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Found 12 results

  1. Nominations for the second annual Global Poker Awards were announced on Friday with popular poker personality Joey Ingram leading the way with four nominations. The Global Poker Awards, slated to take place at the PokerGO Studio in Las Vegas on March 6, celebrates the poker industry by recognizing the game of poker's top talent both on the felt and behind the scenes. This year, awards will be handed out in 19 different categories including two that are voted on by the fans. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="BetMGM NJ"] Multiple Nods Sixteen former award winners are back in contention this year with a number of them recognized in multiple categories. Poker personality and podcast/video producer Joey Ingram picked up nominations in the People’s Choice for Poker Personality of the Year, Podcast of the Year (Poker Life Podcast), Journalist of the Year and Media Content of the Year for his extensive work investigating the Mike Postle cheating allegation story. PocketFives’ own three-time GPI award winner Lance Bradley earned another three nominations for Journalist of the Year, Media Content of the Year, and Podcast of the Year for The FIVES Poker Podcast, alongside PocketFives own Managing Editor Donnie Peters. Daniel Negreanu, Jamie Kerstetter, Lex Veldhuis, Hayley Hochstätter and tournament director Matt Savage each earned two nominations. Alex Foxen, Andrew Neeme, Barny Boatman, Brad Owen, Bryn Kenney, Cary Katz, Joe Giron, Joe Stapleton, Kevin Mathers, Nick Schulman, and Paul Campbell join Bradley, Ingram, Negreanu, Savage, and Veldhuis as previous award winners who find themselves back in the running for even more hardware at the upcoming ceremonies. In addition to the 18 awards that will be voted on and the Global Poker Index Player of the Year awards, the PocketFives Legacy Award will once again be handed out to a PocketFives player who has shown success in both the online and live poker arenas. Previous award winners include Ari Engel, Cliff Josephy and Chris Moorman. 2019 Global Poker Award Nominees GPI BREAKOUT PLAYER OF THE YEAR Robert Campbell (AUS) Ramon Colillas (ESP) Ben Farrell (UK) George Wolff (USA) FINAL TABLE PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR Hossein Ensan (GER), WSOP Main Event William Alex Foxen (USA), WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic Phillip Hui (USA), WSOP Poker Players Championship Bryn Kenney (USA), Triton Poker Super High Roller Series Montenegro TWITTER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Barny Boatman (UK) Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Kitty Kuo (TAI) Kevin Mathers (USA) PLAYERS CHOICE FOR TOUGHEST OPPONENT Michael Addamo (AUS) Kahle Burns (AUS) Stephen Chidwick (UK) Ali Imsirovic (BIH) STREAMER OF THE YEAR Hristivoje Pavlovic (AUS) Benjamin Spragg (UK) Matthew Staples (CAN) Lex Veldhuis (NED) VLOGGER OF THE YEAR Jaman Burton (USA) Andrew Neeme (USA) Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Brad Owen (USA) PODCAST OF THE YEAR DAT Poker Podcast: Terrence Chan, Ross Henry, Adam Schwartz, Daniel Negreanu (CAN) Poker Life Podcast: Joey Ingram (USA) The Fives, a PocketFives Podcast: Lance Bradley (CAN), Donnie Peters (USA) The Grid: Jennifer Shahade (USA) INDUSTRY PERSON OF THE YEAR Phil Galfond (USA), Run it Once Poker Cary Katz (USA), Poker Central/PokerGO Paul Phua (MAS), Triton Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR Tony Burns (USA), Seminole Hard Rock Paul Campbell (USA), Aria Jack Effel (USA), World Series of Poker Matt Savage (USA), WPT/TDA EVENT OF THE YEAR PokerStars Players Championship Bahamas Triton London Million for Charity World Series of Poker Main Event World Series of Poker BIG 50 MID-MAJOR TOUR/CIRCUIT OF THE YEAR Road to PSPC RUNGOOD Poker Series WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR Lance Bradley (CAN) Haley Hintze (USA) Joey Ingram (USA) Nick Jones (UK) BROADCASTER OF THE YEAR Jamie Kerstetter (USA) Jeff Platt (USA) Nick Schulman (USA) Joseph Stapleton (USA) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: WRITTEN A Fight for Fatherhood: The Biggest Win of Jason Young’s Life, Lance Bradley (CAN) for PoketFives Kevin Roster Spread Sarcoma Awareness at WSOP, Wants to End Life on His Terms, Aleeyah Jadavji (CAN), Hayley Hochstetler (USA) for PokerNews Poker and Pop Culture, Martin Harris (USA) for D+B Publishing The Unabridged Story of The Hendon Mob, Paul Seaton (UK) for PokerNews MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: PHOTO Antonio Abrego (USA): Ryan Laplante in deep thought at the WSOP (PokerNews) Drew Amato (USA): Dario Sammartino folds at the WSOP (Poker Central) Joe Giron (USA): WPT Champion Frank Stepuchin is lifted in victory (WPT) Hayley Hochstetler (USA): Doyle Brunson and Jack Binion at WSOP celebration (WSOP) MEDIA CONTENT OF THE YEAR: VIDEO Investigating Mike Postle Hand Histories from Stones Live, Joey Ingram (USA) Legends of the Game – Stu Ungar (PokerGO) The Big Blind w/Jeff Platt featuring Mike Matusow, Normand Chad, Sarah Herring (PokerGO) Who Makes Money from Professional Poker, Sam Rega (USA) for CNBC PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR POKER PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR Joey Ingram (USA) Jonathan Little (USA) Ryan DePaulo (USA) Lex Veldhuis (NED) PEOPLE’S CHOICE FOR HAND OF THE YEAR Bryce Yockey takes a historic hit against Josh Arieh in the WSOP Poker Players Championship Ryan Riess makes 10-high all-in call at EPT Monte Carlo final table Sam Trickett makes Stephen Chidwick fold best hand at Triton London 1M event Thi Xoa Nguyen folds full house to Athanasios Polychronopoulos at PSPC
  2. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. When July comes around, the focus of the entire poker world turns to the most prestigious poker tournament of the year, the World Series of Poker Main Event and 2019 was no different - for a number of reasons. This WAS the Main Event! "This is the best feeling that I’ve had in all my life and my entire career. I am so happy I am here with the bracelet in my hand. What can I say? What can I say?" That was what 55-year-old Hossein Ensan had to say moments after winning the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event for $10 million. Ensan defeated Dario Sammartino heads-up to finish off the three-day final table coverage on ESPN and PokerGO. Sammartino walked away with a $6 million score. 2019 WSOP Main Event Final Table Results Hossein Ensan – $10,000,000 Dario Sammartino – $6,000,000 Alex Livingston – $4,000,000 Garry Gates – $3,000,000 Kevin Maahs – $2,200,000 Zhen Cai – $1,850,000 Nick Marchington – $1,525,000 Timothy Su – $1,250,000 Milos Skrbic – $1,000,000 Massive Turnout Leads to Near-Record Field Ensan's win earned him just the third $10M+ score in Main Event history because 8,569 players made the 2019 Main Event the second-largest one of all-time. As the close of registration crept closer on July 7, tournament organizers were hoping for a last-minute rush of entrants that would allow it to surpass the 8,773-player field from the 2006 Main Event. The 344 players who did register on Day 2C pushed the total registrants past 8,000 for just the second time ever and helped create an 8.83% growth over the 2018 field. Flight Entries % of Field 1A 1,334 15.57% 1B 1914 22.34% 1C 4877 56.91% 2AB 100 1.17% 2C 344 4.01% "Truly an incredible cherry on top of a wonderful 50th World Series of Poker," Seth Palansky, Vice President of Corporate Communication for Caesars Entertainment, said. "The numbers this summer speak for themselves. Poker is alive and well and we can’t thank the players enough for continuing to support the World Series of Poker brand. Seeing an eight as the first number of the Main Event really did seem unfathomable with the majority of the U.S. shutout from playing the game online. But the WSOP Main Event has always been special and we’re incredibly grateful for those that came from six different continents to participate in this year’s Main Event." Player Disqualifications Steal Headlines The 4,877 players that packed the Rio on Day 1C almost guaranteed that things wouldn't go smoothly for tournament staff, but none of them would have predicted the chaos that ensued and eventually lead to two players being disqualified. The first instance involved a player, later identified as Georgii Belianin, moving chips from another player's stack into his own. Belianin admitted to being intoxicated and believes that a language barrier may have played a role in the disqualification as he claimed he was joking around with tablemates. Belianin took responsibility for his actions. https://twitter.com/GBelianin/status/1147717240445235200?s=20 The second disqualification ended up being much more serious and involved the eventual disqualification of Ken Strauss. Here's how PocketFives detailed the action at the time: According to those in the area, the player was all in blind and began yelling while standing next to the table, causing quite a scene. The player proceeded to pull down his shorts with his back facing the table and yell some more. Patrick Eskandar, who was involved in the hand, informed PocketFives that the all-in player had actually moved all in blind before any of the cards were dealt. According to Eskandar, once the cards were dealt out, the all-in player also briefly exposed his cards to reveal queen-three. A player to act before the all-in player, received a ruling and was informed that the all-in bet would stand if no raise was made ahead of the all-in player. This player then limped in forcing the blind all-in bet to stand. Action moved to Eskandar and he thought over his decision but told PocketFives that he was more concerned with the limper than the blind shove. He knew the player who shoved blind had queen-three, but, due to the ruling, felt the player who limped could be trapping. While Eskandar was thinking, the player who was all-in blind removed his shoes and socks and even threw a shoe towards Eskandar, with the shoe landing in the dealer tray. Eskandar then folded his hand, which was pocket fives. The player who limped exposed his hand to show that he had ace-three, which dominated the all-in player’s queen-three. Much to the surprise of Eskandar and those in the area who were watching, he didn’t expose his hand as a call. He folded his hand face up. This allowed the all-in player to win the blinds and antes before he was disqualified and promptly removed from the tournament and property. https://twitter.com/chanian/status/1147250112936067072 Strauss even went as far as to expose himself to the table before being removed forcibly from the Rio. "While these incidents are unfortunate, they do happen every year," WSOP officials told PocketFives. "We disqualify players who violate rules and in the case of the individual who stole another players chips, he’s lost the privilege of playing at the WSOP in the future, too. We have zero tolerance for theft of any kind." In the weeks that followed, more details about Strauss' behaviour that day, which also included him exposing himself once more at another Las Vegas casino, became apparent as he was charged with domestic terrorism. Negreanu Details WSOP Winnings Before the start of the 2019 WSOP, Daniel Negreanu offered poker fans the opportunity to buy a piece of his WSOP action. In an effort to be as transparent as possible, Negreanu published a complete balance sheet following the conclusion of the 2019 WSOP summer events. Negreanu made $2,042,752.92 during the summer, showing a 168.78% return-on-investment for those who were fortunate enough to secure a piece of the two-time WSOP Player of the Year winner. That came from 16 cashes and $760,000 worth of tournament buy-uns. The net return for his investors was $481,026.82 after all fees were removed.
  3. Dates for the 2020 World Series of Poker were announced on Wednesday, and the 51st WSOP is scheduled for May 26 through July 15, 2020. The 2020 WSOP will once again be held at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, with 51 action-packed days of poker planned, despite the recent sale of the property. Although the full schedule of events is yet to be released, the WSOP did give the dates for the WSOP Main Event, the BIG 50, and the Seniors Championship. Main Event Scheduled for July 1-14 The 2020 WSOP Main Event runs July 1-14. It kicks off on Wednesday, July 1, for the first of three starting flights. The second and third flights are scheduled for Thursday, July 2, and Friday, July 3, respectively. Competitors to advance from either of the first two flights will resume action on Saturday, July 4, and those to advance from the third flight will play their Day 2 on Sunday, July 5. All remaining entrants will combine into one field on Monday, July 6. Play is scheduled to continue each day through Friday, July 10, when it is anticipated that the final table will be reached. The final players will have an off day on Saturday, July 11, before resuming the competition on Sunday, July 12. A winner is expected to be crowned on Tuesday, July 14. The 2020 WSOP Main Event will look to draw off the success that was delivered in 2019, when it attracted the second largest field size in the event’s history at 8,569 entries. It was only the second time ever that the field size for the WSOP Main Event topped 8,000 entries, and it was the fourth consecutive year that the Main Event field size increased. The 2019 WSOP Main Event winner was Hossein Ensan, who took home the mammoth $10 million first-place prize. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] BIG 50 Scheduled for May 28-June 4 The beginning of the 2020 World Series of Poker will feature the incredibly popular $500 buy-in BIG 50 tournament. It’s the second year for this event and big things are expected after the 2019 edition absolutely shattered the record books with 28,371 entries. The 2020 WSOP BIG 50 is scheduled to start on Thursday, May 28, and wrap up on Thursday, June 4. In 2019, it was Femi Fashakin finishing in first place from the enormous field. Fashakin took home the lion’s share of the $13.509 million prize pool, winning $1.147 million. Seniors Champions Scheduled for June 18-21 The third event that WSOP officials did confirm in the announcement is the $1,000 buy-in, single reentry Seniors Championship. Scheduled to take place June 18-21, the WSOP Seniors Championship is open to all participants age 50 or older. In 2019, the WSOP Seniors Championship drew 5,916 entries. Howard Mash, a 50-year-old financial advisor from Florida was triumphant, scoring $662,594. Online Satellites Already Running At the time of the announcement, the start of the 2020 WSOP was five and a half months away, so there’s plenty of time to get ready for what should be another record-setting series. The 2019 WSOP was the biggest ever, with 187,298 total entries and more than $293 million in prize pool money generated. The 2020 edition is likely going to set new records, and part of the reason why is because online satellites are already running on WSOP.com in Nevada and New Jersey. Will Pennsylvania Be Involved? Pennsylvania could certainly be involved with the 2020 WSOP, at least to some capacity. With regulated online poker now up and running in Pennsylvania, the Keystone State could become a player when WSOP.com is up and running, although there is no WSOP.com online client available in Pennsylvania at the time of this announcement. When WSOP.com becomes available in Pennsylvania, we should expect there to be online satellites running that will function to qualify players for the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. What we shouldn’t expect is for PA online poker players to be able to play in online gold bracelet events with players from Nevada and New Jersey from within Pennsylvania state lines. Although Nevada and New Jersey share player pools, Pennsylvania is not yet involved in any interstate compacts, so they’ll likely have to wait to compete for an online gold bracelet from within the State of Pennsylvania.
  4. In what was an entertaining finale to the greatest poker tournament in the world, Hossein Ensan emerged victorious in the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event to claim the $10,000,000 top prize. Ensan topped the WSOP Main Event’s second largest field ever, 8,569 entries, and defeated Dario Sammartino in heads-up play to become world champion. "This is the best feeling that I've had in all my life and my entire career," Ensan said in the moments after his triumph. "I am so happy I am here with the bracelet in my hand. What can I say? What can I say?" The victory placed an emphatic exclamation point on the German’s career and gave him his first WSOP gold bracelet. His adds the WSOP Main Event title to a career that includes a European Poker Tour victory and a WSOP International Circuit win. With the win, Ensan moved to seventh on Germany’s all-time money list with $12,673,207 in live tournament earnings. 2019 WSOP Main Event Final Table Results 1st: Hossein Ensan - $10,000,000 2nd: Dario Sammartino - $6,000,000 3rd: Alex Livingston - $4,000,000 4th: Garry Gates - $3,000,000 5th: Kevin Maahs - $2,200,000 6th: Zhen Cai - $1,850,000 7th: Nick Marchington - $1,525,000 8th: Timothy Su - $1,250,000 9th: Milos Skrbic - $1,000,000 "My plan was, every day, step by step, to bag up chips," Ensan said. "My first goal was to [get in the money]. After [getting in the money], my plan was to bag up for the next day." Ensan’s run to the winner’s circle began a week and a half ago, on Friday, July 5, when he hopped into the third and final starting flight of the tournament. Ensan tripled his starting stack on his first day and started his fantastic run. Ensan came into the final table with a huge chip stack of 177,000,000, which was nearly double anyone else in the field. He held onto the lead through the first day of the final table and maneuvered his way up to 207,700,000 in chips. Garry Gates had done well to narrow the gap, but then Monday came and Ensan truly exercised his power as the chip leader. On Monday, Ensan got to work chipping away at Gates, his closest competitor. That helped Ensan stretch his lead to quite a sizable margin and he began to run away with the tournament. Ensan then sent home Kevin Maahs in fifth for $2,200,000 and knocked out Gates in fourth for $3,000,000, allowing him to take a commanding chip lead into Tuesday. Ensan topped three-handed play with 326,800,000 in chips. Alex Livingston was a ways off in second with 120,400,000 and Sammartino was in third with 67,600,000. Just as he began Monday, Sammartino found an early double up on Tuesday’s final day, winning a flip with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"] against Ensan’s [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"]. Sammartino gave some chips back following the double but then he turned two pair to double through Livingston’s kings and move back over 100,000,000. At this moment, there was a sense around the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino that Sammartino had the wind at his sails. Sammartino’s rail was as loud as they’ve ever been, pumping energy into the Italian’s veins and he won another pot off Livingston shortly thereafter to move into the chip lead for the first time at the final table. After Sammartino doubled through him, Livingston couldn’t recover and the 13th-place finisher from the 2013 WSOP Main Event went out in third place. Ensan was the player to finish him off. Ensan had the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qd"] and Livingston had the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jd"]. There was little drama on the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="9d"] board and Livingston went home with a $4,000,000 payday. Heads-up play saw Ensan start with the chip lead, his 279,800,000 to Sammartino’s 235,000,000. Sammartino immediately seized the lead, though, when he took down a substantial pot on the second hand of the duel. The two then battled for more than four hours of heads-up play. Ensan took the lead back and began to apply pressure to Sammartino. The blinds increased to 2,000,000-4,000,000 with a 4,000,000 big blind ante and Sammartino was below 50 big blinds when hand #301 came up, the final hand of the tournament. Ensan opened with a raise to 11,000,000 on the button and Sammartino called from the big blind. The flop came [poker card="Ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"] and Sammartino check-called a bet of 15,000,000. The turn was the [poker card="9c"] and Sammartino checked. Ensan bet 33,000,000 and Sammartino moved all in for 140,000,000. Ensan called and turned over the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"]. Sammartino was at risk with a draw holding the [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"]. The river completed the board with the [poker card="Qc"] and it was all over. "Dario is a friend of mine, a big name, and a very good player," Ensan said of the heads-up match with Sammartino. "Short handed, you need cards, you need hands, you need luck. The luck and hands were on my side, otherwise I would’ve been second. I would’ve been runner-up." As runner-up, Sammartino took home a $6,000,000 payday. "Tomorrow," Ensan responded when asked about what he plans to do with the money. "I need beer and some fun with my friends, then I'll think about that tomorrow."
  5. When the second night of the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event final table began, Hossein Ensan and Garry Gates had most of the chips and almost all of the attention of the poker world. Just one of them survived the four hours of play and now just three players remain in contention for the $10,000,000 first place prize, bracelet, and place in poker history. Gates Struggled to Find Any Footing At the start of the night, Gates had 171,700,000 chips - 33.3% of the chips in play. That turned out to be his high point. After dropping to 152,100,000, Gates lost 44,600,000 to Ensan before the first hour was up. A little over 10 minutes later, he lost another 12,700,000 to Livingston without showdown. He then put together a string of three consecutive small pots to move back above 100,000,000. Gates and Maahs got into a preflop raising war that worked out to be a 13,800,000 win for Maahs. After 90 minutes of play, Livingston caught up and Gates was no longer second in chips. Gates dropped another 15,000,000 to Ensan and had 63,200,000 left. He dropped another 25,200,000 to Livingston after bluffing with [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"] against the Canadian's rivered pair of aces with [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"] to be left with just 38,200,000. Kevin Maahs Goes out in Fifth While Gates was struggling to regain the momentum he enjoyed from night one, Kevin Maahs ran into a flip he couldn't win. Ensan opened to 4,000,000 with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"] from early position before Maahs moved all in with [poker card="ah"][poker card="th"] from the small blind and Ensan called. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"] flop changed nothing and neither did the [poker card="js"] turn or [poker card="4h"] river to eliminate Maahs in fifth place. "It's not really sad, I guess. It's kind of a weird feeling because I just made a lot of money but I didn't win the tournament. Obviously, your goal is to win the tournament or keep making it to the next day and I didn't make it to the next day," Maahs said. "There's 8,500 other people that didn't come close to this, and this is awesome." The End Finally Comes for Garry Gates There was a pivotal on the first night of the final table where Gates, holding pocket tens, got Alex Livingston to fold pocket queens pre-flop. On the second night of play, it was another pair of queens for Livingston that ended Gates' run. Action folded to Gates in the small blind and he moved all in for 29,200,000 with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"] and Livingston snap-called from the big blind with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"]. The board ran out [poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="th"][poker card="ts"] to give Livingston the pot, eliminate Gates in fourth place and halt play for the night. "It was a whirlwind. You come into a final table with as many chips as I had, you expect a higher result but at the same time, those are some world-class poker players," Gates said. "I don't do this for a living. Just to get this far and have as much love and support as I had along the way, I knew that I had already won." Final Three Chip Counts Hossein Ensan - 326,800,000 Alex Livingston - 120,400,000 Dario Sammartino - 67,600,000 Payouts 4. Garry Gates - $3,000,000 5. Kevin Maahs - $2,200,000 6. Zhen Cai – $1,850,000 7. Nick Marchington – $1,525,000 8. Timothy Su – $1,250,000 9. Milos Skrbic – $1,000,000 ESPN Broadcast Schedule The final table begins live in Las Vegas at 530 PM PT and will be on ESPN beginning at 600 PM on a 30-minute delay until a champion is crowned.
  6. The World Series of Poker is the biggest stage in the game. The series draws thousands upon thousands of players make their way to the heart of Sin City to put their tournament skills on display in hopes of securing a life-changing score. Every single year a few players not only find themselves in a position to take down a tournament or add a major cash to their poker resume, but also spend some extra time in the poker spotlight due to their overall performance or even just their personality. Here are just a few of this year's participants that found themselves emerge as one of the breakout stars of the 50th Annual World Series of Poker. Garry Gates If one were to select a single player from the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event to spotlight, you couldn’t blame anyone from choosing the charismatic 2019 World Champion Hossein Ensan or picking the dapper high-stakes pro Dario Sammartino. However, poker industry veteran turned dark horse favorite Garry Gates (and his enthusiastic #LFGGG rail) captured the attention of poker fans everywhere and giving those who, perhaps, put their own poker dream in the rearview mirror, somebody to root for. While Gates is known to many in the industry as PokerStars' Senior Consultant of Player Affairs (aka the go-to guy when it comes to needing a liaison between the online giant and their VIPs), to those that know him he’s the kind of person who would literally give someone the shirt off his back. That attitude of gratitude for the position the Pennsylvania-born Gates was in at the final table was felt through the airwaves. He was painted as a lifelong poker player who was revealing in finally getting his shot. His affable style was easy to connect with and when his run finally came to an end in fourth place, netting him $3 million he didn’t leave disappointed. He turned to his rail, arms outstretched and fell into the embrace of a support system that any poker player would envy. It’s unlikely that Gates will give it all up and hit the road as a full-time pro but while many fourth-place finishers go into the history books but fall from memory, Gates’ run will be remembered by many for a long time to come. Kainalu McCue-Unciano From out of nowhere, Hawaii has a new #1 All-Time Money List leader and that’s Kainalu McCue-Unciano. After four years of traveling to Las Vegas for the World Series of Poker, the Hawaiian took home his first gold bracelet when he took down the $1,500 Monster Stack for a career-high score of just over $1,000,000. But, winning the bracelet was just the beginning for McCue-Unciano at the summer series. The next day, just moments after he accepted the bracelet from Jack Effel, McCue-Unciano, in front of an Amazon room packed full of poker players, dropped to one knee and asked his girlfriend of two years, Nicole, who was there supporting him, to marry him. She happily said yes, putting McCue-Unciano on a freeroll that allowed him to take his biggest shot yet. By all accounts, the newly minted millionaire then ripped off $100,000 and battled against some of the best players in the world by hopping into the $100K High Roller. Having never cashed in a tournament with a buy-in above $3,500 McCue-Unciano climbed into 12th place for a $195,862 score. Indeed that is pretty boss. Robert Campbell Now that summer at the Rio is over, Australian grinder Robert Cambell emerged as the leader in the 2019 WSOP Player of the Year race. He did this on the back of an outstanding 2019 WSOP campaign that saw him cash nine times with five top 10 finishes. Most importantly, Campbell was the only player this year to take home two gold bracelets, one of which provided him a career-high cash of $385,763. Over $679,000 of his career $1.289 million in career earnings was made during the summer and his multi-bracelet performance held off such high profile names as Daniel Negreanu and Shaun Deeb from heading into the World Series of Poker Europe with the POY lead. If Campbell decided to make the (long) trip to Rozvadov this summer and is able to put up a few results he may just forever have a banner hanging up at future WSOPs. Yuri Dzivielevski Most people will probably recognize Yuri Dzivielevski as the tough young Brazilian pro featured multiple time on the ESPN feature tables making a deep run in the Main Event. But it wasn’t just his charismatic camera presence and flowing mane that brought him a number of new fans. He was simply one of the toughest players featured throughout the entire broadcast. In what was supposed to be the Daniel Negreanu show on Day 1B of the Main Event, Dzivielevski stole the show by consistently chipping up and making great play after great play. This trend continued as the field dwindled and he found himself playing on camera for hours until he finally busted in 28th place for over $261,000. Dzivielevski may have been introduced to the world-at-large this summer but PocketFivers have known of his skill for quite some time as the Brazilian is a former worldwide #1-ranked online player. Also, well before the Main Event showcased what he could do, he proved it by taking home his first WSOP gold bracelet in Event #51 ($2,500 Mixed Omaha Hi/Lo 8 or Better. Seven Card Stud Hi/Lo 8 or Better) for $213,750. Dan Zack For the longest time, Dan Zack was known in poker’s inner circles as one of Los Angeles’ best cash game players and a mixed game crusher. But despite a number of final tables in previous years at the World Series of Poker, that breakout score had yet to materialize. Everything changed for Zack in 2019 when early in the series he picked up the first WSOP gold bracelet of his career in Event #6 ($2,500 Limit Mixed Triple Draw) for $160,447. The win put him in the early lead for the WSOP Player of the Year and immediately after he came right out and said that he was gunning for the honor. His desire to win Player of the Year fueled a 2019 campaign that saw him cash 14 times, make three final tables, and earn more than $350,000. He currently sits in fourth place on in the WSOP POY race and after this summer he’s no longer simply considered a ‘cash game pro’, he’s a threat in any tournament he enters.
  7. Garry Gates grew up and went to college in Pennsylvania, but he's always been drawn to Las Vegas. He was also drawn to poker and has been an avid player ever since his father taught him how to play cards in his younger years. After attending Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, it only took Gates half a year to make the leap to Sin City. That was in 2003. In 2011, Gates competed in the greatest poker tournament in the world, the World Series of Poker Main Event, and placed 173rd for $47,107. He also reached the money in the WSOP Main Event in 2015 and 2017, but none of those results came close to his run in 2019 when Gates finished fourth from a field of 8,569 entries to win $3,000,000. With the score, Gates moved to ninth on Pennsylvania poker's all-time money list, according to Hendon Mob, ahead of Aaron Mermelstein and behind Michael Martin. Here are some of the key hands that helped land Gates at the 2019 WSOP Main Event final table and poker's biggest stage, along with his thoughts on the moments he'll likely never forget. Day 5: Pocket Nines Crack Aces On Day 5 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event, with just under 300 players remaining, Gates found himself involved in a four-way pot with Alex Dovzhenko, Chris Wynkoop, and Alex Greenblatt. Dovzhenko had raised to 60,000 from the hijack seat, Gates called on the button with the [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"], Wynkoop called from the small blind, and Greenblatt came along out of the big bling. The four players saw the flop come [poker card="9h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3h"], giving Gates top set, and action checked to Dovzhenko. He bet 90,000, Gates called, and both Wynkoop and Greenblatt folded. The turn was the [poker card="Jh"] and Dovzhenko checked. Gates took the initiative with a bet of 150,000 from his stack of 760,000. Dovzhenko check-raised all in and had Gates covered. Gates went into the tank. "I certainly felt a lot more confident about my hand on the flop than I did on the turn, that’s for sure," Gates told PocketFives. "I think I knew deep down I was probably never folding in this spot, but I took my time with the decision regardless. Whenever you're facing a call for your tournament life in the WSOP Main Event, it's important to be confident that you're making the right decision. Alex played his hand fairly face up here, so once I'd made the decision to call, all I could think was, 'Hold, please,' and we did." Gates called with his set of nines. Dovzhenko turned over the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="As"] for an overpaid and a heart flush draw. The river was the [poker card="5c"] and Gates held for the double. Day 6: An Ace On the River To Never Forget On Day 6, Gates called all in for his tournament life with the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"] against Robert Heidorn. Gates had one of the better hands to get all in preflop with in tournament poker, but his German opponent turned up the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"] to have Gates dominated. "Obviously it's never a good feeling to find out that you're completed dominated with your tournament life on the line, but I did have an eery calm rush over me in that moment," Gates said. "I was at peace with the result no matter what… I had already bested my previous top finish in the Main, so I was going to be happy regardless. After we completely bricked the flop, I remember thinking about Barry Greenstein's book and saying to myself… 'Ace on the river, maybe?'" The [poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"] flop didn’t give Gates much to be thrilled about. His had whiffed on hitting an ace and was left with just one card to help him make a Broadway straight. When the [poker card="5h"] hit the turn, Gates was pushed further out the door as his chance of making a straight were no longer possible. The only card Gates could hit was an ace on the river. Lo and behold, the dealer found the [poker card="Ad"] to put on fifth street and Gates came from behind in dramatic fashion to double up. "When it hit, I shot out of my chair and ran over to my rail," Gates said. "I couldn’t believe it. Anytime you attempt to navigate through a field of 8,500-plus, you're going to need to get lucky every now and again. But man, that ace gave me new life. When you think about it, it was probably a $2.7 million card." Day 7: Cowboys Against the Chip Leader On Day 7, with 13 players left in the field, Gates was involved in another kings-versus-ace-king confrontation. Again, Gates was at risk, but this time he was the one holding pocket kings - [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"]. Hossein Ensan, who was the big chip leader at the time, had the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"]. The preflop action started with Gates raising to 1.2 million from the hijack seat. Ensan three-bet to 3.75 million out of the small blind, and then Gates made it 10 million. Ensan shoved and Gates called off for 23.5 million total. "The adrenaline was pumping, and I knew that if we held here, I would be very well positioned to make a run at the final table," Gates said. "I remember walking over to Robert Heidorn, who made a terrific comeback after being on the losing hand of this same confrontation, and saying something like… 'I know what you're thinking right now, Robert, and I don't want to experience your pain.' Once all the money gets in though, the rest is up to the deck." The [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3h"] flop missed Ensan and kept Gates in the lead. The [poker card="2d"] hit the turn, followed by the [poker card="Jc"] on the river, and Gates had doubled to fourth place on the leaderboard. "Securing that double-up and celebrating with my rail was a moment I'll remember for a long, long time," Gates said. [caption id="attachment_625802" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Garry Gates with his rail moments after securing a big double up with pocket kings against Hossein Ensan's ace-king (photo: 888poker)[/caption] Day 7: Trip Kings with 13 Players Left Shortly after Gates' double up through Ensan, a 20-minute break took place. On the sixth hand back, Gates tangled with Timothy Su in another pivotal hand. Su raised to 1.3 million from the cutoff position to start the action. Gates three-bet to 3.9 million on the button, and Su called. Su then checked the [poker card="7c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop. Gates kept his foot on the gas with a bet of 3.5 million, and Su called. The turn was the [poker card="Ks"], and both players checked to see the [poker card="Kh"] pair the board on the river. Su passed the action to Gates once again, and Gates fired 6.5 million. Su took a little time and then called, but he mucked his hand after seeing Gates’ [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qs"] for trip kings with a queen kicker. This pot moved Gates ahead of Su in the chip counts and up to third place on the leaderboard with a stack of 118 big blinds. Day 7: Out-Kicking Henry Lu for the Knockout With 11 players left, Gates was on the main feature table that had five players seated at it. The blinds were up to 400,000-800,000 with an 800,000 big blind ante, and this is when Gates knocked out Henry Lu. Lu raised to 1.8 million from the cutoff seat, Gates reraised to 7 million from the small blind, and Lu called. The dealer fanned the [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Td"][poker card="7s"] flop and Gates bet 4.5 million. Lu called to swell the pot to nearly 25 million. After the [poker card="6d"] fell on the turn, Gates slowed down with a check. Lu bet 7.8 million, leaving himself with 25.8 million behind, and Gates went into the tank. Eventually, Gates shoved all in to put Lu to the test. Lu tanked for a handful of minutes before calling all in with the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"] for top pair. Gates had him out-kicked with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"]. "Yeah, when you check-shove with top pair, top kicker on a board like this, I think you're always happy with a fold," Gates said. "He spent an awful long time in the tank, so my mind was racing a mile a minute. I tried to keep composed and not give anything away. Once he made the call and tabled his hand, I was mostly just happy to find out that my read was correct and knew the rest was out of my hands." Gates gave a slight fist pump when he saw Lu's hand. "It was one of those spots where my intuition allowed me to extract max value in a spot that a lot of pros probably play differently," Gates said. "That, plus I got some phenomenal intel from a good friend who plays with Lu a lot in California, and said he's capable of making the occasional sticky hero call, so in the end it was a case of things lining up just about perfectly for me. All that said, I'm pretty sure I lost a week's worth of life expectancy, due to an increase in blood pressure and stress… I don't know how these guys do this on a daily basis, but hats off to them (laughs)." Gates finished Day 7 in second place in chips, behind only the event's eventual winner, Hossein Ensan. Each of these hands played a pivotal role in propelling Gates to the 2019 WSOP Main Event final table. From there, the man from Titusville, home of John Heisman and the place where the first United States oil boom was sparked, went on to finish fourth for $3,000,000.
  8. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event is down to 35 players, all guaranteed $261,430 and vying for the event’s $10 million first-place prize. After what was an incredibly entertaining day of poker, Nick Marchington is in the lead with 39.7 million. 21-Year-Old Marchington Leads the Way Marchington hails from England and is 21 years old. Despite his youth, he’s a professional poker player, but Marchington’s success in the game comes from the online poker world and not so much the live tournament world. Entering this event, Marchington had just $12,415 in live tournament earnings, stemming from one cash at this WSOP. Marchington was one of the biggest stacks remaining as the night neared its close, and then he knocked out Ian Pelz in 37th place with pocket sevens against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] to solidify his position as chip leader. Behind Marchington on the leaderboard are Hossein Ensan with 34.5 million, Timothy Su with 34.35 million, and Milos Skrbic with 31.45 million. Those are the only players above 30 million in chips. Top 10 Chip Counts Nick Marchington - 39,800,000 Hossein Ensan - 34,500,000 Timothy Su - 34,350,000 Milos Skrbic - 31,450,000 Henry Lu - 25,525,000 Garry Gates - 25,025,000 Duey Duong - 21,650,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 20,700,000 Dario Sammartino - 19,850,000 Cai Zhen - 19,800,000 Dzivielevski and Sammartino Remain Yuri Dzivielevski, a Brazilian who already has one gold bracelet this summer, bagged 13.75 million for Day 7. Dzivielevski is a former PocketFives #1 and the only former #1 remaining in the field. Dario Sammartino, who is one of the best players in the world still in search of a WSOP gold bracelet, finished with 19.85 million for Day 7. Wild and Crazy Hands Steal the Day 6 Show Day 6 was filled with plenty of action, that’s for sure. There was an enormous clash between Su and Sam Greenwood on the main feature table that could go down as one of the greatest hands in poker history. It will also go down as one of the ultimate bad beats. On one of the outer tables, Garry Gates nailed an ace on the river to crack Robert Heidorn’s pocket kings. On another outer table, at pretty much the same time as the hand between Gates and Heidorn, Kevin Maahs beats aces with his pocket kings to knock out Chang Luo. The incredible hand between Greenwood and Su started with Su opening to 500,000 from the cutoff position. Greenwood three-bet to 2.5 million out of the big blind, and Su called. The flop was [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="4c"] and Green bet 1.8 million Su called to see the [poker card="Js"] land on the turn. Greenwood bet 3.5 million and Su raised all in. Greenwood made the call for about 11.5 million total and turned up his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"]. Su had the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] for a brave semi-bluff. Needing a king or an eight on the river, Su got it when the [poker card="Kc"] hit to complete his straight. Greenwood was eliminated in 45th place for $211,945. On the hand involving Gates and Heidorn, Heidorn opened to 550,000 from middle position before action folded to Gates in the big blind. He three-bet to 2.1 million. Heidorn reraised all in to put Gates to the test. Gates tanked, then called to put himself at risk for 11.35 million total, and turned up the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"]. Heidorn had the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"]. The [poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"] flop and [poker card="5h"] turn weren’t what Gates needed, but the [poker card="Ad"] on the river allowed him to survive with the double up. For the one with Luo and Maahs, it started with Luo opening with a raise to 550,000 from early position. After Milos Skrbic reraised to 1.675 million on the button, Maahs reraised to 3.75 million out of the big blind. Luo shoved all in for 8.1 million, Skrbic folded, and Maahs made the call. Luo had the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"], and Maahs had the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"]. The board ran out [poker card="Qc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Tc"] to give Maahs a club flush and crack the aces of Luo. Luo was eliminated in 43rd place for $211,945. Esfandiari, Hunichen, Hachem Among Day 6 Eliminations Day 6 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event began with 106 players remaining. Greg Himmelbrand was the first player knocked out and then the eliminations began to flow. Four-time gold bracelet winner Jeff Madsen was knocked out in 102nd place, Mukul Pahuja went out in 95th, and Antonio Esfandiari busted in 82nd. Esfandiari’s bust out came after he was hurt in a big hand against Sammartino that left him with just a handful of big blinds. Esfandiari got the last of his chips in against Chris Hunichen with the [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] but Hunichen’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] did the trick. Daniel Hachem, son of 2005 WSOP Main Event winner Joe Hachem, fell in 79th place, and Pennsylvania's Jake Schindler headed out the door in 67th place. Romain Lewis busted in 60th, and Lars Bonding fell in 55th. Hunichen, a former PocketFives #1 player and the one who knocked out Esfandiari, busted in 54th place for $173,015. Another one of the top tournament players in the world was knocked out in 40th place when Alex Foxen was eliminated. The highest finish for a Pennsylvania poker player in the 2019 WSOP Main Event belonged to Thomas Parkes. He took 59th for $142,215. Day 7 On Friday On Friday, the 2019 WSOP Main Event will play from 35 down to its final table of nine, however long that may take. Action is set to kick off at 12 p.m. PT from the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino, and if Friday is anything like Thursday, buckle up for a thrilling ride.
  9. From the 8,659 players that started the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event eight days ago, just nine still remain and Germany's Hossein Ensan stands high above the rest as the chip leader. Now all that stands between him and the $10,000,000 first place prize money is eight other players all hoping to do the same. Another German, Robert Heidorn, was eliminated in tenth place in the very early hours of Saturday morning pausing the clock on the second-largest WSOP Main Event in history until Sunday evening. Ensan ended play with 177,000,000 and is well ahead of the rest of the field with 34.3% of the chips in play. The 55-year-old former European Poker Tour Prague champion was responsible for only one elimination after just three tables remained. Ensan busted Marcelo Cudos in 23rd place to put his stack at 57,500,000. He more than tripled that stack over the next eight hours without eliminating another opponent. Garry Gates bagged up 99,300,000 for the second biggest stack. Gates eliminated two players, Mihai Manole in 18th and Henry Lu in 11th, on his way to the final table. Zhen Cai sits third with 60,600,000 and is the only other player with a stack bigger than the 57,200,000 stack. The Florida native, and best friend of 2018 Main Event runner-up Tony Miles, picked up just one elimination, sending Preben Stokkan out in 21st. The three players in the middle of the chip counts include Kevin Maahs with 43,000,000, Alex Livingston (37,800,000), and Dario Sammartino (33,400,000). The three shortest stacks are separated by just 3.3 big blinds. Milos Skrbic finished with 23,400,000, start of day chip leader Timothy Su ended with 20,200,000 and Nick Marchington has 20,100,000 in the bag. Marchington, just 21 years old, could become the youngest player to win the Main Event should he manage to rise from the shortest stack still in play. Marchington is a few months younger than current record holder Joe Cada. When play resumes on Sunday night there will be just over 90 minutes remaining in the 500,000/1,000,000 (1,000,000 BBA) level. No player will have less than 20 big blinds when action resumes. Main Event Final Table Chip Counts Hossein Ensan - 177,000,000 Garry Gates - 99,300,000 Zhen Cai - 60,600,000 Kevin Maahs - 43,000,000 Alex Livingston - 37,800,000 Dario Sammartino - 33,400,000 Milos Skrbic - 23,400,000 Timothy Su - 20,200,000 Nick Marchington - 20,100,000 Final Table Has International Flavor The nine players at the final table represent six different countries. Ensan is from Germany, Livingston is Canadian, Sammartino is Italian, Skrbic is Serbian, and Marchington is from England. The remaining four players, Gates, Cai, Maahs, and Su, are all American. Yuri Dzivielevski Last #1 Standing Brazilain Yuri Dzivielevski narrowly missed out on making the final three tables but still earned the best finish by a former #1-ranked PocketFiver. Dzivielevski finished 28th for $261,430. WSOP Main Event Final Table Broadcast Schedule Sunday, July 14 - 7 PM on ESPN2 Monday, July 15 - 7 PM on ESPN Tuesday, July 16 - 6 PM on ESPN All times Pacific
  10. The 2019 World Series of Poker is in the books, and so is the first part of the 2019 WSOP Player of the Year race. Through nearly 90 eligible events, Australian Robert Campbell leads the WSOP Player of the Year race with 3,418.78 points. Campbell put together a tremendous 2019 WSOP. He cashed nine times, reached the top 10 on five occasions, and won two gold bracelets. Campbell’s first bracelet, which also happened to be the first of his career, came when he won the $1,500 2-7 Triple Draw tournament for $144,027. He would later go on to win the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event for $385,763. Campbell also made the final table in the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo event and the $1,500 Razz event. Heading into this fall’s 2019 WSOP Europe, Campbell’s lead is less than 140 points over the defending WSOP Player of the Year, Shaun Deeb. Daniel Negreanu sits third with 3,166.24 points and Dan Zack is fourth with 3,126.13 points. Campbell, Deeb, Negreanu, and Zack are the only four players to accumulate more than 3,000 points during the summer. 2019 WSOP Player of the Year Standings PLAYER CASHES FTs WINS EARNINGS POINTS 1 Robert Campbell 10 4 2 $679,359 3,418.78 2 Shaun Deeb 17 4 0 $642,532 3,280.13 3 Daniel Negreanu 17 4 0 $2,049,062 3,166.24 4 Dan Zack 14 3 1 $351,259 3,126.13 5 Phillip Hui 10 3 1 $1,279,093 2,881.67 6 Jason Gooch 11 2 1 $354,819 2,643.72 7 Joseph Cheong 9 2 1 $823,788 2,595.54 8 David 'ODB' Baker 14 2 1 $381,537 2,480.06 9 Chris Ferguson 19 3 0 $253,540 2,476.96 10 Anthony Zinno 8 3 1 $473,730 2,443.22 Sitting just outside of the top 10 are Ismael Bojang in 12th with 2,372.48 points and Scott Clements with 2,368.02 points. Bojang racked up 15 cashes at the 2019 WSOP and won his first-ever gold bracelet. Clements cashed six times, won his third career gold bracelet, and made two additional final tables. Dario Sammartino, who finished second in the 2019 WSOP Main Event, earned 2,289.78 points this summer. In addition to this runner-up finish in the WSOP Main Event, Sammartino took third in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. event, fourth in the WSOP.com $1,000 No Limit Hold’em Double Stack, and ninth in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship, among other cashes. Sammartino’s summer has him currently 19th on the 2019 WSOP Player of the Year leaderboard. Hossein Ensan, winner of the 2019 WSOP Main Event, cashed just once at the series this summer, banking $10 million and 1,730.84 points in the WSOP Player of the Year race. That’s good enough to have Ensan sitting in 53rd place. It’s still a ways off the top of the leaderboard, but it wouldn’t be out of the realm of possibility for Ensan to make a push later this year as he’s a German player and WSOP Europe won’t be too far away in Rozvadov. WSOP Europe features 11 gold bracelet events ranging in buy-ins of €350 to €100,000 and takes place Sunday, October 13, through Monday, November 4.
  11. Kahle Burns started Day 3 of the World Series of Poker Europe €25,500 Platinum High Roller as the chip leader and then held off a surging Sam Trickett to win the first bracelet of his career and nearly €600,000. Three players, Alex Foxen, Abdelhakim Zoufri, and Trickett each started the day with less than 15 big blinds and just 20 minutes after the final six players reconvened, one of them was left with zero. Foxen shoved from UTG for 5,950,000 with [poker card="as"][[poker card="jd"] and Trickett called from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="jh"] to eliminate Foxen in sixth place and given Trickett nearly a full double-up. [ptable zone="NJ Online Poker Promos"][ptable zone="888poker"][ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"] After starting the day with the shortest stack, Trickett continued to find spots to move up and just 20 minutes later sent another player home early. Working with less than 12 big blinds, Timothy Adams moved all in for 7,075,000 from middle position with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"] and Trickett called from the big blind with [poker card="8h"][poker card="8s"]. Adams got some extra outs after the [poker card="4c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2h"] flop, but the [poker card="js"] turn and [poker card="th"] river were no help and the Canadian bracelet winner was eliminated in fifth. Trickett's run good continued and a three-way all in 30 minutes later sent one player home and provided Trickett with a triple up. Action folded to Burns on the button and he moved all in with [poker card="8s"][poker card="5s"]. Zoufri called all in from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"] before Trickett looked down at [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"] in the bid blind and also called all in. Trickett stayed in control through the [poker card="js"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5d"] flop, improved on the [poker card="kc"] turn and dodged Zoufri's gutshot straight draw after the [poker card="2h"] river. Zoufri was out in fourth and Trickett soared past Burns for the first time. Reigning WSOP Main Event champion Hossein Ensan had been relatively quiet while the Sam Trickett Show was on display. Ensan eventually found himself in a hand with Burns that saw his run at a second bracelet end. Ensan raised to 2,000,000 from the button with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qs"] before Burns moved all in from the small blind for 27,775,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"]. Trickett folded his big blind and Ensan called with his tournament life on the line. Neither player's hand improved through the [poker card="8c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3d"] runout and Ensan was eliminated. Heads-up play began with Burns holding a 3-2 chip lead but Trickett won enough on the first two hands of play to take a small lead. That's when Trickett's run good came to an abrupt end, however. After Burns called from the button with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"], Trickett made it 5,000,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"]. Burns made it 12,500,000 to go before Trickett moved all in for 42,000,000. Burns called and then watched the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] board leave Trickett on fumes. Trickett was eliminated on the next hand when his [poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"] wasn't able to beat Burns' [poker card="ks"][poker card="4d"] in an all-in pre-flop battle. This marks the third time that Trickett has finished runner-up in a WSOP bracelet event. In 2010, he finished one spot behind Jason DeWitt in a $5,000 No Limit Hold'em event and he famously finished runner-up to Antonio Esfandiari in the inaugural Big One for One Drop in 2012. Burns's previous best finish in a bracelet event came earlier this summer when he finished second in the $10,000 Six Max NLHE event. Final Table Payouts Kahle Burns - €596,883 Sam Trickett - €368,889 Hossein Ensan - €251,837 Abdelhakim Zoufri - €177,062 Timothy Adams - €128,326 Alex Foxen - €95,962 Anton Morgenstern - €74,117 Robert Campbell - €59,189
  12. The opening night of the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event final table went about as close to script as Hossein Ensan and Garry Gates could have hoped. The two biggest at the start of play, Ensan and Gates were responsible for the first three eliminations as the shortest stacks all went bust. The only deviation from said script, was a fourth player hitting the rail before the end of the night. Milos Skrbic First to Go Nick Marchington got things started early, doubling through Zhen Cai on the third hand of the night leaving Milos Skrbic and Timothy Su as the two remaining short stacks. Three hands after that, Skrbic was sent to the rail. Action folded to Gates in the small blind and he moved all in with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"] and Skrbic called all in from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"]. The board ran out [poker card="td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="5h"] to give Gates an additional 18,400,000 and send eliminate Skrbic in ninth place. "I don't know what to say, I'm still in shock. It was fun for sure," Skrbic said in the minutes after his tournament ended. Timothy Su Eliminated in Eighth Just five hands after that, Timothy Su followed Skrbic out the door. Timothy Su moved all in from UTG for 17,700,000 with [poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"]. Ensan called from the cutoff with [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] flop move Ensan ahead and left Su with just two outs. Neither the [poker card="ts"] turn or [poker card="jd"] river were able to save the 27-year-old engineer from an eighth-place finish. "I came in with zero expectations and just making the min-cash would be awesome, but somehow I was able to spin it up, maintain a chip lead, chip lead Day 2AB, chip lead I think Day 6 and even throughout Day 7 I had over 1/5th of the chips in play one point," Su said. "There's no regrets on anything, that's for sure." Nick Marchington Busts in Seventh Those first two eliminations came very quickly, but thanks to his early double up, 21-year-old Nick Marchington was able to stave off elimination for another two hours. Action folded to Ensan in the cutoff and he made it 2,400,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. Marchington moved his last 14,000,000 all in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"] and Ensan called. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"] flop kept Ensan ahead but gave Marchington a backdoor straight draw. The [poker card="5h"] turn was the first step in filling that straight, but the [poker card="qs"] river was a brick and his run at becoming the youngest Main Event champion in history ended with a seventh-place finish. "I really enjoyed the final table. Not sure why, but I didn't really feel any pressure. Just loved every minute of it," Marchington said. "Maybe I'm the youngest ever seventh-place finisher?" Zhen Cai Elimination Wraps Up Play The plan for the first night of final table play was to play down from nine players to six but the fast pace changed that and ESPN decided to play down until the end of the level or the next elimination. Just 90 minutes later, Zhen became the reason that play was stopped for the night. Ensan raised to 2,400,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="qc"][poker card="js"], Kevin Maahs called from the small blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"], before Cai moved all in for 28,700,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"]. Ensan folded, but Maahs called. The board ran out [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2d"] to give Maahs the pot, eliminate Cai in sixth-place and end play for the night. Final Five Chip Counts Hossein Ensan – 207,700,000 Garry Gates – 171,700,000 Kevin Maahs – 66,500,000 Alex Livingston – 45,800,000 Dario Sammartino – 23,100,000 Payouts 6. Zhen Cai - $1,850,000 7. Nick Marchington – $1,525,000 8. Timothy Su – $1,250,000 9. Milos Skrbic – $1,000,000 WSOP Main Event on ESPN After spending the night on ESPN2, the action now moves over to ESPN. Cards are in the air in Las Vegas beginning at 6:30 PT with the 30-minute delayed broadcast beginning at 7:00 PM PT.
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