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Found 3 results

  1. In the history of High Stakes Poker there are few players who have moved the needle the way that Tom Dwan has. On this week's episode of HSP, Dwan was his usual aggressive self, playing plenty of hands and when all was said and done he had in fact moved the needle this week, to an uptick of over $300,000. It didn't take long for the fireworks to start. On the first hand of the show, Jason Koon, who took Phil Ivey's seat last week, straddled to $1,600. Action folded around to Jake Daniels in the big blind and he raised to $4,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="3h"]. Koon checked his cards and then told Daniels, "I'm going to call you with a really bad hand" before putting in the additional $2,400 with [poker card="ts"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="6h"] flop gave Koon middle pair. Daniels bet $2,700 and Koon called. The turn was the [poker card="ah"] and Daniels fired again, betting $8,100 into the $14,600 pot. Koon called. The [poker card="ac"] completed the board and Daniels took some time before betting $40,000. Koon tanked for a full minute before folding, giving Daniels an early $16,200 boost. The hot streak continued for Daniels on the next hand. After Daniels straddled for $1,600, Koon raised to $3,500 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"], Dwan called with [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"], and Hernandez came along with [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"]. Daniels also called with [poker card="8h"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8s"] flop gave Daniels trip eights. Everybody checked to Dwan who bet $5,500. Hernandez and Daniels called forcing a fold from Koon. The [poker card="jc"] turn improved both Hernandez and Dwan's outs, but left Daniels ahead. Action checked again to Dwan and fired $22,000 into the pot. Hernandez folded and Daniels called to see the [poker card="ah"] river. Daniels checked to Dwan who contemplated a bet before frustratingly tapping the table to check, giving Daniels the opportunity to show the winner and take the $75,700 pot. With Phil Hellmuth steaming after laying down pocket tens earlier in the session, the 15-time World Series of Poker Bracelet winner raised to $3,800 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] after Dwan straddled. Lazaro Hernandez re-raised to $8,500 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"] which got Hellmuth talking. "I love poker," Hellmuth told the table. "You guys can't beat me today I don't think." Meanwhile, Dwan called with [poker card="jd"][poker card="5d"] before Hellmuth folded. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] flop gave Dwan control with top pair. Dwan check-called Hernandez's bet of $15,000. The [poker card="4s"] turn gave Dwan another opportunity to check to Hernandez who threw out a bet of $25,000. Dwan called again. The [poker card="4h"] river changed nothing and Dwan checked again. Hernandez bet $30,000 into the $102,800 pot. Dwan took some time before calling and showing the winner to take down the biggest pot of the night to that point. Daniels and Koon weren't done clashing though. Daniels opened to $2,200 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"] before Koon, sitting to Daniels' direct left, three-bet to $8,000 with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"]. Action folded back to Daniels who put in yet another raise, this time making it $29,000 to go. Koon called to send the two players to a flop of [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"][poker card="4s"]. Daniels led out for $14,300 and Koon called. The [poker card="3s"] turn gave Koon outs to a flush. Daniels did not slow down and bet $40,000 and Koon called again. The river was the [poker card="2h"] and Daniels moved all in for $128,400. Koon asked for an official count and spent nearly five minutes in the tank before calling and being shown the winning hand. Daniels won the $425,400 pot to add $213,000 to his stack. All of that money didn't stay in Daniels' stack for long. Dwan straddled, and Hellmuth raised to $3,600 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="9s"]. Daniels re-raised to $11,500 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"], Dwan called with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] and Hellmuth folded. The flop came [poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] and Dwan checked to Daniels who bet $8,200. Dwan raised to $30,000 and Daniels called. The [poker card="qh"] turn was a brick for both players. Dwan checked to Daniels who bet $40,200 which got another call from Dwan. The [poker card="td"] turn completed Dwan's flush draw but he opted to check. Daniels took the bait and bet $90,000. Dwan tanked briefly before calling to take down the $349,000 pot. After the hand, Daniels admitted he didn't notice that the river completed a potential flush draw. That was the final hand of the episode and ensured Dwan finished as the big winner. Dwan won $331,700 on this episode. Daniels was the only other player to crack the six-figure win mark, taking home $128,800. Hernandez was the biggest loser on this episode, dropping $108,700. The next episode of High Stakes Poker airs on Wednesday, March 3 on PokerGO.
  2. James Bord had a story about a bike ride. Chamath Palihapitiya had some insight on how the Houston Rockets changed basketball. And Phil Hellmuth had a rant about just how bad others play. That and a handful of six-figure pots were the highlights from this week's episode of High Stakes Poker on PokerGO. Joining Hellmuth, Bord, Palihapitiya, at the start of the episode were Phil Ivey, Tom Dwan, Lazaro Hernandez, Jake Daniels, and Brandon Adams. As usual, the stakes were $400/$800 for the No Limit Hold'em cash game. As he is prone to do, Dwan decided to show some aggression early. Hernandez called from UTG with [poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"], Daniels raised to $4,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="7d"] before Dwan re-raised to $17,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"]. Hernandez folded but Daniels clicked back, making it $51,000 to go. Dwan took a moment before moving all in for $174,000 forcing Daniels to muck his cards. Dwan added $52,200 to his stack without even seeing a flop. Not long after regaling the table with his story about attempting to win a prop bet by riding a bike from Miami to Los Angeles, Bord sent Hellmuth on a trip to Tiltsville. From UTG, Bord called with [poker card="as"][poker card="9s"]. Daniels, with [poker card="2c"][poker card="2h"], and Ivey, holding [poker card="7d"][poker card="4d"], both called. From the big blind however, Hellmuth raised to $4,800 with [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"]. All three players called to see a flop of [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"][poker card="td"]. Hellmuth opted to check and Bord bet $7,000, forcing Ivey and Daniels to fold. Hellmuth called and then checked in the dark. The [poker card="ac"] on the turn gave Bord top pair. He bet $12,000 sending Hellmuth into an early tailspin. Hellmuth: "What are you doing, Bordie?" Bord: "I believe it's called gambling." Hellmuth: "You trying to give me money?" Bord: "Yeah, definitely." Hellmuth called and then checked when the [poker card="6s"] completed the board. Bord turned over the winning hand and Hellmuth launched into a rant that had PokerGO's sensors pounding the beep button. The Poker Brat routine continued through the next hand that saw Hellmuth win a small pot off of Dwan with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"]. After giving Dwan the rundown on Bord's win, Hellmuth made it clear he was over it. "I've processed it," Hellmuth said, speaking to Bord. "You're going down. Ten years ago, you might have tilted me, but now I see it for what it was." In the aftermath of Hellmuth's loss, his good friend Palihapitiya became the latest player to make quads this season and the venture capitalist got paid. After Palihapitiya straddled to $1,600, Dwan raised to $5,000 with [poker card="7d"][poker card="5h"], Hellmuth folded [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] before Palihapitiya re-raised to $17,000. Dwan called. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Palihapitiya a set and left Dwan with bottom pair. Palihapitiya bet $20,000 and Dwan called. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Palihapitiya quad nines and with the pot at $76,000, both players checked. The [poker card="7c"] river gave Dwan two pair. Palihapitiya bet $85,000 and Dwan leaned back in his chair smiling, eventually telling Palihapitiya, "kinda feels like you might be going for it". Dwan called and Palihapitiya showed him the goods and raked in a $246,000 pot. Palihapitiya featured in the next big pot, this time taking on Adams. Palihapitiya raised to $2,300 with [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"] and Adams called with [poker card="3h"][poker card="3s"]. Adams moved ahead after the [poker card="tc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"] flop. Palihapitiya lead for $4,000 before Adams raised to $14,000. Palihapitiya called and then checked after the [poker card="2c"] turn. Adams bet $22,000 and Palihapitiya called. The [poker card="8d"] river got Palihapitiya to check again. Adams bet $35,000 and Palihapitiya called and Adams took down the $148,600 pot. At this point, Ivey left the game having not played a significant pot on this episode. Jason Koon replaced him and sat down with $500,000 but stayed out of the picture though the end of the episode. The last significant hand featured the key figures in the big pots played by Palihapitiya. From UTG, Adams raised to $2,500 with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. Action folded around to Dwan in the big blind and he re-raised to $10,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ah"]. Adams called. The flop came [poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"] and Adams called Dwan's bet of $15,000. The [poker card="ts"] turn gave Adams the nut flush draw. Dwan bet $40,000 and once again, Adams called. The [poker card="4h"] river was no help for Adams. With the pot at $131,200, Dwan moved ll in for $145,000 effective and Adams threw his cards away, allowing Dwan to take the pot and add $65,400 to his winnings for the episode. Dwan ended up with a $78,000 net win but was not the biggest winner. Thanks largely to making quads against Dwan's rivered two pair, Palihapitiya ended up with a $87,100 uptick. The biggest loser on the show was Lazaro Hernandez who lost $89,700. Hellmuth wound up losing $38,500. The next episode of High Stakes Poker debuts on PokerGO on Wednesday, February 24 and once again features Hellmuth, Dwan, and Koon.
  3. The Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity will be a record setter when action kicks off Thursday. The £1,050,000 buy-in tournament will make it the biggest buy-in in poker history, and the event comes with a unique format. It's a freezeout where recreational/businessmen players can enter via invite only. Those invited can then issue one invite of their own to a guest/professional players. As of Wednesday morning, 26 pairings had been named, but it's the 'what could have beens' that are equally as intriguing. Let's take a look at a handful of recreational-professional pairings that we would've liked to have seen compete in the Triton Million. Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth It's no secret that Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth have a close relationship. We've seen it on Hellmuth's social media accounts all too often. A former Facebook executive and now a successful investor, Palihapitiya fits the mold of the perfect recreational poker player to enter this field. He's played poker in the past, including the first-ever World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop that cost $1,000,000 to enter, and has three WSOP cashes and two World Poker Tour cashes. Being good friends with Hellmuth makes Hellmuth the perfect invitee for Palihapitiya, and getting the polarizing 15-time gold bracelet winner in the field would be very entertaining. Isai Scheinberg and Daniel Negreanu Now this, this is a pairing, and we'll call it 'getting the band back together.' The founder of PokerStars, Isai Scheinberg, paired with the company's former golden boy, Daniel Negreanu. It would be absolutely tremendous to see, and we all know both parties have enough money to afford the gigantic £1,050,000 buy-in. We all know how skillful and experienced of a poker player Negreanu is, but Scheinberg has conquered the felt before, too. He won the UKIPT Isle of Man High Roller in the same year that Negreanu finished second in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. Tiger Woods and Antonio Esfandiari How can we not want to have Antonio Esfandiari, 'the magician,' the first-ever $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop winner, in the field? In order to make this happen, he needs a recreational player to invite him. Who bigger and better than Tiger Woods? You may be asking yourself, does Woods play poker and what's the connection here? Yes, Woods plays poker. He might not be entering the priciest tournaments in the world as some of these other recreational players are, but he’s the host of Tiger's Poker Night as part of Tiger Jam, held in partnership with the World Poker Tour each year, so he knows the game. On more than one occasion, Esfandiari has been one of the celebrity professionals to attend Tiger's Poker Night. Dan Fleyshman and Phil Ivey How do we get Phil Ivey in this field? We pair him with Dan Fleyshman, that’s how. Fleyshman doesn’t dabble in poker as he once did, but he’s still around the game enough that he could perform well in this tournament. One of his claims to fame is being the youngest founder of a publicly traded company and he's an active businessman and investor. Ivey is Ivey. His star power alone is worthy of entry into a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament, and we all know he has the chops to perform on the felt. He knows Fleyshman, so the pairing works, and we’d absolutely love to see Ivey in the field. David Einhorn and Erik Seidel Investor and hedge fund manager David Einhorn may not be a professional poker player, but he’s as avid a recreational player as they come. He's been known to compete in the highest buy-in poker tournaments the world has to offer, and he took third place for $4,352,000 in the first-ever $1,000,000 buy-in poker tournament the world has ever seen. With Einhorn being a New York guy, a perfect pairing would be Erik Seidel. Seidel is currently third on poker’s all-time money list with more than $35,000,000 in winnings, he’s an eight-time WSOP gold bracelet winner, and also a WPT champion. Although he’s of an older generation of players, Seidel continues to be a crusher on the high-stakes poker scene and has plenty of experience against the fellow professional players in the field. Haralabos Voulgaris and Daniel Colman Since Haralabos Voulgaris' new gig with the Dallas Mavericks, he hasn't been around the poker scene much. Not that the former professional sports bettor was grinding every tournament under the sun before he became the NBA team's Director of Quantitative Research and Development, but Voulgaris was known to get down in the high-stakes arena. Having played a couple million-dollar buy-ins before, this event is right in his wheelhouse. Voulgaris and Daniel Colman have a relationship that saw Voulgaris on Colman’s rail when Colman won the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. It would also be fitting to see Colman return to poker’s public stage in the largest buy-in event in the game’s history. Evan Mathis and Alex Foxen Maybe we’re reaching here, maybe we’re not, but these are dream scenarios so let’s keep rolling with it. Evan Mathis spent 12 years in the NFL and was one of the league’s top offensive lineman. He won a Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos and reached the Pro Bowl on two occasions. According to Spotrac, Mathis has estimated career earnings from football at more than $21,000,000. He recently grabbed headlines when he sold a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle for nearly $3 million. That’s enough to pay for his entry, his guest’s entry, and have plenty left over. Sticking with the football tie-in, Mathis’ guest could be Alex Foxen, a former football player for Boston College. These two would be quite the presence on and off the felt and both have the skills to compete. Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess Another fantasy Triton Million pairing is Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess. This would give us who is arguably poker’s strongest mainstream connection, Seymour, in the field and the three-time Super Bowl winner has plenty of experience on the felt. He just came off a 131st-place finish in the WSOP Main Event. A huge sports enthusiast and a player friendly with Seymour is Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 WSOP Main Event and also a WPT champion. Steve Aoki and Brian Rast The last dream pairing we'll look at involves superstar DJ Steve Aoki and top poker player Brian Rast. The two know each other, so the connection works for the invite, and Aoki has been known to play a bit of poker in his spare time. With Aoki being billed as one of the richest DJs in the world, the cake-tossing music maker should have enough cash to enter. If not, Rast can certainly front or find the money to get Aoki in so that he can play in the event. How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
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