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Found 9 results

  1. In the first of a new feature series on Pocket Fives, we look back at a pivotal poker hand during the career of some of the best players on the planet. This week, four-time World Poker Tour Main Event winner Darren Elias casts his eye back on a crucial hand that led to him winning the WPT Borgata Open, where he won a huge pot from the chip leader at the time, Kane Kalas. The hand in question came at a final table that would prove to be the setting for Elias’ first major tournament poker title. Back in September of 2014, Elias was one of 1,226 entries in the $3,500 WPT Borgata Open Championship. With a prize pool guaranteed at $3 million and eventually reaching over $4 million, Elias went into the hand in question behind only Kalas as the top two had a clear lead over the field. It would be a hand between the two that would change the course of poker history and in particular that of Elias. Before the hand took place, Elias was well aware of the threat that Kalas posed. “I’d played with Kane in one other tournament before,” says Elias. “That Borgata Open was a six-day marathon, so I had played with him for a couple of days and recognized him as a competent player and someone who knew what was going on. He’d identified the dynamics with ICM where we’re playing for a lot of money with big pay jumps and he was playing well with the chip lead.” Kalas may have had the lead, but the hand in question was about to change all that. Pre-flop: Darren Elias: [poker card="Qh"][poker card="6h"] Kane Kalas: [poker card="Th"][poker card="4h"] Flushing From the Flop As Elias describes, Kalas, who had entered the final table with 14 million chips, miles clear of Elias in second place with 8 million, had a huge lead over the rest of the field. Starting out with roughly half the chips in play gave Kalas the ability to raise with a very wide range of hands to put pressure on every player. That was going through Elias’ mind when Kalas raised from the small blind with Elias in the big. “There are all kinds of ICM dynamics where he’s trying to pressure me in the blinds and I called pre-flop with my suited hand in position knowing that he’s going to be very wide,” says Elias. Flop: [poker card="Kh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2h"] That flop gave both players a flush draw, but Kalas had two hearts that were ten-high, with Elias holding a queen-high flush draw, with the king one of two hearts on the flop. At that point, Kalas c-bet a million chips into a pot of 1.35m and Elias just called, making the pot now 3.35m. “I still put him on a very wide range,” says Elias of his thoughts at that point. I think he’s c-betting with almost his entire range.” Both men give each other a long look at this point, but Elias explains that he wasn’t necessarily going for a ‘staredown’. “I’m trying to get all the information I can, but at the highest level, these players are pretty well adjusted at guarding themselves against tells,” he confesses. Despite admitting that ‘I’m always looking to see if there’s something I can pick up’, in reality, the magnitude of the moment was prevalent at that stage. “It’s a big final table; I’m focusing and trying my hardest. It looks like I’m staring intensely, but I’m just trying to play my game.” [caption id="attachment_638090" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Darren Elias (front right) playing for the biggest top prize of his poker career to date.[/caption] Drawing on the Heart "I want to give him the rope to bluff if he has the naked ace of hearts." Turn: [poker card="8h"] When the flush draw came in on the turn, Elias didn’t put his opponent on a flush. “This is going to be great for Darren Elias; I’ll be shocked if he doesn’t double-up here.” Said the late Mike Sexton, legendary former WPT Main Event winner and a cornerstone of the brand’s on-screen coverage for many years. Darren Elias, however, had a lot to do to make sure he got full value on the hand. “I put him on a lot of bluffs that contain one heart, maybe some top pair type hands, but he’d probably slow down. He is most likely bluffing or has a flush or very strong hand when he bets the turn.” Elias remembers the moment on the turn specifically very clearly and says he ‘never’ wants to be bluffing that spot. “It’s an ICM nightmare to shove and I want to give him the rope to bluff if, say, he has the naked ace of hearts. We want to give him that chance to hang himself on the river. If I do shove that turn, I probably always have the nuts and I’m unbalanced. My hand might seem vulnerable if a heart comes, but I still feel pretty safe on the turn with one to come to be trapping.” Kalas bet 1.7 million and Elias called. River: [poker card="Tc"] With the made flush, Elias obviously wanted Kalas to shove the river, which he did. That’s a function of what Elias would want with his range, not just the hand he had. “If I had a king, I should never shove the turn. If I’m to shove the turn with my flushes there, it decapitates my range where I don’t have a lot of strong hands on the river.” Kalas shoved, Elias called and the New Jersey man took the pot and grabbed the lead in the process. With first place worth over $840,000 and second place paying $500,000, it was a vital pot in terms of equity. “You’re a bit handcuffed when there are two big stacks and you’re in second. That flipped the stacks, now I’m in first and there are a lot of other smaller stacks. It really shifts the table dynamics opened up the table, I’m able to open more bet more, pressure more.” The Mistakes That Stay With Champions "When I’ve made an error, it’ll bother me for months or even years." Elias went on to win, of course, and his landmark win at what he considered his home casino was his first major tournament victory. “I had my whole family there which was great,” he tells us. “My fiancée at the time was there, so was my Dad, and we went over to a bar and had a few too many beverages. Something like that gives you confidence in being able to execute on a big stage. That’s always something on my mind, being able to execute in big spots.” Elias clearly enjoyed a mental boost by making his moment in the spotlight count and has gone on to win three more WPT Main Events, a feat that has not been equalled by any player at the time of going to press. Despite that, the now four-time WPT champion confesses that the mistakes he has made in tournaments ‘eat me up’ far more than any victories might linger in the memory. [caption id="attachment_638091" align="alignright" width="650"] Darren Elias stares down Kane Kalas on his way to toppling the overnight chip leader on the home straight.[/caption] “Any time I get to major spots at a big final table, you don’t get the opportunity to play these high stakes games against those sorts of players too often. When I’ve made an error, it’ll bother me for months or even years. To be a professional poker player, you have to be tough on yourself and identify mistakes and make changes going forward, but at some point, you have to forgive yourself and move forward. You walk a fine line.” The win represented a huge return on Elias’ investment at the time. Costing $3,500 to enter the event, the man who was born in Boston and raised in Erie, Pennsylavania had almost all of his own action, so took home the majority of his $843,744 top prize. It didn’t change which tournaments Elias played, but it allowed him to have bigger pieces of himself in $25k and $100k high rollers. “You always want to have a pulse on how you’re doing with your bankroll and adjust your pieces accordingly, taking bigger shots when you’re doing well, so it definitely helped in that regard.” The hand that changed Darren Elias’ life may have been something of a cooler but it was worth a lot of money and propelled him to win that first major title. “It was worth a lot to me in my career,” he admits. “I’m not sitting around thinking about the hand, but I can go back to that vivid memory. I’m always looking forward to the next tournament. Most of the time, it’s the ones where I made mistakes that stick with me more than the flush over flush cooler for all the money!” Elias will continue to play WPT events and says he’ll wait for his career to be over before he even considers his legacy. He has other achievements to accomplish in poker in the years to come, including winning a WSOP bracelet, something he has never done. We wonder if he’s happy being among the best players never to win a bracelet. “I’d like to win a bracelet,” says Elias. “It’s that list you want to be on but don’t want to be on. The World Series can be tough for me with a family, I can’t be out there for two months. I usually go back and forth and play a dozen events, especially the $10,000 2-7 single draw - it’s one of my favourite events. It doesn’t get a ton of players and I’ve got third twice. That’s probably my best shot at a bracelet. Eventually, I’ll break through at the World Series!” It seems like only a matter of time before Darren Elias’ next big victory on the world stage. The man whose mistakes drive him on will always enjoy the memory of that infamous flush over flush cooler that pushed him forward in his career. You can buy some of Darren Elias' action in the $50,000-entry Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on April 6th. Watch the hand that changed Darren Elias' life right here: [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8OkgXhxLA0[/embed] You can buy some of Darren Elias' action in the $50,000-entry Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino on April 6th.
  2. The recent PokerGO Heads-Up Showdown featured 32 of the best poker players on the planet. After three days at the felt, it was Chino Rheem who emerged victorious to claim $400,000 and the title as the end of an important chapter in his chequered poker career was brought to the happiest of conclusions. Daniel Negreanu is in Pre-WSOP Form Though he missed the money, Daniel Negreanu came into the PokerGO Tour Heads-Up Showdown with a tough path ahead of him. In the first round, Kid Poker took care of Jared Bleznick on the feature table, building a sizeable lead before finishing off his opponent and progressing to a meeting with Tamon Nakamura. Nakamura provided a stiff challenge, but an early pot for Negreanu when his pocket tens turned top set against the Japanese player’s inside straight draw and flush draw worked the Canadian to almost level in chips and he would eventually prevail at the feature table. He may have lost to Darren Elias, but Negreanu is warming up for the World Series of Poker nicely. [caption id="attachment_638152" align="aligncenter" width="768"] Daniel Negreanu performed well at the felt, looking happy with his form and the game in general.[/caption] Elsewhere on Day 1, in the ‘Spades’ section, there were unexpected defeats for Sam Soverel and Shaun Deeb, who slid out after a dramatic and high-quality defeat to long-time rival, Shannon Shorr. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTi3JEAcEuw Darren Elias Knows How to Close The four-time World Poker Tour winner Darren Elias had an excellent run in the event, making it all the way to the final showdown, where he eventually lost out for the runner-up prize of $200,000. It could be argued, however, that Elias’ performance was the strongest in the entire Showdown, with his opponents among some of the best players ever to have looked down at hole cards. In the opening round, Elias took care of Landon Tice in the first match to conclude, with the final hand seeing Elias’s ace-king beat Tice’s dominated ace and ease the former’s progress. The second round didn’t get any easier for Elias, however, as he faced - and beat - Erik Seidel. The former WSOP Main Event runner-up proved a tricky opponent, but Elias again prevailed, only to face Daniel Negreanu in the next round, with his Round of 16 and quarterfinal opponents having won over $85 million in tournaments between them. Elias got the better of Negreanu and then took on the impressive Justin Young, who had beaten two of the favorites for the trophy on his way to the semifinals. Now in profit, Elias once again came out on top, making the final when he had worked himself 3:1 up in chips before winning a flip with ace-queen against Young’s pocket threes. The Big Guns Are Out for Hellmuth "My opponent gave me the double bird, and was out of line [with] his verbal attacks." ~ Phil Hellmuth There was no question about the most dramatic fall-out from the opening round inside the PokerGO Studio at ARIA. Phil Hellmuth was the favorite to progress against Eric Persson in the $25,000 buy-in event. That result didn’t materialize, however, and when Persson won, a disgruntled Hellmuth trudged off complaining of the behaviour of his opponent. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1517361856779759616 While the verbal sparring had been even, Hellmuth perceived Persson’s flipping of the[ ‘double bird’ to be over the line, leading to a small explosion on Poker Twitter. Eventually, however, Hellmuth, ever the bigger man after the event, made a live apology during Persson’s next round victory over Dan Shak. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1517620869693988865 Persson might have triumphed against the Poker Brat and much-fancied Shak, but couldn’t make profit as he lost out to the whirlwind that is Isaac Kempton. Favorites Can Still Lose to Underdogs Many of the PokerGO Heads-Up Showdown games went against the favorite pre-match. Ali Imsirovic came into the Showdown on the back of perhaps his most difficult week in the game and exited immediately after being busted by Jake Daniels in the opening round. Others faced the same fate, with stars of the game such as Alex Foxen losing to Justin Young in the quarterfinals, Scott Seiver falling in the opening round to Isaac Kempton and Jeremy Ausmus losing inside the PokerGO Studio as he became one of Chino Rheem’s many victims on route to the title being decided. By the time the event reached the semifinal stage, it was one where every player was guaranteed a return of $100,000 on their stake of $25,000. Darren Elias was the only player of the four to have put his action on sale on Pocket Fives, once again making huge profit for investors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yp2dhO_jn8Y Chino Rheem is on the Redemption Trail "We’re back on the right track. God willing." ~ Chino Rheem Chino Rheem’s victory came with more than a heavy dose of irony in a week overshadowed for many by the cheating allegations that have peppered Twitter all week. Rheem, who openly admitted many of his problems early in his career came down to his reliance on drink or drugs, credited his sponsor and his many supporters in helping him turn his life around. “We’re back on the right track. God willing, thank God, if I can just stay there,” he said after the final victory against Darren Elias. “Honestly, once I made the money, once I won the first three matches, I was like, ‘whatever happens from here it’s all good.’ Things went my way, and I’ll take it, obviously. I can’t complain at all.” In achieving some inner peace, Rheem has proved something of a redemption story in the game and during a period in poker where many are being asked to look for the same sort of redemption by acting in good faith in the here and now, Rheem’s win confirms it can be done. With one of the toughest sets of players to win against, his victory against Darren Elias saw a superb tournament close out in dramatic fashion as four men made the money and in Rheem’s case, win his 14th ranking tournament victory across a rollercoaster poker career. PokerGO Heads Up Showdown Final Results: Chino Rheem - $400,000 Darren Elias - $200,000 Isaac Kempton - $100,000 Justin Young - $100,000
  3. Ali Imsirovic scored yet another victory inside PokerGO’s Las Vegas studio on Wednesday after taking down the penultimate event (Event #7: $25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for his third career PokerGO Cup event victory and $365,500. With the victory, Imsirovic soared past $16 million in live career earnings, just another testament of the young phenom being one of the toughest players in the game today. At the start of the 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) level, four of the six players were sitting with less than 20 big blinds, including Darren Elias who, at his fourth final table of the series, had just over 10 bigs in his stack. Sam Soverel opened the action to 80,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="5s"], next to act was Imsirovic who flatted holding the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"]. Elias was in the small blind and three-bet shipped for a total of 405,000 and Soverel let go of his hand. Imsirovic, however, did not fold. He made the call and putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2d"], handing Imsirovic top pair and leaving Elias looking for an eight. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and the [poker card="3h"] completed the board, sending Elias out in sixth place for $64,500. On the very next hand, Cary Katz shipped his final 325,000 all-in holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] and, once again, it was Imsirovic happy to make the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="td"] flop brought Karz some chop outs to go along with his bottom pair. However, the [poker card="6s"] on the turn and the [poker card="5d"] river was no help to the PokerGO founder and in back-to-back hands Imsirovic took out two. Katz hit the cage to collect his $86,000 fifth-place prize and snap-enter Event #8. After Ausmus found a double, Nick Schulman was the lone short stack with roughly 10 big blinds. When it folded to Ausmus in the small blind, he opened shoved on Schulman holding the [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"]. In the big blind, Schulman looked down at the [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"] and made the call with his tournament on the line. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"], keeping Schulman in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] giving Ausmus a double-gutter to go along with his pair outs to eliminate Schulman. The [poker card="qd"] hit the river, bringing Ausmus top pair and sending Schulman out in fourth place, good for $118,250. Three-handed play saw Imsirovic build a tower of chips, holding a better than four-to-one lead over Soverel in second place with 1.1 million. When the blinds hit 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante), Ausmus had himself roughly 13 big blinds and found a great spot to potentially double yet again. From the button, Imsirovic moved all-in with the chip lead holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"]. In the small blind, with 640,000 total, Ausmus picked up [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"] and called for the rest of his stack. In the big blind, Soverel let go of the [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"] and let Imsirovic know he had the same hand. That said, the flop came [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], bringing one of the last two sevens in the deck and putting Imsirovic’s hand in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="4s"], offering Ausmus chop-outs to a five. But the river came the [poker card="3h"] and Ausmus’ day was done in third place for $161,250. Imsirovic held a better than five-to-one chip lead over Soverel when the pair sat down heads-up to determine a winner. But Soverel hung around, closed the gap between them, and eventually took the chip lead. Although Soverel held the momentum, a pivotal hand swung the match back in Imsirovic’s favor. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) Soverel raised the button to 175,000 with his [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"] and Imsirovic called holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"], giving Imsirovic trips. Imsirovic checked to Soverel who bet 75,000. Imsirovic raised to 350,000 and Soverel opted for a quick call. The turn came the [poker card="ad"] and Imsirovic led for 700,000, which Soverel quickly called. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Imsirovic shipped his stack for 1.9 million. Soverel, with just 2.1 million behind, took his time, asked for a count, and eventually shrug-called hoping to win it right here. But Soverel was shown the trips and was left with just 210,000 in his stack. The very next hand, the pair got it all-in and Imsirovic’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="4d"] outflopped Soverel’s [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"] as the board came [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="qd"][poker card="9h"]. Soverel’s second-place finish was good for $236,500 while Imsirovic celebrated his third career PokerGO Cup event win with the $365,500 first-place prize. PokerGO Cup Event #7 Final Table Results Ali Imsirovic - $365,500 Sam Soverel - $236,500 Jeremy Ausmus - $161,250 Nick Schulman - $118,250 Cary Katz - $86,000 Darren Elias - $64,500
  4. The New Year poker doldrums are coming to an end and the 2022 tournament schedule is about to heat up. A wave of big-time tournament series are on the immediate horizon and with them, some of the best players on the planet will be getting back to work, hoping to start the year off on the right foot. Upcoming events include the World Poker Tour Lucky Hearts Poker Open at the Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood, Florida, the Los Angeles Poker Classic held at the Commerce Casino in Los Angeles, and the return of the PokerGO Cup at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. All of these series are sure to draw big fields and massive prize pools. Over on PocketFives Staking, some of those players are giving fans a shot at jumping in on the action by offering shares of their upcoming tournaments. So, if you are looking to add some excitement while following the results, check out some of our upcoming featured events. WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open Main Event This tournament - this entire series actually - is going to be a blowout. Poker in Florida has seemingly been unimpacted by current conditions and last year the LHPO Main Event turned into one of the biggest live fields in WPT history. In addition to Daniel Weinman and Josh Arieh having offered action (both are currently sold out), two-time WPT champion Sam Panzica opened up just a few shares in a special “for the fans” offering. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1483933546137985025?s=20 Additionally, WPT Instructor Katie Stone is headed to the East Coast and will be playing in a number of side events (many of which have sold out) and the Main Event. The Main Event kicks off on Friday, January 21. LHPO $25K High Roller Arieh may be sold out of his Main Event, but the reigning 2021 WSOP Player of the Year is also going to be firing in the $25,500 NLHE High Roller on January 24. Plus, there’s minimal markup for the four-time bracelet winner on this one. Joining Arieh is German high-stakes savant Rainer Kempe who is offering action in the NLHE High Roller as well. Kempe's resume is a long one and includes a win in the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl for $5 million and more than $27 million in career earnings. By all accounts, he is one of the most respected players in the game. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1483928956642361344?s=20 PokerGO Cup - Feb 2-10 The PokerGO Cup returns to the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas (and the PokerGO Studio) in the first week of February and four-time WPT champion Darren Elias has his sights set on playing nearly every No Limit Hold’em event on the schedule. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1483937330247487493?s=20 Elias has packages available for two $25K’s, the $50K, and the $100K event. Elias is coming off a 2021 in which he won an Aria $10K High Roller for $169,600 and also had two runner-up high roller finishes for a total of nearly $825,000 and he's gearing up for a big year in 2022. READ: For Darren Elias The Motivation and Pressure To Execute Is All Self Imposed The PokerGO Cup is one of the most sweatable series in the immediate future with every final table being broadcast on the platform. Looking for more? There’s low-stakes action available for the upcoming LAPC and the return of the Wynn Millions series in March. Check out all of the upcoming action over at PocketFives Staking. [stakingupcoming]
  5. It’s another win inside the PokerGO Studio for Nick Petrangelo who bested the 41-entry field of Event #5 ($25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup to take home the $369,000 first-place prize. Petrangelo has been on a bit of a heater in the PokerGO high-stakes events as of late, having cashed four times, including two victories, in January’s Stairway to Millions series. All of his early 2022 high-roller results have him currently sitting atop the PokerGO Tour leaderboard and, with his latest victory, topping more than $2 million in earnings this year. “Everything has been going really well since even, like, September,” Petrangelo told PokerGO after the win. “A little up and down, but yeah, since then pretty much everything has been working out. I’m running great, winning all-ins, and getting hands at the right times. Sometimes you get around the bubble when you have a lot of chips and you lose a couple of hands, but it’s been the opposite for me when I go deep and everything just goes well.” Darren Elias was at his third PokerGO Cup final table of the 2022 series, however, he started this final table on the short stack and with the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) he held just under 10 big blinds. After Nick Schulman opened from under the gun to 100,000, Elias three-bet shoved his final 485,000 holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. When the action folded back to Schulman, he quickly called putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="9d"][poker card="9c"] giving Schulman top pair and leaving Elias with needing runner-runner to survive. When the turn came the [poker card="2c"], Elias was officially drawing dead to the river. The four-time WPT champ said his goodbye and went to collect his $51,250 sixth-place prize. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Schulman and 2021 PokerGO Tour champion Ali Imsirovic were both sitting on just over 10 big blinds, with Imsirovic holding a 40,000 chip edge. From the cutoff, Imsirovic raised to 140,000 holding the [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"] and when it got to Schulman in the small blind, he three-bet shipped all-in with his [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"]. Petrangelo folded his big blind and with Imsirovic going nowhere, he snap-called, and the two short stacks put the cards on their backs. Schulman was slightly covered putting his tournament at risk, but it was Imsirovic who was in trouble when the flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2c"], giving Schulman top pair. The turn was the [poker card="7d"], leaving Imsirovic looking for an ace or king to take out Schulman. But the river was the [poker card="5c"], giving Schulman the full double and leaving Imsirovic with just over a small blind left. Imsirovic was eliminated in fifth place on the very next hand, losing in a four-way pot. Imsirovic collected $82,000 for his efforts. After the first break, the blinds escalated to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante), and with just over 10 bigs in his stack, Sean Winter raised to 375K from the button with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="th"]. After Schulman folded the small blind, Petrangelo looked down at the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"] and jammed all-in for 1 million. Winter, with half his stack in the middle quickly called for it all. Winter playfully picked up the [poker card="th"] and said to Petrangelo “Hey, have you seen these coming today?”. Petrangelo, unfazed said no and Winter continued “Have you been watchin’?” Soon the dealer put out a [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3c"] flop, giving both top pair, but keeping Petrangelo’s kicker in play. “Ten baby!” Winter rooted. “Four of spades, I have a deck read” Petrangelo replied. Close, the turn came the [poker card="4d"] leaving Winter looking for just three outs to survive. The river was the [poker card="6d"] and the good-natured Winter stood and went to the cage to collect his $112,750 cash for fourth place. Playing three-handed at the same level, Schulman raised to 160,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"] and when it was Bill Klein’s turn in the big blind, he three-bet shipped his chip lead with the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. After using a time bank, Schulman said “I don’t know what I’m doing here, Bill.” and eventually made the call, wincing when he saw Klein’s hand. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2s"], and Schulman took the lead hitting top pair. “I’m the captain, now,” Schulman joked having come from behind. The [poker card="7c"] turn brought Schulman two pair, but it didn’t change the situation. However, the [poker card="8s"] on the river did, giving Klein a set of eights and shipping him the pot. Schulman tapped the table and “hugged it out” with Bill Klein before he left in third place for $164,000. Klein took a better than 3:2 lead into heads-up play versus Petrangelo. The duo put on one of the longer heads-up battles of the series so far, playing for the better part of an hour. Eventually, Petrangelo. chipped up and took the lead, reversing the situation. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante) Klein picked up [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"] on the button and made the call. Petrangelo looked at the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and moved all-in. Klein decided to go for it, flipping in a single chip to make the call. There was little drama as the board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8s"] leaving Petrangelo the winner with his ace. Klein scored $246,000 as the runner-up and Petrangelo, who won the PokerGO Stairway to Millions finale, scored another victory in the PokerGO Studio, winning Event #5 for $369,000. PokerGO Cup Event #5 Final Table Results Nick Petrangelo - $369,000 Bill Klein - $246,000 Nick Schulman - $164,000 Sean Winter - $112,750 Ali Imsirovic - $82,000 Darren Elias - $51,250
  6. Sean Perry put on a show as he battled back from just two big blinds to score the victory in Event #2 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for $200,000. High roller final tables can often be a serious affair with top players battling in silence in search of a big-time payday. However, this particular final table was one of the most entertaining of the year with its loose and engaging vibe and plenty of table talk. There were side bets, all-in blind raises and shoves, and improbable comebacks. In fact, PokerGO founder Cary Katz and Bryn Kenney even agreed to swap outfits if they got heads-up. In addition to the pure entertainment of this table, there was another storyline that had emerged. Kenney was tracking down Justin Bonomo to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob’s All-Time Money List. Kenney needed a third-place finish or better to make it happen. The final table fireworks started on just the second hand of the day. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Kenney opened from under the gun to 80,000 with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Next to act was Dan Shak who three-bet shipped his 1 million chip stack with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Perry in the big blind who woke up with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"]. Perry re-shipped all-in for 1.3 million forcing a fold from Kenney. Shak, at-risk and dominated, needed help in order to survive however the board ran out [poker card="8s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2h"] keeping kickers in play. Perry received a near full double-up and Shak made his way to the cage to collect his $48,000 sixth-place prize. During the 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) level, Elias, who had made back-to-back PokerGO Cup final tables played a pivotal pot with Kenney. Kenney made it 100,000 to go from the cutoff holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Elias, who had just doubled through Kenney, defended his big blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="2s"] giving Elias top pair and he quickly checked it over to Kenney who continued for 60,000, which Elias called. The turn was the [poker card="jh"], bringing in the gutshot straight for Kenney who, when checked to, fired again - this time for 210,000. Elias called once again. The river came the [poker card="7d"] and this time when Elias checked, Kenney put together a hefty 785,000 bet. Elias only had 900,000 left in his stack. After burning through multiple time banks, Elias made the call. Kenney surged to the chip lead and Elias was left with just over two big blinds. Elias went out on the very next hand, finishing in fifth place for $64,000. The dynamics changed quite a bit with four left. Katz went from the short stack to the chip lead after tripling through Ball and Kenney. Then Ball took back the lead, after sending Kenney to the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante) Kenney remained active and doubled up when his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] got it in the middle against Perry holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"] and the board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5h"] leaving Perry with just two big blinds. But Perry battled back, doubling in multiple hands to not only get back in the game but bring all four chip counts effectively even. The wild swings continued when Perry and Kenney agreed that if it folded to Perry in the small blind, the two would go all-in blind. With that on the table, both Ball and Katz folded. Perry made good on his word, sticking in 1.6 million (20 big blinds) with the [poker card="td"][poker card="2h"] and Kenney made the call with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"]. The board ran out [poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"] giving Perry a pure double up with his pair of deuces and sending him to the top of the chip counts. Things got even more hectic when, at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante), Ball opened from under the gun to 200,000. When it folded to Perry in the small blind, he looked down at [poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"]. Normally, this might be an uneventful fold. However the final four players were playing the "nine-four" game (the equivalent of the popular seven-deuce game) where if someone won a hand with any nine-four combo, the rest of the table would pay that player a $5K bounty. So, with that in mind - Perry shoved his chip lead, and Ball snap-called. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] giving Perry the lead with his pair of nines. The turn was the [poker card="3c"] and Ball was left with just ten outs. The river was the [poker card="4d"] shipped Perry the hand and the $15,000 side bet from the other players. Ball, who finished in fifth place in Event #1, fell in fourth place for $80,000. That wasn’t the only other significant result from that hand, with Ball eliminated, Kenney was guaranteed to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob All-Time Money List. Soon thereafter, Kenney slipped in the chip counts and found himself chasing Katz and Perry, both of who had more than 40 big blinds. But after doubling through Perry once, Kenney and Perry got it all in again with Perry just barely covering Kenney. Perry raised the button to 200,000 with the [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Kenney shipped 2.7 million in the small blind with his [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"]. After Katz folded, Perry pretty quickly made the call and put Kenney at risk. The flop came [poker card="8s"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3c"] giving Perry middle set and leaving Kenney with just a 2% chance to survive. The turn was the [poker card="kd"] and the new All-Time Money List leader was drawing dead to the [poker card="5h"] river. Kenney did what he needed to do, finishing in third place for $96,000, besting Justin Bonomo on the ATML by a little more than $10,000. After a short break, Perry and Katz returned to finish the tournament with Perry holding a slight chip lead. Within just a couple of hands Perry, extended that lead and looked to close it out. On the ninth hand of head-up play, Perry moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="3h"] and Katz, with roughly 10 big blinds behind, called for it all holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"] flop kept Katz in the lead to double up but brought Perry both flush and backdoor straight outs. The [poker card="jd"] turn was safe for Katz, but the river came the [poker card="3c"], pairing Perry's kicker and eliminating Katz as the runner-up for $144,000. PokerGO Cup Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $200,000 Cary Katz - $144,000 Bryn Kenney - $96,000 Scott Ball - $80,000 Darren Elias - $64,000 Dan Shak - $48,000
  7. Daniel Colpoys outlasted the 77-entry field in Event #1 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup to earn his first career high-roller victory and take home the $200,200 first-place prize. Colpoys started the day third in chips with less than half that of final table chip leader Andrew ‘LuckyChewy’ Lichtenberger and only slightly behind four-time WPT champ Darren Elias. But Colpoys played tough through the four-hour-long final table, frequently ending up on the right side of hands against Lichtenberger and ultimately eliminating three of his final five opponents. "I was kind of handcuffed at the start, and then I got some momentum and ran pretty well," Colpoys said to PokerGO after his win. "I'm happy to take it down. I respect a lot of the guys there. It was nice." It didn’t take long for the final table to shed its first player. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Matthew Wantman put in a raise to 80,000 holding the [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"]. Next to act was Michael Lang who, with roughly 15 big blinds, three-bet shipped with his [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"] for just over 600,000. The action folded around to Colpoys in the big blind and when he looked down at the [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"], he announced he was also all-in for nearly 1.6 million. Wantman let go of his hand and the cards were on their backs with Lang at risk. Even before the flop came out Lang tapped the table, said “good game, guys”, and stood up. The [poker card="9d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="3c"] flop was of little help for Lang who did indeed look to be on his way out. The turn was the [poker card="5d"], leaving Lang with just six outs, one time. The [poker card="2c"] completed the board and this time Lang was serious when saying his goodbyes, exiting in sixth place for $46,200. After Lang’s departure, Scott Ball was sitting on the short stack and slipped below 10 big blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante). After Darren Elias made it 100,000 to go in the cutoff with [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"], Ball three-bet shipped his final 460,000 with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="tc"]. Both blinds folded and, after verifying the amount, Elias made the call. The flop came [poker card="qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6h"] giving Ball extra outs to the straight. “That’s an exciting flop, I’ll take that,” Ball said to Elias. “That’s fun.” The [poker card="7s"] turn added some chop outs for Ball, but the [poker card="2c"] river missed them all and Ball slid his chips to Elias and made he way to the rail in fifth place to collect his $61,600. Four-handed play stretched out over the next couple of levels as Lichtenberger increased his chip lead and the rest of the table battled for position. With the blinds up to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante), Colpoys picked up [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"] on the button and raised to 800,000, leaving himself with over one big blind behind. Lichtenberger folded his small blind and Wantman, in the big blind, and less than 10 bigs behind, opted to move all-in with his [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"]. Colpoys quickly committed the rest of his chips and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], keeping Colpoys in the lead and adding the nut flush draw to increase his lead in the hand. The turn was the [poker card="4c"] completing the flush and leaving Wantman drawing dead to the river. Wantman made a quiet exit in fourth place, good for $77,000. Three-handed, Colpoys and Elias chipped away at Lichtenberger’s lead, drawing the chip counts closer. Eventually, Colpoys wrestled the chip lead away from Lichtenberger when the pair played a pivotal pot in which Lichtenberger’s flopped trips were downed by Colpoys who rivered a flush. After a short break, the blinds escalated to 50,000/100,000 and Elias was sitting on just 13 big blinds. After Lichtenberger folded his button, Elias moved all-in holding the [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"] and was quickly called by Colpoys and his dominating [poker card="kh"][poker card="tc"]. With Elias at risk, the pair saw a flop of [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"][poker card="2c"], keeping Colpoys in the lead but offering Elias some notions of additional chop outs. That increased when the turn came the [poker card="qc"]. However, everything bricked for Elias when the [poker card="7h"] hit the river. Elias settled for the bronze and a $100,100 score. After taking out Elias, Colpoys held a 16 big blind chip lead over Lichtenberger at the start of heads-up play. The pair battled into the next level when Colpoys, with a 3.5:1 chip lead found a fortunate river to help him seal the victory. With the blinds at 75,000/150,000 (150,000 ante), Lichtenberger called on the button with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="4c"] and Colpoys put in a raise to 475,000 holding [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"]. Lichtenberger made the call and the pair took a flop of [poker card="qh"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"]. Colpoys led for 225,000 and Lichtenberger made the call, leaving himself with just over 10 big blinds behind. The turn came the [poker card="ad"] vaulting Lichtenberger’s hand into the lead and leaving Colpoys with just 5% to win the hand. Colpoys checked it over to Lichtenberger who bet 450,000 and Colpoys opted to make the call not knowing he had just two outs headed to the river. When the [9c[ hit the river, Colpoys locked up the hand. He checked it to ‘LuckyChewy’ who moved all-in for his final 1.5 million. Colpoys snap-called and ended the tournament. Lichtenberger settled for runner-up and $146,300 while Colpoys took down the first event of the 2022 PokerGO Cup and added $200,200 to his results. PokerGO Cup Event #1 Final Table Results Daniel Colpoys - $200,200 Andrew Lichtenberger - $146,300 Darren Elias - $100,100 Matthew Wantman - $77,000 Scott Ball - $61,600 Michael Lang - $46,200
  8. When one thinks of the World Poker Tour it’s almost impossible not to think of Darren Elias. His success is nearly synonymous with the brand. Elias, famously, sits alone at the top of the heap when it comes to any number of World Poker Tour categories including Main Event titles (4), final tables (12), and cashes (43). However, Elias’ extensive poker resume is much more than WPT Main Event victories, and at 35 years old, it's something he’s proven year over year. Elias has excelled in 2021, picking up big-time scores in a trio of High Rollers on the PokerGO tour (totaling nearly $1 million in earnings) as well as having a breakout year playing online that saw him grab a prestigious GGPoker Super MILLION$ title for one of the biggest cashes of his career. As the World Poker Tour prepares to wrap up Season XIX with the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Main Event at the Bellagio, Elias is headed to Las Vegas looking to add to his 2021 High Roller totals and, perhaps, pick up title number five. We caught up with him for an extended conversation about his success on the WPT, his aspirations for the World Series of Poker, balancing his home and poker lives, and the pressure he puts on himself to succeed. __ For many fans, when they first hear the name Darren Elias, they probably think of the World Poker Tour. You sit alone with four WPT Main Tour titles and Matt Savage has taken to calling you the “WPT G.O.A.T.”. How have you been so successful on the WPT? What is it about those events that play to your strengths? Yeah. I love the World Poker Tour and that makes up a bulk of my schedule during the year. I play about 50 to 60 tournaments every year, I'm pretty consistent, and World Poker Tour tournaments probably make up a dozen of those - and I do like that most are in America or Canada. I traveled internationally a lot in my early '20s playing EPTs, Macau…basically everywhere in the world, and I kind of found that I liked playing in the [U.S.] and North America. A couple of reasons behind that, and probably linked in with my success is that I like the knowledge of the player pool in these events. Most of the time these WPT events, it's the same group of guys, and each stop has its locals, but I do think knowing the players gives me a bigger edge. I wouldn't say that my results are equal to my edge, where I would say I probably over-performed on the World Poker Tour and under-performed at the World Series, luck-wise or expectation-wise, but I do love the events and I do love that they're all basically in the states. I know you plan on playing the $25K High Roller at the upcoming WPT Five Diamond but didn’t realize how many High Roller cashes you actually have on your resume. How do you differential between playing your normal schedule of events and when you jump into high rollers? Is playing higher something you continue to aspire to or are you just picking the best spots you can? Well, I would say I kind of hand pick the high roller events that I want to play and I try to pick the bigger ones, the ones with the biggest prize pools and most runners. I don't have a ton of interest in traveling internationally to play small field 100Ks or 250Ks. I mean, I've done it in the past, but for me, my biggest value is time. Especially now that I'm home with a family, I really have to pick my events that I want to go to. I probably play five to ten 25K plus events a year - maybe, 25K, 50K, 100K, something like that - and they do play differently than, like, a World Poker Tour Main Event, obviously, and you have to be sharper. I might do more preparation beforehand if I know I'm playing a tough 100K, and you have to be more fundamentally sound in an event like that because you're playing higher tier players, some of the best players in the world are in those events. In the World Poker Tour, that's not always true. When you decide you are going to play higher, do you put in extra study time? Absolutely. Yeah. I think most players would agree, at lower stakes, playing even $1Ks, $2Ks, $3,500, $5Ks, you can probably get away with not studying if you have good instincts and still win. But if you play in bigger events, these $50Ks, $100Ks, and you're playing with the elite players, you really need to put in your practice study work or you're going to find yourself in there guessing a lot, which is not the way to win. [caption id="attachment_637478" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Darren Elias, four-time World Poker Tour Main Event champion.[/caption] You just mentioned that time is one of your most valuable currencies and you’ve decided to take on a role as an ambassador for BetMGM/partypoker U.S. For some players becoming an ambassador is an aspiration, was it one for you? In the past you’ve talked about how public speaking wasn’t really your thing, do you feel any added pressure taking on this new role? I wouldn't say it's added pressure but it is something that's taken me a while to get comfortable with. It's not my natural personality to put my face on something and put it out there. It's taken some time to get used to, and the main reason of my drive behind this is, I felt so terrible for the American online poker players over the last 10 years, and I feel like this is a good opportunity. If there's anything I can do to further our cause and get bigger tournaments online in the US, get more states legalized, linked up, organize tournaments, work on schedules - anything I can do to help get online poker back in the US should be a priority. I think at this point I'm in a position where maybe I can make a little bit of difference, and that's kind of my long-term goal with BetMGM and partypoker. Speaking of online poker, you have a reputation as a live pro but this year you cracked the worldwide PocketFives Top 10 rankings, have more than $8 million in career earnings, and have both a WCOOP and Super MILLION$ title on your online resume. Where does an online grind fit into your schedule right now? I guess most of that took place this year while you were traveling abroad? Yeah. Last year I played a lot on GGPoker during COVID. I feel like I cashed for more last year than I probably did in my whole online career just because the stakes of the tournaments nowadays on the international sites are huge. That may have been kind of a one-off year because of COVID, there weren't any live tournaments and that was just a weird year. I do see myself playing a lot more online in the states, but my international, rest of the world, online career is probably drawing to a close I would say. You talked a little about how maybe variance has been on your side in WPT events, more so than the WSOP. You don’t yet have a WSOP bracelet and I wanted to know if WSOP success, outside of the money, is on your list of things you’d like to achieve? Are you thinking ‘I would like to win a bracelet’? I would like to win a bracelet, but I would say it means less now than it used to, just in how easily they're giving them away nowadays with the online events and these Flip & Gos. You can play a 50 runner, $200 event online and win a World Series of Poker bracelet and that kind of takes some of the prestige away from it. But, sure, when I go to the World Series every year I'm trying to make final tables. I'm trying to win. I don't play the full WSOP schedule where I'm in these $1,500 No Limits, battling ten-handed all day. I'm not in a lot of those, but I do play most of the $5K+. I play Deuce-to-Seven, so some of these events are smaller fields, like under a hundred players, and I am in there and I'm trying to win a bracelet. That would mean something to me, to win one of those events, the high roller 10K Deuce-to-Seven no limit, something like that. I think those events still carry some prestige, and when I'm going out there, I'm trying to win those. Where do you land on mixed games? Do you like them and are those fields you would like to be competing in? Not really. My experience with mixed games is, I don't really like the limit games. I never have. I mean, I played Limit Hold’em when I first started playing poker. I was 17, 18 years old at casinos, and I played a little bit of Stud and 08, that kind of thing, and to be honest, I find them a little boring. I'd gravitate more towards No Limit games, so I like No Limit Deuce-to-Seven. I've played Pot Limit and No Limit Triple Draw online quite a bit. I like those games, and I could see maybe down the line I play more PLO, but I really don't have much interest in limit games, so I'm a bit restricted in that regard. I'm sure if I put in the study and really tried to learn these games, then I could become a winning player, but I don't enjoy them so I'm not really devoting my time there. What are your thoughts on the WSOP moving to the Strip? Are you planning on making the quick turnaround this summer for the World Series of Poker? Yeah, I’ll be there, and I kind of don't know what to expect. I have low expectations. I'm kind of happy to get out of the Rio and erase all my memories of the World Series when I haven't done amazing. So maybe I'll get new mojo here at Ballys or whatever it's going to be called when we're there. I think it's cool that it's on the Strip. I really don't know what to expect, but I will be there and I'll be playing. You have a family with two small kids, how do you strike a balance between grinding the circuit and being present for your family? I’ve learned a lot about it over the last five years, and one important thing I found, is keeping the trips short. I can't go to Las Vegas for a month and play the WSOP and be away from my kids and my family that long. So, kind of breaking it up into shorter trips, which is one of the reasons World Poker Tour's great now. They have a Main Event, maybe a high roller, but it's one or two events. It's a week. I'm there. I'm back. I really like that, and mentally, kind of, when I'm on a poker trip and I'm there competing, battling, I'm thinking about poker and I'm 100% focused. When I'm home, I'm being dad and I'm being a husband and trying to do these duties, and I think keeping them separate has worked well for me. One more, do you put any pressure on yourself to stay ahead of the pack when it comes to WPT titles? There’s a number of heavy hitters with three titles looking to make it four, so just wondering what your state of mind is when you think about that. I put pressure on myself regardless of who's chasing me. Like, I get to these final tables or deep in these events and I feel huge pressure to execute just to do the right thing. I'm in such a good spot, usually deep in these things against weaker players, playing for a lot of money where there are big opportunities and these are kind of what I've trained and prepared for. I always feel pressure to execute at these final tables, and I don't think I'm driven too much by who's on my tail or what other people are doing, because if I mess up in one of these final tables, these big spots that you get once a year or once every other year, that's going to drive me crazy no matter who has three titles, who has four titles. I'm tough on myself in that regard, so I don't think I need any extra motivation.
  9. The stakes have been raised in the 2021 Poker Masters as Chris Brewer took down Event #8 ($25,000 NLHE) on Wednesday for a career-high tournament cash of $427,500. The $10Ks on the schedule are in the rearview mirror and the super high rollers have made their way to the PokerGO studio in Las Vegas. In fact, Event #8 saw a total of 57 entries which created an impressive prize pool of $1.425 million. For Brewer, an emerging face on the high-stakes scene, he relied on both his experience and a little bit of luck to take down first of the $25Ks. “I won a lot of all-ins which was super helpful,” Brewer said after his win. “I’m pumped to win.” It looked like it could be a quick final table after the early exit of table short stack John Riordan. On the very first hand, with the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante), Darren Elias was looking to apply some pressure on the short stack as he moved all-in with the [poker card="qs"][poker card="4s"]. Riordan, the lone blind, picked up [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and went with it, sticking his eight big blind stack in the middle. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"] giving Elias trips and leaving Riordan looking for runner-runner help to survive. The [poker card="8c"] opened the door for a possible flush for Riordan, but he missed when the river came the [poker card="td"]. Riordan’s fifth-place finish was good for $114,000 and it marked his fourth cash in the first eight events. Brock Wilson had also been on a Poker Masters heater, sitting at his third final table of the series and capturing a win in Event #4 for $189,800. For the better part of an hour, Wilson had been nursing the short stack and when the blind climbed to 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) he was sitting on just eight big blinds when he moved all-in from the small blind holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"]. Elias was in the big blind, looked down at [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] and instantly called. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"] flop kept Elias’ dominating hand in the lead with top pair. The turn came the [poker card="6d"] and Wilson found himself drawing dead to the [poker card="4s"] river. He added to his Poker Masters resume with his fourth-place finish for $142,500, bringing his 2021 Poker Masters total to $414,300, good enough to assume the top of the leaderboard for the Purple Jacket. Lou Garza, who started the day with the chip lead continued to be the leader when three-handed play started. But as the first break approached, he lost that lead to a surging Elias while Brewer also found himself losing chips. By the end of the third hour, Elias was building a tower of chips as Garza slipped to the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) the two short stacks went to war. Brewer opened from the small blind to 575,000 with his [poker card="8h"][poker card="6h"], forcing Garza to go all-in if he wanted to call. Indeed he did as Garza put his chips in the middle with the [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8d"] flop paired up Brewer and left the former chip leader needing help to stick around. The turn was the [poker card="5d"] and the river was not an ace, but the [poker card="3d"], ending Garza’s back-to-back final table run in third place for $199,500. Elias held a healthy 2.5-to-1 chip lead over Brewer when heads-up began. But in a key hand where Elias had [poker card="qc"][poker card="5c"] and Brewer held [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] and the flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"], Brewer was able to bring the two stack to even. It was just twenty minutes later that Brewer had flipped the chip counts, holding the 2.5-to-1 chip lead over Elias. The blinds escalated to 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) and Elias was sitting on just over 10 big blinds when he moved all-in from the button with his [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"]. With the lead and [poker card="kd"][poker card="9c"], Brewer defended, looking to finish off the four-time WPT champion. The [poker card="js"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"] board never really provided a sweat for the duo as Brewer’s king-high hand was good enough to score the win. Elias collected $285,000 as the runner-up and Brewer booked the win and $427,500 to go with it. Brewer’s third 2021 Poker Masters cash brings his series total to $490,800. 2021 Poker Masters Event #8 Final Table Results Chris Brewer - $427,500 Darren Elias - $285,000 Lou Garza - $199,500 Brock Wilson - $142,500 John Riordan - $114,000
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