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Found 8 results

  1. Nine years ago, a 22-year-old Michigan State graduate called Ryan Riess won the World Series of Poker Main Event for over $8.3 million. At the time, he was six months out of college, having spent the last months of his studies alternating between poker dealer. Just a few weeks later, the final hand of the 2013 WSOP Main Event saw the Riess' life change forever. Between winning a World Series bankroll with the last money to his name and today, a decade of growth, fatherhood and memories have seen ‘Riess the Beast’ become one of the most well-respected poker players on the planet. This is the story of the hand that changed Ryan Riess’ young life. Coming into the WSOP With Momentum “It was all the money I had to my name. I chopped it three ways and won $270,000.” Having momentum in poker is something that is spoken about often, and it was one of the main contributions to Riess’ success at the Rio nine years ago in November. After graduating in business at Michigan State, Riess decided to play a WSOP Circuit event in Hammond in October 2012. The cost was not only out of his usual bankroll, but everything he had. “It was a $1,675 buy-in and it was all the money I had to my name,” the 2013 world champion told us. “I chopped it three ways and won $270,000. That was my first ever live tournament cash and how my poker career started.” Two months earlier, Riess had started playing poker full-time. After winning some small cashes in tournaments around Los Angeles, Riess took that momentum into a World Series where he played everything he could afford. “I had a bunch of smaller cashes and was about breakeven - expenses are high - then played the Main Event. I sold pieces to family and friends and swapped pieces. I had a little over 50%, which was good. I had a lot of momentum but was still relatively new to tournament poker. I was starting to become friends with people on the circuit; we were all young at the time and learning together.” Kicking off his Main Event on Day1a, Riess had players such as Mike Matusow and T.J. Cloutier at his table. Despite this, he bagged up plenty of chips, more than double that which he started with. “I was very naïve, which was a good thing. I put my head down; I wasn’t following the other tables or live updates and never thought about how much money I was playing for, so was never scared.” Believing He Could Win “Looking back, I don’t think I was the best player in the world.” Riess may have been a long way off from winning, but that was all to change. In the middle period of the Main Event, he admits that he sat on less than 30 big blinds for “two or three days” but a pivotal coinflip went his way when his pocket nines survived against Rep Porter’s suited king-jack. “The atmosphere was electric,” laughs Riess. “Others might have thought I was trying to run the table over, but I wasn’t; I kept getting good hands. If I lose that hand, I have nine big blinds left. I won the flip and that propelled me to having 50 big blinds and I had a lot more flexibility with my stack.” After Riess won the Main Event, he would state that he was ‘the best player in the world’, but he concedes this wasn’t actually the truth. It was more about the belief he needed to have in order to accomplish his dream. “I think in order to win something, you have to believe it before and then work tirelessly,” he says. “Looking back, I don’t think I was the best player in the world. I wasn’t even in the top 1,000. But I truly believed I was at the time and I think that gave me a chance to win. If I didn’t believe I was the best, I probably shouldn’t even have registered the tournament in the first place.” Winning that hand against Porter would see Riess make the final table, but he was far from the chip leader, who was JC Tran. A host of other more experienced pros were at the final table. “Tran was really unlucky at the final table after coming in as the chip leader and not being able to get much going. I thought the best player at the table was Marc Etienne McLaughlin,” says Riess. “He was very good, very aggressive and I tried to bluff him in a hand on TV when I turned two jacks into a bluff and fours spades almost counterfeited his two spades. He eventually got coolered and that gave me energy because I found it hard winning pots against him. David Benefield is a world class player and he got short and was handcuffed, too.” Benefield and Riess were the only two not to wear sponsorship patches at the final table. “I’ve never accepted any sponsorship deal or worn patches. I turned down a lot of money, but I didn’t want them to say you have to do this interview at this time, wear this shirt, do this social media post. I didn’t want anything to cloud my judgement. I thought the responsibility of what I’ve have to do would be greater than the value of what they were offering me. Maybe if I’d worn a patch, I’d have had to have done other stuff, wouldn’t have studied as much and not won.” Taking on Farber for the Win “As a poker player, that’s the dream. It’s the Super Bowl of our sport.” Riess had never played against Jay Farber before that year’s Main Event, nor did he feel they’d played any significant pots against each other until they were the only two players left. Suddenly, though, one of them was going to win $5.1 million and the other would take $8.3m and become champion of the world. “We started with around the same chips and I just decided to be aggressive. We played around 90 hands and I was raised all 45 buttons. I was very inexperienced. Looking back, I’d fold or limp some hands, but I wanted to put pressure on him. He was only three-betting me with really good hands.” Riess was forcing the action, but admits that while he wanted to raise in order to see flops in position with almost his entire range, he was also getting the run of the deck. “In heads up poker, so much comes down to hand distribution,” he says. “If Jay had my hands and I had his, if it was switched, he probably would have won.” Pre-flop: Ryan Riess: [Ah][poker card="Kh"] Jay Farber: [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"] Before the flop, riess raised his 45th and final button, and almost immediately got raised all-in by Farber. Riess snap-called and one of the fastest final all-in and calls in Main Event history saw the two men on their feet. Riess admits that he was surprised to see what Farber had shoved with. “I was surprised to see that hand specifically. Maybe if the hand happened again, he might just call, but I was raising every button and I just happened to have it. He might have thought he was getting run over at the table, but I was just getting the cards. Heads up, if you’re losing it can be demoralising. I’ve lost to people heads-up, I actually played Koray Aldemir, our newest world champion - and I was losing pots, got frustrated and ended up doing things out of character. It’s emotionally draining to lose hands heads-up.” Headint to the embrace of his friends and family, Riess was ‘pretty confident’ but knew that anything could happen. He was a 65% chance to become the world champion and the moment was catching up with him. Flop: [poker card="4c"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"] “The flop was really good for me,” Riess says. “He couldn’t hit his queen any more, because it would give me a straight so it was the best flop I could have asked for without flopping a pair. After the flop, having all my friends and family around me gave me such good vibes.” Turn: [poker card="3c"] “Tears already in the eyes of Ryan Riess.” Said the commentary team as the moment that would change Riess’ life played out. The emotion of the achievement that he was about to claim was monumental. [caption id="attachment_638157" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Hunched on the floor of the Rio, Ryan Riess is hit by the emotion of what he might be about to achieve.[/caption] “That’s when it really became real for me. It was the weight of having everyone support me. We’re that close and it was a very surreal moment. I’m glad I won, because if the river was a five, it might have been very hard for me mentally for me to sit back at the table and play my best, because in my head I’d already won.” As Jay Farber commiserated with his coaches, two men Riess himself now counts among his poker friends, Shaun Deeb and Chance Kornuth, tie seemed to stand still. “I’m friends with both of them and we talk frequently. They’re both great - he had great coaches and it’s hard to beat someone with those coaches. I just had better cards on the day. River: [poker card="4d"] Riess collapsed to the ground, his poker ambitions coming true in glorious reality. Nine years on, Riess says he doesn’t watch it back as much as he should. “It brings back such great memories. As a poker player, that’s the dream. It’s the Super Bowl of our sport. To reach the pinnacle of the game that you love is the ultimate dream as a poker player.” Pining for the November Nine Amid a wild atmosphere in the Thunderdome, Riess now believes part of that excitement came down to players returning some time after they’d reached the final table to play it down to a winner. “It was the penultimate year of the November Nine. ESPN flew out a camera crew to my home town. I thought the November Nine was awesome. I’m blessed and honored to have taken part in that. Now they don’t give the players any time at all, family doesn’t even time to fly in and players can’t get sponsorship deals or even get their hair cut!” Riess believes that if the WSOP gave players a week between reaching the final table and playing it out, it would be perfect. “I don’t think a week is too much at all. Four months was really cool, but it’s a long time, and someone’s game could do a 180 in that time with coaching and solvers these days.” Apart from the length of time, however, Riess believes that the November Nine is a concept that could do with a comeback. “I think they should give them a week. It’s the biggest event in our game, so the more hype around it the better.” A decade after he graduated, Ryan Riess is now a name synonymous with poker success and in particular, the WSOP Main Event. He came close to winning the WSOP Europe Main Event too, but despite finishing fourth, calls it ‘the tournament that haunts me most’. [caption id="attachment_638158" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Ryan Riess is now one of the most respected former world champions still playing the game. (Photo: King's Casino)[/caption] “I was chip leader with nine and six left. The moment got to me a little bit; I made a lot of mistakes. I wanted to win for the legacy of winning both [Main Events] not the money but I focused too much on how cool that would be, and I let the opportunity slip between my fingertips. If Riess had lost with pocket aces to a pair of tens, he admits he wouldn’t have minded, not being a results-oriented person at all. The fact that it wasn’t luck that he perceives was to blame is what hurt. “I make a mistake, I’m the hardest critic of myself. Martin Jacobson said ‘Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity’. You almost don’t deserve to win if you’re not trying your hardest.” A Poker Career Without Regret “My focus is my kids and spending as much time with my family as I can.” Nine years after his greatest moment, Riess looks back on his victory as a platform for sustained success and of all the many world champions there have been, few could argue he has been one of the most positive. Aside from that WSOPE near-miss, he has no regrets. His diamond encrusted 2013 WSOP Main Event bracelet sits in a bank in a safety deposit box. “It’s worth a lot of money, so I don’t want it in the house,” Reiss says with a smile. “It’s locked away and I go and look at it now and then. To be honest, I should make a replica of it with cubic zirconia instead of diamonds, but I haven’t got around to it. I have no regrets about my career. I guess I could have grinded harder if I wanted too, but I travelled to a lot of cool places pretty much up to when COVID started and now my focus is my kids and spending as much time with my family as I can.” This year will see the WSOP move from the Rio to Bally’s (soon to be the Horseshoe) and Paris, but Riess holds no fear about the event leaving the venue where he made his name. In fact, quite the opposite. “I won it the first time I played it at the Rio, so maybe it will happen again,” he says. “I’m optimistic about it - I’m sure it’ll be fun. I’ll be playing pretty much all the NLHE tournaments, $25,000 and lower. I don’t feel the need to play the $100,000 buy-ins; the bubbles are stressful, and kids are expensive!” Nine years is a long time in any poker player’s life, but from being a precocious 22-year-old winner of the biggest event on the poker calendar to a family man almost a decade later, it has been some ride for Ryan Riess. Happily, for poker fans, that ride is not finished yet. You can watch the hand that changed Ryan Riess’ life right here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MAbaJ9W7Q8    
  2. With just nine players remaining, the WSOP Main Event final table is set, and it is German player Koray Aldemir who will go into the final two days of the biggest poker tournament in the world with a huge chip lead. Here's Your November Nine With players such as Chance Kornuth, Andreas Kniep, and Jesse Lonis busting across a dramatic day at the felt, the final table of the WSOP Main Event was reached in the early hours of the morning, with Matt Berkey looking like a savant when he called the time and was just a few minutes out. https://twitter.com/berkey11/status/1460464671073341440 It didn’t take long from the kick-off of the day’s action for the bust-outs to keep coming, with Chance Kornuth’s one of the biggest of the day. Kornuth’s conqueror, George Holmes ended the day second in chips with 83.7 million chips, but at one point had less than two big blinds to his name, spinning his stack up to eventually knock out the most experienced player in the field when his [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] triumphed against Kornuth’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"]. The final hand of the day played out when Canadian player Demosthenes Kiriopoulos bubbled the final as his [poker card="As"][poker card="3s"] lost out to the chip leader’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"], with Aldemir’s fans on the rail going crazy when the board of [poker card="Qs"][poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="Jc"] gave the German another knockout and the overwhelming chip lead heading into the final nine. Only one player already has a WSOP bracelet to their name and that man is Chase Bianchi (12,100,000), who couldn’t be more excited about the potential checking off of one of his life’s goals. https://twitter.com/Chase_Bianchi/status/1460563523960934408   With two British players also surviving, Jack Oliver (30,400,000) and Jareth East (8,300,000) will both be hoping to become champion in two days time just as all the nine finalists will. Tomorrow at 4 pm local time, the final table begins. It will end in two nights time with a new world champion. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Final Table Chipcounts: Koray Aldemir - 140,000,000 George Holmes - 83,700,000 Alejandro Lococo - 46,800,000 Joshua Remitio - 40,000,000 Jack Oliver - 30,400,000 Ozgur Secilmis - 24,500,000 Hye Park - 13,500,000 Chase Bianchi - 12,100,000 Jareth East - 8,300,000 Six Remain In Crazy Eights In the Crazy Eights tournament, just six players remain from a field of 237 who started the penultimate day of the event. It is Leonid Yanovski who leads the final table, with a whopping 62.2 million chips, some way clear of closest challengers David Moses (49.1 million) and Paul Fehlig (48.7 million). On a busy day for final tables that should see four tournaments conclude and the Main Event reach three players, Yanovski will also face the challenge of short-stack Timo Kamphues (7.4 million), as well as former bracelet winners Georgios Sotiropoulos (21.8 million) and Sejin Park (14.6 million). WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Final Table Chipcounts: Leonid Yanovski - 62,200,000 David Moses - 49,100,000 Paul Fehlig - 48,700,000 Georgios Sotiropoulos - 21,800,000 Sejin Park - 14,600,000 Timo Kamphues - 7,400,000 $10K Stud 8 Needs One More Day In the $10,000-entry Event #73, the Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship, Yuval Bronshtein leads the final four combatants after the final table was started but abandoned halfway through the story being told. It’s some story, as with four remaining, Bronshtein (3,320,000) is shooting for another WSOP bracelet, with two of his three opponents each holding bracelets in their back catalogs too. With nine players remaining, WSOP Player of the Year leader Josh Arieh bowed out, before being followed from the event by Gary Benson and Erik Seidel, who missed the chance to capture his tenth WSOP crown. After the elimination of John Monette in sixth place, Marco Johnson was the final player to miss out on the denouement of the tournament. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Results: 5. Marco Johnson - $79,073 6. John Monnette - $59,545 7. Erik Seidel - $46,140 8. Gary Benson - $36,821 9. Josh Arieh - $30,290 The four remaining players share nine bracelets between them, with only Ian O’Hara (2,120,000) yet to win one. Scott Seiver (1,665,000) is aiming for his fourth title in WSOP history, with Brian Hastings going for his fifth gong. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Yuval Bronshtein - 3,320,000 Ian O'Hara - 2,120,000 Scott Seiver - 1,665,000 Brian Hastings - 1,535,000 Denis 'aDrENalin710' Strebkov Leads $2,500 Big Bet Mix In Event #74, the $,2500-entry Big Bet Mix, Denis Strebkov of Russia took a massive chip lead into the final day with just 14 players remaining. Strebkov piled up over 1.4 million chips to lead by a big margin from Shanmukha Meruga (877,000) and Scott Bohlman (827,000), with every other one of the 11 players having less than half of Strebkov’s chips with one day to play out. Just 91 players started the day, but 77 busted, with James Chen, Yuri Dzivielevski, John Racener, Matt Waxman, Ryan Laplante, Eli Elezra, and Chris Brewer among them. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Top 10 Chipcounts: Denis Strebkov - 1,402,000 Shanmukha Meruga - 877,000 Scott Bohlman - 827,000 Hooman Nizad - 512,000 Patrik Ciklamini - 498,000 Anthony Ribeiro - 479,000 Noah Boeken - 455,000 Jon Turner - 415,000 Asher Lower - 375,000 Amnon Filippi - 371,000 $1,500 Freezeout Kicked Off In Event #75, Day 1 of the $1,500-entry Freezeout event took place, with Rennei Liu (889,000) also a big chip leader. Other prominent names such as Bin Liu (610,000), Asi Moshe (604,000), Artan Dedusha (504,000), Joe Serock (436,000), Nadya Magnus (414,000), Patrick Tardif (239,000), Gabriel Andrade (180,000), Sherry Hammers (139,000) and Angelina Rich (124,000) all remain in contention, while stars such as Barny Boatman, Daniel Strelitz, and Barry Greenstein exited before the close of play. WSOP 2021 Event #75 $1,500 Freezeout NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Rennei Liu - 889,000 Bin Liu - 610,000 Asi Moshe - 604,000 David Pham - 572,000 Stefan Reiser - 537,000 Armin Rezaei - 529,000 Kartik Ved - 523,000 Nicholas Hubers - 510,000 Naor Slobodskoy - 505,000 Artan Dedusha - 504,000 Chidwick, Sammartino, Timoshenko Survive Super Turbo Bounty Finally, seven players only remain in contention for the 76th WSOP event bracelet, namely the players who survived a brutal Day 1 of the $10,000-entry Super Turbo Bounty event. In what was a stacked field, Stephen Chidwick made up for busting out of the WSOP Main Event yesterday by racking up 2,270,000 chips, with the Brit only behind runaway leader Aditya Agarwal (8,750,000) and Barth Melius (3,550,000). Romain Lewis (2,050,000), Dario Sammartino (1,930,000), Uri Reichenstein (1,795,000), and Yevgeniy Timoshenko (1,065,000) all made the final table too as the overall field of 307 was reduced by 300 in one 10-hour shove fest marathon. With the $463,885 top prize one of the bigger prizes on offer in the Rio over the final few days of the 2021 World Series of Poker, finding out who wins is sure to be an exciting watch. WSOP 2021 Event #76 $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty Final Table Chipcounts: Aditya Agarwal - 8,750,000 Barth Melius - 3,550,000 Stephen Chidwick - 2,270,000 Romain Lewis - 2,050,000 Dario Sammartino - 1,930,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,795,000 Yevgeniy Timoshenko - 1,065,000 One person who sadly won’t be part of the commentary team for the final days of the WSOP Main Event is Nick Schulman, who tested positive for COVID-19. It appears he’ll miss Ali Nejad... well, a bit. https://twitter.com/NickSchulman/status/1460429518837936128 Finally, players were being careful and getting tested in general, but like every situation in poker, there’s always a player who takes it too far. https://twitter.com/_dmock9888/status/1460432721566584838  
  3. The latest action in the 2021 WSOP Main Event saw several big names make dramatic exits on Day 6 as the 96 players who started the day were whittled down to just 36 survivors by the close of play. On a day where Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura won his first-ever WSOP bracelet, the Main Event was the main attraction at the Rio in Las Vegas. Park Takes Main Event Lead, Kornuth and Aldemir Still Crushing It didn’t take long for there to be big drama on Day 6 of the WSOP Main Event, with players like Stephen Chidwick heading to the rail. Dragana Lim was the final female player sitting, but her chances ended when her [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"] was overtaken on a cruel river by Mikiya Kudo’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qs"] when the board played out [poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Qh"] after all the chip had gone in pre-flop. Nicholas Rigby continued to grab headlines and baffle his fellow players as time and again he played the hand he referred to as the ‘dirty diaper’, deuce-three. It was good enough to take down a massive pot with a bluff right here: https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1460094277027917829 Other big names fell, such as British pro Alex Goulder, whose pocket eights weren’t enough to hold against Spanish player David Cabrera’s pocket jacks. Goulder was the last player of the night to depart, cashing for $163,900 in 37th place. Other big names, however, thrived on a day where over half the remaining field was trimmed. With 36 players still in the hunt for the $8 million top prize and the WSOP Main Event bracelet worth $500,000 alone, it is Hye Park who leads the Main Event after six days at the felt with stack of 29,500,000 chips. He’s some way ahead of Demosthenes Kiriopoulos (24,905,000) and Joshua Remitio (21,490,000), who are second and third in chips respectively. Elsewhere, there are some very big players with chipstacks, as Chase Bianchi 920,765,000) and Koray Aldemir (18,905,000) round out the top five, PokerStars players Ramon Colillas (18,200,000) and Alejandro Lococo (17,950,000) both make the top ten and both David Cabrera (14,530,000) and Chance Kornuth (13.6 million) remain in with a great chance of victory. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Hye Park - 29,500,000 Demosthenes Kiriopoulos - 24,905,000 Joshua Remitio - 21,490,000 Chase Bianchi - 20,765,000 Koray Aldemir - 18,905,000 George Holmes - 18,425,000 Ramon Colillas - 18,200,000 Alejandro Lococo - 17,950,000 Ozgur Secilmis - 14,700,000 David Cabrera - 14,530,000 Okamura Wins First Ever Gold In Event #72, the only bracelet of the day was won by Japanese player Motoyoshi Okamura as he triumphed against the overnight chip leader Rafael Mota of Brazil. With eight players kicking off the $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO action, Tim Grau of Austria busted first for $20,737 in PLO, before Marc Lange went out in seventh just a few minutes later for $27,088. Lange was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="2s"] but lost out to Leonid Yanovski’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qs"] after the ace-high board provided no hope for the unfortunate Lange. He was joined on the rail by Jordan Spurlin when the American’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] couldn’t hit against Nick Yunis’ [poker card="8s"][poker card="8h"] on a seven-high board after all the chips had gone into the middle pre-flop. Spurlin had won $35,942 with his run to the top six and it was Mike Takayama who went one step higher up the ladder as he busted in fifth for $48,428. Takayama was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="7c"], but couldn’t catch an ace to overtake Yunis, who this time had [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] and held on the paired board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jh"]. Yanovski ran short to bust in fourth place for $66,249 before Yunis himself found himself on the rail. Moving all-in for his last six big blinds, Yunis needed help as his [poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"] was some way behind Okamura’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kd"] in no limit hold’em. He couldn’t find it on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2h"] board and cashed for $91,989 in third place. Heads-up, Okamura had a strong chip lead, playing over 12 million to Mota’s 8 million and sealed the deal when he won in PLO with a full house of queens over tens to beat Mota’s pocket kings. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO Final Table Results: Motoyoshi Okamura - $209,716 Rafael Mota - $129,621 Nick Yunis - $91,989 Leonid Yanovski - $66,249 Mike Takayama - $48,428 Jordan Spurlin - $35,942 Marc Lange - $27,088 Tim Grau - $20,737 A huge final Day 1 flight in Event #70 saw the Crazy Eights field final reach Day 2 after a cancelled Day 1a and three Day 1 flights thereafter. Day 1d saw a massive 2,241 players take part, with only 337 of them making the money. When the dust settled at the end of the day, Farhad Davoudzadeh (2,410,000) had the chip lead, with a slight lead over both Miklos Zsuffa (2,405,000) and Cole Ferraro (2,290,000), who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn in Las Vegas. Others to make the cut included Jason Wheeler (2,100,000), Philip Tom (1,045,000), Kenny Hallaert (590,000) and Cate Hall (310,000), while others such as Barny Boatman, Ryan Depaulo, Bruno Lopes, Pamela Balzano, Chris Moorman, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Blair Hinkle and Jeremy Ausmus all fell short of the next day’s play. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Day 1d Top 10 Chipcounts: Farhad Davoudzadeh - 2,410,000 Miklos Zsuffa - 2,405,000 Cole Ferraro - 2,290,000 Leonid Yanovski - 2,205,000 Jason Wheeler - 2,100,000 Timo Kamphues - 2,055,000 Lipei Xu - 1,975,000 John Simonian - 1,850,000 Pierre Merlin - 1,850,000 Joseph Liberta - 1,835,000 Erik Seidel Plays For Bracelet #10, Another Deep Run for Arieh In the $10,000-entry Seven Card Stud Championship, there are a number of different narratives lining up to play out on the final day of the event. Event #73 has some big, big players still in the hunt for the bracelet and $352 958 top prize, with Marco Johnson (1,400,000) top of the shop and in line for his third WSOP bracelet. Further down the final 11 players, Erik Seidel (994,000) will shoot for the 10th WSOP bracelet of his career tomorrow, which would put him second on the all-time bracelet winners list with Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey and Johnny Chan. Josh Arieh (535,000) seeks another deep run to the podium places in order to further stretch his WSOP Player of the Year lead after an amazing 2021 World Series of Poker so far. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $888 Seven Card Stud Championship Final Day Chipcounts: Marco Johnson - 1,400,000 Yuval Bronshtein - 1,332,000 Brian Hastings - 1,093,000 Erik Seidel - 994,000 Ian O'Hara - 975,000 Scott Seiver - 783,000 John Monnette - 657,000 Josh Arieh - 535,000 Gary Benson - 351,000 Ahmed Mohamed - 273,000 Brett Richey - 192,000 Finally, in Event #74, the $2,500-entry Big Bet Mix event, 212 entries led to 10 hours of poker reducing the field to just 92 in the mix for Day 2. Of the survivors, Jarryd Godena (1,400,000) has the lead with the Australian bagging slightly more than Brazilian player Yuri Dzivielevski (1,332,000) and Ismael Bojang (1,093,000). With players such as Chris Brewer, Yueqi Zhu, Mike Matusow, David ‘Bakes’ Baker, Benny Glaser, Jake Daniels, Paul Volpe and Ben Yu all departing on the first day’s play, players will likely battle down to a final table and one step closer to the $117,898 top prize on tomorrow’s Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #74 $2,500 Big Bet Mix Top 10 Chipcounts: Jarryd Godena - 1,400,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 1,332,000 Ismael Bojang - 1,093,000 Asher Lower - 994,000 Yik Chiu - 975,000 Richard Bai - 783,000 Anthony Ribeiro - 657,000 Scott Bohlman - 535,000 Jon Turner - 351,000 Maury Barrett - 273,000
  4. The WSOP Main Event made the money on Day 3 as 2,362 players were whittled down to just 1,000 as the clock ticked down hand-for-hand in the final level of the day. With players such as Chris Moneymaker, Stephen Song and Chris Dowling all bagging million-plus stacks, it was a dramatic day of action at the Rio in Las Vegas. Bubble Bursts at the Last in Las Vegas The WSOP Main Event money bubble is a special atmosphere, the kind that has to be experienced to be believed, but for the 1,000 players who made the cut on Day 3, it was unforgettable. https://twitter.com/JohnnieVibes/status/1459078055117287424 The day began with the elimination of Phil Hellmuth in a hand that was brutal for the 1989 champion to take, his pocket jacks all-in and at risk against pocket eights only for his opponent to hit and the Poker Brat to depart. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1458880964881305600?s=20 Some time before the actual bubble, one of the most incredible hands of this or any WSOP Main Event took place live on the PokerGO stream at the feature table. Five players went to a flop of [poker card="6h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] and it was checked through, despite Ugur Ozgur Secilmis holding [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"] and Chang Liu holding the nuts with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"]. the turn of [poker card="6c"] gave Secilmis quad sixes in an amazing turnaround, but despite this, all five checked again to the [poker card="5s"] river. On the river, Secilmis led for 55,000 and when Liu raised to 225,000, raised to set Liu all-in. The American made the call quickly, flipping over quads and expecting to scoop a vital double-up. Instead, as his Turkish opponent turned over pocket sixes for quads over quads, the table was stunned as Liu busted with quads in the WSOP Main Event. https://twitter.com/pokergo/status/1459040437788762113?s=21 As ever, the real drama came in the hands just before the bubble burst. One in particular saw the rollercoaster of emotions that players feel writ large as Sebastian Gahl was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="5c"] on a board showing [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="2d"] against Randy Ohel’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. On the dramatic river card of [poker card="Qc"], nearby players cheered in the mistaken belief that Ohel’s rivered set of queens was the winning hand without spotting that it was a club and therefore gave Gahl the flush. Once players were told of this, the Amazon Room was a chorus of boos instead. When it was over, the ‘bubble boy’ was Kevin Campbell, who was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"] against Chris Alafogiannis’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9c"], which managed trip nines on a dramatic board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9s"] that sent the Rio into raptures. As the room reacted with whoops and cheers, Jack Effel offered Campbell a chance to play the WSOP Main Event in 2022 and one player had the temerity to capture the moment in a slightly different way. https://twitter.com/PaulShadyoda/status/1459095275629207559?s=20 https://twitter.com/dklappin/status/1459090407674060800 With everyone locking up $15,000 min-cash, the chip leader at the close of play ended up being Jessica Cai, who bagged up 1,796,000 chips, marginally more than Thailand's Phachara Wongwichit (1,773,000). Players such as Stephen Song (1,557,000) and Chris Moneymaker (1,432,000) will both be hoping it is their year, with the latter going for the title 18 years after his era-defining victory of 2003. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1459221310454865920?s=20 Plenty of big names busted before the bubble burst, with Anthony Zinno, Justin Bonomo, Ben Lamb, Ole Schemion, Greg Mueller, Faraz Jaka, Andy Black, Niall Farrell, Jerry Yang, Liv Boeree Yevgeniy Timoshenko, Pat Lyons, Joseph Hebert, and Chris Hunichen WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 WSOP Main Event Top 10 Chip counts: Jessica Cai - 1,796,000 Phachara Wongwichit - 1,773,000 Joshua Paige Remitio - 1,671,000 Ehsan Amiri - 1,574,000 Stephen Song - 1,557,000 Neel Choksi - 1,552,000 Andreas Kniep - 1,509,000 Chris Dowling - 1,485,000 Chris Moneymaker - 1,432,000 Johan Martinet - 1,365,000 Solitro, Alache, and Jackson Star on Day 2 of Little One for One Drop A busy day of action on Day 2 of the Little One for One Drop event saw three Day 1 flights combine into a massive second day of action. With the $1,111-entry event seeing the 3,797 field reduced to just 229 players, with some superstar names at the top of the leaderboard. Mathew Solitro (2,300,000) bagged up the chip lead, closely followed by Day 1c chip leader Oscar Alache (1,980,000) and David Jackson (1,935,000), with players like Sorel Mizzi (1,280,000), Melanie Weisner (610,000) and Joe Cheong (510,000) not too far back. With other legends such as Phil Laak (500,000), 2019 WSOP Main Event winner Hossein Ensan (345,000), and 2021 bracelet winner DJ Alexander (320,000) all making Day 3, there are sure to be some very exciting moments as the next day of action brings us closer to finding out who the next bracelet winner will be. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Top 10 Chipcounts: Mathew Solitro - 2,300,000 Oscar Alache - 1,980,000 David Jackson - 1,935,000 Jan Wagner - 1,720,000 Idris Ambraisse - 1,605,000 Lingkun Lu - 1,590,000 Chris Vickrey - 1,565,000 Edward Pak - 1,475,000 Masaki Nakamura - 1,450,000 David Singontiko - 1,450,000 Event #69 Sees Dozen Remain in Bracelet Hunt The $1,500-entry Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Event #69 has just 12 players remaining in the hunt for the latest WSOP bracelet and bracelet winners John Racener (1,220,000) and John Monette (1,165,000) who lead the way heading into the final table of the event. With other bracelet winners of the past Carol Fuchs (940,000) and Norwegian player Espen Sandvik (255,000) still in the hunt, a dramatic final day is in the offing on Friday night as the final dozen will return to battle for the bracelet and $113,459 top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #69 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: John Racener - 1,220,000 John Monnette - 1,165,000 Esther Taylor - 1,100,000 John Hoang - 1,065,000 Peder Berge - 962,000 Carol Fuchs - 940,000 Jermaine Reid - 725,000 Joseph Ranciato - 705,000 Espen Sandvik - 255,000 Joseph Kupresanin - 240,000 Negreanu Loses to Royalty, Calvin Anderson Sits Top 5 Daniel Negreanu suffered a bad beat as he busted from the $1,500-entry Bounty PLO Event #71. All-in with two pair, the Canadian busted to Colossus winner Anatolii Zyrin. The Russian had a flush draw and got there on the turn, but even worse/better was to come for the video blog-filming Kid Poker, as the ten of diamonds on the river gave his opponent a royal flush. At the end of play, Mourad Amokrane held the chip lead, with 1,066,000 the only seven-figure stack in the room. Jaime Lewin (712,000) and Nikolay Yosifiv (674,000) were Amokrane’s nearest challengers, with Calvin Anderson (525,000) the biggest name in the top 10 on a day when players such as Ryan Laplante, Ryan Hughes, Ian Steinman and Avi Cohen all missed out on bagging an end-of-day stack. WSOP 2021 Event #71 $1,500 Bounty Pot Limit Omaha Top 10 Chipcounts: Mourad Amokrane - 1,066,000 Jaime Lewin - 712,000 Nikolay Yosifov - 674,000 Miltiadis Kyriakides - 578,000 Calvin Anderson - 525,000 Paulo Villena - 483,000 Ryan Coon - 468,000 Matthew Mlsna - 465,000 Blake Napierala - 461,000 Manuel Ruivo - 448,000 Jon Aguiar highlighted the difference between a 40 big blind stack in 2008 and 13 years later in 2021. https://twitter.com/JonAguiar/status/1458964113497808898 GGPoker ambassador may have lost the last longer bet for the remote control against his wife, Natalie Hof Ramos, but he couldn’t help wishing his love good luck as the German progressed to Day 4. https://twitter.com/FelipeMojave/status/1458920630909222943 Finally, few of us will ever get to experience it, but for everyone feeling a little FOMO at not being in Vegas, we’d look away now if we were you. This is how it feels to make Day 4 of the Main Event, whoever you may be. https://twitter.com/ChancesCards/status/1459092723957260293
  5. Another dramatic day in the 2021 WSOP Main Event saw big names bust and other stars rise high on Day 5 as Chris Moneymaker busted the Main, Koray Aldemir and Ramon Colillas continued to crush and some of the best poker of the World Series of Poker so far took place in between. Koray Aldemir Leads Final 96 In Main Event Day 5 of the most popular poker tournament in the world saw 292 players reduced to under 100 hopefuls as German pro Koray Aldemir grabbed the chip lead by the last level of the day inside the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. On a day of big bust-outs, especially involving pocket aces, the German professional who has over $12 million in live tournament earnings is in the best position in his career to add a WSOP Main Event title and $8 million to his legacy in a few days’ time. To do that, he’ll have to get through some of the best players in the world, with modern legends such as Stephen Chidwick and Chance Kornuth both surviving Day 5 with chips. Any one of those three players, along with everyone else, will have to avoid the kind of awful luck suffered when aces were shot down by ace-king as the player with the latter pronounced ‘Ace king owes me!” upon winning the hand. David Williams spoke for many in his incredulity at the situation. https://twitter.com/dwpoker/status/1459787752187187200 When the chips were bagged up, it was Aldemir who held the chip lead, bagging up 14.3 million chips, a decent amount ahead of Spanish player Ramon Colillas (12 million) and Jonathan Dwek (12.1 million), both of whom finished in podium positions. There are some serious contenders very close by, however, with Jesse Lonis (8.9 million), Chance Kornuth (5.9 million), Stephen Chidwick (3.7 million), Stephen Song (2.7 million) and Yuri Dzivielevski (2 million) all capable of being chip leader at the end of Day 6 with the skills they possess. One man who won't be playing Day 6 is Jason Koon, who busted along with Chris Moneymaker on Day 5. Koon tweeted his feelings on the matter... https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1459713206180454419 ... as did the 2003 WSOP Main Event champion. https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1459633808320471045 Plenty of others couldn’t get a thing going and busted, but some players were doing great until, as is often the case in no limit hold’em, a few hands sent them to the rail in brutal fashion. https://twitter.com/danmflowery/status/1459633452790136833 WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Koray Aldemir - 14,325,000 Ramon Colillas - 12,000,000 Jonathan Dwek - 10,125,000 Zachary Mcdiarmid - 9,700,000 Jesse Lonis - 8,995,000 Roongsak Griffeth - 8,925,000 Andreas Kniep - 8,515,000 Tonio Röder - 8,000,000 Alejandro Lococo - 7,805,000 Stephen Gerber - 7,700,000 Scott Ball Wins Little One For One Drop In Event #68, the Little One for One Drop, Scott Ball overcame overnight chip leader Michael Shanahan as he won $396,445 and his first bracelet after a thrilling denouement to the popular event. With the $1,111-entry event, which raises money for charity alongside building a bumper prize pool, having 3,797 total entries, there were 10 players left in no time at all on the final day to bring about the final table. At that stage, Shanahan had over 42 million chips, more than double his nearest challenger as he looked to run over his final nine adversaries, but as so often in poker, things didn’t work out like that. The first player to bust, Spanish player Jose Latorre, did so in 10th for $33,939 and was all-in with the best hand, holding [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"], but Sorel Mizzi’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="6s"] overtook him on a dramatic board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="6d"]. The Canadian Mizzi, cashing in a WSOP event for the first time since 2018, was on the rise and proving that he is still one of the best poker players out there on his day. He wasn’t the only player looking up the leaderboard rather than down as Sebastian Medina from Colombia eliminated another player to vault up the ranks. Medina had the dominating hand of [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Tc"] against Frank Marasco’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Th"] and a runout of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="6s"] saw the American bust in ninth place for $42,389. Next to depart was Seth Fischer, who busted in $53,343 with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qh"] as David Jackson’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="5c"] overtook him on a board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Js"][poker card="Ad"] with all the chips going into the middle pre-flop. At that stage, Medina had taken the lead, but Mizzi gained more ground after busting Petro Zakusilov in seventh place for $67,592. The Ukrainian was all-in pre-flop with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8d"] but was called in two places and Sorel Mizzi’s [poker card="5c"][poker card="2c"] eventually won after he and the overnight leader Shanahan checked down a board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="3s"][poker card="Th"][poker card="2s"]. Soon after, Ronnie Ballantyne was out of the event in sixth place for a score of $86,249 as his [poker card="Tc"][poker card="8s"] lost out when all-in pre-flop against Scott Ball’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ts"]. The board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jc"] was a crusher for Ballantyne and the same fate befell David Jackson in fifth for $110,827 just a couple of minutes later as he lost a race with [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"] against Mizzi’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Td"] on a board of [poker card="Th"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="9h"]. Shanahan was the lowest stack of the four remaining men, but after an extended period of play, everything had turned around and Medina was on the rail in fourth for $143,399. Medina’s pre-flop shove for 13 big blinds with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"] was called by the chip-dominant Shanahan with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"]. On the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qd"], Shanahan made a full house of queens over aces and took the chip lead for the first time since just after the final table began. Mizzi was next to go, busting in third place for $186,824 as his tournament ended as he was dominated and delivered from the event. Mizzi was all-in with [poker card="3s"][poker card="3h"] and needed a lot of help, with Ball holding [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Js"]. The board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="2h"][poker card="7s"] saw Mizzi depart and Ball take the chip lead into heads-up with 94 million playing against Shanahan’s 57.8 million chips. Heads-up was a brief but exciting affair. Scott Ball won a series of pots at the beginning of the bout to take a 2:1 chip lead into the final hand. Shanahan shoved with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8h"] but when Ball called with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"], the overnight chip leader would need a lot of help. The flop of [poker card="Kh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="3d"] gave Shanahan an eight, but after the [poker card="Kd"] turn, the [poker card="2c"] river ended the event in Ball’s favor, winning him his first WSOP bracelet and $396,445, condemning Shanahan to second place and $245,068. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Final Table Results: Scott Ball - $396,445 Michael Shanahan - $245,068 Sorel Mizzi - $186,824 Sebastian Medina - $143,399 David Jackson - $110,827 Ronnie Ballantyne - $86,249 Petro Zakusilov - $67,592 Seth Fischer - $53,343 Frank Marasco - $42,389 Mourad Amokrane Scores Gold Another bracelet was won in Event #71, but French player Mourad Amokrane was incredibly dominant at the last as he took just one hand of heads-up play to complete a remarkable victory at the $1,500 Bounty PLO final table. Amokrane, an optician from France, seemed to have X-Ray specs as he took apart the competition, with players such as Kao Chieng Saechao (8th for $13,610) and Jeff Gross (7th for $17,712) both missing out on podium places. With a massive $132,844 top prize and the first bracelet of his amateur career, Amokrane, one of the most modest winners of the series, said he would continue to help people see better after showing us his PLO Bounty skills in the clearest way possible. WSOP 2021 Event #71 $1,500 Bounty PLO Final Table Results: Mourad Amokrane - $132,844 Matt Mamiya - $82,100 Matthew Humphrey - $58,733 Matthew Mlsna - $42,604 Dustin Nelson - $31,344 Paulo Villena - $23,392 Jeff Gross - $17,712 Kao Chieng Saechao - $13,610 Nikolay Yosifov - $10,616 Things Are Getting Crazy In Event #70, another huge Day 1 took place as Day 1c saw 1,907 players reduced to just 87 by the close of play. Only 287 of those made the money, with Justin Arwine (3,280,000) the chip leader. Arwine was followed in the counts by fellow podium placers Eric Baldwin (2,825,000) and Irish player David Lappin (1,940,000), who followed his exit from the Main Event in 242nd place by immediately registering the event and running up a big stack. Others to make the cut included Natalie Hof-Ramos (1,700,000), Michael Cordell (940,000), Tom Hall (740,000) and Ari Engel (725,000) who could still make a push for WSOP Player of the Year with a strong showing in this event. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Top 10 Chipcounts: Justin Arwine - 3,280,000 Eric Baldwin - 2,825,000 David Lappin - 1,940,000 Paul Fehlig - 1,880,000 Wayne Harmon - 1,800,000 Alex Visbisky - 1,775,000 John Jenkins - 1,740,000 Alan Ferraro - 1,710,000 Natalie Hof-Ramos - 1,700,000 Kharlin Sued - 1,675,000 Mota Leads Event #72 Final Table In Event #72, the $1,500 Mixed NLHE/PLO event, Brazilian Rafael Mota bagged a huge lead going into the eight-handed final tomorrow, with six other countries represented in his seven talented opponents. With 7,515,000 chips, Mota’s stack dwarfes even his closest challenger Motoyoshi Okamura (3,835,000), but with players like Nick Yunis (3,190,000) also attempting to take the title and win a WSOP bracelet, nothing is guaranteed ahead of the final day of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE / PLO Final Table Chipcounts: Rafael Mota - 7,515,000 Motoyoshi Okamura - 3,835,000 Nick Yunis - 3,190,000 Leonid Yanovski - 2,070,000 Mike Takayama - 1,900,000 Jordan Spurlin - 1,740,000 Marc Lange - 535,000 Tim Grau - 360,000 Big Names Bag In $10K Stud 8 Championship In Event #73, the first day of action in the $10,000-entry Seven Card Stud Championship took place, with Gary Benson (331,000) of Australia leading the field at the end of the day, with Adam Owen (289,500) and Denis Strebkov (274,000) close by. With stars of the mixed game circuit such as Shaun Deeb and Scott Seiver (both of whom have 256,000) lurking in the top 10, a tough Day 2 will be in the offing for everyone, especially as players can still register right up to the start of play. Players to bust the event on Day 1 included Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, Robert Campbell, Kevin Gerhart, Joe Hachem, John Racener, Nathan Gamble, Ben Yu and Allen Kessler. WSOP 2021 Event #73 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Gary Benson - 331,000 Adam Owen - 289,500 Denis Strebkov - 274,000 Eli Elezra - 263,000 Shaun Deeb - 256,000 Scott Seiver - 256,000 Alex Livingston - 215,000 Mike Watson - 207,000 Brett Richey - 187,500 Yuval Bronshtein - 183,500 Finally, Greg Jennings highlighted an anomaly in the Matrix as he mentioned how Matt Berkey seems to get taller when he is sitting down, particularly at feature tables, it would appear. Just how tall is Berkey? We wouldn’t bet a single chip on it. https://twitter.com/ZGregJennings/status/1459528701574529025  
  6. Chance Kornuth won his third World Series of Poker bracelet as the self-confessed Short Deck novice won the $10,000-entry event to claim the $194,670 top prize. With a talented selection of six top players returning to the felt in the Thunderdome for the final table, Kornuth got the better of Chad Campbell heads-up as the final duel ended in the poker professional and coaching expert’s favor in dramatic fashion. Kornuth Claims Dramatic Victory Against Campbell The final table of six kicked off with Kornuth in a slim lead over Chad Campbell as the half dozen final table players battled to a winner under the lights. There was a quick bust-out to kick the action off as Thomas Kysar, who came into the action with the shortest stack, busted in sixth place for $32,437 with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Td"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qh"] as the board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] gave the chip leader two pair to further boost his stack ahead of just four remaining opponents. Next to go was Joao Vieira as the Portuguese player was eliminated by Campbell just a few hands later. Vieira jammed with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] and was called by Campbell with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"]. On the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"], Campbell made two-pair and Vieira missed turn and river to bust for $42,885 in fifth place. With four players remaining, a lot of play took place without anyone losing their stack. Kornuth and Campbell traded places at the top, but neither Dan Shak or fourth-place finisher Moshe Gabay could make any in-roads into their advantage and it was no surprise when Gabay lost his stack next for $58,601. The manner of Gabay’s exit was, however, a shock. Calling Shak’s shove, Gabay was all-in with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="As"] and ahead of Shak’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] was a sensational one, however, as while it kept Gabay ahead, it offered Shak the chance of a straight flush, which he duly hit on the [poker card="8c"] turn. The [poker card="Jh"] was insignificant in the extreme and Shak chipped up at Gabay’s expense. Despite winning that hand, Shak couldn’t threaten the leaders and bowed out in third after a courageous run. All-in with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"] against Kornuth’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"], the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="Js"] gave Kornuth a vital pot to send him into heads-up with a lead of 2.6 million chips to Campbell’s 1.4 million. Shak, meanwhile, went to the rail with a score of $82,678. Heads-up, Kornuth took very little time to emerge victorious, after the shortest battle of the final table. On a board showing [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"], Campbell raise-shoved with [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"] and Kornuth called with a flopped full house, holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"]. The river of [poker card="7d"] ended the event and Kornuth could celebrate his third WSOP title with the bracelet and $194,670 top prize, while Campbell commiserated himself with the runner-up result worth $120,316. Kornuth’s title will feel even sweeter as he proved to his wife Emily that he was able to do it based on some YouTube learning. https://twitter.com/Srirachaaa/status/1449597512495419398 WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Final Table Results: Chance Kornuth - $194,670 Chad Campbell - $120,316 Dan Shak - $82,678 Moshe Gabay - $58,601 Joao Vieira - $42,885 Thomas Kysar - $32,437 Dylan Weisman Gets His First Gold In Event #28, Dylan Weisman sealed a memorable victory in the $1,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha tournament for a top prize of $166,461. Weisman is a name well-known to PLO players, coaching on the popular Upswing Poker site and he utilized his stack advantage over the field to maximum effort in winning his debut WSOP bracelet. Just five players came back to the final table to play out the conclusion of the event, with Weisman holding a big lead coming into the action. Weisman had almost as many chips as his two closest challengers combined and ran over the table to become champion. Before long had elapsed, Weisman had half the chips at the table and watched on as Tim Van Loo busted Ran Niv of Israel in fifth place for $40,109. Van Loo might have been hoping to put those chips to good use, but he was the next to leave, ousted by Alexander Yen in fourth place for $54,230. It was a remarkable run for Van Loo, as not only was it his first appearance at a WSOP final table, but his first World Series cash of any kind, and the young German will be one to watch based on this event. His conqueror in the final hand, Yen, busted in third place for $74,239 in the pivotal hand of the final. Yen’s set of eights was crushed by Weisman’s set of nines and when both players improved to a full house on the board, Weisman knocked out his more dangerous rival in terms of chips. Craig Chait only had 1.7 million to Weisman’s stack of almost 20 million, so it was no surprise when Chait was busted in the runner-up position for $102,884. Weisman’s victory was worth $166,461 and in taking down the tournament, he won his first-ever gold bracelet, to the delight of his many fans and friends on the rail. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Dylan Weisman - $166,461 Craig Chait - $102,884 Alexander Yen - $74,239 Tim Van Loo - $54,230 Ran Niv - $40,109 Chase Fujita - $30,040 Manan Bhandari - $22,787 Youness Barakat - $17,510 Hellmuth In Position For 4th Final Table Phil Hellmuth will go into his fourth final day of an event this World Series, and with the Poker Brat holding over a million chips, there’s a chance the controversial star wins bracelet #16 tomorrow. With only Rep Porter (1,129,000) bagging up more chips than Hellmuth, who totalled 1,016,000 at the close of play, the Poker Brat will be putting on a charm offensive ahead of the final day. A little further back sits Dario Sammartino (800,000) who finished as runner-up in the last live, authentic Las Vegas WSOP Main Event in 2019. Sammartino isn’t the only other big-name chasing down Porter and Hellmuth at the top of the leaderboard. Chris Vitch (447,000), Jake Schwartz (398,000) and Ryan Riess (266,000) will all harbor hopes of victory as they battle for the bracelet on the final day of another prestigious mixed game event, with stars such as Rok Gostisa, Ali Imsirovic and Melanie Weisner all missing out during Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #31 $1,500 No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Day Chipcounts: Rep Porter - 1,129,000 Phil Hellmuth - 1,016,000 Kenji Faris - 840,000 Dario Sammartino - 800,000 Jason Papastavrou - 666,000 Jason Lipiner - 663,000 Kevin Gerhart - 581,000 Chris Vitch - 447,000 Jake Schwartz - 398,000 Ryan Riess - 266,000 Ryan Leng, Dylan Linde Score Monster Stacks The massive Monster Stack field was grown to a total of 3,520 players on Day 1b, with 1,219 players making the Day 2 seat draw through both Day 1a (518) and Day 1b (701). The biggest chipstack on Day 1b belonged to Rajaee Wazwaz (510,500), with Pavel Plesuv (483,500) and 2021 bracelet winner Ryan Leng (473,000) the nearest to overtaking the leader at the close of play. Others such as Dylan Linde (443,000), Andrew Neeme (304,500), Upeshka De Silva (219,000), Jesse Sylvia (129,000), Cate Hall (125,000), Ari Engel (108,000) and Ronnie Bardah (75,000) all making the cut. WSOP 2021 Event #30 $1,500 Monster Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Rajaee Wazwaz - 510,500 Pavel Plesuv - 483,500 Ryan Leng - 473,000 Mitchell Collins - 465,000 Dylan Linde - 443,000 Francois Pirault - 440,500 Joshua Gordon - 440,500 Yeon Bae - 433,500 La Sengphet - 428,000 Matthew Eng - 424,500 Brian Hastings, Maria Ho In $3K H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Finally, in Event #32, 154 players survived from a Day 1 field of 282 who took part. Lithuanian player Vincas Tamasauskas leads the way with 197,000 chips, from top 10 players such as Brian Hastings (178,400), Maria Ho (169,400), and David Williams (168,900). Elsewhere, John Monnette (120,600), Yuri Dzivielevski (105,800), Ari Engel (95,100), Ryan Laplante (59,000), and John Racener (52,500) all made Day 2 in good chip health, while players such as Frank Kassela, Shaun Deeb, Norman Chad, Mike Matusow, and Chino Rheem all crashed out before the end of the first day. WSOP 2021 Event #32 $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Vincas Tamasauskas - 197,000 John Fahmy - 188,700 Brian Hastings - 178,400 Daryl Aguirre - 174,600 Sachin Bhargava - 173,300 George Alexander - 169,700 Maria Ho - 169,400 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 169,400 David Williams - 168,900 Paramjit Gill - 139,500 Maria Ho, who made it through in seventh place on the leaderboard, revealed her tactics as she made her way from the Rio after a successful day’s work at the felt. https://twitter.com/MariaHo/status/1449534894325977090 Finally, it’s still a few weeks until the WSOP Main Event kicks off, but Phil Hellmuth has kicked off some speculation about his ‘entrance outfit after posting this picture of some old classics. We’ll take some action on a green-blue tracksuit with the number ‘456’ in the corner. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1449148701247639559
  7. Two new WSOP bracelet winners were crowned as Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Championship and Dalibor Dula won a $1,000 Freezeout event, with more gold grabbed by first-timers in both cases. Eisenberg Stages Epic Comeback to Triumph Lara Eisenberg won the Ladies Event final table as she triumphed as an against-the-odds short stack to defeat Debora Brooke heads-up for the title. The final day began with just five players remaining, but JJ Liu left the action early. Liu moved all-in on the turn of a board showing [poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Jc"] with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Js"] but was called by Brooke with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jd"] and the [poker card="Th"] river couldn’t save her, leaving Liu to collect her $26,458 prize. Diane Cooley busted in fourth place for $36,269 after her shove on the turn ended in failure to double. The board was [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="6s"] when Cooley pushed all-in with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"], but Lara Eisenberg had turned the flush with [poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"] and after the [poker card="4c"] river, held the chip lead. In the commentary booth, WSOP legend Lon McEachern shared the mike with Jamie Kerstetter and Hollywood actress Jennifer Tilly, who also knows a thing or two about winning at poker. https://twitter.com/JenniferTilly/status/1448847044651601928 Next to go was the overnight chip leader Mikiyo Aoki, who had doubled up Eisenberg when her ace-queen was shot down by the eventual winner’s ace-king. Aoki was on the rial in third place for $50,525 when her shove with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="8c"] was called by Eisenberg with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] and the board played out [poker card="Td"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"]. Heads-up, Eisenberg had almost double her opponent’s chips, and gradually increased her lead until Brooke had just 1.8 million to the leader’s 11.1 million. At that point, Eisenberg shoved on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="2s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Tc"] with Brooke calling and showing down [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"]. Eisenberg had [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"], however, and that kicker played to leave Brooke with the runner-up prize of $71,507 and Eisenberg holding the bracelet and winning the top prize of $115,694. WSOP 2021 Event #22 Ladies Championship Final Table Results: Lara Eisenberg - $115,694 Debora Brooke - $71,507 Mikiyo Aoki - $50,525 Diana Cooley - $36,269 JJ Liu- $26,458 Qing Lu - $19,619 Marle Cordeiro - $14,791 Cherish Andrews - $11,341 Tiffany Lee - $8,847 Thi Nguyen - $7,023 Dalibor Dula Wins Against All-American Opponents Just one player wasn’t American who reached the final table of Event #26, the $1,000-entry freezeout, but that player - Dalibor Dula from the Czech Republic - won the bracelet and $199,227. With only nine players making the final table, Maurice Hawkins and Levi Klump were both eliminated in the same hand as Hawkins shoved for less than a big blind with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jd"], Maxx Coleman re-shoved with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] and Levi Klump called off his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"] immediately put Coleman into the lead and it stayed that way through the [poker card="7h"] turn and [poker card="5s"] river, seeing Hawkins win $17,270 and Klump claim $22,080 for making it one rung higher up the ladder. Just a couple of minutes later, Nicolo Audannio was on the rail in seventh place for $28,565. Audannio moved all-in pre-flop for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8c"] and was called by the initial raiser in the hand, Cole Ferraro with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Jd"]. The board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="9d"] provided no salvation for Audannio and he left as play went six-handed. Anthony Askey was busted in sixth place for $37,393 when his [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"] were up against Edward Welch’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] and saw a flop of two kings and a jack decimate his stack. In the next hand, Askey’s few remaining chips went in with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] and lost to Cole Ferraro’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4h"]. It was high roller Maxx Coleman who busted in fifth place for $49,519 when his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Th"] was shot down by Ferraro’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"] on a board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] which gave the latter a flush on the turn, while Guowei Zhang busted in fourth for $66,335 when he lost tow coinflips in a row to depart, with Dula winning the first and most valuable one wit [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] hitting against Zhang’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. Three-handed play saw Welch eliminated with his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="2d"] dominated and defeated by Ferraro’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ts"], with the board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"] cruelly offering Welch hope on the flop then denying him on 4th and 5th streets. Both men held the lead during a rollercoaster heads-up battle, but eventually, Dula led and Ferraro and he were both under 20 big blinds. When Dula moved all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"], Ferraro called it off with just [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8c"], but couldn’t get lucky on the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qc"] board. WSOP 2021 Event #26 $1,000 NLHE Freezeout Final Table Results: Dalibor Dula - $199,227 Cole Ferraro - $123,142 Edward Welch - $89,875 Guowei Zhang - $66,335 Maxx Coleman - $49,519 Anthony Askey - $37,393 Nicolo Audannio - $28,565 Levi Klump - $22,080 Maurice Hawkins - $17,270 Jaffe, Racener, Hall Make $5K Six-Max Final Table The final table of the $5,000-entry Six-Handed Event #25 has been reached and after a day of drama, it was Eric Tsai (8,040,000) who grabbed the chip lead by the close of play. Tsai finished just a short distance ahead of Scott Ball, who bagged up 7,820,000, with Jonathan Jaffe coming into the final third in chips with 6,170,000. Bin Weng (3,980,000), Galen Hall (2,245,000), and John Racener are all a little shorter-stacked, but all have a wealth of experience to draw on as the final six race to a winner on Friday. Elsewhere in the event, players such as Yuri Dzivielevski (30th for $17,995), Frank Kassela (25th for $17,995), Daniel Negreanu (22nd for $21,838) and Nick Petrangelo (13th for $27,150) all made the money but not the business end of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #25 $5,000 Six-Handed NLHE Final Table Chipcounts: Eric Tsai - 8,040,000 Scott Ball - 7,820,000 Jonathan Jaffe - 6,170,000 Bin Weng - 3,980,000 Galen Hall - 2,245,000 John Racener - 1,950,000 Anthony Zinno Leads $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. On Day 2 of the $1,500-entry H.O.R.S.E. Event #27, Anthony Zinno performed at a high level to dominate the day at the felt. Zinno built a massive chip lead with 18 players remaining, with 2,565,000 chips putting him in a commanding lead at the end of the day’s play. At one point, Zinno had twice his nearest challenger’s chips, but Kao Saechao caught up a little to end the day second in chips on 1,495,000, while others to make the top half of the chip counts included Randy Ohel (1,040,000) and Max Pescatori (850,000). With players such as former WSOP Main Event winner Joe McKeehen (835,000) and Ari Engel (300,000) both on Pescatori’s table on Day 3, the action will be intense as players battle towards the top prize of $160,636. With the bubble bursting on Day 2, some players weren’t lucky enough to make any profit or claim vital WSOP Player of the Year points, with Phil Hellmuth, Chino Rheem and Barry Greenstein all finishing outside the money. Others, such as Shaun Deeb, Brian Hastings, Jason Somerville, and Allen Kessler all made the money places but failed to reach the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #27 $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. Top 10 Chipcounts: Anthony Zinno - 2,565,000 Kao Saechao - 1,495,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,355,000 Darren Kennedy - 1,330,000 Paul Holder - 1,160,000 Randy Ohel - 1,040,000 Michael Rosenberg - 930,000 Christopher Adams - 920,000 Max Pescatori - 850,000 Joe McKeehen - 835,000 $1K PLO Gets Underway Two more events took place at the Rio on Day 15, with Event #28, the $1,000 PLO 8-Handed tournament seeing 14 hours of gameplay across a mammoth Day 1. With 1,069 total entries, just 59 players ended the night with chips after over 94% of the field fell by the wayside. Ryan Gibson grabbed the chip lead and will go into the second and final day with high hopes of winning the bracelet, piling up 1,940,000 chips as the leader. Alex Yen is Gibson’s closest challenger on 1,314,000 chips, with Jonathan Therme (1,033,000) third in chips. With such a fast-paced day, a lot of players busted before the 161st place player began to earn money. Luminaries such as Daniel Negreanu, Tom McEvoy, Ryan Laplante, Dylan Linde and Sam Razavi all cashed, but missed out on the second day. WSOP 2021 Event #28 $1,000 PLO 8-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Gibson - 1,940,000 Alexander Yen - 1,314,000 Jonathan Therme - 1,033,000 Dylan Weisman - 937,000 Michael Perrone - 750,000 Casey Carroll - 680,000 Craig Chait - 664,000 Tegnear Butler - 553,000 Gabe Ramos - 550,000 Youness Barakat - 539,000 Kornuth, Koon Make $10K Short Deck Day 2 Ye Shen bagged the chip lead with 361,400 chips after eight levels of play on the first day of Event #29, with players such as Dan Shak (320,500), Chance Kornuth (262,000), and Jason Koon (235,400) all making the top 10 chip counts on a busy Day 1 in Event #29. With 59 entries being reduced to just 19 players, there are five former WSOP bracelet winners in the hunt for another, with Joao Vieira (199,100), Dan Zack (125,800), Stephen Chidwick (119,500) Daniel Negreanu (95,000), and Ben Yu (73,000) all hoping to go for gold again. WSOP 2021 Event #29 $10,000 Short Deck Top 10 Chipcounts: Ye Shen - 361,400 Young Ko - 340,000 Chad Campbell - 326,300 Dan Shak - 320,500 Chance Kornuth - 262,000 Moshe Gabay - 251,100 Jason Koon - 235,400 Thomas Kysar - 231,000 Joao Vieira - 199,100 Daniel Zack - 125,800 Finally, players of all levels meet and greet at the 2021 World Series of Poker and to prove it, Kid Poker himself, Daniel Negreanu, showed what happens when you meet someone with a common interest. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1448832619790036992
  8. Largely unknown Mixed Games player Jesse Klein won his first WSOP bracelet after taking down a final table stacked with stars at the 2021 World Series of Poker. The recruitment firm owner went from recreational hopeful to WSOP winner on a final day full of drama as one $25,000 event ended and another began. Hellmuth Rants, Glaser Denied As Klein Pulls Out The WIn All the focus at the start of the third day of WSOP action was on the final table of Event #2, the $25,000 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event which saw another mixed game specialist, British player Benny Glaser, go into the final table with the lead. It took little time for Matt Glantz to become the first casualty of the day as Phil Hellmuth took out his fellow American in Razz with a ten-five, with Glantz paired up and drawing dead on 6th street. Glantz cashed for $52,211. Next to go was DJ Buckley, who lasted just a few minutes more to bust in eighth place for $61,549. Buckley’s elimination to Ben Yu precipitated an extended period of play without a bust-out, but it was not short of drama as Hellmuth exploded at the end of losing a hand to eventual champion Klein. Folding on the river, Hellmuth declared his opponent’s start as "insane" and it was to serve as the opening bout in a war of words between the pair. It was some time before Yu busted in seventh place for $75,260, but that was only the warm-up act to another blow-up from Hellmuth as Klein scooped a second big pot against the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner. The Poker Brat was back as Hellmuth left the table, pacing the floor and cursing at his lack of fortune. Just a few hands later, Hellmuth was gone, out in sixth place for $95,329 after bricking every street in Seven Card Stud against Chad Eveslage. After the event, Hellmuth was keen to point out the benefits of his staying power in bringing his A-Game to the Rio. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1444470919204769803 Hellmuth’s bust-out started a flurry of them. Philip Sternheimer was crushed in the same format by Glaser to leave in fifth place for $124,935. The same winner of that hand took out the aforementioned Eveslage in fourth for $169,218 when Glaser’s pair of sevens with a low ace was enough to win both Hi and Lo to send his American rival to the rail. Glaser led at that stage, but over the course of two hours without an elimination, each man had their periods of domination as the chips moved between each man. French player David Benyamine’s neck was on the block when he lost on 7th street to Klein, who won the pivotal pot to go into heads-up with a massive lead of 10.1 million to Glaser’s 1.5m. Klein won his maiden bracelet not long after the final duel began, with his victory in a Seven Card Stud hand ending an entertaining event. While Glaser, who had already won three WSOP bracelets in his career called off his stack with a smile and will enjoy the second-place prize of $341,274. For Jesse Klein, however, it was the fulfillment of a dream as the recruitment firm owner capped an enjoyable two-day sojourn to Sin City with a WSOP bracelet and $552,182 score. Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Results: Jesse Klein - $552,182 Benny Glaser - $341,274 David Benyamine - $236,626 Chad Eveslage - $169,218 Philip Sternheimer - $124,935 Phil Hellmuth - $95,329 Ben Yu - $75,260 DJ Buckley - $61,549 Matt Glantz - $52,211 Jake Daniels Leads $25K NLHE, Michael Addamo Outsted Many of the H.O.R.S.E. field took to the 6th event on the schedule, the $25,000-entry NLHE High Roller that kicked off on Day 3 of the WSOP. With 135 entries in total, it was Jake Daniels who ended Day 1 top of the pile, bagging up 1,182,000 chips by close of play as one of only two players to "crack a milly." While Daniels was steady throughout, he did not dominate the leaderboard until the final two levels, eliminating Eric Worre and Daniel Negreanu to vault himself to the top of the chip counts, with Michael Liang (1,028,000) and James Chen (835,000) his nearest challengers. Elsewhere in the top 10 players, Jake Schindler (667,000) and Chance Kornuth (570,000) will be major threats when the action resumes on Day 2. Several superstars made the upper echelons of the leaderboard, but plenty of big names hit the rail too. Australia’s most successful tournament player of all-time, Michael Addamo busted both bullets so will not be eligible for re-entry on Day 2. Others to lose their stacks on Day 1 included Stephen Chidwick, Brian Altman, Kenny Hallaert, Koray Aldemir, Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, Ryan Riess, Jeremy Ausmus, Upeshka De Silva, and Niall Farrell whose epic journey to the World Series was common among those from outside the United States. At the close of play on Day 1, just 54 players made the counts, but with entry and re-entry possible on Day 2 right up until the start of play, that number is sure to swell with some of the best players in the world going for gold. Galen Hall was among those to express his relief at playing some live poker for the first time in a very long time. https://twitter.com/galenhall/status/1444423233160187904   Some of the biggest players in the world have already been drawn together for Day 2, with battles between Jake Schindler, Adrian Mateos and Mikita Badziakouski at one table just a single example of the level of quality in the event. Whoever grabs a final table place at the end of Day 2 will have earned it. Event #6 $25,000 No Limit Hold’em High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Jake Daniels - 1,182,000 Michael Liang - 1,028,000 James Chen - 835,000 Scott Eskenazi - 747,000 Jake Schindler - 667,000 Clayton Kalisek - 610,000 Alexandros Theologis - 594,000 Chance Kornuth - 570,000 Ankush Mandavia - 553,000 Brian Rast - 551,000 Brobyn Bags 5 Million During Reunion Day 2 The Reunion, otherwise known as Event #4 on this year’s 2021 WSOP schedule, saw a huge number of entries on Day 1b, as 4,455 players took to the felt and made it into the money. Several high-profile players busted out before 204 players bagged up for the night, with Maurice Hawkins, Shaun Deeb, and Brad Owen just three of the Day 1 casualties. Others thrived at the felt, however, and by close of play, it was Robert Brobyn who bagged the biggest stack of chips, an incredible 5,015,000 of them. That total was way clear of Brobyn’s nearest challenger on the day Tyler Jamieson (3,040,000) and Brobyn’s lead represents the overall tournament lead after two days. Others to pile up plenty of chips on Day 1b included two former WSOP bracelet winners in the form of Ronnie Bardah, who proved a ‘Survivor’ with 2,005,000, and Jeremy Wien (1,640,000). WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Brobyn - 5,015,000 Tyler Jamison - 3,040,000 Jared Ambler - 2,450,000 Ya Yun Liu - 2,445,000 Ryan Messick - 2,410,000 Elvis Toomas - 2,375,000 Darryl Ronconi - 2,030,000 Ronnie Bardah - 2,005,000 Randy Rhee - 1,990,000 Mark Lilomaiava - 1,765,000 Connor Drinan, Rob Mizrachi Top Omaha 8 Final 15 Event #5, the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, saw 230 players whittled down to just 15 by the close of Day 2. Of those 15 players, only Connor Drinan and Robert Mizrachi have won WSOP bracelets before, but with both men at the top of the chipcounts, it could be a ding-dong battle on the final day to see whether Drinan wins his second, Mizrachi wins his fifth or a new player gets their hands on the gold. Day 2 of the event saw players such as Brian Hastings and Shaun Deeb hit the rail on the day the bubble burst with players such as Max Pescatori (80th for $2,400), David ‘Bakes’ Baker (75th for $2,400), Randy Ohel (48th for $3,200), Ari Engel (41st for $3,634) and former two-time WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Hughes (18th for $5,580) all make the money. It’s the potential shoot-out between Drinan and Mizrachi that has us salivating, however, as the final day of the event on Monday will crown a winner. WSOP 2021 Event #5 $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Connor Drinan - 2,415,000 Robert Mizrachi - 1,410,000 Sandy Sanchez - 1,380,000 Pearce Arnold - 1,160,000 Carl Lijewski - 1,095,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,080,000 Kris Kwiatkowski - 1,045,000 Yehuda Buchalter - 1,020,000 Michael Moed - 965,000 Scott Baumstein - 900,000
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