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Found 6 results

  1. From the 8,659 players that started the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event eight days ago, just nine still remain and Germany's Hossein Ensan stands high above the rest as the chip leader. Now all that stands between him and the $10,000,000 first place prize money is eight other players all hoping to do the same. Another German, Robert Heidorn, was eliminated in tenth place in the very early hours of Saturday morning pausing the clock on the second-largest WSOP Main Event in history until Sunday evening. Ensan ended play with 177,000,000 and is well ahead of the rest of the field with 34.3% of the chips in play. The 55-year-old former European Poker Tour Prague champion was responsible for only one elimination after just three tables remained. Ensan busted Marcelo Cudos in 23rd place to put his stack at 57,500,000. He more than tripled that stack over the next eight hours without eliminating another opponent. Garry Gates bagged up 99,300,000 for the second biggest stack. Gates eliminated two players, Mihai Manole in 18th and Henry Lu in 11th, on his way to the final table. Zhen Cai sits third with 60,600,000 and is the only other player with a stack bigger than the 57,200,000 stack. The Florida native, and best friend of 2018 Main Event runner-up Tony Miles, picked up just one elimination, sending Preben Stokkan out in 21st. The three players in the middle of the chip counts include Kevin Maahs with 43,000,000, Alex Livingston (37,800,000), and Dario Sammartino (33,400,000). The three shortest stacks are separated by just 3.3 big blinds. Milos Skrbic finished with 23,400,000, start of day chip leader Timothy Su ended with 20,200,000 and Nick Marchington has 20,100,000 in the bag. Marchington, just 21 years old, could become the youngest player to win the Main Event should he manage to rise from the shortest stack still in play. Marchington is a few months younger than current record holder Joe Cada. When play resumes on Sunday night there will be just over 90 minutes remaining in the 500,000/1,000,000 (1,000,000 BBA) level. No player will have less than 20 big blinds when action resumes. Main Event Final Table Chip Counts Hossein Ensan - 177,000,000 Garry Gates - 99,300,000 Zhen Cai - 60,600,000 Kevin Maahs - 43,000,000 Alex Livingston - 37,800,000 Dario Sammartino - 33,400,000 Milos Skrbic - 23,400,000 Timothy Su - 20,200,000 Nick Marchington - 20,100,000 Final Table Has International Flavor The nine players at the final table represent six different countries. Ensan is from Germany, Livingston is Canadian, Sammartino is Italian, Skrbic is Serbian, and Marchington is from England. The remaining four players, Gates, Cai, Maahs, and Su, are all American. Yuri Dzivielevski Last #1 Standing Brazilain Yuri Dzivielevski narrowly missed out on making the final three tables but still earned the best finish by a former #1-ranked PocketFiver. Dzivielevski finished 28th for $261,430. WSOP Main Event Final Table Broadcast Schedule Sunday, July 14 - 7 PM on ESPN2 Monday, July 15 - 7 PM on ESPN Tuesday, July 16 - 6 PM on ESPN All times Pacific
  2. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event is down to 35 players, all guaranteed $261,430 and vying for the event’s $10 million first-place prize. After what was an incredibly entertaining day of poker, Nick Marchington is in the lead with 39.7 million. 21-Year-Old Marchington Leads the Way Marchington hails from England and is 21 years old. Despite his youth, he’s a professional poker player, but Marchington’s success in the game comes from the online poker world and not so much the live tournament world. Entering this event, Marchington had just $12,415 in live tournament earnings, stemming from one cash at this WSOP. Marchington was one of the biggest stacks remaining as the night neared its close, and then he knocked out Ian Pelz in 37th place with pocket sevens against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Qc"] to solidify his position as chip leader. Behind Marchington on the leaderboard are Hossein Ensan with 34.5 million, Timothy Su with 34.35 million, and Milos Skrbic with 31.45 million. Those are the only players above 30 million in chips. Top 10 Chip Counts Nick Marchington - 39,800,000 Hossein Ensan - 34,500,000 Timothy Su - 34,350,000 Milos Skrbic - 31,450,000 Henry Lu - 25,525,000 Garry Gates - 25,025,000 Duey Duong - 21,650,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 20,700,000 Dario Sammartino - 19,850,000 Cai Zhen - 19,800,000 Dzivielevski and Sammartino Remain Yuri Dzivielevski, a Brazilian who already has one gold bracelet this summer, bagged 13.75 million for Day 7. Dzivielevski is a former PocketFives #1 and the only former #1 remaining in the field. Dario Sammartino, who is one of the best players in the world still in search of a WSOP gold bracelet, finished with 19.85 million for Day 7. Wild and Crazy Hands Steal the Day 6 Show Day 6 was filled with plenty of action, that’s for sure. There was an enormous clash between Su and Sam Greenwood on the main feature table that could go down as one of the greatest hands in poker history. It will also go down as one of the ultimate bad beats. On one of the outer tables, Garry Gates nailed an ace on the river to crack Robert Heidorn’s pocket kings. On another outer table, at pretty much the same time as the hand between Gates and Heidorn, Kevin Maahs beats aces with his pocket kings to knock out Chang Luo. The incredible hand between Greenwood and Su started with Su opening to 500,000 from the cutoff position. Greenwood three-bet to 2.5 million out of the big blind, and Su called. The flop was [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="4c"] and Green bet 1.8 million Su called to see the [poker card="Js"] land on the turn. Greenwood bet 3.5 million and Su raised all in. Greenwood made the call for about 11.5 million total and turned up his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"]. Su had the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"] for a brave semi-bluff. Needing a king or an eight on the river, Su got it when the [poker card="Kc"] hit to complete his straight. Greenwood was eliminated in 45th place for $211,945. On the hand involving Gates and Heidorn, Heidorn opened to 550,000 from middle position before action folded to Gates in the big blind. He three-bet to 2.1 million. Heidorn reraised all in to put Gates to the test. Gates tanked, then called to put himself at risk for 11.35 million total, and turned up the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"]. Heidorn had the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"]. The [poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"] flop and [poker card="5h"] turn weren’t what Gates needed, but the [poker card="Ad"] on the river allowed him to survive with the double up. For the one with Luo and Maahs, it started with Luo opening with a raise to 550,000 from early position. After Milos Skrbic reraised to 1.675 million on the button, Maahs reraised to 3.75 million out of the big blind. Luo shoved all in for 8.1 million, Skrbic folded, and Maahs made the call. Luo had the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"], and Maahs had the [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"]. The board ran out [poker card="Qc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Tc"] to give Maahs a club flush and crack the aces of Luo. Luo was eliminated in 43rd place for $211,945. Esfandiari, Hunichen, Hachem Among Day 6 Eliminations Day 6 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event began with 106 players remaining. Greg Himmelbrand was the first player knocked out and then the eliminations began to flow. Four-time gold bracelet winner Jeff Madsen was knocked out in 102nd place, Mukul Pahuja went out in 95th, and Antonio Esfandiari busted in 82nd. Esfandiari’s bust out came after he was hurt in a big hand against Sammartino that left him with just a handful of big blinds. Esfandiari got the last of his chips in against Chris Hunichen with the [poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] but Hunichen’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] did the trick. Daniel Hachem, son of 2005 WSOP Main Event winner Joe Hachem, fell in 79th place, and Pennsylvania's Jake Schindler headed out the door in 67th place. Romain Lewis busted in 60th, and Lars Bonding fell in 55th. Hunichen, a former PocketFives #1 player and the one who knocked out Esfandiari, busted in 54th place for $173,015. Another one of the top tournament players in the world was knocked out in 40th place when Alex Foxen was eliminated. The highest finish for a Pennsylvania poker player in the 2019 WSOP Main Event belonged to Thomas Parkes. He took 59th for $142,215. Day 7 On Friday On Friday, the 2019 WSOP Main Event will play from 35 down to its final table of nine, however long that may take. Action is set to kick off at 12 p.m. PT from the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino, and if Friday is anything like Thursday, buckle up for a thrilling ride.
  3. The opening night of the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event final table went about as close to script as Hossein Ensan and Garry Gates could have hoped. The two biggest at the start of play, Ensan and Gates were responsible for the first three eliminations as the shortest stacks all went bust. The only deviation from said script, was a fourth player hitting the rail before the end of the night. Milos Skrbic First to Go Nick Marchington got things started early, doubling through Zhen Cai on the third hand of the night leaving Milos Skrbic and Timothy Su as the two remaining short stacks. Three hands after that, Skrbic was sent to the rail. Action folded to Gates in the small blind and he moved all in with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"] and Skrbic called all in from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="jh"]. The board ran out [poker card="td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="5h"] to give Gates an additional 18,400,000 and send eliminate Skrbic in ninth place. "I don't know what to say, I'm still in shock. It was fun for sure," Skrbic said in the minutes after his tournament ended. Timothy Su Eliminated in Eighth Just five hands after that, Timothy Su followed Skrbic out the door. Timothy Su moved all in from UTG for 17,700,000 with [poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"]. Ensan called from the cutoff with [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"]. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] flop move Ensan ahead and left Su with just two outs. Neither the [poker card="ts"] turn or [poker card="jd"] river were able to save the 27-year-old engineer from an eighth-place finish. "I came in with zero expectations and just making the min-cash would be awesome, but somehow I was able to spin it up, maintain a chip lead, chip lead Day 2AB, chip lead I think Day 6 and even throughout Day 7 I had over 1/5th of the chips in play one point," Su said. "There's no regrets on anything, that's for sure." Nick Marchington Busts in Seventh Those first two eliminations came very quickly, but thanks to his early double up, 21-year-old Nick Marchington was able to stave off elimination for another two hours. Action folded to Ensan in the cutoff and he made it 2,400,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"]. Marchington moved his last 14,000,000 all in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"] and Ensan called. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"] flop kept Ensan ahead but gave Marchington a backdoor straight draw. The [poker card="5h"] turn was the first step in filling that straight, but the [poker card="qs"] river was a brick and his run at becoming the youngest Main Event champion in history ended with a seventh-place finish. "I really enjoyed the final table. Not sure why, but I didn't really feel any pressure. Just loved every minute of it," Marchington said. "Maybe I'm the youngest ever seventh-place finisher?" Zhen Cai Elimination Wraps Up Play The plan for the first night of final table play was to play down from nine players to six but the fast pace changed that and ESPN decided to play down until the end of the level or the next elimination. Just 90 minutes later, Zhen became the reason that play was stopped for the night. Ensan raised to 2,400,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="qc"][poker card="js"], Kevin Maahs called from the small blind with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"], before Cai moved all in for 28,700,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"]. Ensan folded, but Maahs called. The board ran out [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2d"] to give Maahs the pot, eliminate Cai in sixth-place and end play for the night. Final Five Chip Counts Hossein Ensan – 207,700,000 Garry Gates – 171,700,000 Kevin Maahs – 66,500,000 Alex Livingston – 45,800,000 Dario Sammartino – 23,100,000 Payouts 6. Zhen Cai - $1,850,000 7. Nick Marchington – $1,525,000 8. Timothy Su – $1,250,000 9. Milos Skrbic – $1,000,000 WSOP Main Event on ESPN After spending the night on ESPN2, the action now moves over to ESPN. Cards are in the air in Las Vegas beginning at 6:30 PT with the 30-minute delayed broadcast beginning at 7:00 PM PT.
  4. "We are booked. Let's get rich..." Those words just might come back to haunt Nick Marchington. On July 15, Marchington woke up on top of the world after being eliminated in seventh place from the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event the night before for a $1,525,000 score. The 21-year-old Brit could have become the youngest WSOP Main Event champion ever had he won. Just a few hours later, Marchington found himself on the ugly end of a lawsuit as two men who claimed to have bought a 10% piece of Marchington's Main Event action filed a lawsuit in a Clark County, Nevada court alleging Marchington breached a contract with them and committed fraud. In their lawsuit, David Yee and Colin Hartley, partners in C Biscuit Poker Staking, allege that Marchington entered into an agreement to sell them 10% of his action in the $5,000 Six Max No Limit Hold'em event and the Main Event at markups of 1.1 and 1.2 respectively and then attempted to back out and sell at a higher price. According to the lawsuit, Marchington contacted Yee and Hartley on May 27 asking if they would have any interest in buying some of his WSOP action should he decide to sell. On May 29, Yee and Hartley agreed to pay Marchington $1,750 for 10% of his action in the two previously discussed tournaments and Marchington accepted. The payment was made on June 4 in two instalments of $875. Marchington confirmed receipt of the money and sent them a text message stating, "We are booked. Lets get rich...". On June 28, Yee and Hartley claim they contacted Marchington asking for receipts from the Rio cage showing he had bought into both tournaments. According to the lawsuit, Marchington informed the pair that he was "most likely not playing the 5K or main". He allegedly followed up the next morning with another message stating, "I am cancelling my wsop pieces. I am not going home early though." Marchington, through a motion filed by his attorneys, claims that C Biscuit was willing to accept the refund and attempted to use an intermediary to pick up the funds. "Hey Nick, hope you are well mate. I’ve talked with the guys and we are fine on the refund. We’d like for you to hand it over to our associate that will meet you but are still confirming with our associate and we will follow up within 24-48 hours on details for the meet..." On July 1, Hartley and Yee say Marchington messaged them to inform them he might be playing the Main Event after all and would be selling action for it at a higher markup. "I messaged a few people and can sell for 1.7," Marchington wrote. That same day, he sent Yee and Marchington a photo of his buy-in receipt for the $5,000 Six Max event that started that day. Yee sought clarification on whether or not they still had action with Marchington. "So I'm guessing that 5K is with our action then and that is the receipt - thanks for that. "I'm guessing WSOP main event is still booked then with us?" Marchington responded, confirming that the $550 piece in the $5,000 Six Max event was in action but that he was still unsure about the Main Event. Marchington finished Day 1 of that event with an average stack but did not cash. On July 3, Hartley and Yee claim that Marchington informed them he was cancelling their Main Event action writing in a message to the pair, "I am playing the main event but unfortunately your piece is cancelled. I know this is bad practice but I have to do what's best for myself since I lost a lot on the trip." Marchington played Day 1B of the Main Event on July 4 and finished with 109,100 chips. According to Hartley and Yee, Marchington attempted to return $1,200 on July 5. On the same day that the lawsuit was filed, a Clark County judge granted Hartley and Yee a temporary restraining order preventing Marchington from claiming all of his winnings. Unbeknownst to Hartley and Yee, or the judge, Marchington had already collected his earnings via cash and check. The Rio has since placed a stop payment on the check and is holding the remainder of Marchington's funds. Marchington first learned of the lawsuit after cashing in the $5,000 No Limit Hold'em event after the Main Event. He finished 87th for $7,396 and was told after he went to collect his winnings that there was a hold placed on his winnings. Hartley and Yee are suing for $152,500 plus legal fees. The case has similarities to the situation 2006 Main Event champion Jamie Gold found himself in following his record-setting win. Gold was sued by Crispin Leyser over a pre-tournament agreement between the two. Gold and Leyser eventually settled their case.
  5. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Just minutes before Lance and Donnie recorded this week's episode of The Fives, word broke that PokerStars was bringing back the PokerStars Players Championship for 2020 - this time in Barcelona. The guys get into all of the details on that and what it could potentially mean for the online poker giant over the next 12 months. They also recap early action from EPT Barcelona, the decision by PokerStars to limit players to just four cash game tables running at any given time. Lance also gives an update on the Nick Marchington lawsuit. All this and more on this week's episode of The Fives.
  6. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. Even though it was August, the WSOP Main Event was back in the headlines, as a player that was disqualified from the tournament had a terrorism charge brought against him and another player was being sued over a staking deal. Ken Strauss Arrested and Charged for Terroristic Threat Ken Strauss, who was disqualified from the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event, was taking into custody and charged with making terroristic threats against a Las Vegas casino. The charge stemmed from Strauss’ social media activity at the end of July. In a tweet, Strauss threatened the Venetian Resort. WSOP Main Event Seventh-Place Finisher Sued Another big story from August that had WSOP Main Event ties was a lawsuit involving seventh-place finisher Nick Marchington. The 21-year-old Marchington won $1.525 million for his result, but he was soon hit with a lawsuit from two men who claimed to have bought a 10% piece of his WSOP Main Event action. David Yee and Colin Hartley, partners in C Biscuit Poker Staking, alleged that Marchington attempted to back out of a staking deal after he had agreed to sell 10% of his action to them for the WSOP's $5,000 Six Max No Limit Hold’em and Main Event tournaments. There were many questions surrounding the situation, most of which focused on the conversations had between the two parties and if the deal was on or off. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Aaron Zang Wins Poker’s Richest Tournament With a buy-in of £1.05 million, the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity became poker’s richest tournament. It was also set to award some absolutely mammoth paydays. Topping the field of 54 entries was Aaron Zang, who won £13.779 million. But, Zang wasn’t the event’s biggest winner. A heads-up deal between Zang and Bryn Kenney saw Kenney take home £16.89 million. The conversion rate put the score north of $20.4 million for Kenney, making him the holder of poker’s largest single score from a live tournament. Triton Million Results 1st: Aaron Zang - £13,779,791* 2nd: Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509* 3rd: Dan Smith - £7,200,000 4th: Stephen Chidwick - £4,410,000 5th: Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 6th: Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 7th: Alfred DeCarolis - £1,720,000 8th: Timothy Adams - £1,400,000 9th: Wai Leong Chan - £1,200,000 10th: Chin Wei Lim - £1,100,000 11th: Winfred Yu - £1,100,000 *First and second prizes as a result of a heads-up deal. For more on this incredible tournament, go back and read the PocketFives recap. Bryn Kenney Doing His Own Thing and Crushing Speaking of Bryn Kenney, PocketFives’ Lance Bradley had the opportunity to sit down with Kenney for an interview. Even though he’s younger, Kenney isn’t often thought of as the same wizard-like player that his peers are. Kenney would be the first to admit it, too, but with a style all to his own he put together a tremendous year of poker in 2019. Checking in on Kenney’s stats on Hendon Mob, we can see that Kenney has more than $56 million in live tournament earnings and is atop poker’s all-time money list. As we mentioned before, he’s also the holder of poker’s largest single score from a live tournament. In 2019, Kenney won more than $30 million. Take some time and read the special feature story on this special player. PSPC Going To Barcelona in 2020 The first-ever PokerStars Players Championship was a smashing success, becoming the largest $25,000 buy-in event in poker history. PokerStars wanted to run it back, only in a different location, and announced that the PSPC would be heading to Barcelona, Spain. Taking place August 20-24, the 2020 PSPC will be part of the European Poker Tour stop in Barcelona that is ever so popular with players. Platinum Passes are back and currently being given out through a variety of promotions from PokerStars, and this event is anticipated to be even larger than the first. ‘Girafganger7’ Wins Monthly PLB in August 'Girafganger7,' a former top-ranked online poker player in the world, earned his second PocketFives Monthly PLB title by topping the leaderboard in August. He put in a ton of volume and accumulated 2,399 points from more than 120 results. He won just over $125,000 from those results. His August was highlighted by a win in the PokerStars High Roller Club: $530 Bounty Builder HR for $13,519.
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