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  1. Sunday night's World Series of Poker Online Event #12 ($1,000 Double Stack) on GGPoker saw an exciting final table conclude with a heroic heads-up victory for Hinojas Jerome as he toppled GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos to win his first WSOP bracelet and $635,576. With a former WSOP Online Main Event winner at the final table felt, it was a dramatic conclusion to another well-populated event on GGPoker. The final table began with Jerome at the bottom of the chipcounts with just 14 big blinds to his name, while the eventual runner-up Ramos was leading the way with 92 big blinds. Only Yi Wang with 88 big blinds was anywhere near Ramos, with every other player having less than 27 big blinds going into the nine-handed table. It didn’t take long for the first player to be busted, with Manish Lakhotia losing his stack in ninth place for a result worth $63,557. Lakhotia went to a flop with both Ramos and former WSOP Online $5,000 ‘Main Event’ winner Stoyan Madanzhiev. Madanzhiev, who won the 2020 WSOP Main Event on GGPoker only for the $5,000 single-reentry event to then be demoted by a $10,000 Main Event later in the year, had periods of dominance throughout the race from 100 players down to the final table. On the flop of [poker card="7d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3h"], Lakhotia’s bet of 900,000 was raised to 3,120,000 by Madazhiev, with Ramos getting out of the way. On the [poker card="Ks"] turn, Madanzhiev bet 3.2 million but Lakhotia check-shoved for 16.8 million. Madanzhiev called it off. Lakhotia tabled [poker card="4h"][poker card="4c"] for a flopped middle set, but Madanzhiev had a lock on the hand with [poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"]. Only a four could save the Indian player, but the [poker card="2c"] river was not the card and Madanzhiev propelled himself up the leaderboard after a dream start to the final. Ramos had lost his chip lead by getting involved in the opening action at the table but worked himself into the lead again pretty quickly. Quick enough to be able to open the action in the next bust-out hand. Ramos’ bet of 1.6 million saw Nethanel Klein move all-in for 17.7 million with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"] and Madanzhiev was again the player prepared to risk his stack, this time with the inferior [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"]. Klein was way ahead and stayed like that across the [poker card="Qd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"] flop. On the [poker card="Td"] turn, the gutshot chance of a Broadway straight presented itself, with four jacks able to send Klein to his doom. One landed on the [poker card="Jd"] river and gave the Bulgarian player the winning hand, sending Klein home stunned in eighth place with $84,755. That hand vaulted the dominant Madanzhiev into the lead and the early aggressor was at it again in eliminating Xuejian Li in seventh place for $113,023. Li moved all-in for nine big blinds pre-flop with [poker card="As"][poker card="5s"] and Madanzhiev was the only caller with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9d"]. The flop of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"][poker card="Js"] kept the Bulgarian chip leader ahead and after the [poker card="4h"] turn and [poker card="Ks"] river, Li saw her chances of becoming the latest female winner of a WSOP bracelet disappear. With six players left, Madanzhiev had a comfortable chip lead, holding 80 million chips compared to his nearest challengers in the shape of Wang, who had 56 million, but all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9c"], Madanzhiev doubled up Jerome, who held [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"] across a board where both men made two pair. That hand was critical to Jerome’s tournament and it helped him gain the lead a few hands later. Russian player Anton Yakuba was down to just 11 big blinds when he moved all-in with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jc"] pre-flop. Jerome made the call with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"] and remained ahead of his opponent on the [poker card="As"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3c"] flop. The turn of [poker card="Qc"] and river of [poker card="Kc"] ended the hand in the Hong Kong player’s favor, eliminating Yakuba for a score of $150,718. With five players left, the former chip leader and dominant player of the early stages, Stoyan Madanzhiev, busted for $200,986. The hand took place shortly after Ramos lost with pocket kings to ace-eight. Possibly due to that upset of the odds, when Madanzhiev called all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"] for 14 big blinds from the big blind, Jerome’s small blind shove with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="6h"] suddenly seemed to have a chance of success. So it proved, as the board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qh"] gave the eventual winner two pair on the river to oust the Bulgarian in unfortunate circumstances. If Jerome’s hopes were boosted by that hand, his confidence was sky-high after the next. Wang was the loser in fourth place for $268,018 after he three-bet shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2c"] and Jerome had the easiest call ever with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"]. The flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"] gave Wang hope of a miracle, but the [poker card="9h"] turn and [poker card="Th"] river ended those hopes and further propelled Jerome ahead of the only two players who could stop him. Sriharsha Doddapaneni had clambered up the ladder to third place, but that was where their adventure ended, for a result of $357,409. Doddapaneni called off their stack with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"] and started the hand ahead of Jerome’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"], but the flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3c"] flipped the script and put the overwhelming chip leader in front. The [poker card="Jh"] turn didn’t help Doddapaneni at all, and on the [poker card="Kh"] river, play was heads-up, with Jerome holding a strong lead. With 223 million to Ramos’ 69 million, Jerome was a 3:1 leader and it took just a few minutes for the first-time WSOP event winner to end the Brazilian’s hopes of claiming that maiden bracelet. Ramos moved all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jc"] in great shape against Jerome’s [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"] and the flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6h"] paired both men’s hands and kept the GGPoker ambassador ahead. The turn of [poker card="Qs"] was no danger to Ramos’s chances of doubling back to being almost level in chips. However, the river of [poker card="6c"] gave Jerome a devil of a hand, with ‘666’ proving enough to win him his first WSOP gold bracelet, sending Ramos home with the runner-up result worth $476,612. The latest WSOP Online event had a total of 5,894 entries, costing just $1,000 to play. That meant 927 players advanced to the final day with 600 making the money. While a min-cash was worth $2,626, plenty of big names went higher, including Ramos’ fellow GGPoker ambassador Daniel Negreanu, who claimed $9,015 for an 83rd place finish. Others to run deep included Nick Maimone (16th for $23,529) and Jiachen Gong (10th for $35,494), both of whom dominated at different points but eventually missed out on the final table action. It was Jerome’s day, though, after a final table that saw others take control before losing their shot at winning WSOP gold. Instead, the short stack came from nowhere to land his first-ever WSOP bracelet victory and walk away with the $635,576 top prize after a thrilling win. WSOP Online GGPoker Event #12 Final Table Results: Hinojas ‘POLALIFE!’ Jerome - $635,576 Felipe Ramos - $476,612 Sriharsha ‘Upswinger’ Doddapaneni - $357,409 Yi ‘jolen’ Wang -$268,019 Stoyan Madanzhiev - $200,986 Anton Yakuba - $150,718 Xuejian ‘LuckyCat00" Li - $113,023 Nethanel ‘natykkk’ Klein - $84,755 Manish ‘thekid’ Lakhotia - $63,557
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