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Found 6 results

  1. Ali Imsirovic scored yet another victory inside PokerGO’s Las Vegas studio on Wednesday after taking down the penultimate event (Event #7: $25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for his third career PokerGO Cup event victory and $365,500. With the victory, Imsirovic soared past $16 million in live career earnings, just another testament of the young phenom being one of the toughest players in the game today. At the start of the 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) level, four of the six players were sitting with less than 20 big blinds, including Darren Elias who, at his fourth final table of the series, had just over 10 bigs in his stack. Sam Soverel opened the action to 80,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="5s"], next to act was Imsirovic who flatted holding the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"]. Elias was in the small blind and three-bet shipped for a total of 405,000 and Soverel let go of his hand. Imsirovic, however, did not fold. He made the call and putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2d"], handing Imsirovic top pair and leaving Elias looking for an eight. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and the [poker card="3h"] completed the board, sending Elias out in sixth place for $64,500. On the very next hand, Cary Katz shipped his final 325,000 all-in holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] and, once again, it was Imsirovic happy to make the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="td"] flop brought Karz some chop outs to go along with his bottom pair. However, the [poker card="6s"] on the turn and the [poker card="5d"] river was no help to the PokerGO founder and in back-to-back hands Imsirovic took out two. Katz hit the cage to collect his $86,000 fifth-place prize and snap-enter Event #8. After Ausmus found a double, Nick Schulman was the lone short stack with roughly 10 big blinds. When it folded to Ausmus in the small blind, he opened shoved on Schulman holding the [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"]. In the big blind, Schulman looked down at the [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"] and made the call with his tournament on the line. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"], keeping Schulman in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] giving Ausmus a double-gutter to go along with his pair outs to eliminate Schulman. The [poker card="qd"] hit the river, bringing Ausmus top pair and sending Schulman out in fourth place, good for $118,250. Three-handed play saw Imsirovic build a tower of chips, holding a better than four-to-one lead over Soverel in second place with 1.1 million. When the blinds hit 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante), Ausmus had himself roughly 13 big blinds and found a great spot to potentially double yet again. From the button, Imsirovic moved all-in with the chip lead holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"]. In the small blind, with 640,000 total, Ausmus picked up [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"] and called for the rest of his stack. In the big blind, Soverel let go of the [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"] and let Imsirovic know he had the same hand. That said, the flop came [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], bringing one of the last two sevens in the deck and putting Imsirovic’s hand in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="4s"], offering Ausmus chop-outs to a five. But the river came the [poker card="3h"] and Ausmus’ day was done in third place for $161,250. Imsirovic held a better than five-to-one chip lead over Soverel when the pair sat down heads-up to determine a winner. But Soverel hung around, closed the gap between them, and eventually took the chip lead. Although Soverel held the momentum, a pivotal hand swung the match back in Imsirovic’s favor. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) Soverel raised the button to 175,000 with his [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"] and Imsirovic called holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"], giving Imsirovic trips. Imsirovic checked to Soverel who bet 75,000. Imsirovic raised to 350,000 and Soverel opted for a quick call. The turn came the [poker card="ad"] and Imsirovic led for 700,000, which Soverel quickly called. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Imsirovic shipped his stack for 1.9 million. Soverel, with just 2.1 million behind, took his time, asked for a count, and eventually shrug-called hoping to win it right here. But Soverel was shown the trips and was left with just 210,000 in his stack. The very next hand, the pair got it all-in and Imsirovic’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="4d"] outflopped Soverel’s [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"] as the board came [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="qd"][poker card="9h"]. Soverel’s second-place finish was good for $236,500 while Imsirovic celebrated his third career PokerGO Cup event win with the $365,500 first-place prize. PokerGO Cup Event #7 Final Table Results Ali Imsirovic - $365,500 Sam Soverel - $236,500 Jeremy Ausmus - $161,250 Nick Schulman - $118,250 Cary Katz - $86,000 Darren Elias - $64,500
  2. After two more tournaments closed out the 2021 World Series of Poker, there was late drama across the Rio. Michael Addamo claimed the High Roller victory that confirms 2021 as the ‘Year of Addamo’, Boris Kolev won his first-ever bracelet and there was late drama in the WSOP Player of the Year race, which was over, not over, then done for good. Addamo Claims Huge High Roller Win Australian high roller crusher Michael Addamo won his fourth WSOP bracelet after taking down the $100,000-entry Event #87 High Roller after a final table performance that confirmed his greatness in 2021. Addamo has crushed the year, winning more in the past 11 months than many great players have in their entire careers. His quest for his fourth bracelet began looking down from a great height at the top of the leaderboard. Nevertheless, Addamo would have been surprised that his closest challenger when play began, Danish player Henrik Hecklen, busted in fifth place for $434,523. Sam Soverel had chipped up in the early exchanges at the table, and his raise pre-flop saw Hecklen call off his 14 big blind stack with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jd"]. Soverel called it off with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3d"] and managed to ride home his better hand, with the board playing out [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] for a flopped top pair to almost double his stack. Soverel was on a mini heater and doubled through the chip leader Addamo to take the lead when he was all-in and at risk with top pair against the Aussie’s two pair on the turn, only for the river to give him a better two pair and stun the table. If Addamo was running bad, could it be anyone’s tournament? Sean Perry certainly hoped so when he moved all-in with [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"] against the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] belonging to Kevin Rabichow. The board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] saw Rabichow make trips and slay Perry’s chances, the result worth $590,344. Down to three players, Rabichow was still the short stack, but over an extended period of play without an elimination, Soverel first spiked as chip leader, but then plummeted in two hands as Addamo delivered him from the tournament in brutal fashion, his [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] dominating Soverel’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Td"] on a board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Th"]Ks][poker card="2c"] and sending Soverel home with $830,992. Heads-up, it was that hand that propelled Addamo into a dominant position. With 28 million to Rabichow’s 5 million, the Australian needed no time at all to wrap up the event and claim his fourth WSOP bracelet of an already astounding poker career. Rabichow was all-in pre-flop for his last 12 big blinds with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"] and although he began the final hand ahead of Addamo’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2c"] the board of [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7h"] saw the most successful Australian tournament player in history add yet more glory to a stunning poker CV. Kevin Rabichow won over $1.2 million for a great run to runner-up but it was Michel Addamo who lost the lead yet won it all back and more to take down Event #87 and claim a famous victory worth $1.95m WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Results: Michael Addamo - $1,958,569 Kevin Rabichow - $1,210,487 Sam Soverel - $830,992 Sean Perry - $590,344 Henrik Hecklen - $434,523 Sorel Mizzi - $331,806 Sam Grafton - $263,227 Mikita Badziakouski - $217,274 Bill Klein - $186,909 Fedor Holz - $167,869 Kolev the King as WSOP Closes Rio Events With Maiden Win In the final event of the WSOP 2021, Boris Kolev became the answer to a thousand poker quizzes of the future as he won the last physical bracelet inside the Rio. Kolev had come into play just outside the top 10 chipcounts with 30 players remaining and for some time, the day was about Ben Yu in more ways than one. Yu, who led the field heading into the final day, was actually in the running to win the WSOP Player of the Year as Justin Bonomo of all people revealed. Eventually, thanks in no small part to Shaun Deeb’s amusing asides and general great play, Yu could not prevent Josh Arieh from celebrating - again - the Player of the Year title that was re-confirmed upon Yu’s exit in 10th place, as we wrote about right here in more detail. Yu’s exit in 10th place saw the final table of eight almost there and when Justin Liberto crashed out in ninth place with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"] unable to beat Niko Koop’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"] across a thrilling run out of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"] that gave the latter a full house on the river, the race was on to win the final bracelet of the series. Lee Markholt busted in eighth place for $49,107 when his shove with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] was overtaken by Kolev’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"] as the board played out [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Qs"]Kh] to give the eventual winner trips, and George Wolff lost his stack to Huy Nguyen when [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"] didn’t hold against Nguyen’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3d"] as a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Tc"] saw Wolff cash for $64,207. With six players remaining, Koop made his bow in sixth place for $85,411 as his shove with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"] ran into the dominating [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] belonging to Uri Reichenstein. The board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"] saw Reichenstein win that important pot to climb the ranks and send the dangerous Koop to the rail. It was the turn of Z Stein to bust in fifth place as his check-call for his stack on the turn of a board showing [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Qc"] doomed his [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8c"] with Reichenstein holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="9h"]. The river of [poker card="Jc"] confirmed a full house for the Israeli and sent Stein home with a result worth $115,558 his final result of the Autumn WSOP. It was some time before the next elimination, but when it came, it belonged to Ramon Colillas. The PokerStars player busted with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"] when Kolev’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] got there on a board of [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"], Colillas cashing for $158,972. It wasn’t long before Huy Nugyen was on the rail too, his short stack of 12 big blinds going into the middle with [poker card="KS"][poker card="Ts"] unable to hold against Reichenstein’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"]. The board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="8d"] was a killer, too, rivering Nguyen’s chances of a vital double and instead condemning him to a third-place finish worth $222,310. Heads-up, Kolev had a marginal lead over Reichenstein, the Bulgarian’s stack of 13.7 million a little ahead of Israeli Reichenstein’s 12.8 million. Kolev opened up a lead, however, and on a flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="As"], check-called to the turn holding [poker card="Jc"][poker card="6c"]. The turn of [poker card="Ks"] saw the same pattern, Kolev check-calling Reichenstein, who held only [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7s"] for a total bluff. Reichenstein ran that bluff for his whole stack on the river, but it was the [poker card="4c"] that came and Kolev called it off, showed his flush and became a first-time winner in the final ever WSOP Event at the Rio, winning the $511,184 top prize and leaving Reichenstein with another consolation prize of a deep run to a final table and $315,936. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Boris Kolev - $511,184 Uri Reichenstein - $315,936 Huy Nguyen - $222,310 Ramon Colillas - $158,972 Z Stein - $115,558 Niko Koop - $85,411 George Wolff - $64,207 Lee Markholt - $49,107 Justin Liberto - $38,222 With the final events playing out at the Rio, most of the players had left the building...but perhaps for some, most importantly, the car park. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1463271505911947269 Not everyone believes the Rio was the ideal place to play poker, of course, and they were nobly represented by the viral sensation of videos that has fuelled so many Twitter Poker laughs over the last years of the home of the WSOP. https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1463214257772761092 Matt Glantz neatly summed up Josh Arieh’s two-time triumph in the WSOP Player of the Year race. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321 Legendary WSOP font of all knowledge Kevin Mathers, known to us all as ‘Kevmath’ signed off his look at the old venue with one last short of the Rio’s lights burning bright as the shadows took the building one last time. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1463392728289406978 Finally, how could we close out the series without a glimpse into the bizarre, amazing world of Phil Hellmuth. Answer: we couldn't. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463277999353069568 It’s been an immense end to the World Series of Poker at the Rio and a WSOP never to be forgotten in 2021. The best news of all is that in six months time, the poker world will be ready to do it all over again at Bally’s and Paris... we can’t wait!
  3. Six bracelet events took place on Day 26 of the 2021 World Series of Poker as Chad Norton won his first WSOP bracelet in the $800 Deepstack event and three final tables were reached with some superstars of the game in pole position to win gold. Norton Scores First Bracelet Chad Norton was dominant in his display at the $800-entry Deepstack event with the chip leader going into the final table Kevin Wang overtaken by Norton before the first-timer deservedly claimed a debut bracelet and the top prize of $214,830 to go with it. The final table of nine players began with Wang on 22 million chips, an amount far clear of the 9 million in front of the eventual winner. It was Joshua Herman who busted first in ninth place for $19,533, as he moved all-in for around four big blinds with [poker card="Js"][poker card="9s"] and was called by Norton with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Th"]. That call was vindicated across the board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Ks"] as Norton’s ace-kicker played and he vaulted to 20 million chips after a fast start to the table. Next to go was William Blais for $24,982, as the Canadian moved all-in on a flop showing [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3h"]. Blais had a monster hand with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kh"], but it was well behind his caller Norton with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"], and through the [poker card="3c"] turn and [poker card="9h"] river, Blais was on the rail and Norton became chip leader. Jordyn Miller was eliminated in seventh place as his [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"] call for his tournament life after Andres JeckIn’s shove with [poker card="As"][poker card="8h"] met with ill fortune. The flop of [poker card="8d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"] gave JeckeIn top pair but kept Miller ahead, with the [poker card="2d"] turn maintaining that lead. The river of [poker card="8s"] changed everything, however, with Miller busted before the final six. The chip leader heading into the final nine, Wang was gone in sixth place, as he fell to Norton too. Wang shoved from the button with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3c"] and was called by Norton with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jh"]. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Qs"] saw Wang flop a gutshot but miss it as Norton paired up on the turn and busted Wang for a $42,031 score. In fifth place, it was the turn of Ivan Uzunov to depart the party, winning $55,279 as his shove with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Ts"] was called by JeckeIn with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"]. The board of [poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="As"] saw Uzunov on the rail with the Argentinian staying in contention albeit at the bottom of the counts. Narimaan Ahmadi had laddered to fourth place for $73,371 but could go no further as he shoved from the small blind with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"] and Norton, who called with an audible ‘Sure, why not?” turned over [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"]. The board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"] saw Ahmadi leave the event, and Norton, who had four times the chips of his remaining two opponents combined, continued to obliterate all who sat between him and the gold bracelet. Both of Norton’s opponents were in ICM problems, and JeckeIn paid for it with his stack in third place for $98,269. The Argentinian shoved with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Ts"] but was called by the other short stack in Steve Lemma, whose [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"] held across a comfortable board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] which saw JeckeIn pick up a flush draw on the flop but fade both turn and river as Lemma filled up to sevens over fives on 5th street. Heads-up was looking like it might not be a procession for Norton purely due to Lemma busting JeckeIn, but with just under a 3:1 chip lead, that proved enough for a quick kill for Norton. Lemma shoved over Norton’s raise from the button and Norton made a quick call. Lemma was behind with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"], Norton holding [poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] and hitting top pair on the flop as the board played out [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="3d"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3h"] to give Lemma the runner-up spot for $132,802 and award Norton the bracelet and top prize of $214,830. WSOP 2021 Event #46 $800 Deepstack Final Table Results: Chad Norton - $214,830 Steve Lemma - $132,802 Andres Jeckeln - $98,269 Narimaan Ahmadi - $73,271 Ivan Uzunov - $55,279 Kevin Wang - $42,031 Jordyn Miller - $32,254 William Blais - $24,982 Joshua Herman - $19,533 Jeff Platt, Jonathan Dokler Head Day 4 of Double Stack Day 3 of the $1,000-entry Double Stack event saw Michael Wang end the day with a dominant chip stack as the American piled up over 24 million chips. With Joshua Harrison his nearest challenger on 14.7 million, others in contention include South Korean player Sejin Park (13.3 million), Jonathan Dokler (12.8 million), and PokerGO presenter Jeff Platt, who led after Day 2 and still has a very playable 8 million stack heading into the penultimate day. Of the players who busted on Day 3 as the field dropped from 149 players to just 17, former WSOP Main Event winner Martin Jacobson fell in 145th place for $3,124, Niall Farrell dropped in 88th place for $4,716 and Ralph Massey made it all the way to 23rd place for $15,856. Others to bust on a busy day for eliminations included Daniel Dayan, Andrew Moreno, Brandon Shiels and Antoine Saout. Wang was understandably delighted with his progress. https://twitter.com/miw210/status/1452879499423465474 WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Wang - 24,300,000 Joshua Harrison - 14,725,000 Sejin Park - 13,325,000 Jonathan Dokler - 12,875,000 Timothy Little - 11,475,000 Alexander Farahi - 10,725,000 Alex Kulev - 9,550,000 Anthony Denove - 8,475,000 Jeff Platt - 8,075,000 Kenneth Inouye - 7,475,000 Back-To-Back Final Tables For Tommy Le Tommy Le is the man to catch in Event #45, the $10,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha Championship. With a stack of 7.4 million, Le leads from Artem Maksimov, with both of the top two some way clear of Chris Sandrock (3.2m), Jordan Spurlin (2.8m), and Jeremy Ausmus (2.2m), who will all be hoping for an early double up to put themselves back in contention for the WSOP bracelet. With players such as Mike Matusow, Dylan Linde, and Daniel Zack all busting on the penultimate day of play, Le will be hoping to go one better than his last final table, where he lost out for the bracelet to our own Josh Arieh. Le got off to a blistering start on the day, with just 18 players starting out and an unlucky 13 of that number failing to make the final day. Le doubled up through Arthur Morris and never looked back, as the day’s dominant player busted Mike Matusow with a rivered nut flush against ‘The Mouth’, who had flopped the nut straight. Once the final table of eight was reached, Ashly Butler was the first player to depart, with eighth place worth $71,242. Morris himself was busted in seventh for $93,406, while Eli Elezra failed to make it five bracelets, falling short in sixth place for $124,508 as Le claimed the chip lead heading to the denouement of the PLO Championship. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Tommy Le - 7,240,000 Artem Maksimov - 5,080,000 Chris Sandrock - 3,200,000 Jordan Spurlin - 2,885,000 Jeremy Ausmus - 2,235,000 $5K Freezeout Final Table Set Day 2 of the $5,000 Freezeout event saw a returning field of 82 players play down to just five finalists as the penultimate day of action saw plenty of it. At the close of play, Frenchman Alexandre Reard had the biggest stack, with 8,820,000 chips, some way clear of the only remaining bracelet winner in the field, Daniel Strelitz (5,345,000). With Qing Liu (3,375,000), Conrad Simpson (2,390,000), and Ren Lin (1,535,000) completing the final five, there are sure to be fireworks as the five men play for the top prize of $428,694. Day 2 of this event saw plenty of big names exit the competition, with eight hours of play leading to the unofficial final table of nine. With players such as Daniel Lazrus, Scott Seiver, Daniel Negreanu, and Shaun Deeb all making the money but failing to trouble the final table, others weren’t so fortunate, with stars such as Ben Heath, Andrew Kelsall - who bubbled - and Alan Sternberg all falling short of profit. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Final Table Chipcounts: Alexandre Reard - 8,820,000 Daniel Strelitz - 5,345,000 Qing Liu - 3,375,000 Conrad Simpson - 2,390,000 Ren Lin - 1,535,000 Ari Engel, Sam Grafton Survive Day 1 Shootout Event #48 was the $1,500 Shootout, a unique event on the WSOP calendar and one of our favorites, with each 10-handed starting table producing one winner who then makes the next day of single-table shootouts ahead of a final table full of winners eventually being reached. Day 1 saw a neat total of 800 players reach just 80 as players such as Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, and Ari Engel all ended the day too strong for nine opponents, slaying their way to victory. Of the 12 hours that players were at the felt, some tables ended much sooner than others. The first table to leave just one player standing was the one that ended with Victoria Livschitz sat behind all the chips. Players such as Shiraz Lall and Huy Nguyen couldn’t stop her progression, with other tables just as star-studded. Sam Grafton made his way through a table that included Michael Noori, who already has a 2021 WSOP bracelet to his name, while Joseph Cheong added to the Day 2 banter after taking care of Zach Gruneberg heads-up. Ari Engel, who already has two 2021 WSOP bracelets to his name, is 79 players from repeating that trick, with players such as Maria Ho, Ryan Depaulo, Michael Mizrachi and Jeff Gross among those to miss out. Sam Soverel Leads $10K NL 2-7 Event #49 completed the mammoth day at the felt for WSOP fans, with Sam Soverel leading the way after Day 1 of the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Single Draw event. Soverel’s stack of 454,500 chips puts him ahead of Johannes Becker (373,500) and Julien Martini (338,500) at the top of the leaderboard, but there is quality in every seat, with Shaun Deeb (302,500), Benny Glaser (290,500), and Yuval Bronshtein (225,500) all in the top 10 chip counts. Elsewhere, players such as the vastly experienced Dan Shak (190,500), Chris Vitch (83,000), Scott Seiver (99,500), Nick Schulman (90,000), and Ryan Leng (74,500) will all be very positive that they can claim a profit on Day 2 and push for the gold. Among those who busted on Day 1 were stars such as Phil Hellmuth, Galen Hall, and Michael Noori. WSOP 2021 Event #49 $10,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw Top 10 Chipcounts: Sam Soverel - 454,500 Johannes Becker - 373,500 Julien Martini - 338,500 Shaun Deeb - 302,500 Benny Glaser - 290,500 Benjamin Diebold - 277,500 David McGowan - 269,500 Yuval Bronshtein - 225,500 Farzad Bonyadi - 215,500 Matt Vengrin - 210,500 Chris Moneymaker already decided pre-festival that he wouldn’t be gracing Vegas with his presence, but a recent champion has, ahem, ‘encouraged’ him to rethink that choice. Sounds like a sidebet to us. https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1451943037299568643 Finally, if you’re worried that some of the big names you love haven’t arrived I Vegas yet - such as Phil Ivey - then fear not, because the two men who battled it out for the legendary WSOP Main Event win back in 1989 were pictured together at the Rio for the first time in a long time. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1452863857467084803
  4. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl kicks off in Las Vegas at the PokerGO Studio on Monday, September 27 with some of the biggest names in tournament poker vying for a piece that will be, undoubtedly, a hefty seven-figure prize pool with multiple millions of dollars being shipped to the winner. With the $300,000 buy-in bringing out poker's best and brightest you might be thinking about getting a sweat going while watching the action unfold online. So, whether you are drafting a team with a few friends or playing a little fantasy poker these are the names you should be targeting to make sure they are on your SHRB Squad. These guys are the first-round picks for the 2021 Super High Roller Bowl. #1. Michael Addamo The dominance of Michael Addamo cannot be denied. And when you run as good as he is running right now, you top the list of SHRB draft picks. His high-roller credentials have been more than checked out - in addition to going back-to-back at the end of the 2021 Poker Masters to claim the Purple Jacket (and $1.84 million in 48-hours), Addamo is also the all-time leader in victories of the GGPoker Super MILLION$ where he’s amassed more than $1 million in profit. Add to that, he's also a two-time WSOP bracelet winner and Aussie Poker Open Main Event champ (among other accolades.) While others on this list may have more past SHRB success, Addamo is a player you simply can’t pass up. #2. Stephen Chidwick But...if one were to pass up Addamo and his sun run, they’d be a fool to pass up UK crusher Stephen Chidwick. With more than $35 million in total live earnings, Chidwick - a former #1 GPI ranked player and 2019 European Player of the Year - is both the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion and 2020 Australian Poker Open winner. As an aside, he was voted, by his peers, at the Global Poker Awards as the Players Choice for Toughest Opponent. Like Addamo, he enters the SHRB with momentum, cashing in three events of the 2021 Poker Masters, including a victory in Event #7 for $183,600. Plus, he’s cashed in three previous Super High Roller Bowls, all in 2018, including the last one that took place in Las Vegas where he finished in third place for $1.5 million. #3. David Peters David Peters may not be a trendy pick at #3, but there may be no more reliable player in the field. Sitting fifth on the All-Time Money List, Peters simply knows how to win. He’s proven that yet again this year by taking home the Golden Eagle trophy in the 2021 U.S. Poker Open after winning three of the four events he cashed in. Plus, he’s had plenty of SHRB success, including a fifth-place finish in this year’s SHRB Europe for $820,000 and a final table finish in the inaugural event back in 2015. Simply put, Peters is the kind of player who can win it all on any given day. #4 Ali Imsirovic Critics might say that fourth is a little high for young Ali Imsirovic, after all, there are SHRB champions that are ranked underneath him. But there are only a few players who have spent as much time in the PokerGO Studio grinding high rollers in the past 24 months as Imsirovic. This gives him a huge home-field advantage. And you don’t have to look too hard to see how hard (and often) Imsirovic crushes high rollers. The 2018 Poker Masters champion currently only has one seven-figure cash on his ever-growing resume however that was a runner-up finish to Cary Katz in the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl London. Imsirovic just seems destined to add more million-dollar scores in the very near future. While he didn’t have a standout performance in this year’s Poker Masters, he should find a way to bounce back here in the Main Event. #5. Justin Bonomo No one loves the Super High Roller Bowl more than Justin Bonomo. According to PokerGO, no one has won more money from Super High Roller Bowl events than Bonomo, who has reaped $12,706,516 worth of cashes thanks to back-to-back SHRB title in 2018. Hell, even in the midst of COVID, Bonomo took down the Super High Roller Bowl $100K Online Event for $1.775 million. So, why is Bonomo only fifth? It’s not a comment on his talent against the field obviously, it’s simply a question of if he will actually be in the field? And if so, without a live result for the better part of two years, how will he perform? Even not knowing the answer to either question, you still gotta put respect on his name and include him in the top 5 picks. #6. Mikita Badziakouski Belarusian nosebleed crusher Mikita Badziakouski has proven himself time and time again to be one of the best tournament players on the planet. With more than $29 million in live earning, Badziakouski seems to have a way of always making a deep run in the most critical of events. Like Addamo, Badziakouski showed up a little early in Las Vegas to warm up before the SHRB. He promptly took down a Poker Masters event and made the final table of the Main Event. That was coming off of two third-place finishes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe. In 2018, Badziakouski took third in May’s SHRB event for $1.6 million, and then in 2020, he did the same in the event in the Bahamas for another $1.6 million. If it’s Badziakouski walking away with the win in 2021, there won’t be a single surprised person in the PokerGO Studio. #7. Jake Schindler You’d best not sleep on Jake Schindler in any event, especially one in the PokerGO Studio. Schindler rolls into the SHRB with three recent results from the 2021 Poker Masters, a pair of cashes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe, and a PokerGO cup event win. He’s generally considered one of the very best tournament players on the planet and that was on full display in 2017 when he finished second to Christoph Vogelsang in the SHRB for a career-high $3.6 million payday. Although he’s seventh on this list, any person betting on Schindler should feel confident that they have an absolute top-tier player on in their corner. #8. Jason Koon One of the nicest guys on the high-roller scene is also one of the most dangerous. Jason Koon, currently seventh on the All-Time Money List, has enjoyed plenty of success in the SHRB over the years, cashing in four SHRB live events. Because the 2018 heads-up between Bonomo and Daniel Negreanu was so memorable, it often gets forgotten that Koon had a shot at winning the title that year, but he fell in third place for $2.1 million score. However, history aside, Koon has been putting in work at the PokerGO Studio over the summer, including taking down a PokerGO cup event for $324,000. Like Schindler ahead of him on the list, Koon isn’t flashy at the table - he just produces results. If he gets close here in 2021, it wouldn't be a shocker to see him finally take one down. #9. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Negreanu’s infamous “second-place streak” has come to an end and "Kid Poker" is back to his winning ways. This includes locking up the overall leaderboard in the 2021 PokerGO Cup and a victory in the 2021 Poker Masters, where he was in the running for the Purple Jacket right up until the start of the final event. Negreanu is one of those “old school” players that polarizes fans when it comes to the biggest events in the world. However, where others of his era have been unable to compete with the young crop of crushers, Negreanu constantly provides receipts. It should be noted that one of those second-place finishes that people point to was his runner-up finish in the 2018 SHRB to Bonomo - good for a cool $3 million. In the interest of transparency, Daniel Negreanu is selling a piece of his 2021 Super High Roller Bowl action here on PocketFives. #10. Sam Soverel Another player that thrives in the PokerGO Studio is Sam Soverel. Soverel, the 2019 Poker Masters overall champion, currently sits in third place on PokerGO’s high-roller leaderboard by thoroughly dominating a string of $10K tournaments throughout 2021. There are a number of players who could be considered right here, but it’s Soverel’s undeniable success in this atmosphere plus incredible momentum that puts him as the final player in round one. The only downside of taking him here, as opposed to a player like two-time champion Tim Adams, fan-favorite Nick Petrangelo, or up-and-comer Chris Brewer, is his lack of previous SHRB results. But this may be the year that changes. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl is available to stream from Sept. 27-29 on PokerGO. A recap of the final table will be available here on PocketFives.
  5. Sean Perry was never really in any danger of elimination during the final table of the 2021 Poker Masters Event #2 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em). He started the day with the chip lead, held on to it by taking out four of his final five opponents, and, in under three hours, walked out of the PokerGO studio with $206,400 for the win. The tournament was slightly larger than Event #1, as 86-entries created an $860,000 prize pool. For Perry, the victory, plus his eighth-place finish in the first event for $32,800, has made him the early points leader for the Purple Jacket something he said, “would mean the world to me.” Just six players returned to the PokerGO studio to battle for the Event #2 title, including John Riordan, fresh off his sixth-place finish in Event #1 for $49,200. Roughly 30 minutes into play, with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Riordan found himself on the short stack with just eight big blinds. From the hijack, he moved all-in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] and Jake Schindler, next to act, made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair watched as the board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"] giving Schindler a straight and, for the second tournament in a row, ending Riordan’s day in sixth place for $51,600. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) Sam Soverel clashed in a big pot against Daniel Negreanu. All-in before the flop, Negreanu held the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"], and Soverel, with the slightly larger stack, had the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"], keeping Negreanu in good shape. It got even better for "Kid Poker" when the [poker card="kd"] hit the turn leaving Soverel drawing dead to the [poker card="8d"] river. After the hand, Soverel was left with roughly two big blinds. Although he hung around for fifteen minutes, Soverel could build it back up when his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] eventually lost to Perry’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] run out. Soverel, who won the Poker Masters Purple Jacket back in 2019, finished in fifth place for $68,800. Perry grabbed a commanding chip lead with four players left and began to apply the pressure. From the button, Perry made it 160,000 to go with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="4h"]. Negreanu bowed out in the small blind and then Schindler, with seven big blinds left, three-bet all-in holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2s"]. Perry took some time to consider and ended up making the call. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Perry bottom pair which held through the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river. Schindler fell in fourth place and picked up $86,000 on the day. The final three then went to break. On the first hand back, with blinds up to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), there was only one big blind due to the prior elimination. First to act, Perry made it 225,000 holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Negreanu quickly moved all-in on the button for 1.425 million with his [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. Jeremy Ausmus folded the single big blind and Perry wasted no time in calling. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] keeping Perry’s sixes ahead, but not the favorite to Negreanu’s over cards, flush outs, and back door straight outs. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] giving Negreanu 16 outs one time. But that was simply too many outs, as Negreanu missed them all when the [poker card="ad"] completed the board. “He had half the deck and missed somehow,” Perry shouted as Negreanu collected his things and went to collect his $103,200 prize for third place. Unlike in Event #1, the heads-up match between Perry and Ausmus didn’t take very long. With a two-to-one chip lead, Perry kept control for the roughly 25-minute match. On the final hand, Ausmus raised to 200,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"] and Perry raised it to 825,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus called and the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Perry led for 400,000. In position, Ausmus opted for a call and the turn came the [poker card="kh"]. Perry checked it to Ausmus and Ausmus bet 800,000. After taking some time, Perry made the call. The [poker card="6d"] hit the river and Perry once again checked to Ausmus. Having missed all his outs, Ausmus moved all-in for just over 2 million. Perry went into the tank and eventually called the bluff with his pair of kings and ended the tournament. Ausmus was eliminated as the runner-up for $146,200 and Sean Perry took home the win and $206,400. Poker Masters Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $206,400 Jeremy Ausmus - $146,200 Daniel Negreanu - $103,200 Jake Schindler - $86,000 Sam Soverel - $68,800 John Riordan - $51,600
  6. After starting the final table of 2021 Poker Masters Event #4 (10,000 No Limit Hold’em) dead last in chips, Brock Wilson willed himself to the top of the chip counts and found a way to take down the first Poker Masters event of his career, earning $189,800 and the top spot on the Poker Masters Purple Jacket leaderboard. For a relatively new face on the high roller scene, Wilson has been making quite the impression. Tor the better part of two years, the Las Vegas resident has been firing in some of the biggest live tournaments on the circuit. While he’d come close on numerous occasions to bringing home a win in the PokerGO studio, it had yet to materialize. On Saturday night, however, the win that felt inevitable finally came to pass. His victory in Event #4 is not only his most high-profile official victory, but the cash also ranks as a top-5 career score of over $3.5 million in earnings. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment It took nearly an hour and a half before the final table had its first elimination. Wilson started the day as the short stack, and right behind him was Elio Fox. However, both players navigated the early levels to give themselves a little breathing room. The opposite was true for Nick Petrangelo who went from third in chips to the bottom of the chip counts. With blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Petrangelo, with just 10 big blinds, raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Chad Eveslage in the big blind who defended with his [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"], giving Eveslage bottom set and offering Petrangelo a flush draw to go with his overpair. When checked to, Petrangelo min-bet 50,000. Eveslage check-raised all-in, and Petrangelo, covered, made the call. The turn was the [poker card="js"] and the river came the [poker card="2c"], improving Eveslage to quads and sending Petrangelo out in sixth for $43,800. Five-handed play took place for over an hour more. The blinds increased to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Wilson raised to 175,000 from the cutoff holding [poker card="as"][poker card="ah"]. In the small blind, Brekstyn Schutten, who started the day with the chip lead, flatted with his [poker card="7h"][poker card="7c"]. Then, Sam Soverel, with just under ten big blinds came along holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="3h"] and it checked through to Wilson who bet 150,000. Schutten let his pocket sevens go but Soverel didn’t follow suit, he made the call. The turn was the [poker card="9d"], bringing Soverel two pair. Soverel checked it to Wilson again, and Wilson moved all-in. Soverel snapped called, his hand ahead and just one card from a double. However, the river was the [poker card="ac"], bringing a set for Wilson and sending the 2019 Poker Masters champion to the rail in fifth place for $58,400. As Wilson climbed to second in chips, Eveslage found himself slipping. At 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), Eveslage had just eight big blinds. From the small blind, he moved all in with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"] and, in the big blind, Wilson made the call holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="8s"]. The board ran out [poker card="7c"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="kd"] leaving Wilson’s ace high as the best hand and finishing Eveslage in fourth place for $73,000. At three-handed, Wilson, Schutten, and Elio Fox were all roughly even in stacks. After Elio took a big pot to put a dent into Schutten’s stack, the former chip leader was looking for a spot to double up. At 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante), Fox was applying pressure to Schutten’s big blind when he moved all-in from the small blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="qd"]. Schutten woke up with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7s"] and called for his final 8 bigs. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"], putting Fox in the lead with top pair. That held through the [poker card="jd"] turn and the [poker card="3d"] river. Schutten settled for third place and collected $94,900 for his efforts. After a short break, Wilson and Fox sat down to play heads-up with Fox holding a better than two-to-one chip lead. Unlike some of the recent heads-up matches in the Poker Masters, these two didn’t take long to determine a winner. Wilson picked up a big pot, assumed the chip lead, and closed it out in roughly thirty minutes. On the final hand, Fox called on the button with the [poker card="8c"][poker card="5d"] and Wilson checked his option in the big blind holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="kd"][poker card="td"][poker card="8d"] and Wilson checked it to Fox who checked it back. The [poker card="8h"] hit the turn, giving both players trips. Wilson checked again and Fox put out 175,000. Wilson check-raised to 600,000 and Fox made the call. The river was the [poker card="7h"], eliminating the chop by giving Wilson a full house. After letting the shot clock wind down, Wilson shoved and after thinking it over, Fox decided to call and was shown the winner. Fox laddered from fifth in chips at the start of the day to finishing in second for $138,700. Brock Wilson won Event #4 for $189,800 and surged to the lead in the Poker Masters leaderboard. Poker Masters Event #4 Final Table Results Brock Wilson - $189,800 Elio Fox - $138,700 Brekstyn Schutten - $94,900 Chad Eveslage - $73,000 Sam Soverel - $58,400 Nick Petrangelo - $43,800
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