy - 3,350,000 Marty Zabib - 2,700,000 The kick-off of Event #65, the Mini Main Event, is something thousands of players were looking forward to, as evidenced by the 3,821 players who played the freezeout tournament that apes the structure and style of the WSOP Main Event, which kicks off on Thursday. After starting at 11am, the tournament enjoyed a busy opening day, with players such as the Player of the Year favorite Shaun Deeb busting out before the day was through. Others such as WSOP world champion Joe McKeehen went the same way, but some survived, with Thomas Boyden the pick of the 282 who made the cut. Others to feature in the top ten included Farid Jattin (2,240,000) and two-time WSOP winner Georgios Sotiropoulos (2,135,000), while the highest other former WSOP bracelet winner in the counts was Ismael Bojang (1,850,000). WSOP 2021 Event #65 $1,000 Mini Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Thomas Boyden - 3,325,000 Giorgii Skhulukhiia - 3,150,000 Nicholas Verderamo - 2,560,000 Farid Jattin - 2,240,000 Jinkwang Do - 2,150,000 Georgios Sotiropoulos - 2,135,000 Gareth Devereux - 1,995,000 John Longowa - 1,995,000 Nana Sanechika - 1,955,000 Ye Yuan - 1,925,000 Finally, in terms of poker events that is, the $10,000 PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship kicked off and saw 194 players reduced to just 101 on Day 1 of the event. Brian Hastings (447,000) leads the field, but he is in illustrious company in a top 10 that includes Chip Jett (308,500), Nick Schulman (295,000), GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos (282,500) and two-time 2021 WSOP winner Ari Engel, the Canadian sitting on 224,000 chips. Players to bust included Yueqi Zhu, David Benyamine, Bradley Ruben, Rep Porter, Chris Vitch, Robert Campbell, Randy Ohel, Daniel Zack and Joao Vieira. WSOP 2021 Event #66 $10,000 PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Brian Hastings - 447,000 Tommy Chen - 377,500 Chip Jett - 308,500 Nick Schulman - 295,000 Matt Livingston - 289,000 Felipe Ramos - 282,500 Ward Crane - 240,000 Esther Taylor-Brady - 240,000 Ari Engel - 224,000 Dan Colpoys - 223,000 Despite positive actions, not everybody’s WSOP is going to plan. Ronnie Bardah’s luck isn’t changing any time soon by the looks of it. https://twitter.com/RonnieBardah/status/1456041676414148609 Finally, is there a Player of the Year curse to legends of the past? Current combatant Ari Engel thinks so! https://twitter.com/AriEngelPoker/status/1456033927311802370  
  2. Tommy Le claimed his second $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship title on Day 27 of the 2021 WSOP as he saw off Jordan Spurlin heads-up to win the top prize of $746,477. Plus, two other titles were won on a day with seven bracelet events in progress at the Rio in Las Vegas. Tommy Le Scores Another PLO Win Tommy Le’s victory in the PLO Championship finale should come as no surprise, with Le also winning the event back in 2017. This time around, the champion defeated plenty of big names at the final table, including four-time WSOP winner Eli Elezra before the day had begun. Just five started in seats as Le took a large lead into the action. The first player to depart was WSOP bracelet winner Jeremy Ausmus, who busted in fifth place for $168,689 when his two pair couldn’t find running cars to top Chris Sandrock’s top set. That pot put Sandrock second in chips and suddenly in contention for the gold, but while Sandrock would take the lead, two hours of play without an exit saw the stacks see-saw wildly and it was during that period that Le took control. Ausmus voiced concerns about the playing cards used at the WSOP earlier the same day. https://twitter.com/jeremyausmus/status/1453076037185638411 Le’s high variance mastery has led to him winning this particular bracelet before and as Artem Maksimov busted in fourth place for $232,236, it wasn’t hard to see why. Piling up 15.3 million, Le’s challengers three-handed had a lot fewer chips, with Sandrock on 4.1 million and Spurlin totaling 1.3 million. If Sandrokc knew that attack was the best form of defense then he was prepared to display it too, taking the lead right back after surging through the next hour of play. PLO is known for wild swings, however, and within a few pots, the gregarious player was on the rail. Sandrock busted in third for $324,800 when his pocket kings in the hole lost to Jordan Spurlin’s aces after the board played out. Heads-up, Spurlin actually had a marginal lead with 10.8 million playing Le’s 9.8 million chips. Le, however, is imperious in the format and he took control before a Spurlin double-up hinted at a miraculous comeback. It was not to be, snuffed out by Le’s aggression and ability to play the variance like a rodeo cowboy mastering control of something so many others find hard to tame. The final hand saw Le river a full house after Spurlin had been all-in on the flop with bottom pair and Le’s top two had ridden the river home to improve even more. Le’s victory wasn’t just worth the top prize of $746,477, but the tile of double WSOP champion in an event so many top pros desire above most others. Spurlin’s consolation prize of $461,360 was not insignificant, but like every player at the final table of the PLO Championship in two of the last four occasions, he had to watch as Le took the gold and the glory. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 PLO Championship Final Table Results: Tommy Le - $746,477 Jordan Spurlin - $461,360 Chris Sandrock - $324,800 Artem Maksimov - $232,236 Jeremy Ausmus - $168,689 Eli Elezra - $124,508 Arthur Morris - $93,406 Ashly Butler - $71,242 Denove Wins Double Stack, Jeff Platt Finished 4th The $1,000-entry Double Stack Event #43 saw Anthony Denove outlast the mammoth field of 3,990 opponents as he closed out a memorable victory on the final day of the four-day event. The drama began with 17 players still in seats, but two big names never made it to the final table, with Jonathan Dokler (15th for $23,877) and Sejin Park (13th for $29,602) both eliminated before the business end of the event. Once the final table of ten players was reached, the bust-outs came quickly, with the first two departees going in the same hand. It was Denove who benefitted from the three-way all-in and emerged with 49 million chips, at the time a huge lead, as Matthew Raffoul was busted in tenth place for $36,949 and former chip leader at the start of the day Michael Wang went in ninth for $46,430. Denove held [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"], with Raffoul’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"] and Wang’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"] both committed pre-flop after much thought. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3h"] meant that Denove made top set on the flop and put paid to both player’s hopes of a miracle on the river. https://twitter.com/miw210/status/1453167299972661248 Out in eighth place for $58,735 was Joshua Harrison, who big blind all-in call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] came after Frank Lagodich had shoved from the button with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Td"] kept Harrison ahead, but the [poker card="Jh"] turn gave Lagodich Broadway and on the [poker card="5c"] river, the field was reduced to seven players. Out in seventh was Kennth Inouye, who won $74,796 when his shove with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"] ran into David Guay’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] with Guay making a full house on the turn. Inouye was followed from the felt by Steven Stolzenfeld as he busted in sixth for $95,878. Stolzenfeld’s all-in for 8.3 million chips equated to ten big blinds with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] and he was in good shape when Timothy Little called with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5d"]. That wasn’t the case after the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Td"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8d"] as Little flushed his opponent away along with his hopes of WSOP gold. Lagodich left in fifth place for $123,710 as he shoved on the river with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] on a board showing [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="5h"] as his two pair was trumped by Guay’s turned set of tens with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"]. Guay was to deliver another player from the table too as he next took out a man many on the rail were hoping would clinch gold. Jeff Platt, famous commentator of PokerGO streams and No Gamble, No Future co-host, busted in fourth place for $160,662. Moving all-in for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"] from under the gun, Platt saw Guay call with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jd"] and a disastrous flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"] set him behind. After the [poker card="Tc"] turn, only one of the three available aces would save Platt, but the [poker card="9s"] fell on the river to send him home in fourth and increase Guay’s lead over his two remaining opponents after back-to-back bust-outs. Some on the rail felt it was unfair to ask Platt to get in front of the camera to set up the final he was taking part in himself! https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1453129783890497539 Little couldn’t improve his stack in the next few hands and busted to Guay too. Little’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3c"] shove was dominated by Guay’s call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8h"] and after the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="9h"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="8s"] board rivered Guay the pot, play was heads-up, with Denove at only a slight disadvantage, holding 76.5 million to Guay’s 83.2 million chips. It took only a short time after a break to decide the winner, with Denore stealing the lead then four-betting all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"], gaining a call from Guay with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"]. The flop of [poker card="Js"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"] kept Denove in the lead and after the [poker card="8s"] turn and [poker card="Kd"] river, he was the champion and winner of his first WSOP bracelet and the $446,983 top prize, with Guay claiming $276,269 for second. WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Final Table Results: Anthony Denove - $446,983 David Guay - $276,269 Timothy Little - $210,004 Jeff Platt - $160,662 Frank Lagodich - $123,710 Steven Stolzenfeld - $95,878 Kenneth Inouye - $74,796 Joshua Harrison - $58,735 Michael Wang - $46,430 Matthew Raffoul - $36,949 Reard Freezes The Competition In Event #47, French player Alexandre Reard won the top prize of $428,694 after surviving a short but intense final day where five players were whittled down to one brand-new bracelet winner. Reard was the first player to bust another as he used his stack throughout the denouement of the event to keep his opponents at arm’s length. It was Qing Liu who busted first of the five, cashing for $97,238 after running [poker card="9s"][poker card="7s"] into Reard’s [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"], with two fours on the flop helping the eventual winner to add another scalp to his tournament haul. Just a few minutes later, play was three-handed as Conrad Simpson busted in fourth for $133,733 when [poker card="Kd"][poker card="2c"] couldn’t overtake Daniel Strelitz’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Three-handed, Strelitz and Reard seemed on collision course and that was borne out by the elimination of Ren Lin in third place for $186,803. Lin moved all-in for ten big blinds with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"] and Strelitz had to call with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"], the king-high board with no deuce giving Strelitz 10 million, just a little short of the 11 million in front of Reard as both rails cheered on their men. Heads-up, Reard got off to a strong start and after winning the opening exchanges and growing a big lead, had his opponent exactly where he wanted him. Strelitz was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"] and Reard called with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"], the board of [poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Kd"] confirming his victory for what his maiden WSOP bracelet. Strelitz, who was hoping to add another piece of poker history to his wrist, had to settle for the $264,953 runner-up prize. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Final Table Results: Alexandre Reard - $428,694 Daniel Strelitz - $264,953 Ren Lin - $186,803 Conrad Simpson - $133,733 Qing Liu - $97,238 Darren Grant - $71,827 Diogo Veiga - $59,913 Jamie Sequeira - $41,132 Ari Engel Makes Shootout Final Table In Event #48, the $1,500 Shootout saw just 10 players progress as eight 10-anded tables produced a winner. While recognized superstars such as Sam Grafton, Joe Cheong and Brian Yoon all failed to progress, others confirmed their greatness with their second single-table victory in two days. Easily the highest-profile of the 10 to make the final (each on roughly the exact same chips) is Ari Engel, who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn at the Rio and could be extremely hard to catch in the Player of the Year race should he win another. He’ll have some top competition tomorrow battling to stop him from achieving that, though with Orson Young, David Tran, Thomas Boivin and Jonathan Betancur amongst those who conquered their second set of nine opponents to reach the final table. Negreanu, Glaser To Battle At $10K 2-7 Final Table In Event #49, British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser collected the most chips as he goes into the final day of the $10,000-entry No Limit Hold’em 207 Lowball Draw Championship final with 2,101,000 chips. Johannes Becker (1,381,000) and Farzad Bonyadi (1,106,000) were Glaser’s closest challengers on the day, but the Brit has a huge lead and will be a big favorite to clinch what would be his fourth bracelet if he can get over the line tomorrow. Elsewhere, of the eight players remaining, the biggest name is without question Daniel Negreanu. Kid Poker bagged up 517,000 as he made it to the final table where his latest attempt at breaking his WSOP drought continues. Jake Schwartz wasn’t far behind Negreanu, taking 468,000 through to the final day, with Julien Martini the short stack on just 270,000. WSOP 2021 Event #49 $10,000 NLHE 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Table Chipcounts: Benny Glaser - 2,101,000 Johannes Becker - 1,381,000 Farzad Bonyadi - 1,106,000 Dustin Dirksen - 953,000 Ben Diebold - 522,000 Daniel Negreanu - 517,000 Jake Schwartz - 468,000 Julien Martini - 270,000 66 Left In Event #50 Event #50, the $600 Six-Handed PLO/No Limit tournament had a big turnout, with 1,569 entries whittled down to just 66 players by the close of play. It was the two-time WSOP bracelet winner Eric Froehlich who finished the day with the biggest stack, holding 2,550,000 chips at the day’s end. Froehlich was followed in the counts by Kristopher Burchfield (2,530,000) and Alejandro Jaureguireynoso (1,975,000), with players such as Justin Lapka (1,455,000) and Mark Seif (1,230,000) two more bracelet winners who made the top 10 chip counts. WSOP 2021 Event #50 $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Eric Froehlich - 2,550,000 Kristopher Burchfield - 2,530,000 Alejandro Jaureguireynoso - 1,975,000 Mario Arribas - 1,730,000 Michael Thomas - 1,620,000 Justin Lapka - 1,455,000 Hanan Braun - 1,255,000 Mark Seif - 1,230,000 Steve Westheimer - 1,190,000 Colten Yamagishi - 1,165,000 Brian Rast, Manig Loeser In $3K Six-Max Top 10 The final poker event to close down for the day was the $3,000-entry Six-Max Event #51, which enjoyed 997 entries with just 41 making Day 2 with 30-minute blinds throughout. Chip leader at the end of the opening day was Jun Obara from Japan, with Rostyslav Sabishchenko of Ukraine (2,020,000) and American Tuan Phan (2,000,000) rounding out a truly global set of podium positions. With players such as Brian Rast (1,665,000) Uri Reichenstein (1,660,000) and Jon Vallinas (1,655,000) all well positioned in the top 10, there’s every chance of high drama and quality on the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #51 $3,000 NLHE Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Jun Obara - 3,010,000 Rostyslav Sabishchenko - 2,020,000 Tuan Phan - 2,000,000 John Gallaher - 1,700,000 Brian Rast - 1,665,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,660,000 Jon Vallinas - 1,655,000 Matthew Schwagler - 1,475,000 Lachezar Petkov - 1,415,000 Manig Loeser - 1,375,000 If you see two grown men fighting on the back lot of the Rio close to the midday sun, be warned - it's a jungle out there. https://twitter.com/RemkoRinkema/status/1453217722301513730 Finally, no, it's not just you, Randy Ohel. Makes you wonder who could ever... finish him! https://twitter.com/randyohel/status/1452818949297504257  
  3. Six bracelet events took place on Day 26 of the 2021 World Series of Poker as Chad Norton won his first WSOP bracelet in the $800 Deepstack event and three final tables were reached with some superstars of the game in pole position to win gold. Norton Scores First Bracelet Chad Norton was dominant in his display at the $800-entry Deepstack event with the chip leader going into the final table Kevin Wang overtaken by Norton before the first-timer deservedly claimed a debut bracelet and the top prize of $214,830 to go with it. The final table of nine players began with Wang on 22 million chips, an amount far clear of the 9 million in front of the eventual winner. It was Joshua Herman who busted first in ninth place for $19,533, as he moved all-in for around four big blinds with [poker card="Js"][poker card="9s"] and was called by Norton with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Th"]. That call was vindicated across the board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Ks"] as Norton’s ace-kicker played and he vaulted to 20 million chips after a fast start to the table. Next to go was William Blais for $24,982, as the Canadian moved all-in on a flop showing [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3h"]. Blais had a monster hand with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kh"], but it was well behind his caller Norton with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"], and through the [poker card="3c"] turn and [poker card="9h"] river, Blais was on the rail and Norton became chip leader. Jordyn Miller was eliminated in seventh place as his [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"] call for his tournament life after Andres JeckIn’s shove with [poker card="As"][poker card="8h"] met with ill fortune. The flop of [poker card="8d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"] gave JeckeIn top pair but kept Miller ahead, with the [poker card="2d"] turn maintaining that lead. The river of [poker card="8s"] changed everything, however, with Miller busted before the final six. The chip leader heading into the final nine, Wang was gone in sixth place, as he fell to Norton too. Wang shoved from the button with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3c"] and was called by Norton with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jh"]. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Qs"] saw Wang flop a gutshot but miss it as Norton paired up on the turn and busted Wang for a $42,031 score. In fifth place, it was the turn of Ivan Uzunov to depart the party, winning $55,279 as his shove with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Ts"] was called by JeckeIn with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"]. The board of [poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="As"] saw Uzunov on the rail with the Argentinian staying in contention albeit at the bottom of the counts. Narimaan Ahmadi had laddered to fourth place for $73,371 but could go no further as he shoved from the small blind with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"] and Norton, who called with an audible ‘Sure, why not?” turned over [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"]. The board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"] saw Ahmadi leave the event, and Norton, who had four times the chips of his remaining two opponents combined, continued to obliterate all who sat between him and the gold bracelet. Both of Norton’s opponents were in ICM problems, and JeckeIn paid for it with his stack in third place for $98,269. The Argentinian shoved with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Ts"] but was called by the other short stack in Steve Lemma, whose [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"] held across a comfortable board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] which saw JeckeIn pick up a flush draw on the flop but fade both turn and river as Lemma filled up to sevens over fives on 5th street. Heads-up was looking like it might not be a procession for Norton purely due to Lemma busting JeckeIn, but with just under a 3:1 chip lead, that proved enough for a quick kill for Norton. Lemma shoved over Norton’s raise from the button and Norton made a quick call. Lemma was behind with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"], Norton holding [poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] and hitting top pair on the flop as the board played out [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3d"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3h"] to give Lemma the runner-up spot for $132,802 and award Norton the bracelet and top prize of $214,830. WSOP 2021 Event #46 $800 Deepstack Final Table Results: Chad Norton - $214,830 Steve Lemma - $132,802 Andres Jeckeln - $98,269 Narimaan Ahmadi - $73,271 Ivan Uzunov - $55,279 Kevin Wang - $42,031 Jordyn Miller - $32,254 William Blais - $24,982 Joshua Herman - $19,533 Jeff Platt, Jonathan Dokler Head Day 4 of Double Stack Day 3 of the $1,000-entry Double Stack event saw Michael Wang end the day with a dominant chip stack as the American piled up over 24 million chips. With Joshua Harrison his nearest challenger on 14.7 million, others in contention include South Korean player Sejin Park (13.3 million), Jonathan Dokler (12.8 million), and PokerGO presenter Jeff Platt, who led after Day 2 and still has a very playable 8 million stack heading into the penultimate day. Of the players who busted on Day 3 as the field dropped from 149 players to just 17, former WSOP Main Event winner Martin Jacobson fell in 145th place for $3,124, Niall Farrell dropped in 88th place for $4,716 and Ralph Massey made it all the way to 23rd place for $15,856. Others to bust on a busy day for eliminations included Daniel Dayan, Andrew Moreno, Brandon Shiels and Antoine Saout. Wang was understandably delighted with his progress. https://twitter.com/miw210/status/1452879499423465474 WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Wang - 24,300,000 Joshua Harrison - 14,725,000 Sejin Park - 13,325,000 Jonathan Dokler - 12,875,000 Timothy Little - 11,475,000 Alexander Farahi - 10,725,000 Alex Kulev - 9,550,000 Anthony Denove - 8,475,000 Jeff Platt - 8,075,000 Kenneth Inouye - 7,475,000 Back-To-Back Final Tables For Tommy Le Tommy Le is the man to catch in Event #45, the $10,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha Championship. With a stack of 7.4 million, Le leads from Artem Maksimov, with both of the top two some way clear of Chris Sandrock (3.2m), Jordan Spurlin (2.8m), and Jeremy Ausmus (2.2m), who will all be hoping for an early double up to put themselves back in contention for the WSOP bracelet. With players such as Mike Matusow, Dylan Linde, and Daniel Zack all busting on the penultimate day of play, Le will be hoping to go one better than his last final table, where he lost out for the bracelet to our own Josh Arieh. Le got off to a blistering start on the day, with just 18 players starting out and an unlucky 13 of that number failing to make the final day. Le doubled up through Arthur Morris and never looked back, as the day’s dominant player busted Mike Matusow with a rivered nut flush against ‘The Mouth’, who had flopped the nut straight. Once the final table of eight was reached, Ashly Butler was the first player to depart, with eighth place worth $71,242. Morris himself was busted in seventh for $93,406, while Eli Elezra failed to make it five bracelets, falling short in sixth place for $124,508 as Le claimed the chip lead heading to the denouement of the PLO Championship. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Tommy Le - 7,240,000 Artem Maksimov - 5,080,000 Chris Sandrock - 3,200,000 Jordan Spurlin - 2,885,000 Jeremy Ausmus - 2,235,000 $5K Freezeout Final Table Set Day 2 of the $5,000 Freezeout event saw a returning field of 82 players play down to just five finalists as the penultimate day of action saw plenty of it. At the close of play, Frenchman Alexandre Reard had the biggest stack, with 8,820,000 chips, some way clear of the only remaining bracelet winner in the field, Daniel Strelitz (5,345,000). With Qing Liu (3,375,000), Conrad Simpson (2,390,000), and Ren Lin (1,535,000) completing the final five, there are sure to be fireworks as the five men play for the top prize of $428,694. Day 2 of this event saw plenty of big names exit the competition, with eight hours of play leading to the unofficial final table of nine. With players such as Daniel Lazrus, Scott Seiver, Daniel Negreanu, and Shaun Deeb all making the money but failing to trouble the final table, others weren’t so fortunate, with stars such as Ben Heath, Andrew Kelsall - who bubbled - and Alan Sternberg all falling short of profit. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Final Table Chipcounts: Alexandre Reard - 8,820,000 Daniel Strelitz - 5,345,000 Qing Liu - 3,375,000 Conrad Simpson - 2,390,000 Ren Lin - 1,535,000 Ari Engel, Sam Grafton Survive Day 1 Shootout Event #48 was the $1,500 Shootout, a unique event on the WSOP calendar and one of our favorites, with each 10-handed starting table producing one winner who then makes the next day of single-table shootouts ahead of a final table full of winners eventually being reached. Day 1 saw a neat total of 800 players reach just 80 as players such as Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, and Ari Engel all ended the day too strong for nine opponents, slaying their way to victory. Of the 12 hours that players were at the felt, some tables ended much sooner than others. The first table to leave just one player standing was the one that ended with Victoria Livschitz sat behind all the chips. Players such as Shiraz Lall and Huy Nguyen couldn’t stop her progression, with other tables just as star-studded. Sam Grafton made his way through a table that included Michael Noori, who already has a 2021 WSOP bracelet to his name, while Joseph Cheong added to the Day 2 banter after taking care of Zach Gruneberg heads-up. Ari Engel, who already has two 2021 WSOP bracelets to his name, is 79 players from repeating that trick, with players such as Maria Ho, Ryan Depaulo, Michael Mizrachi and Jeff Gross among those to miss out. Sam Soverel Leads $10K NL 2-7 Event #49 completed the mammoth day at the felt for WSOP fans, with Sam Soverel leading the way after Day 1 of the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Single Draw event. Soverel’s stack of 454,500 chips puts him ahead of Johannes Becker (373,500) and Julien Martini (338,500) at the top of the leaderboard, but there is quality in every seat, with Shaun Deeb (302,500), Benny Glaser (290,500), and Yuval Bronshtein (225,500) all in the top 10 chip counts. Elsewhere, players such as the vastly experienced Dan Shak (190,500), Chris Vitch (83,000), Scott Seiver (99,500), Nick Schulman (90,000), and Ryan Leng (74,500) will all be very positive that they can claim a profit on Day 2 and push for the gold. Among those who busted on Day 1 were stars such as Phil Hellmuth, Galen Hall, and Michael Noori. WSOP 2021 Event #49 $10,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw Top 10 Chipcounts: Sam Soverel - 454,500 Johannes Becker - 373,500 Julien Martini - 338,500 Shaun Deeb - 302,500 Benny Glaser - 290,500 Benjamin Diebold - 277,500 David McGowan - 269,500 Yuval Bronshtein - 225,500 Farzad Bonyadi - 215,500 Matt Vengrin - 210,500 Chris Moneymaker already decided pre-festival that he wouldn’t be gracing Vegas with his presence, but a recent champion has, ahem, ‘encouraged’ him to rethink that choice. Sounds like a sidebet to us. https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1451943037299568643 Finally, if you’re worried that some of the big names you love haven’t arrived I Vegas yet - such as Phil Ivey - then fear not, because the two men who battled it out for the legendary WSOP Main Event win back in 1989 were pictured together at the Rio for the first time in a long time. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1452863857467084803
  4. For years, Ari Engel was one of the most consistent players on the poker circuit, final tabling and winning major tournaments all around the country, and the world for that matter. However, before 2019, the former #1-ranked online player on PocketFives simply couldn’t produce the same results at the World Series of Poker. He had never even made a final table after years of playing there until 2019, where he won his first WSOP final table in a $2,500 Event, earning over $427,000. Well, that seems to have triggered something in Engel. Last week, he made it two bracelets in as many series, when he won the $10,000 Omaha Hi/Lo Championship Event. An appreciative Engel pointed out how the bracelet in 2019 was different than this one. “I had a long drought at World Series where I didn’t get a top nine for various reasons. That was a big mental hurdle because I was thinking is it the desert, the weather, what am I doing wrong because I was winning at other places but not in Vegas?” Engel went on to explain that this bracelet brought different feelings for him for different reasons. “This one, I really enjoy O8 so winning after spending a ton of COVID time playing O8 was a very nice feeling. Different for sure the first one is more special like that, but winning a $10k Championship is nice.” Engel has been largely known as a No Limit Hold’em player, but he shared with us that in recent years, he has been playing more Omaha Hi/Lo. He starting grinding PLO8 in 2008, and made Supernova in 2009 grinding six to eight tables at a table. Interestingly enough, Engel barely got into the No Limit bracelet event that he eventually won in 2019, and said that since he was playing so much O-8, he couldn’t handle simply playing one game of live hold’em. “I was playing PLO8 all day in 2019 and just max late regging events. I showed up at 7 PM for the noon event and I couldn’t stomach it, I had to play more PLO8 so I just grabbed my laptop and played while I played the bracelet event I won. I really enjoy O8 at this stage.” It is no surprise that the final table of this $10,000 Mixed Game Event was stacked with bracelet winners and high-roller regulars. Engel bested a final table that included Robert Mizrachi (7th), George Wolff (6th), Phil Hellmuth (5th), and Andrew Yeh (3rd). Engel, the 2018 recipient of the PocketFives Legacy Award, confessed that while he had plenty of experience playing Omaha-8, he wasn’t sure how he would stand up against some of the best players in the world. “All of these guys were pretty great. I wasn’t sure how I would stack up against them and I still don’t know, because one tournament doesn’t tell you that much, but they are clearly phenomenal players. It’s very exciting to play against legends of the game. I’m a fanboy too in addition to being a player.” Engel also pointed out that while this was a different game, his years of final table Hold’em experience helped him in certain spots, as much of the ICM strategy is still the same. “I understand table dynamics and leverage from other tournaments I’ve played so getting the stack was the luck part.” The seven-hour heads-up battle was made a bit easier, or at least more exciting, because of a raucous rail that was cheering Engel on. Some of the railbirds were betting on whether the flops would come out red or black, adding some entertainment to the long grind of heads-up play. Engel was appreciative of the support after his win. “Awesome having a great rail to support you. I had the same at Aussie Millions. My first bracelet, I didn’t have a strong rail. It doesn’t happen often, so when it does it makes it more special. It makes it more fun and enjoyable from a life perspective. If I had lost maybe it would be more painful, but it hasn’t happened yet, so I’m not sure.” Engel adds another $317,000 and change to his already robust poker resume, but for Engel, it doesn’t change much about his plans this summer. In fact, Engel confessed that he doesn’t even have a schedule planned out, instead opting to wait until the day of to decide what to play. “I never have a schedule for the WSOP. I’ve never had one. I came into this one planning to play more mixed games but I wasn’t sure what to an extent. I will be playing any and all Omaha Hi/Los. Not sure about the other games.” Engel did say that he is certainly enticed by playing at the high level of the $10k WSOP champions events, so expect to see him there for sure. “At the 10k level, I’m not sure where I stand on a lot of mixed games, but I’m happy to gamble and find out and maybe get better by playing against better players. We’ll see what happens. I’ll be playing more tournaments than cash, but I’m never really sure where I’ll be playing on a given day.”
  5. Chance Kornuth won his third World Series of Poker bracelet as the self-confessed Short Deck novice won the $10,000-entry event to claim the $194,670 top prize. With a talented selection of six top players returning to the felt in the Thunderdome for the final table, Kornuth got the better of Chad Campbell heads-up as the final duel ended in the poker professional and coaching expert’s favor in dramatic fashion. Kornuth Claims Dramatic Victory Against Campbell The final table of six kicked off with Kornuth in a slim lead over Chad Campbell as the half dozen final table players battled to a winner under the lights. There was a quick bust-out to kick the action off as Thomas Kysar, who came into the action with the shortest stack, busted in sixth place for $32,437 with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Td"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"] as the board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] gave the chip leader two pair to further boost his stack ahead of just four remaining opponents. Next to go was Joao Vieira as the Portuguese player was eliminated by Campbell just a few hands later. Vieira jammed with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] and was called by Campbell with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"]. On the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"], Campbell made two-pair and Vieira missed turn and river to bust for $42,885 in fifth place. With four players remaining, a lot of play took place without anyone losing their stack. Kornuth and Campbell traded places at the top, but neither Dan Shak or fourth-place finisher Moshe Gabay could make any in-roads into their advantage and it was no surprise when Gabay lost his stack next for $58,601. The manner of Gabay’s exit was, however, a shock. Calling Shak’s shove, Gabay was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="As"] and ahead of Shak’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] was a sensational one, however, as while it kept Gabay ahead, it offered Shak the chance of a straight flush, which he duly hit on the [poker card="8c"] turn. The [poker card="Jh"] was insignificant in the extreme and Shak chipped up at Gabay’s expense. Despite winning that hand, Shak couldn’t threaten the leaders and bowed out in third after a courageous run. All-in with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="Js"] gave Kornuth a vital pot to send him into heads-up with a lead of 2.6 million chips to Campbell’s 1.4 million. Shak, meanwhile, went to the rail with a score of $82,678. Heads-up, Kornuth took very little time to emerge victorious, after the shortest battle of the final table. On a board showing [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"], Campbell raise-shoved with [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"] and Kornuth called with a flopped full house, holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"]. The river of [poker card="7d"] ended the event and Kornuth could celebrate his third WSOP title with the bracelet and $194,670 top prize, while Campbell commiserated himself with the runner-up result worth $120,316. Kornuth’s title will feel even sweeter as he proved to his wife Emily that he was able to do it based on some YouTube learning. https://twitter.com/Srirachaaa/status/1449597512495419398 WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Final Table Results: Chance Kornuth - $194,670 Chad Campbell - $120,316 Dan Shak - $82,678 Moshe Gabay - $58,601 Joao Vieira - $42,885 Thomas Kysar - $32,437 Dylan Weisman Gets His First Gold In Event #28, Dylan Weisman sealed a memorable victory in the $1,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha tournament for a top prize of $166,461. Weisman is a name well-known to PLO players, coaching on the popular Upswing Poker site and he utilized his stack advantage over the field to maximum effort in winning his debut WSOP bracelet. Just five players came back to the final table to play out the conclusion of the event, with Weisman holding a big lead coming into the action. Weisman had almost as many chips as his two closest challengers combined and ran over the table to become champion. Before long had elapsed, Weisman had half the chips at the table and watched on as Tim Van Loo busted Ran Niv of Israel in fifth place for $40,109. Van Loo might have been hoping to put those chips to good use, but he was the next to leave, ousted by Alexander Yen in fourth place for $54,230. It was a remarkable run for Van Loo, as not only was it his first appearance at a WSOP final table, but his first World Series cash of any kind, and the young German will be one to watch based on this event. His conqueror in the final hand, Yen, busted in third place for $74,239 in the pivotal hand of the final. Yen’s set of eights was crushed by Weisman’s set of nines and when both players improved to a full house on the board, Weisman knocked out his more dangerous rival in terms of chips. Craig Chait only had 1.7 million to Weisman’s stack of almost 20 million, so it was no surprise when Chait was busted in the runner-up position for $102,884. Weisman’s victory was worth $166,461 and in taking down the tournament, he won his first-ever gold bracelet, to the delight of his many fans and friends on the rail. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Dylan Weisman - $166,461 Craig Chait - $102,884 Alexander Yen - $74,239 Tim Van Loo - $54,230 Ran Niv - $40,109 Chase Fujita - $30,040 Manan Bhandari - $22,787 Youness Barakat - $17,510 Hellmuth In Position For 4th Final Table Phil Hellmuth will go into his fourth final day of an event this World Series, and with the Poker Brat holding over a million chips, there’s a chance the controversial star wins bracelet #16 tomorrow. With only Rep Porter (1,129,000) bagging up more chips than Hellmuth, who totalled 1,016,000 at the close of play, the Poker Brat will be putting on a charm offensive ahead of the final day. A little further back sits Dario Sammartino (800,000) who finished as runner-up in the last live, authentic Las Vegas WSOP Main Event in 2019. Sammartino isn’t the only other big-name chasing down Porter and Hellmuth at the top of the leaderboard. Chris Vitch (447,000), Jake Schwartz (398,000) and Ryan Riess (266,000) will all harbor hopes of victory as they battle for the bracelet on the final day of another prestigious mixed game event, with stars such as Rok Gostisa, Ali Imsirovic and Melanie Weisner all missing out during Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #31 $1,500 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Day Chipcounts: Rep Porter - 1,129,000 Phil Hellmuth - 1,016,000 Kenji Faris - 840,000 Dario Sammartino - 800,000 Jason Papastavrou - 666,000 Jason Lipiner - 663,000 Kevin Gerhart - 581,000 Chris Vitch - 447,000 Jake Schwartz - 398,000 Ryan Riess - 266,000 Ryan Leng, Dylan Linde Score Monster Stacks The massive Monster Stack field was grown to a total of 3,520 players on Day 1b, with 1,219 players making the Day 2 seat draw through both Day 1a (518) and Day 1b (701). The biggest chipstack on Day 1b belonged to Rajaee Wazwaz (510,500), with Pavel Plesuv (483,500) and 2021 bracelet winner Ryan Leng (473,000) the nearest to overtaking the leader at the close of play. Others such as Dylan Linde (443,000), Andrew Neeme (304,500), Upeshka De Silva (219,000), Jesse Sylvia (129,000), Cate Hall (125,000), Ari Engel (108,000) and Ronnie Bardah (75,000) all making the cut. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Rajaee Wazwaz - 510,500 Pavel Plesuv - 483,500 Ryan Leng - 473,000 Mitchell Collins - 465,000 Dylan Linde - 443,000 Francois Pirault - 440,500 Joshua Gordon - 440,500 Yeon Bae - 433,500 La Sengphet - 428,000 Matthew Eng - 424,500 Brian Hastings, Maria Ho In $3K H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Finally, in Event #32, 154 players survived from a Day 1 field of 282 who took part. Lithuanian player Vincas Tamasauskas leads the way with 197,000 chips, from top 10 players such as Brian Hastings (178,400), Maria Ho (169,400), and David Williams (168,900). Elsewhere, John Monnette (120,600), Yuri Dzivielevski (105,800), Ari Engel (95,100), Ryan Laplante (59,000), and John Racener (52,500) all made Day 2 in good chip health, while players such as Frank Kassela, Shaun Deeb, Norman Chad, Mike Matusow, and Chino Rheem all crashed out before the end of the first day. WSOP 2021 Event #32 $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Vincas Tamasauskas - 197,000 John Fahmy - 188,700 Brian Hastings - 178,400 Daryl Aguirre - 174,600 Sachin Bhargava - 173,300 George Alexander - 169,700 Maria Ho - 169,400 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 169,400 David Williams - 168,900 Paramjit Gill - 139,500 Maria Ho, who made it through in seventh place on the leaderboard, revealed her tactics as she made her way from the Rio after a successful day’s work at the felt. https://twitter.com/MariaHo/status/1449534894325977090 Finally, it’s still a few weeks until the WSOP Main Event kicks off, but Phil Hellmuth has kicked off some speculation about his ‘entrance outfit after posting this picture of some old classics. We’ll take some action on a green-blue tracksuit with the number ‘456’ in the corner. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1449148701247639559
  6. Two new WSOP bracelet winners were crowned as Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Championship and Dalibor Dula won a $1,000 Freezeout event, with more gold grabbed by first-timers in both cases. Eisenberg Stages Epic Comeback to Triumph Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Event final table as she triumphed as an against-the-odds short stack to defeat Debora Brooke heads-up for the title. The final day began with just five players remaining, but JJ Liu left the action early. Liu moved all-in on the turn of a board showing [poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Jc"] with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Js"] but was called by Brooke with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jd"] and the [poker card="Th"] river couldn’t save her, leaving Liu to collect her $26,458 prize. Diane Cooley busted in fourth place for $36,269 after her shove on the turn ended in failure to double. The board was [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="6s"] when Cooley pushed all-in with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"], but Lara Eisenberg had turned the flush with [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] and after the [poker card="4c"] river, held the chip lead. In the commentary booth, WSOP legend Lon McEachern shared the mike with Jamie Kerstetter and Hollywood actress Jennifer Tilly, who also knows a thing or two about winning at poker. https://twitter.com/JenniferTilly/status/1448847044651601928 Next to go was the overnight chip leader Mikiyo Aoki, who had doubled up Eisenberg when her ace-queen was shot down by the eventual winner’s ace-king. Aoki was on the rial in third place for $50,525 when her shove with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"] was called by Eisenberg with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] and the board played out [poker card="Td"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"]. Heads-up, Eisenberg had almost double her opponent’s chips, and gradually increased her lead until Brooke had just 1.8 million to the leader’s 11.1 million. At that point, Eisenberg shoved on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="2s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Tc"] with Brooke calling and showing down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"]. Eisenberg had [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"], however, and that kicker played to leave Brooke with the runner-up prize of $71,507 and Eisenberg holding the bracelet and winning the top prize of $115,694. WSOP 2021 Event #22 Ladies Championship Final Table Results: Lara Eisenberg - $115,694 Debora Brooke - $71,507 Mikiyo Aoki - $50,525 Diana Cooley - $36,269 JJ Liu- $26,458 Qing Lu - $19,619 Marle Cordeiro - $14,791 Cherish Andrews - $11,341 Tiffany Lee - $8,847 Thi Nguyen - $7,023 Dalibor Dula Wins Against All-American Opponents Just one player wasn’t American who reached the final table of Event #26, the $1,000-entry freezeout, but that player - Dalibor Dula from the Czech Republic - won the bracelet and $199,227. With only nine players making the final table, Maurice Hawkins and Levi Klump were both eliminated in the same hand as Hawkins shoved for less than a big blind with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jd"], Maxx Coleman re-shoved with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] and Levi Klump called off his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"] immediately put Coleman into the lead and it stayed that way through the [poker card="7h"] turn and [poker card="5s"] river, seeing Hawkins win $17,270 and Klump claim $22,080 for making it one rung higher up the ladder. Just a couple of minutes later, Nicolo Audannio was on the rail in seventh place for $28,565. Audannio moved all-in pre-flop for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8c"] and was called by the initial raiser in the hand, Cole Ferraro with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="9d"] provided no salvation for Audannio and he left as play went six-handed. Anthony Askey was busted in sixth place for $37,393 when his [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"] were up against Edward Welch’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] and saw a flop of two kings and a jack decimate his stack. In the next hand, Askey’s few remaining chips went in with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] and lost to Cole Ferraro’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4h"]. It was high roller Maxx Coleman who busted in fifth place for $49,519 when his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Th"] was shot down by Ferraro’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"] on a board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] which gave the latter a flush on the turn, while Guowei Zhang busted in fourth for $66,335 when he lost tow coinflips in a row to depart, with Dula winning the first and most valuable one wit [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] hitting against Zhang’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. Three-handed play saw Welch eliminated with his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2d"] dominated and defeated by Ferraro’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ts"], with the board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"] cruelly offering Welch hope on the flop then denying him on 4th and 5th streets. Both men held the lead during a rollercoaster heads-up battle, but eventually, Dula led and Ferraro and he were both under 20 big blinds. When Dula moved all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"], Ferraro called it off with just [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8c"], but couldn’t get lucky on the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qc"] board. WSOP 2021 Event #26 $1,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Table Results: Dalibor Dula - $199,227 Cole Ferraro - $123,142 Edward Welch - $89,875 Guowei Zhang - $66,335 Maxx Coleman - $49,519 Anthony Askey - $37,393 Nicolo Audannio - $28,565 Levi Klump - $22,080 Maurice Hawkins - $17,270 Jaffe, Racener, Hall Make $5K Six-Max Final Table The final table of the $5,000-entry Six-Handed Event #25 has been reached and after a day of drama, it was Eric Tsai (8,040,000) who grabbed the chip lead by the close of play. Tsai finished just a short distance ahead of Scott Ball, who bagged up 7,820,000, with Jonathan Jaffe coming into the final third in chips with 6,170,000. Bin Weng (3,980,000), Galen Hall (2,245,000), and John Racener are all a little shorter-stacked, but all have a wealth of experience to draw on as the final six race to a winner on Friday. Elsewhere in the event, players such as Yuri Dzivielevski (30th for $17,995), Frank Kassela (25th for $17,995), Daniel Negreanu (22nd for $21,838) and Nick Petrangelo (13th for $27,150) all made the money but not the business end of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #25 $5,000 Six-Handed NLHE Final Table Chipcounts: Eric Tsai - 8,040,000 Scott Ball - 7,820,000 Jonathan Jaffe - 6,170,000 Bin Weng - 3,980,000 Galen Hall - 2,245,000 John Racener - 1,950,000 Anthony Zinno Leads $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. On Day 2 of the $1,500-entry H.O.R.S.E. Event #27, Anthony Zinno performed at a high level to dominate the day at the felt. Zinno built a massive chip lead with 18 players remaining, with 2,565,000 chips putting him in a commanding lead at the end of the day’s play. At one point, Zinno had twice his nearest challenger’s chips, but Kao Saechao caught up a little to end the day second in chips on 1,495,000, while others to make the top half of the chip counts included Randy Ohel (1,040,000) and Max Pescatori (850,000). With players such as former WSOP Main Event winner Joe McKeehen (835,000) and Ari Engel (300,000) both on Pescatori’s table on Day 3, the action will be intense as players battle towards the top prize of $160,636. With the bubble bursting on Day 2, some players weren’t lucky enough to make any profit or claim vital WSOP Player of the Year points, with Phil Hellmuth, Chino Rheem and Barry Greenstein all finishing outside the money. Others, such as Shaun Deeb, Brian Hastings, Jason Somerville, and Allen Kessler all made the money places but failed to reach the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #27 $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Anthony Zinno - 2,565,000 Kao Saechao - 1,495,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,355,000 Darren Kennedy - 1,330,000 Paul Holder - 1,160,000 Randy Ohel - 1,040,000 Michael Rosenberg - 930,000 Christopher Adams - 920,000 Max Pescatori - 850,000 Joe McKeehen - 835,000 $1K PLO Gets Underway Two more events took place at the Rio on Day 15, with Event #28, the $1,000 PLO 8-Handed tournament seeing 14 hours of gameplay across a mammoth Day 1. With 1,069 total entries, just 59 players ended the night with chips after over 94% of the field fell by the wayside. Ryan Gibson grabbed the chip lead and will go into the second and final day with high hopes of winning the bracelet, piling up 1,940,000 chips as the leader. Alex Yen is Gibson’s closest challenger on 1,314,000 chips, with Jonathan Therme (1,033,000) third in chips. With such a fast-paced day, a lot of players busted before the 161st place player began to earn money. Luminaries such as Daniel Negreanu, Tom McEvoy, Ryan Laplante, Dylan Linde and Sam Razavi all cashed, but missed out on the second day. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 PLO 8-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Gibson - 1,940,000 Alexander Yen - 1,314,000 Jonathan Therme - 1,033,000 Dylan Weisman - 937,000 Michael Perrone - 750,000 Casey Carroll - 680,000 Craig Chait - 664,000 Tegnear Butler - 553,000 Gabe Ramos - 550,000 Youness Barakat - 539,000 Kornuth, Koon Make $10K Short Deck Day 2 Ye Shen bagged the chip lead with 361,400 chips after eight levels of play on the first day of Event #29, with players such as Dan Shak (320,500), Chance Kornuth (262,000), and Jason Koon (235,400) all making the top 10 chip counts on a busy Day 1 in Event #29. With 59 entries being reduced to just 19 players, there are five former WSOP bracelet winners in the hunt for another, with Joao Vieira (199,100), Dan Zack (125,800), Stephen Chidwick (119,500) Daniel Negreanu (95,000), and Ben Yu (73,000) all hoping to go for gold again. WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Top 10 Chipcounts: Ye Shen - 361,400 Young Ko - 340,000 Chad Campbell - 326,300 Dan Shak - 320,500 Chance Kornuth - 262,000 Moshe Gabay - 251,100 Jason Koon - 235,400 Thomas Kysar - 231,000 Joao Vieira - 199,100 Daniel Zack - 125,800 Finally, players of all levels meet and greet at the 2021 World Series of Poker and to prove it, Kid Poker himself, Daniel Negreanu, showed what happens when you meet someone with a common interest. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1448832619790036992
  7. The $25,000-entry Heads Up Championship, Event #11, on the 2021 World Series of Poker schedule was always going to be a dramatic one. With four fantastic players making the final stages of the tournament, finding a winner would be a war of wits like no other as four men played off to meet in the final and then battle it out for the bracelet. Jason Koon Takes Down $25K Heads-Up In the semifinals, Daniel Zack was the first player to hit the rail and that meant a new winner would take home the gold as Zack was the only remaining bracelet winner in the final four. Gabor Szabo had a nut flush early to work himself into a massive lead, before making a great call with bottom pair just a few hands later. Sealing the deal with a Broadway straight against Zack’s two-pair, Szabo awaited the winner of another titanic tussle on the other table. It was a lengthy scrap for the other place in the final as Finnish online boss Henri ‘ButtonClickr’ Pusstinen was shot down by Jason Koon. Puustinen was a tricky customer and Koon found it difficult to close the match out. Puustinen dropped behind early in the match-up but consistently found a way to survive until Koon’s two pair eventually got the job done against the Finn’s bottom pair. In the final, neither player took a distinctive lead for over an hour as play started tentatively with the bracelet on the line. Koon moved into the lead but that was reversed by the talented Hungarian who established a 2:1 lead. Koon was all-in for his tournament life with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"] and was called by Szabo with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] before a dramatic flop of [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="4h"] gave both men a big sweat. The turn of [poker card="Jd"] and river of [poker card="Js"] kept Koon alive and vaulted him into the lead, but Szabo evened up the stacks to almost level by the time the pivotal hand arrived, with both men committing their stacks to the middle pre-flop and over 90% of the chips being on the line with Koon holding [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"] and Szabo dominated with [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"]. The flop of [poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"] saw Koon remain in the lead and nothing altered that on the [poker card="9h"] turn. When the [poker card="Qd"] river fell, Koon had an overwhelming lead. Just a few hands later it was all over and the newly named GGPoker ambassador had ended his long career wait for a WSOP bracelet. Szabo was all-in and at risk pre-flop with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9d"] and Koon, who had pushed all-in with [poker card="Js"][poker card="7d"] needed to hit. The flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5h"] saw jacks once again come to Koon’s rescue and after the [poker card="8d"] turn and [poker card="6h"] river, Koon had won his first-ever WSOP bracelet and the $243,981 top prize, with Szabo claiming $150,790 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #11 $25,000 Heads Up Championship Results: Jason Koon - $243,981 Gabor Szabo - $150,790 Henri Puustinen -$89,787 Daniel Zack - $89,787 Mikita Badziakouski - $36,280 Bin Weng - $36,280 Benjamin Reason - $36,280 Jake Daniels - $36,280 https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1446398841264087044 Former #1 Ari Engel Wins $10K Omaha 8 Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Ari Engel was a popular winner in Event #9, the $10,000-entry Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship, where Phil Hellmuth busted out first of the final five. Hellmuth went all the way to the river against Engel and Eddie Blumenthal, but his two opponents ended up chopping the pot and sending the 15-time bracelet winner to the rail for a cash worth $80,894. With four players remaining, it was Blumenthal who was next to go, eliminated in fourth place for $107,204. The American busted to the eventual winner when Engel’s higher flush edged out his opponent and strengthened his chip lead. Engel then busted his next victim when his nut flush and low hand scooped the pot against Andrew Yeh, who received $143,988 for coming third. With Engel holding a better than 4:1 chip lead, the final battle could have been simple, but it was anything other than that. Over the course of almost eight hours and one of the longest heads-up matches in living memory, Engel and his opponent, Zachary Milchman both held the lead on multiple occasions. Both men had chances to seal victory long before Engel’s two pair queens and tens topped Milchman’s queens and eights. While Milchman brought home $195,968 for a runner-up result, it was Engel’s day and his second bracelet, which came with a top prize of $317,076. WSOP 2021 Event #9 $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Final Table Results: Ari Engel - $317,076 Zachary Milchman - $195,968 Andrew Yeh - $143,988 Eddie Blumenthal - $107,204 Phil Hellmuth - $80,894 George Wolff - $61,877 Robert Mizrachi - $47,987 Ben Landowski - $37,738 Khamar Xaytavone - $30,102 https://twitter.com/AriEngelPoker/status/1446382753910439937 Bronshtein Scores Second Career Bracelet The third and final WSOP bracelet winner of the day came in Event #12, the $1,500 Limit Hold’em event. It was Yuval Bronshtein who eventually prevailed in another lengthy battle into the small hours at the Rio. Heading into the final table, Kevin Erickson had the chip lead and he made that count over the course of the final day, with 16 players reduced to the final table in just a couple of hours play. Despite that momentum, Erickson would run out of luck at just the wrong moment. Working himself into a heads-up battle against Bronshtein with a 3:1 chip lead, Erickson improved that dramatically to look nailed on for the win with an 18:1 chip lead a short time later. Bronshtein somehow worked his way back into contention, however, and managed to turn the tide to go 3:1 up in chips himself. On the final hand, Bronshtein got it into the middle with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kd"], which was way ahead of Erickson’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qd"] and stayed there through the jack-high board to relegate Erickson to runner-up for $76,868 and give Bronshtein $124,374 and the much-coveted WSOP bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #12 $1,500 Limit Hold'em Top 10 Chipcounts: Yuval Bronshtein - $124,374 Kevin Erickson - $76,868 Tom McCormick - $53,588 John Bunch - $38,011 Ian Glycenfer - $27,488 Zachary Gruneberg - $20,262 Guy Cicconi - $15,230 Tony Nasr - $11,677 Anh Van Nguyen - $9,137 https://twitter.com/Yuvee04/status/1446408541682556928 Final Table Set For $3K Freezeout In the 13th event of the 2021 WSOP, the $3,000 NLHE Freezeout event, it was Brandon Caputo who captured the chip lead heading into the final day. With just seven players remaining, Caputo’s stack of 7,200,000 was a little ahead of Belgian player Michael Gathy (6,700,000), the four-time WSOP bracelet winner, with Gabriel Andrade (4,900,000) a little further back. Elsewhere in the event, several players made the money without managing to seal a final table seat, with Betrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier (32nd for $9,299), Sergio Aido (21st for $10,816) and Niall Farrell (12th for $18,815) all going close to the final seven but falling short. Andrew Jeong, the Day 1 chip leader, bubbled the last day in 8th place for $37,824 when his top pair with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"] on a flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"] couldn’t hold against Gathy’s [poker card="8d"][poker card="6c"] for two pair. The turn of [poker card="Td"] and river [poker card="9d"] ended the hand, sent Jeong to the rail, and ended the day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #13: $3,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Table Chipcounts: Brandon Caputo - 7,200,000 Michael Gathy - 6,700,000 Gabriel Andrade - 4,900,000 Craig Mason - 2,780,000 Harvey Mathews - 2,520,000 Girish Apte - 2,425,000 David Lolis - 2,295,000 Shaun Deeb, David Williams At Event #14 Final Table Event #14, the $1,500 Seven Card Stud event, saw six players remain with chips after a rollercoaster day sent a former WSOP world champion to the rail in the money and plenty of other big names missed out on the final day. Tom McEvoy (29th for $2,687) worked his way to a min-cash, while Day 1 chip leader Elias Hourani lasted a little longer to go out in 20th place for $3,390. Anthony Zinno ran all the way to 11th place for (5,338), but missed out on the last half-dozen, which were headlined by Rafael Lebron with 1.69 million chips. Of the six players who survived Day 2 as 76 players were cut down to just half a dozen, Shaun Deeb (1,195,000) and David Williams (1,050,000) will look to add to already legendary WSOP resumes with victory on the third and final day of the event. They’ll both be desperate to win the next WSOP Gold Bracelet and the $82,262 top prize to go with it. WSOP 2021 Event #14: $1,500 Seven Card Stud Final Table Chipcounts: Rafael Lebron - 1,690,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,195,000 David Moskowitz - 1,150,000 David Williams - 1,050,000 Nicholas Seiken - 970,000 Christina Hill - 435,000 $1,500 Six-Handed Kicks Off Event #15 saw players take to the action in the $1,500 Six-Handed tournament, with 96 players surviving from a Day 1 field of 1,450 total entries. The chip leader at the close of play was Daniel Orgil, who ended the day with a,650,000. He was followed by Daniel Rezaei (1,266,000) and Jun Obara (1,200,000) as well as plenty of other big names, such as Jonas Mackoff (502,000), Melanie Weisner (467,000), Joni Jouhkimainen (320,000), Darren Elias (265,000) and the man who has more WSOP cashes than anyone, Roland Israelashvili (262,000). WSOP 2021 Event #15 $1,500 NLHE Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Daniel Orgil - 1,650,000 Daniel Rezaei - 1,266,000 Jun Obara - 1,200,000 Steve Foutty - 971,000 Jesse Yaginuma - 843,000 Jeremy Eyer - 825,000 Itai Levy - 782,000 Jared Ambler - 635,000 Sean Hegarty - 621,000 Mark Liedtke - 616,000 Dzivielevski, Nate Silver In $10K Limit Top 10 It took until the small hours of the night for Event #16, the $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship, to wind to a close as 78 players were more than halved to just 35 hopefuls heading into Day 2. The chip leader at the end of the opening night’s play was Eric Kurtman, who bagged up 466,000 chips, some distance ahead of his nearest rivals Andony Wasaya (314,000) and two-time WSOP event winner Yuri Dzivielevski, who made it through with a stack of 270,000. Elsewhere in the top 10 chipcounts, Nate Silver (198,000) and Chad Eveslage (162,000) will both be hoping to add to their poker resumes with a bracelet, while former bracelet winners Chris Vitch (162,000) and Anthony Zinno (159,000) are also very well placed for more glory on the final day of the event. Some players not to make the next day's play, missing out on the money bubble, which is yet to burst, included Scott Seiver, Jake Daniels, David Benyamine, Mark Gregorich, David 'ODB' Baker, Eli Elezra, Dan Zack, Ronnie Bardah, Daniel Negreanu and Robert Mizrachi. WSOP 2021 Event #16 $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Eric Kurtzman - 466,000 Andony Wasaya - 314,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 270,000 Casey Mccarrel - 232,000 Christopher Chung - 201,000 Nate Silver - 198,000 Mike Thorpe - 178,000 Christopher Vitch - 162,000 Chad Eveslage - 162,000 Anthony Zinno - 159,000
  8. The 2021 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas is here and that means there’s simply no time to waste. So, without further ado, let’s get star--- DON’T GO OUT THE NIGHT BEFORE YOUR FIRST TOURNAMENT AND PLAY BEER PONG AT O’SHEA’S WHILE DRINKING SIX IRISH CAR BOMBS THEN THINK IT’S A GOOD IDEA TO STAY UP UNTIL 7 AM AND LOSE 10 BUY-INS ON A $1/$2 TABLE AT THE FLAMINGO. Go out, by all means. Just don’t do that. Have you ever been so hungover that you completely forget what it’s like to not be hungover? Over-partying is easily done in Las Vegas, but a throbbing head and overwhelming nausea is the last thing you want when you’re heading to the Rio to play your first ever WSOP event. Save that for your final night in town. DO GET EXCITED. You’re at the WSOP! You made it! Don’t let some moaning, jaded veteran at your table dampen your spirits. If you feel anxious beforehand, that’s completely normal. Playing for a bracelet is a big deal and you don’t know what will happen. But while anxiety suggests you should fear the uncertainty, excitement views the uncertainly as something to look forward to. So, get excited and enjoy the action. DON’T OVERLOAD ON CAFFEINE. Any anxiety you do feel pre-tournament will only be made worse if you chug four coffees before making your way to the Rio. Instead, find different ways to wake yourself up and save the healing power of coffee for later in the day, like bracelet winner and former #1-ranked online pro Ari Engel does. “I try and go to the gym most mornings and limit caffeine in the morning so it’s more effective in the evening when I’m playing tournaments,” says Engel. DO REGISTER THE NIGHT BEFORE. On the night before your first event, why not stop by the Rio before heading out for dinner? That way, not only will you know what to expect, you can also take care of something that first-timers often overlook: “Make sure you register the day before the tournament, especially if it's a big weekend event,” says WSOP czar Kevin “Kevmath” Mathers. “No one wants to be stuck in a long line when the tournament starts.” Registration is available 24/7. DON’T STRESS YOURSELF OUT. Keep your mornings stress-free by limiting your obligations to others and planning your food/travel the night before. That way you can just relax pre-poker. “I like to give myself time before I go play so that my brain is actually awake and functioning,” says three-time WSOP bracelet winner Benny “RunGodlike” Glaser. “I'll meditate a bit if I have time, so my mind isn’t cluttered with unnecessary things. I also try not to eat huge meals that will slow me down mentally or give me an insulin crash after.” To help matters further when playing, Mathers suggests downloading the Bravo Poker Live app on your phone. “It shows you when tournament breaks are coming, the status of the dinner break, and how close you are to reaching the money.” At the Rio the food options can be limited and expensive, so Kevmath also suggests packing snacks and drinks in your bag, along with other items you consider essential. DO WEAR LAYERS. “The Rio is notorious for keeping the tournament rooms cooler than you're used to,” says Kevmath. “Be sure to bring a hoodie or wear layers that you can add or remove as needed.” And if you have to wear something warm, why not have some fun with it? “When people see me in a stupid bear suit, it's not just because the Rio is an ice cube,” says two-time bracelet winner Brandon Shack-Harris. “I'm from Chicago, so what do I care? I do it because there's a point in the Series where I've bricked infinite tournaments and I'm too mentally fried to read enough Stoic Philosophies to get through tomorrow's $1,500 Limit Hold ‘Em Event.” DON’T RUSH. Break times in big WSOP tournaments can get hectic. Don’t feel obliged to rush. Remember, there are two outcomes when you’re sprinting back to the table trying not to miss a hand: 1. You’re going to be flustered and your heart racing, so chances you probably won’t play the hand to the best of your ability anyway. 2. You’re probably going to be dealt seven-deuce-offsuit. “I try not to race back to the table,” says Shack-Harris. “If I miss a hand, that's fine. Unless running is going to make me happy for some reason, I'm walking, and I'll get there when I get there.” DO AVOID BAD BEAT STORIES. Talk strategy with friends on breaks, sure, but if you catch yourself beginning to tell a bad beat story--or being forced to listen to one--get out of there. “Forget about beats,” says Shack-Harris. “While it's important to acknowledge hands you could've played better, do it once and let them go.” Instead, on breaks, Shack-Harris likes to get outside and find some peace. “I find it helpful to shut my brain off, so I don’t bother looking at my phone,” he says. “Find a quiet spot and think about adjustments you’ll make in the next level. “There have been times where I've grabbed my skateboard mid-tournament and taken it outside for 10 minutes to calm my brain down and get some air. Sometimes you've got to leave the table and reset!” DON’T BEAT YOURSELF UP OVER BUSTING. OK, so you busted the tournament. That sucks. But you know what? You’re still in Las Vegas. “I care less about busting tournaments in Vegas than I do other places because there are so many things to do there,” says Glaser. “There are lots of good bars and clubs, shows, and restaurants to choose from. Or you can even get away from the strip and see some nature, maybe go on a hike somewhere like Red Rock. It can be really nice for resetting and calming the mind.” Just do what your body and mind want to do. “It's such an intense grind and it's so cognitively taxing that it's important to give yourself a rest sometimes,” says Glaser. DO BE KIND TO YOURSELF. Playing at the WSOP is special, whether you’re ticking it off the bucket list or back for the tenth time. But it can be a long grind, so whatever happens, be gentle with yourself. “Throughout the Series, there are ebbs and flows and I’ll make adjustments to stay sane,” says Shack-Harris. “It's important to be kind to yourself and allow yourself to eat shit food if it's going to be convenient or if it will bring your spirits up. Just be aware that you might have to bail in the middle of Level 9 to handle some...extra business.”
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