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Found 14 results

  1. Nicholas 'mrfinalt' Kiley navigated through 1,483 other players on Saturday night to the early hours of Sunday morning to win the 2020 World Series of Poker Online Event #25 ($500 NLHE Summer Saver) for $149K and his first career bracelet. Matt 'Berkey11_S4Y' Berkey made his second WSOP final table appearance in as many nights and started as chip leader. Looking to improve on his seventh place finish from Event #24, Berkey was also on the hunt for his first career bracelet. The 2016 Super High Roller Bowl champion also got the first final table elimination of the day. Raising all-in on the button to 9,149,831 with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="3c"], Ofir 'panda15' Mor called off his 2,941,919 stack with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. Despite Mor flopping middle set on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6d"] flop, he still had to evade the flush draw. The [poker card="8c"] turn completed the flush for Berkey and the [poker card="3s"] river ended the tournament for Mor. Four minutes later Nicholas 'mrfinalt' Kiley opened to 345,678 from late position and Michael 'ha8me' Policastro called from the small blind. Policastro took the initiative on the [poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="Qc"] flop, betting 758,517 which was called by Kiley. Policastro jammed for 3,526,398 on the [poker card="8s"] turn and was snap-called by his opponent. Policastro flopped two pair with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qd"] but was behind as Kiley rolled over [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3d"] for the stronger holding. The [poker card="Tc"] river wasn't one the two outs Policastro needed and finished the day in eighth. The next bust-out came seven minutes later when 'Daddyp69' open-jammed from the cutoff looking to get the walk. Unfortunately, Berkey woke up with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ah"] and called from the small blind looking for another elimination. 'Daddyp69' was drawing to two immediate outs with [poker card="5c"][poker card="5s"] and was sent to the rail failing to connect with the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Tc"] runout. Six-handed play lasted for less than ten minutes when Berkey was again leading the action as he opened from UTG for 480,000. Kevin 'Specialk333' Calenzo moved all-in for 3,330,936 from the cutoff, Weiyi 'wymoney' Mo then four-bet jammed her 5,780,224 from the small looking to isolate Calenzo. The pre-flop action caused Berkey to fold and Calenzo with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] was dominated by Mo's [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"]. Both players paired their ace on the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="5d"] and both made two-pair with the [poker card="5h"] turn. The at -isk Calenzo was looking for another ace, queen or five to preserve his tournament status but the [poker card="6h"] river meant Mo took all the chips. Berkey's bracelet hunt was dented after being on the wrong side of a cooler against Guo Liang 'Ct188' Chen. In blind versus blind action, Chen limped-called from the small when Berkey raised to 689,999 to see the [poker card="As"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3d"] flop. Berkey bet 1,166,248 after Chen checked his option, Chen made the call to see the [poker card="Jd"] turn. Chen again checked and Berkey put his opponent all in and was snap-called. Berkey, holding [poker card="4s"][poker card="3h"] connected hard, making two pair on the flop but was drawing dead as Chen flopped top set with his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"]. The [poker card="5d"] river meant nothing and left Berkey hanging in there by a thread. Two hands later Berkey was out in fifth, moving all in from the button for 3,237,065. Kiley called in the small blind. Kiley: [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Ts"] Berkey: [poker card="Jc"][poker card="9s"] Kiley made trips on the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="Th"][poker card="6s"] flop, the [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="Js"] river denied the storybook ending Berkey was looking for. Kiley quickly scored another final table knockout four minutes later. Stephen 'S.Dott22' Russo raised to 1,040,000 from UTG with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"] and called off his remaining 4,723,216 stack after Kiley three-bet jammed for 16,993,456 from the big blind with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8d"]. Both players missed the [poker card="5s"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="6c"][poker card="7s"] board but Kiley's ace-high was good enough to send Russo out in fourth. Mo, who is one of many female poker players who had deep runs in this year's WSOP, called Chen's 800,000 button raise from the big blind. Mo with [poker card="3s"][poker card="3d"] decided to ship her short stack on the [poker card="7h"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="6d"] flop, Chen holding [poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"] quickly called with third pair. The [poker card="5d"] turn meant Mo picked up a gutshot straight draw but the [poker card="As"] river ended Mo's chances of becoming the first female winner of 2020 WSOP Online event. That left Chen and Kiley both looking to win their first WSOP bracelet event and claim the $149K first place cash prize. Chen three-bet to 2,475,000 after Kiley opened 800,000 and the latter called to see the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"] flop. Chen fired a continuation bet, downsizing to 2,125,000, Kiley called again to see the [poker card="8c"] turn. Chen then decided to check-call after Kiley fired for 5,050,000, the [poker card="Jh"] completed the board and Chen checked again. Kiley, who had the chip lead, put Chen to the test for all his chips and he made the crying call with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jc"] but Kiley's [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Th"] was best and enough for him to scoop a six-figure payday and secure his maiden WSOP gold bracelet. Final Table Payouts Nicholas 'mrfinalt' Kiley - $149,244.52 Guo Liang 'Ct188' Chen - $92,223.22 Weiyi 'wymoney' Mo - $67,300.65 Stephen 'S.Dott22' Russo - $49,554.22 Matt 'Berkey11_S4Y' Berkey - $36,850.50 Kevin 'Specialk333' Calenzo - $27,637.87 'Daddyp69' - $20,849.62 Michael 'Ha8me' Policastro - $15,903.90 Ofir 'panda15' Mor - $12,315.82 Faces in the Crowd Event #25 brought saw a plethora of familiar faces getting into the money while chasing for WSOP glory. Daniel 'RedSoxNets5' Sewnig finished 49th for $2,618.32 while Anthony 'heheh' Zinno (71st - $1,842.52), Brian Rast (87th - $1,454.62), and Chris Moorman (92nd - $1,357.65) also worked their way into the money. After spending part of the night at the same table, Daniel Negreanu (183rd - $969) and Phil Hellmuth (216th - $873) both added another WSOP cash to their long list of achievements.
  2. Friday night's World Series of Poker Online action on WSOP.com saw 'samadhi' overcome a final table that included Matt 'Berkey11_S4Y' Berkey and WSOP bracelet winner Ryan 'Adopt_aDogg0' Leng to win Event #24 ($400 NLHE 8-Max) and earn $133,412.83 and a WSOP bracelet. It didn't take long for the first final table bust out of the day when Christian 'CalcFather' Calcano open-jammed with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9c"] from middle position for 1,226,311. Action folded to chip leader 'samadhi' in the big blind who made the call with [poker card="8c"][poker card="8s"]. It was a coin flip that Calcano needed to win but he didn't connect on the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="7h"] runout and ended his final table cameo appearance. Eight minutes later high-roller regular Berkey moved all-in for 2,936,652 after 'eric_shun' limped in on the button. The button limper called and they were off to the flop. 'eric_shun': [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"] Berkey: [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"] The [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5s"] flop meant Berkey was still ahead but gave 'eric_shun' a gutshot for Broadway. The [poker card="6c"] on the turn missed both players but Berkey made a pair on the [poker card="Td"] river which also gave 'eric_shun' the straight sending the 'Solve For Why' co-founder to the rail. With six players remaining, 'alululululu' raised to 480,000 from the cutoff, Norman 'abnormality' Michalek called off his remaining stack of 241,624 and Leng completed from the big blind. 'alululululu' fired a 240,000 continuation bet which Leng called after checking on the [poker card="6c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2d"] flop. The [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="3d"] were checked down. The at-risk Michalek tabled [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Tc"] for ace-high but Leng rivered a pair as he was holding [poker card="Qc"][poker card="3h"] to eliminate Michalek in sixth place. Mark 'batsman' Bansemar was the next player with his tournament life on the line. Leng who was in the small blind put Bansemar all in, who committed his 2,161,265 stack from the big blind. Leng held [poker card="Jh"][poker card="3h"] while Bansemar showed [poker card="7c"][poker card="7h"]. The flop came a favorable [poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="2h"] for Bansemar. The [poker card="Ad"] river meant that Leng just had three outs to hit, and hit he did as the [poker card="Js"] fell on the river and sent Bansemar packing for a $33K payout. There was more blind versus blind action 13 minutes later as short stack 'alululululu' shoved their 1,654,922 stack from the small blind with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9h"] and 'samadhi' called with [poker card="Th"][poker card="7h"] in the big blind. Despite 'alululululu' remaining ahead on the [poker card="8h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4d"] flop he still had to avoid what seemed like half the deck. An inconsequential [poker card="3d"] came on the turn but 'samadhi' completed his flush on the [poker card="Qh"] river ending the hopes of 'alululululu' in fourth place. Three-handed play ended just over ten minutes later after another blind versus blind battle. Leng limped in the small blind and 'eric_shun' checked his option. Leng bet 333,333 after seeing the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6c"] flop and 'eric_shun' called. Leng put the pressure on betting 666,666 the [poker card="Ah"] turn and again 'eric_shun' called. Leng then put in a hefty bet of 3,669,669 on the [poker card="Kh"] river and then snap-called after 'eric_shun' river raised all-in with [poker card="Th"][poker card="9s"] for a pair of nines. Leng, holding [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"], rivered the nuts, rendering 'eric_shun's' holding useless to take it to heads up. Ryan 'Adopt_aDogg0' Leng at one point had a 8:1 chip lead and had 'samadhi' all in on three separate occasions with the latter winning all three to take the chip lead. With the blinds at 300,000/600,000 Leng moved all in on the button with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"] and was quickly called by 'samadhi' with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="8s"]. The chip leader continued his run good versus Leng as the flop came [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="2d"], looking to fade any diamond or nine, the turn came the [poker card="4s"] and the [poker card="7s"] on the river sealed the win for 'samadhi' who overcame the odds to pick up a WSOP title and the lion's share of $866,880 prize pool. Final Table Payouts Nick 'samadhi' Binger - $133,412.83 Ryan 'Adopt_aDogg0' Leng - $82,440.28 'eric_shun' - $60,161.47 'alululululu'- $44,297.56 Mark 'bansman' Bansemar - $32,941.44 Norman 'abnormality' Michalek - $24,706.08 Matt 'Berkey11_S4Y' Berkey - $18,637.92 Christian 'CalcFather' Calcano - $14,216.83 Faces in the Crowd 2020 WSOP bracelet winner Pat 'ichiikawawa' Lyons bubbled the tournament in 331st place and notable names like Ali 'sasukeuchiha' Imsirovic (82nd - $1,300.32) and Scott 'BudLightLime' Hempel (53rd - $2,340.57) finished in the money. WSOP veteran Mike 'mouth123' Matusow made it to the final four tables but finished 30th for $3,380.83 and the unfortunate final table bubble boy Jordan 'HFNeon' Spurlin picked up $11,009.37 for his efforts.
  3. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Jeff Walsh, The Fives Poker Podcast is LIVE this week from the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure with daily episodes bringing in all of the guests and action from the PokerStars Players No Limit Championship and the PCA Main Event. There are just 20 players left in the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event and two of them, Matt Berkey and Daniel Strelitz, join Lance and Jeff on this episode of The Fives. Both players discuss the up and down nature of their day and what it's like to go from the feature table to a side table and back again. Also - you can win an ultrarare PocketFives NWO shirt just by listening! Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  4. August is the time to go 'Big' or go home. The 2019 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open takes place at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, FL and will run from August 1-13 with a 27-event schedule culminating in the return of their four featured tournaments, dubbed ‘The Big 4’. The schedule gets off to a fast start with a multi-flight $1 million guaranteed $600 DeepStack and is followed by a full slate of tournaments with wide-ranging variants and buy-ins that will attract every level of player, leading up to the starting dates of The Big 4. The Big 4 Since 2015, the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open has hosted The Big 4, four individual tournaments that all play down to a final table together so they can be live-streamed on the same day at the same time. This year the Big 4 include: $5,250 SHRPO Championship - $3 million guarantee $2,650 NLHE - $1 million guarantee $1,100 NLHE - $500,000 guarantee $25,500 High Rollers - $2 million guarantee. Since 2013, SHRPO has been a favorite destination for poker pros from all over the world. Headed into their fifth year of the The Big 4 promotion, organizers are looking forward to making 2019 the biggest Big 4 yet with all eyes on the $5,250 Main Event. $5,250 SHRPO Championship In 2014, the year before SHRPO Championship was a part of The Big 4, Daniel Colman took down the $5,300 tournament for $1.44 million. The $5 million guaranteed SHRPO Championship event drew 907 runners in 2015 and the big story was that Colman returned to the final table, looking to go back-to-back and defend his 2014 SHRPO Championship title. In the end Colman couldn’t get there, falling in third place for $310,000 as Omar Zazay went on to win the $1,000,000 first-place prize for a career-high score. Pennsylvania’s Paul Volpe also made an appearance at this final table, but he ended up hitting the rail in eighth place for $100,000. Even though registration dipped in 2016, the tournament still held a $5 million guarantee. That meant there was a healthy overlay for the field of top-tier players who made the trip. Ryan Fair and Joe Serock joined regular high rollers Seth Davies and Jason Koon at the final table where Koon ended up taking home the title and his very first seven-figure score of $1 million. In 2017, the tournament reduced the guarantee to $3 million when Australia’s Martin Kozlov picked up the largest cash of his career by winning the $754,083 first-place prize. Matt Berkey finished in third place this year while Aaron Mermelstein, Adam Levy, and Joe Kuether all also had a seat at the final table. Then, just last year, Brandon Eisen denied Jeremy Ausmus the title in 2018, taking home $771,444 for the win. Familiar faces Joseph Cheong, Jared Griener and Ryan D’Angelo also made the final table in what was the largest SHRPO Championship field in The Big 4 era with 914 runners. Big Buy-In, Big Moments The Big 4 have had plenty of standout performances outside of the Main Event over the years. As one might expect, the $25K High Roller has always been flush with big-name pros looking to take home six-figure scores. In 2015, Florida’s All-Time Money List leader, Jason Mercier, took down the $25K High Roller for over $517K in his own backyard, surviving an all-star final table that included runner-up Ian O’Hara, Sean Winter, Ankush Mandavia, Barry Hutter, David ‘Doc’ Sands, and Phil Laak. One year later, Marvin Rettenmaier denied Daniel Colman another SHRPO title by taking first place and over $787K. John Andress took home the High Roller title in 2017 and then in 2018, Jake Schindler topped the 123 player field for a score of over $800K after defeating Shaun Deeb heads up. Another amazing Big 4 feat has been the performance of the GPI #1-ranked player Alex Foxen who, in 2017 took down the $2,650 NLHE for $204,600 and then followed that up by defending his title in that even in 2018 for another $208,452. All the action from the 2019 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open begins on August 1 with all four of the Big 4 set to be live-streamed on August 13. 2019 SHRPO Schedule of Events DATE EVENT # EVENT TIME BUY-IN 8/1 1A Deep Stack NLH Flight A (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/1 1B Deep Stack NLH Flight B (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/2 1C Deep Stack NLH Flight C (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/2 1D Deep Stack NLH Flight D (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/3 1E Deep Stack NLH Flight E (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $600 8/3 1F Deep Stack NLH Flight F (Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 6:00 PM $600 8/4 1 Day 2 1:00 PM -- 8/1 2 Omaha 8 Or Better (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/2 3 H.O.R.S.E. (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/3 4 PLO 8 (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/4 5 Deep Stack NLH (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/4 6 Purple Chip Bounty (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD 3:00 PM $1,700 8/5 6 Day 2 2:00 PM -- 8/5 7 Seniors 50+ (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 11:00 AM $400 8/5 8 Big Stack Black Chip Bounty NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/5 9 PLO (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400 8/5 10 Big Stack NLH (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - $5,250 Championship Seat Added - One Day Event 6:00 PM $150 8/6 11 Six-Max NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD - One Day Event 11:00 AM $600 8/6 12 Big O (Re-Entry) - One Day Event 12:00 PM $400 8/6 13 Omaha 8/Stud 8 (Single Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400 8/6 14 Eight-Handed Turbo NLH (Freeze-Out) - One Day Event 5:00 PM $1,100 8/7 15 Eight-Handed NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $200,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $2,200 8/7 16 Jeff Conine Celebrity Poker Classic - One Day Charity Event 7:00 PM $300 8/8 17 Six-Max Big Stack NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $100,000 GTD - One Day Event 12:00 PM $1,100 8/8 18 Super High Roller NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD - Held In Salon East 1:00 PM $50,000 8/9 18 Day 2 1:00 PM -- 8/8 19 Six-Max PLO (Single Re-Entry) - One Day Event 3:00 PM $400.00 8/9 20A SHRPO Championship Day 1A (Single Re-Entry) - $3,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $5,250.00 8/10 20B SHRPO Championship Day 1B (Single Re-Entry) - $3,000,000 GTD 11:00 AM $5,250.00 8/11 20 Day 2 12:00 PM -- 8/12 20 Day 3 12:00 PM -- 8/13 20 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/11 21 NLH (Single Re-Entry) - $1,000,000 GTD 2:00 PM $2,650 8/12 21 Day 2 12:00 PM -- 8/13 21 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/12 22 NLH (Re-Entry) - $500,000 GTD 11:00 AM $1,100 8/13 22 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/12 23 High Roller (Re-Entry) - $2,000,000 GTD - Held In Salon East 12:00 PM $25,500 8/13 23 Final Table Televised And Live Streamed As Part Of The Big 4 1:00 PM -- 8/11 24A NLH Day 1A (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD 5:00 PM $150 8/12 24B NLH Day 1B (Re-Entry) - $50,000 GTD 5:00 PM $150 8/13 24 Day 2 - Held In The Poker Room 5:00 PM -- 8/12 25 PLO (Re-Entry) 6:00 PM $2,650 8/13 25 Day 2 - Held In The Poker Room 3:00 PM -- 8/13 26 Deep Stack Turbo (Re-Entry) - $30,000 GTD - Held In Salon East - One Day Event 11:00 AM $400 8/13 27 NLH (Re-Entry) - $500,000 GTD - Held In Salon East - One Day Event 12:00 PM $10,000
  5. [caption width="680"] Martin Kozlov navigated a 13-hour final table to win the SHRPO Championship. (SHRPO photo)[/caption] Australian Martin Kozlov made a name for himself in the United States last summer when he made multiple final tables at the World Series of Poker, capped off by his win in the $10,000 Six Max Championship event. On Tuesday, Kozlov made his way through a field of 887 to make it to the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Championship final table as part of the SHRPO Big 4. Following a marathon 13-hour session, Kozlov walked away with the title and $754,083 first place prize. The first player ousted was Joe Kuether, who was playing with history on his side. Kuether became the first player in the three-year history of the Big 4 to make multiple final tables, as he was also in the $1,100 lineup. Kuether started the final table as the short stack and was out on the 22nd hand of play. Kuether was all in for 1,120,000 and was in the middle of a major cooler with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kd"] against the [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"] of Dylan Drazen. There was no help on the board for Kuether and he exited the final table. Kuether finished in eighth place in the $1,100 event and earned a combined $91,000 for his two cashes. The final table played deep throughout and it took another 34 hands before Luke Breretonwas eliminated next. Yi Chi Li opened to 150,000 and Brereton shoved for 1,180,000. Li called with [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"] and had to hit against the [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] of Brereton. A jack hit the flop and that was it for Brereton. Following the cooler of an elimination for Joe Kuether, Adam Levy experienced a similar fate against Michael Aron. Aaron Mermelstein opened under the gun to 175,000 and Aron three-bet to 475,000 on the button. Levy ripped it in for 2,650,000 from the small blind and only Aron called, showing down [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"]. Levy’s [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"] was dominated and he headed to collect his $126,305 consolation prize once a king hit the flop. Mermelstein started the final table as the chip leader but wound up finishing sixth with Matt Berkey the one to send him packing. Berkey limped under the gun and Li did the same from one seat over. Dylan Drazen raised to 500,000 in the cutoff and Mermelstein shoved for 2,350,000 in the big blind. Berkey called with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ah"] and showed the bad news to Mermelstein’s [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"] after the table folded. Once the board ran dry, Berkey was in control of the chip lead. It took three hours for the next elimination to take place and then the field was down to two in only 30 hands. With the blinds at 75,000/150,000, Aron shoved the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ts"] for 3,900,000 and Berkey called with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"] from the big blind. The board was no help to Aron and he took home fifth place. Kozlov was able to gain control of the chip lead from Berkey shortly after the elimination of Aron. Kozlov opened to 300,000 under the gun and Berkey three-bet to 800,000 on the button. Kozlov shoved for 6,000,000 and Berkey called with [poker card="jd"][poker card="js"]. Kozlov’s [poker card="qd"][poker card="qh"] was in the lead and he held through the nine-high board to double up. A severely short-stacked Li busted in fourth. All in for only three big blinds, Li was up against Drazen and Berkey. On a board of [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="3c"], Drazen bet out Berkey and showed [poker card="jd"][poker card="9c"] against the [poker card="qd"][poker card="5h"] of Li. A queen did not come on the river and Li left to collect $252,481. Berkey was on the ropes not long after and met his end in Hand 208. Kozlov opened to 300,000 on the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"] and called the 3,900,000 shove from Berkey, who held [poker card="ad"][poker card="5s"]. Kozlov flopped trip queens and would enter heads up play with 16,325,000 chips to the 10,325,000 of Drazen. The heads up match lasted 37 hands with Kozlov never relinquishing the lead and ending the long final table. With the blinds at 125,000/250,000, Kozlov opened the button to 600,000 and Drazen called. The [poker card="kd"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8h"] flop was check-called for 400,000 by Drazen. Drazen checked the [poker card="4s"] turn and Kozlov bet 2,600,000. Drazen called and then checked the [poker card="2h"] river. Kozlov moved all in for effectively 6,000,000. Drazen thought it over and called with [poker card="jh"][poker card="8d"] but Kozlov’s set of kings [poker card="kh"][poker card="kc"] would seal him the victory. Final Table Payouts Martin Kozlov – $754,083 Dylan Drazen – $528,322 Matt Berkey – $341,618 Yi Chi Li – $252,481 Michael Aron – $191,437 Aaron Mermelstein – $152,547 Adam Levy – $126,305 Luke Brererton – $100,408 Joe Kuether – $75,413
  6. [caption width="640"] Matt Berkey is two days away from the biggest score of his career.[/caption] Only 16 players remain in the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl and 15 of them finished Day 2 looking up – way up – at the chip leader, Matt Berkey. The 34-year-old poker pro bagged up 2,816,000 to end Day 2, more than double that of his nearest competitor. The key pot for Berkey, who came into the day second in chips, came against Tom Marchese where he caught Marchese bluffing against his top pair. The pot was worth over 900,000 and pushed Berkey past 2,000,000 in chips. After the day wrapped up, Berkey knew he had put on a show. Timofey ‘TrueTeller’ Kuznetsov, who came into the second day of play with the only stack over 1 million, didn’t see the end of Day 2. The young Russian pro ran his [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"] into Dan Colman’s [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"] for a huge part and then eventually found himself on the losing side of a flush draw against Jason Mercier and was eliminated. While Berkey is the only player to break through the 2 million chip mark, six players finished with at least a million in the bag. Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel bagged 1,299,000, the second biggest stack. Dan Shak (1,243,000) and Jason Mercier (1,208,000) are right behind Seidel. Dan Smith, Bryn Kenney and Andrew Robl round out the group of players closest to Berkey. The defending champ, Brian Rast, won’t be repeating the feat as Dan Smith took him out in an all-in preflop situation. Rast’s [poker card="ah"][poker card="5h"] wasn’t able to catch up to Smith’s [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"] and his run was over. Daniel Negreanu headlines the other 17 players eliminated on Day 2. Negreanu took a number of successive beats and was finally eliminated by Kathy Lehne. She soon joined him on the rail. Other Dy 2 eliminations included Stephen Chidwick, Dominik Nitsche, Bobby Boldwin, Dan Colman and David Peters. The remaining 16 players return on Tuesday to play down to a final table of seven players. Day 3 Schedule Action gets underway Tuesday at 1 PM PT. The Twitch stream runs from 2 PM – 5 PM PT on https://www.twitch.tv/pokercentral with CBS Sports Network picking up the live, cards up coverage at 5 PM PT Top 10 Chip Counts Matt Berkey - 2,816,000 Erik Seidel - 1,299,000 Dan Shak - 1,243,000 Jason Mercier - 1,208,000 Dan Smith - 1,152,000 Bryn Kenney - 1,097,000 Andrew Robl - 1,075,000 Phil Hellmuth - 936,000 Fedor Holz - 751,000 Rainer Kempe - 740,000
  7. One look at #WSOP gives even those with the slightest interest in poker a severe case of FOMO. The first week of the 49th Annual World Series of Poker had it all. Big names fighting for multimillion-dollar scores and players mixing it up both on and off-the-felt. It’s impossible to catch everything that’s happening at the Rio in Las Vegas but here are some of the highlights we enjoyed that will make you feel like you’re in the thick of the action yourself. So Many Rings When you want to stretch your bankroll, perhaps a single table satellite is the way to go. Just beat a soft field of 9 other players and next thing you know you’re vying for a gold bracelet. Well, maybe the field isn’t that soft. On to week two!
  8. Before the 2018 World Series of Poker began, Matthew Hunt, who has $1.6 million in online tournament earnings, had a live tournament resume which read more like that of an eighth-grade math teacher than of somebody who would be a threat to win a WSOP bracelet. One previous WSOP cash, in the $565 buy-in Colossus in 2016, was the standout alongside some €20 - €100 buy-in events. Nothing that would have given any indication that he was about to have a breakout summer. "(This summer) has been fantastic. I've played events here and there the last couple of summers. I've been here, but haven't been able to play a full schedule," said Hunt. "This year I've been going pretty hard at it, playing a lot of events and it's been going pretty well so far. So I'm loving it." This summer he's picked up seven cashes, three of them in WSOP events including a runner-up finish in a $1,000 buy-in No Limit Hold'em event. Being able to play more events this summer over year's past is the result of some of the work he's done with one of the top coaching groups around - as a coach. "I've been doing a lot of work with the Solve For Why Academy guys lately. Through that, one of the things that came out of it was Matt Berkey and I talked about a staking arrangement for some WSOP events this summer," said Hunt. "So Berkey and Nick Howard, who I've also been working with a lot, are taking a big piece of my action in a lot of these events and that's enabled me to play a lot of stuff I wouldn't otherwise have been able to play." Most players talk about their first WSOP final table with a bit of romanticism. Thanks to the 30-minute levels though, Hunt's deep run was more like a one-night stand. "It was going so fast that I didn't even really have time to digest what was going on a lot of the time," said Hunt. "At the final table itself, we went from six-handed to a winner in 13 hands. It was really fast and furious. Certainly looking back on it I can appreciate what a great experience it was, but when I was in the moment I just had to focus because there was always something going on." Once he had a minute to get over the fact that he was as close to a WSOP bracelet as you can possibly get without actually winning it, Hunt recognized that all the effort he's put in over the last few years has started to show. "It's a lot of validation for all the hard work I've put in, definitely. I've felt for a long time that I have been really sort of banging on the door of asserting myself and making some big scores," said Hunt. "But this summer I'm feeling more confident than I ever have in my game and I'm playing really well and thankfully the scores are coming in. So it's definitely a big step forward for me in my career and I'm looking forward to riding this momentum as long as I can." Ever the grinder, Hunt woke up the day after that event and headed right back to the Rio to get back to work. Turns out that maybe a day off was in order. "I was scheduled to play the Monster Stack that day so I just got up and went to play again and I'm not sure I played that great in the Monster Stack. I'm not sure if it was just tiredness or I wasn't too focused or what, but it was strange," said Hunt. "I kind of told myself I could get back on it and keep going and ride the momentum. Looking back on it I probably should have taken a day off." Hunt's hope of turning some momentum into a deep Main Event run didn't quite pan out. He busted Day 1A for the second consecutive year, but that doesn't mean he's done chasing a bracelet.
  9. Over the last 72 hours, California poker room Stones Gambling Hall has found itself as the epicenter of cheating allegations based around the live-streamed cash game action hosted by the casino. The allegations of cheating in the game first came to light after Veronica Brill, who has played in and worked as a commentator for the game, tweeted the following:
  10. The notion of vlogging isn’t completely new, with some of the world’s most popular vloggers, like Casey Neistat, having turned the camera on themselves for the better part of this decade. But when it comes to vlogging in poker, it’s still a little bit of the Wild West. The growing genre is finding many previously largely unknown personalities now making a name for themselves by showcasing their on-the-felt (and off) adventures for all to see. But while many of the personalities that are drawing attention in the space are of the up-and-coming variety some of the biggest stars in poker have spent time vlogging letting their fans in on what they are doing and increase their reach. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Negreanu, arguably, one of the most well-known poker players on the entire planet occasionally turns to vlogging to bring fans inside his routine while playing some of the biggest events of the year. During the 2017 World Series of Poker Negreanu’s team produced 45 days worth of behind-the-scenes content of how Daniel prepares himself to play day-in and day-out. More recently, he fired up the vlog again in his quest to capture the Poker Masters Purple Jacket. He mentioned on his podcast that despite the fact that the WSOP vlog was a ton of continuous work, there’s a good chance that his over 166,000 subscribers will get a fresh batch of WSOP footage beginning this June. Doug Polk One of poker’s more masterful marketers, Doug Polk commands the attention of a legion of fans. Not just in poker but also in the world of cryptocurrency. Nowadays, he’s been more into the world of crypto news and, on the poker side, going in-depth in breaking down televised hands. But Polk has been known to take his audience for a ride along when he’s out doing things like…winning the 2017 High Roller For One Drop at the WSOP for over $3.6 million. Polk has always seemingly been able to jump between social mediums, racking up nearly 175,000 subscribers on his Doug Polk Poker YouTube channel, 100,000 Twitter followers and roughly 70,000 followers on Instagram. It’s been a while since he’s properly vlogged but should crypto take a nose dive and Polk needs to find his way back to the Rio this summer, there’s a good chance his camera won’t be too far behind. Matt Berkey High-stakes cash game grinder Matt Berkey helped produce the eight-part Dead Money documentary on his path to the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl. The episodes are available as streaming-content on PokerGo and Berkey has continued to chronicle his adventures in poker on his YouTube channel. In addition to being a promotional vehicle for his training site, Solve For Why Academy, the vlog focuses on Berkeley and his team as they do everything from detail hand histories from tournaments to recap live cash games. Berkey’s channel is still growing, with just over 6,000 subscribers currently, but Dead Money won an American Poker Award and so it’s likely he’s in the content creation game for some time to come. Jaime Staples As one of the most prolific poker streamers, Jaime Staples is also on a near daily vlogger. Staples documents his travels around the world, looking for places to eat, houses with the best wi-fi and, of course, providing updates on one of the craziest #ultimatesweat weight loss (and gain) bets the poker world has seen since Ted Forrest’s $2 million bet with Mike Matusow. The Team PokerStars Online pro has been gaining followers while shedding pounds. He has been steadily increasing his influence in the community through his 15,000 followers of his daily vlog and the near 50,000 that follow his poker highlights YouTube channel. Jeff Gross Jeff Gross was once dubbed a “professional best friend”, hanging around with the likes of Olympic Champion Michael Phelps, original One Drop winner Antonio Esfandiari and Streamboat Captain Bill Perkins. Nowadays, he’s hanging out with his viewers having secured a sponsorship deal with PokerStars, Gross spends his time streaming his Flow Show and dabbling in the occasional vlog when he’s playing live events. These are just a few of already established players who have taken to vlogging. Others like World Series of Poker bracelet winner Ryan Laplante, Team PokerStars Online pro Fintan Hand, and Poker Life Podcast host Joey Ingram all have taken turns breaking down hands, sharing their thoughts and peeling back the curtain of their day-to-day lives. With less than 100 days left until the World Series of Poker fans of poker vlogs can expect an avalanche of content from some of these popular poker personalities.
  11. [caption width="640"] Understanding your opponents "pain thresholds" will lead to more profit for you[/caption] Eliminating Your Poker Pain Threshold Recently, I was lucky enough to interview high-stakes live cash pro Matt Berkey for a podcast over at Tournament Poker Edge - one of the most interesting interviews I’ve been a part of to date. He raised an interesting concept, using terminology that isn’t really part of the traditional poker lexicon - he talked about high-level poker being a case of figuring out your opponents’ “pain thresholds”. This struck me as a particularly apt analogy, given that the higher the stakes you’re playing, the more potential pain awaits your unsuspecting opponents (at least if you’re someone who crushes as hard as Berkey does) or you if you make mistakes. The funny thing, however, is that even players playing the lowest stakes have pain thresholds, they just don’t exist for the same reasons. Understanding Contrasting Motivations It goes without saying that people playing poker for high stakes mostly do it for the huge sums of money involved (and, to some extent, for the thrill of playing for them), but that doesn’t mean people playing for low stakes are just playing because they have nothing better to do. Of course, we should consider that everyone playing the game does it for a reason, and thus, they all have something to lose. That something isn’t always money - sometimes it’s pride or ego, sometimes it’s the time they spend playing, sometimes it’s the fun and entertainment they get from it. But no matter what the circumstances, there is always something that can suddenly cause a player to go from complete comfort and serenity, to forehead-scrunching confusion and abject frustration. While we’re not in the business of causing our opponents pain on a personal level and we should always be respectful to our fellow players, we can use our understanding of our opponents’ motivations to inflict as much pain on them as possible with our playing style. For example, low-stakes players who are playing for pride or their ego frequently exhibit a tendency to ‘hero-call’ too often - they’re obsessed with trying to achieve that great feeling of calling an opponent’s bluff and winning the pot, and they’re willing to lose ten pots that way just to win one. On the other hand, a player in even a $3 online tournament might be extremely tilted from a bad beat he just took, and he’ll be extremely risk-averse for a while as a result. Making Peace with Big Pots and Variance In order to take advantage of other people’s pain thresholds, we need to begin by minimising or eliminating our own. Simply put, there should be nothing in poker that can cause you any significant pain. Our bodies and brains are conditioned to avoid pain, but we can also use our emotional and mental capabilities to define what is or isn’t painful for us, so we can manipulate our brains (our bodies, not so much) in this way. The process of eliminating your pain threshold begins with the recognition that the things that usually cause you pain - losing big pots, bad beats, coolers, bubbling the final table of a tournament, losing a heads-up match - are a necessary part of life as a poker player. They’re unavoidable - if you played poker forever, you’d experience countless instances of each one. The more of each you experience, the less pain each one causes you - your pain threshold expands. Given long enough, it would expand to the point where nothing in poker could hurt you, and then you’d be the one in charge. Being Fearless in Important Spots People often refer to ‘fearlessness’ as an important quality for a poker player, and there’s a strong correlation between that quality and lacking a pain threshold. However, there’s an important step in between the two - before you can learn to do something fearlessly, you have to learn to “feel the fear and do it anyway”, to quote Susan Jeffers’ book. Before making a big river bluff becomes a matter of course for you, there has to be a first time, and a second time, and a third time - you get the picture. If you never start doing something, it can’t become a habit, and if it doesn’t become a habit, it will probably always have fear attached to it. Breaking through your pain threshold means turning the things that used to scare you into the most mundane things in the world, and to do that you have to push through those first few instances. Putting Poker in a Wider Context Finally, it’s crucial to recognize that while poker might seem like the most important thing in the world while we’re in the middle of each tournament or cash game session, it should never be our be-all and end-all. No matter how motivated you are to succeed in poker, it should always form part of a balanced lifestyle that gives you opportunities to interact socially and do the other things you enjoy - otherwise you’re risking burnout, mental game and even mental health problems. By recognizing that poker is just one aspect of your life and busting a poker tournament or having a losing cash session really isn’t that much of a big deal, you ruin poker’s ability to inflict pain on you - if it can’t hurt you that badly, all of a sudden you’re the one with the power. A well-rounded understanding of your own emotions and thought processes can help you discover your potential and crash through the pain barrier to unlock the riches beyond.
  12. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640"] 2017 saw it's fair share of poker players mixing it up both on and off the tables[/caption] As the final days of 2017 slowly tick by, it's time to take a look back at the year in poker. Over the last 10 days of the year, PocketFives is taking readers on a trip back in time to recap the last 12 months in a fun and unique way. To date we've gone over the top five off-the-felt news stories of 2017, the top heaters of the year, covered the game's newest characters and breakout stars. Now it's time to get into the he said, she said world of grudges Mike 'The Mouth' Matusow vs. Shawn Sheikan. Tom Dwan vs. Dan 'Jungleman' Cates. 'Jesus' Ferguson vs. The Poker Community at Large. Throughout the history of the game of poker, there's been no shortage of ill will, well-timed “needles” and downright disrespect among poker players. 2017 was no different with a number of hard-fought grudges developing over an assortment of disagreements. #5 - Maurice Hawkins vs. Tim Reilly An on-the-felt conflict led to a war of words off-the-felt this summer when 10-time World Series of Poker Circuit ring winner Maurice Hawkins clashed with Massachusetts grinder Tim Reilly. Deep in WSOP Event #23, The Marathon, Hawkins and Reilly played a hand against each other where Reilly spiked a one-outer on the river to give him a royal flush against Hawkins aces full, allowing Reilly to double through Hawkins with only 22 remaining. Then, depending on which of the two you speak with, the reported war of words not only spilled off the table but into the press with Hawkins claiming that Reilly said to him “This ain’t the circuit. Go back to the circuit.” and Reilly saying that Hawkins “literally lies more than anybody I’ve met in my entire life” and that his table talk was simply “trying to belittle him.” As the tournament intensified it seems so did their mutual dislike with the needles going back and forth. Finally, Reilly says he went up to Hawkins to try and squash the beef and apologize but, according to Reilly, Hawkins told “Hey man, you’re a piece of ***.”, right to his face. Both players ended up at the final table with Hawkins finishing in ninth for $54,000 and Reilly in fourth for $224,000. Both went home with a grudge that likely won’t soon be forgotten. #4 - Doug Polk vs…Lots of Players Doug Polk, the YouTuber who won the 2017 High Roller For One Drop for over $3.6 million, has never shied away from the spotlight of controversy and in 2017 he found himself fighting very public battles on many fronts. Not one to be without an opinion and an audience with an insatiable appetite for content, Polk tackled a number of issues troubling to him, firing shots at a variety of popular poker players in the process. Just some of the items Polk took issue with were players who may or may not have angled on Poker Night in America by not having his big chips visible (Alec Torelli), players who may or may not have agreed to appear at televised poker games and opted not to show up (Matt Berkey), players who may or may not have tried to argue the notion that “more rake is better” (Daniel Negreanu) and players who lost a ton of money at the high stakes games on PokerStars (Luke Schwartz). For, each of these issues Polk took to his Silver Play Button YouTube channel (or Facebook live) to call them out. But a good grudge isn’t one sided and Torelli, Berkey, Negreanu and Schwartz all shot back, either defending themselves or attacking Polk directly, on their social media platforms and in the media. Are the grudges real? There seems to be some very real disdain from each of these guys but for Polk, who every day is finding new ways to market himself, 2018 will likely find him embattled in brand new issues with a new cast of high profile players - and we’ll likely be watching. #3 - Phil Hellmuth vs. The Germans Is there anyone who would disagree that the current contingency of German high rollers are crushing the game right now? Yes. Phil Hellmuth. Whether it’s just his public persona or very real hubris, the 14-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner seems to think he’s a favorite against the field in just about any No Limit Hold’em game. After the 2017 Poker Masters, despite a lackluster performance, Hellmuth tweeted out he was “always the #1 seed” in NLHE tournaments and it started off a firestorm between him and Daniel Negreanu as to just how much of a favorite Hellmuth is in today’s modern high-rolling circuit. Negreanu accusing Hellmuth of constantly muttering how bad all the players are, especially the Germans, and how disrespectful he was to their games. For his part, Hellmuth claimed he was a “good guy” and even told Fedor Holz and, the eventual winner of the 2017 Poker Masters Purple Jacket, Steffen Sontheimer that "he liked them". When the war of words began to escalate into a big-time prop bet Hellmuth ended up easing off the gas but never conceding that he is always a huge favorite. Sontheimer, for his part, kept it classy. In the media he talked about how he liked Hellmuth, but is more than willing to play him, just about anytime, anywhere. #2 - Leon Tsoukernik vs. Matt Kirk A late night high-stakes heads-up match at the Aria Casino in Las Vegas between King’s Casino owner Leon Tsoukernik and “Aussie” Matt Kirk not only ended up with Tsoukernik losing $3 million of money he borrowed from Kirk but after a confusing series of events, the pair have found themselves in a bitter lawsuit in the Nevada court system. Depending on who you listen to Tsoukernik, Kirk or even Dusk Till Dawn owner Rob Yong, who ended up as an intermediary between the two parties, Tsoukernik was either was too drunk to know what he was doing, simply lost a massive amount of money and refused to pay it back, or the pair struck a deal for a lesser amount which Kirk’s “backers” refused to take. However you look at it, the situation is cloudy and now the lawyers are involved. The lawsuit at first was simply Kirk wanting his $3 million back but now there is a countersuit from Tsoukernik claiming that the reports in the media that he refused to pay has damaged his reputation and he wants $10 million from Kirk for defamation of character and he also wants the Aria Resort & Casino in on the lawsuit for over-serving. Someone is not going to be happy at the conclusion of this saga and it’s not very likely that the pair will be shuffling chips on the felt together anytime soon. #1 - Cate Hall vs. Mike Dentale A three month war of words between the two outspoken professional poker players, Cate Hall and Mike Dentale, reached its conclusion back in March after the pair booked a mini-HU4Rollz match on Poker Night In America, finally putting their money where their mouths were. Dentale, very publicly, called out the play of Hall from a hand during the December 2016 World Poker Tour Five Diamond. Hall, eventually having enough, issued the challenge and before long the pair sat across the felt from each other with $15,000 playing $75/$150 NLHE in a best two-out-of-three match. While Dentale may have started it with his comments online, Hall finished it off by sweeping the Brooklyn player in two straight matches, earning his $30,000 and, maybe, his respect? Not so much. “Remember you will always suck,” Dentale said to Hall during the match. In the end, Hall took home the cash, Dentale apologized to his fans and both raised money for charity. All's well that ends well for the pair as both went on to earn six-figures over the course of 2017.
  13. Less than 10 days after allegations that Mike Postle had been cheating on the Stones Live Poker stream first came to light, the California poker pro is being named in a lawsuit requesting more than $30 million in restitution from his victims. In addition to Postle, King's Casino, the owner of the Stones Gambling Hall, and Justin Kuraitis, the Stones Tournament Director who was also responsible for the management of the streaming operation, have also been named in the suit that alleges Postle, Kuraitis, and Stones were involved in racketeering, fraud, negligence, and libel. The lawsuit, filed in the United States District Court's Eastern District of California by Maurice B. VerStandig of The VerStandig Law Firm, alleges that Postle, along with an as-yet identified number of co-conspirators used "one or more electronic devices for the purposes of cheating, while playing in broadcast games of poker, to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars from fellow player." [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="PokerStars NJ"] [ptable zone="GG Poker"] The lawsuit names Veronica Brill, the former Stones employee who was the first to make the allegations public, as one of 25 total plaintiffs seeking damages from Postle, Kuraitis, Stones Gambling Hall and, any unidentified parties labeled in the lawsuit as John Does 1-10 and Jane Does 1-10. "As extrapolated upon infra, this case represents the single largest known cheating scandal in the history of broadcast poker, emanates from a series of events that have rocked the poker community…" The complaint then details much of the information that was uncovered by Joey Ingram, Matt Berkey, posters on the Two Plus Two forums, and the poker community at large. Allegations of cheating by Postle claims that he "has won more money than any other participant, in total, and has often times been the winningest player on the show on any given night which he is a participant." It proceeds to examine the manner in which Postle was treated by Stones and the commentary crew. "Mr. Postle's winnings on the Stones Live Poker broadcast, and his correlative play of poker, have been so exceptionally outstanding as to lead the Commentator to note his seemingly musical abilities on numerous occasions, and to lead Stones Live Poker to produce various graphics portraying Mr. Postle as a deity-like individual imbued with omniscient powers (with one such graphic conflating an image of Mr. Postle and an image of Jesus Christ)." The document continues to allege that Postle committed acts of wire fraud by using mechanisms, including Postle’s own cell phone, that helped him generate winnings that would represent "a quality of play multiple degrees higher than that achieved by the best poker players in the world." The complaint alleges that when notified of suspicions of cheating, Stones Tournament Director Justin Kuraitis and Stones began a cover-up, one that started with the initial statement that a "full investigation" had already been conducted and concluding with the current fact that the current "independent investigation team" is being headed up by Michael Lipman, an attorney who has represented Stones in the past. In total, the lawsuit alleges that the cheating and fraud took place on no fewer than 69 different days, dating back to July 18, 2018. The plaintiffs are asking for restitution on nine different counts including racketeering, fraud, negligent misrepresentation and unjust enrichment. In addition to the funds lost by the players to Postle in the game, they are seeking damages of $10,000,000 against Postle and his a yet unnamed ‘confederates’ for fraud based on the allegations of cheating. The plaintiffs are also seeking damages of $10,000,000 against Stones Gambling Hall as an entity for constructive fraud as "Stones has a legal duty to monitor the Stones Live Poker game for cheating and take reasonable steps and measure to prevent the occurrence of cheating therein." They claim that Stones did not meet the industry standard for security. The complaint is seeking another punitive $10,000,000 sum against Stones and Kuraitis on a count of fraud based on Kuraitis' alleged dismissing of the initial allegations and potential cover-up. Finally, there is a request for the sum of $1,000 sought by Veronica Brill for libel against Stones for when they tweeted that her initial concern was "completely fabricated."
  14. As the launch of Pennsylvania online poker nears, PocketFives takes a look at the top 10 of the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list. The list includes a World Series of Poker Main Event champion, one other WSOP gold bracelet winner, a couple of World Poker Tour winners, and a European Poker Tour champion. The leader falls under none of these categories, though, but he does top the list in a big way with more than $24 million in live tournament earnings. Pennsylvania Poker All-Time Money List Jake Schindler - $24,659,374 Joseph McKeehen - $16,224,026 John Hennigan - $8,472,252 Matt Glantz - $7,110,451 Daniel Ott - $4,726,701 Matt Berkey - $4,152,310 Russell Thomas - $3,770,309 Michael Martin - $3,305,970 Aaron Mermelstein - $3,246,815 Garry Gates - $3,243,129 Jake Schindler Jake Schindler and his career live tournament earnings of more than $24.6 million tops the PA poker all-time money list, and the gap between him and second place is quite large. Schindler is originally from Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, just west of Philadelphia. It’s a suburb of Philadelphia with a population of only few thousand people. Schindler’s largest live tournament score to date comes in at $3.6 million for when he finished second to Christoph Vogelsang in the $300,000 buy-in Super High Roller Bowl in 2017. He also has scores of $1.192 million from winning the 2014 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $25,000 High Roller, $2.151 million for winning the 2018 partypoker MILLIONS Grand Final Barcelona €100,000 Super High Roller, and $1.332 million for winning the WPT Five Diamond $100,000 Super High Roller in 2018. Not only does Schindler’s more than $24.6 million put him on top of Pennsylvania’s all-time money list, but it has him ranked in the top 15 of the United States all-time money list and top 25 of the overall all-time money list. Joseph McKeehen Coming in at #2 on Pennsylvania’s all-time money list is 2015 WSOP Main Event champion Joseph McKeehen with more than $16.2 million in live tournament earnings. Of those winnings, $7.683 million came when McKeehen topped a field of 6,420 entries in poker’s most prestigious event, the WSOP Main Event. McKeehen is originally from North Wales, Pennsylvania. It’s a small town in the southeast corner of the Keystone State. McKeehen proved his wasn’t just a one-hit wonder when, in 2017, he won his second WSOP gold bracelet in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship, scoring $311,817. McKeehen also has a WSOP Circuit Main Event title to his name. McKeehen’s second biggest score came from the 2016 PCA $100,000 Super High Roller. In that event, he finished second to Bryn Kenney for $1.22 million. John Hennigan One of the most well-known poker players in the world, John Hennigan, comes in at #3 on Pennsylvania’s all-time money list. He has $8.472 million in live tournament earnings. Hennigan has loads of big scores and triumphant victories on his résumé, but it’s the six WSOP gold bracelets and one WPT title that really stick out. Hennigan’s largest career score is his World Poker Tour win, coming in 2007 at the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open when he won $1.606 million. His second biggest score came in 2014 when he won the WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship to the tune of $1.517 million. That WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship win came just one year after he finished third in the same event for $686,568. In 2018, Hennigan took second in the WSOP $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $765,837. Hennigan is originally from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Matt Glantz Matt Glantz, from Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania, comes in at #4 on the list with $7.11 million in live tournament earnings. His biggest live tournament score came from the European Poker Tour London £20,500 High Roller. He won that event for what converted to $862,837. In 2008, Glantz took fourth in the WSOP $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. event for $568,320, and in 2014 he finished fifth in the PCA $100,000 Super High Roller for $445,520. Glantz has a handful of WSOP final tables on record, but to date, he’s yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet. His closest was in 2005 when he took second in the WSOP $3,000 No Limit Hold’em tournament for $364,620. Daniel Ott Almost smack dead in the center of Pennsylvania is Altoona, where Daniel Ott is from. Ott comes in at #5 on PA’s all-time money list with $4.726 million in live tournament earnings. Nearly all of that, $4.7 million worth, comes from a single score. In 2017, Ott made the final table of the WSOP Main Event and finished second to Scott Blumstein for $4.7 million. Elsewhere on Ott’s résumé, you’ll find a bunch of WSOP cashes, all for small amounts, and an MSPT cash, but that’s it. Matt Berkey Originally from Leechburg, Pennsylvania, Matt Berkey is one of poker’s most popular players. He has more than $4.15 million in live tournament earnings, but that could change rather quickly for as big as he plays. Berkey is a regular in some of poker’s priciest tournaments, including the $300,000 Super High Roller Bowl, which he took fifth in in 2016 for $1.1 million. That’s Berkey’s only seven-figure score to date, but he has several six-figures cashes and it seems like only a matter of time before he nets another cash of a million dollars or more. Russell Thomas Like Ott, the bulk of Russell Thomas’ career live tournament earnings come from a final table in the WSOP Main Event. Thomas has more than $3.77 million in earnings, which lands him #7 on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list. More than $2.85 million of that comes from a fourth-place finish in the 2012 WSOP Main Event. Thomas is originally from Wallingford, Pennsylvania, which is located in the southeast corner of the state. Michael Martin You won’t see Michael Martin on the poker circuit much these days, but he did well to amass more than $3.3 million in live tournament earnings. Nearly all of Martin’s live tournament cashes come from 2006 to 2010, with one very small cash coming in each of 2013 and 2019. Martin’s biggest score came when he won the European Poker Tour London Main Event in 2008 for more than $1.8 million. Prior to that, earlier in the same year, he banked $666,171 for a fifth-place finish in the EPT Grand Final in Monte Carlo. Martin is originally from Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania. Aaron Mermelstein Philadelphia’s Aaron Mermelstein is still very much grinding the tournament circuit, and with more than $3.25 million in live earnings, he’s #9 on the Pennsylvania all-time money list. Mermelstein doesn’t have a seven-figure score on record, to date, but he does hold two WPT titles. He won both in 2015, topping the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open for $712,305, his largest score ever, and then winning the WPT Maryland Live! tournament for $250,222. Another big score for Mermelstein came when he won the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown $25,000 High Roller event in 2019 for $618,955. Garry Gates Titusville’s Garry Gates is a newcomer to the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list, thanks to his fourth-place finish in the 2019 WSOP Main Event for $3 million. Gates, a longtime member of the poker industry on both the media and corporate side, now has four WSOP Main Event cashes. Gates’ second-biggest score is a fourth-place finish in the 2012 WSOP Circuit Atlantic City Main Event for $64,530. Gates’ hometown of Titusville is home to notable football player and coach, John Heisman.
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