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Found 2 results

  1. Sao Paulo born Vivian Saliba has grown up with poker around her, first playing the game at 12-years-old and then accompanying her father to card rooms for the first time at the age of 17. Primarily a Pot Limit Omaha cash game player, but no stranger to poker tournaments, the Brazilian has put in strong performances during various years of the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. Most notably in 2017, she made the money in three No Limit Hold’em events and two in her specialized game of Pot Limit Omaha. But it would be a PLO hand, a game that has allowed her to amass a small fortune, that still gives Saliba nightmares to this day. “By the end of 2015, I decided to quit college and follow my dream as a professional poker player. The beginning of my career was a real rollercoaster and even though in 2016 I played WSOP events for the first time, I didn't actually play that many tournaments,” Saliba said. So, 2017 was the first time playing in her dream tournaments and marked a special year for her as a poker player. The tournament in question was WSOP Event #54 and was the most important tournament for her at the time due to the buy-in and what was at stake. “Back in 2017 during the WSOP in Las Vegas I was playing my first ever $10,000 buy-in event. That was a PLO event, my main game at the time, and still is nowadays. The tournament had 428 entries and I managed to finish it in 11th place.” Despite making it to the final two tables and winning $47,923 for her efforts but busting that event negatively affected her feelings as there was a strong desire to make It as a professional poker player “That tournament seemed to be the perfect opportunity, giving the high level of the competitors, price of the buy-in, prize pool and it being WSOP bracelet event.” Playing five-handed, holding an average stack of 30 big blinds, and playing her strongest poker variant, it was almost a certainty that Saliba would make the final table and be in with a chance of claiming the $938,732 prize. But of course, nothing is guaranteed in poker. Defending her big blind with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"] following a raise from the button, Saliba smashed the board making top set on the [poker card="9c"][poker card="6c"]2x flop. “I check-raised the flop with my top set and my opponent re-raised so that all the money is in the middle, he had [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="7c"]8x for an overpair and open-ended straight draw.” The turn card brought a jack, leaving Saliba pretty much dead as only the case nine on the river would have saved her from elimination. “If I had won this hand, I would be up to top-3 stacks of the tournament and also would bust my opponent. I was left with 3bb and on the next hand I end up busting. Looking back that is nothing I would do differently at that specifically play but I would definitely take it easier with myself," she said. “I literally had nightmares with this hand for months. I believed that I would never get so close to a WSOP final table ever again.” Despite the setback, in November of that same year she became part of the 888poker team, which was one of her poker career ambitions. Shortly after, the Brazilian recalled another hand that would make anyone shudder, but this time the 888poker ambassador was on the more fortunate side of lady luck. Playing Event #64 - $888 No Limit Hold’em – Crazy Eights in the 2019 WSOP with six players and eight big blinds remaining. Saliba ended up getting it all in for her tournament life with ace-four versus Ireland’s Patrick Clarke's ace-ten. Despite being dominated and in horrific shape, she out-drew her opponent to secure the full double up and keep her WSOP bracelet ambitions alive. “I won and he was left with a couple of big blinds and busted a few hands after. That bad beat gave me the chance of cashing for $131K more. “I imagine that my opponent must have felt very bad in this situation giving that he had me dominated, it was a huge event with a huge prize pool and we were all so close to the bracelet so the stakes were that much higher!” Vivian narrowly missed out on securing her first-ever WSOP gold bracelet, instead finishing in 4th place out of a field of over 10,000 entries for the biggest payday of her career for $308,888.
  2. The 2019 World Series of Poker is on the horizon, with action slated to begin on Wednesday, May 29, at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Much has been made of the revamped tournament structures that the WSOP has implemented for the 50th annual WSOP, and players should expect more chips and more play across the board. Now, let’s take a look at the new-look Pot Limit Omaha events for 2019. PLO at the Sub-$1,000 Buy-In Level The first thing that can be noticed when comparing the 2018 schedule to 2019 specific to pot-limit Omaha events is that the 2019 schedule does not have the $365 Pot-Limit Omaha GIANT or $565 Pot-Limit Omaha tournaments. Instead, there is the $600 Pot-Limit Omaha Deepstack event that is at a similar price point. The $565 buy-in PLO event from 2018 is closer to the bone, so that’s the event we’ll use to compare to the $600 PLO Deepstack in 2019. In 2018, the $565 PLO event had a starting stack of 5,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the eight-level registration period, and was a three-day event. This event had 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 60-minute levels on Day 2 and Day 3. In 2019, the $600 PLO Deepstack has a starting stack of 30,000 in chips, unlimited re-entry during the 12-level registration period, and is scheduled as a two-day tournament. This event has 30-minute levels on Day 1 and 40-minute levels on Day 2. In 2018, the $565 buy-in PLO event had a 11.5% rake, as $65 of the $565 was taken out for fees and staff. In 2019, the rake is listed at 12.5%, so $75 of the $600 buy-in will be taken out. Here's a look at the 2019 $600 PLO Deepstack structure compared to the 2018 $565 PLO structure over the registration levels. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 300 200 - 2 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 75-150 200 133.33 - 3 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 100-200 150 100 - 4 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 150-300 100 66.67 - 5 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 200-400 75 50 - 6 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 250-500 60 40 - 7 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 300-600 50 33.33 - 8 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 400-800 37.5 25 - 9 2018 300-600 8.33 5.56 2019 500-1,000 30 20 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 25 16.67 - 11 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 800-1,600 18.75 12.5 - 12 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,000 15 10 - 13 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 1,000-2,500 12 8.57 As you can see, the 2019 structure is a bit deeper throughout the earlier levels. That's good news for players. Where the structure makes up for it will be on Day 2 when the levels are only 40 minutes compared to 2018's 60 minutes. $1,000 and $1,500 PLO Events At the $1,000 and $1,500 buy-in levels, we also see an increase in starting chips. The $1,000 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018 had a starting stack of 5,000. In 2019, the starting stack has been increased to 20,000. In the $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event in 2018, the starting stack was 7,500. In 2019, it’s be upped to 25,000. Both events in 2019 are listed as three-day events, which is the same as in 2018, and the rake is the same at 10%. At the $1,000 level, late registration lasts two levels longer. At the $1,500 level, it lasts three levels longer. Here's a look at the structure for the $1,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 100 66.67 2019 50-100 200 133.33 - 2 2018 50-100 50 33.33 2019 75-150 133.33 88.89 - 3 2018 75-150 33.33 22.22 2019 100-200 100 66.67 - 4 2018 100-200 25 16.67 2019 150-300 66.67 44.44 - 5 2018 150-300 16.67 11.11 2019 200-400 50 33.33 - 6 2018 200-400 12.5 8.33 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 10 6.67 2019 300-600 33.33 22.22 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 25 16.67 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 20 13.33 Here's a look at the structure for the $1,500 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 25-50 150 100 2019 50-100 250 166.67 - 2 2018 50-100 75 50 2019 75-150 166.67 111.11 - 3 2018 75-150 50 33.33 2019 100-200 125 83.33 - 4 2018 100-200 37.5 25 2019 150-300 83.33 55.56 - 5 2018 150-300 25 16.67 2019 200-400 62.5 41.67 - 6 2018 200-400 18.75 12.5 2019 250-500 40 26.67 - 7 2018 250-500 15 10 2019 300-600 41.67 27.78 - 8 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 400-800 31.25 20.83 - 9 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 500-1,000 25 16.67 - 10 2018 Reg. Closed 2019 600-1,200 20.83 13.89 As you can see in both of these events, the added chips to the starting stack provide much deeper play. $10,000 PLO Championship Structure The $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed) is back for 2019. In 2018, this event’s starting stack was 50,000. In 2019, it’s up to 60,000. Late registration is open until the start of Day 2 and there is no re-entry, which is the same as in 2018. The rake is also the same as it was in 2018. The blind levels are nearly the exact same except for a few spots where the small blind is larger. Here's a look at the structure for the $10,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 2 2018 100-200 250 166.67 2019 100-200 300 200 - 3 2018 150-300 166.67 111.11 2019 200-300 200 120 - 4 2018 200-400 125 83.33 2019 200-400 150 100 - 5 2018 250-500 100 66.67 2019 300-500 120 75 - 6 2018 300-600 83.33 55.56 2019 300-600 100 66.67 - 7 2018 400-800 62.5 41.67 2019 400-800 75 50 - 8 2018 500-1,000 50 33.33 2019 500-1,000 60 40 - 9 2018 600-1,200 41.67 27.78 2019 600-1,200 60 33.33 - 10 2018 800-1,600 31.25 20.83 2019 800-1,600 37.5 25 - 11 2018 1,000-2,000 25 16.67 2019 1,000-2,000 30 20 In the $10,000 PLO event, you can see that the added chips allow for a deep structure throughout, even despite the two spots early on in the structure when the small blind is higher. The small blind being higher in Level 3 and Level 5 allow the tournament to remove the T25 chips sooner, which should speed up play a little bit. Players who opt to skip Day 1 of this event entirely and buy in for Day 2 will start with five more big blinds and with a greater M when compared to last year. $25,000 PLO High Roller Structure Like the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship (8-handed), the 2019 version of the $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha High Roller (8-handed) is pretty much identical to what it was in 2018. The one big change is that the starting chips have gone up from 125,000 to 150,000. Other than that, late registration is the same 12 levels, there is one re-entry allowed per player, the rake is the same 5%, and the event is scheduled for four days - all of these things are the same as in 2018. Also like the $10,000 PLO event, there are a few minor tweaks to the blind structure for the small blind in a few spots, but it’s nothing major. Here's a look at the structure for the $25,000 PLO event in 2019 over the registration levels compared to the 2018 version. Note that we included the level following the close of the registration period because players can still enter during the final break. LEVEL YEAR BLINDS BB DEPTH M 1 2018 150-300 416.67 277.78 2019 200-300 500 300 - 2 2018 200-400 312.5 208.33 2019 200-400 375 250 - 3 2018 250-500 250 166.67 2019 300-500 300 187.5 - 4 2018 300-600 208.33 138.89 2019 300-600 250 166.67 - 5 2018 400-800 156.25 104.17 2019 400-800 187.5 125 - 6 2018 500-1,000 125 83.33 2019 500-1,000 150 100 - 7 2018 600-1,200 104.17 69.44 2019 600-1,200 125 83.33 - 8 2018 800-1,600 78.13 52.08 2019 800-1,600 93.75 62.5 - 9 2018 1,000-2,000 62.5 41.67 2019 1,000-2,000 75 50 - 10 2018 1,200-2,400 52.08 34.72 2019 1,200-2,400 62.5 41.67 - 11 2018 1,500-3,000 41.67 27.78 2019 1,500-3,000 50 33.33 - 12 2018 2,000-4,000 31.25 20.83 2019 2,000-4,000 37.5 25 - 13 2018 2,500-5,000 25 16.67 2019 2,500-5,000 30 20 The starting stack for 2019 is 25,000 chips more than in 2018. It's not a massive increase when compared to the other PLO events on the schedule, but it's an increase that allows more deeper play throughout the competition.
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