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Found 9 results

  1. Aaron Zang has done it! On Saturday, he captured the title in poker's richest-ever tournament, winning the £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity for £13,779,791 in prize money. Zang topped a mixed field of 54 businessmen, recreational players, and the game’s top professionals to capture the title. Entering the Triton Million, Zang, who is known as a high-stakes cash game player, had less than $900,000 in live tournament earnings. Originally set to pay the winner £19,000,000, a heads-up deal was struck between Zang and his final opponent, Bryn Kenney, that saw Zang take £13,779,791 and Kenney take £16,890,509. With a conversion rate that puts Kenney's prize north of $20,400,000, Kenney is now the holder of poker's largest single score from a live tournament. That is rather fitting as Kenney now sits atop poker's all-time money list, as recorded by Hendon Mob, as a result of the finish. Triton Million Results 1st: Aaron Zang - £13,779,791* 2nd: Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509* 3rd: Dan Smith - £7,200,000 4th: Stephen Chidwick - £4,410,000 5th: Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 6th: Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 7th: Alfred DeCarolis - £1,720,000 8th: Timothy Adams - £1,400,000 9th: Wai Leong Chan - £1,200,000 10th: Chin Wei Lim - £1,100,000 11th: Winfred Yu - £1,100,000 *First and second prizes as a result of a heads-up deal. Zang began the third and final day of the tournament in sixth place on the leaderboard with eight players remaining, but the early story of the final table was the demise of Vivek Rajkumar, who entered with a big chip lead over the rest of the field. First, Bill Perkins scored a double through Rajkumar when his pocket nines held up against Rajkumar’s pocket fours on Hand #9. Perkins then doubled again through Rajkumar on Hand #30 when his pocket sevens held up against Rajkumar’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kh"]. Despite the two hits to his stack, Rajkumar maintained his lead. Not too long after Perkins scored his second double up of the day, Zang took his turn doubling through Rajkumar. Both players had the same hand, ace-jack, but it was Zang’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jh"] that made a flush against Rajkumar’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jd"] after the board ran out [poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="Th"]. That brought Rajkumar back to the pack and his closest competitor was Kenney, who had rather quietly worked his way up to an eight-figure chip stack. Rajkumar was able to get things moving in the right direction when, on Hand #49, he knocked out Timothy Adams in eighth place. Right after that, on Hand #50, Stephen Chidwick scored a double up through Rajkumar, forcing Rajkumar to give a good chunk of the chips he had just won to someone else. Chidwick used those newly acquired chips to then knock out Alfred DeCarolis on Hand #51, closing out quite the exciting three-hand run of action. Things only got worse for Rajkumar on Hand #56. On the [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4h"] flop, Dan Smith held the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"] to Rajkumar’s [poker card="Th"][poker card="9h"]. All the money went in and it was Smith’s overpair up against Rajkumar’s top two pair. It was a good spot for Rajkumar, but the turn was the [poker card="3d"] and the river the [poker card="Js"] to give Smith the huge double into the chip lead. Rajkumar was knocked down to the second shortest stack with six players remaining. Perkins grabbed another double up through Rajkumar on Hand #66, which knocked Rajkumar down to the bottom of the pack. Rajkumar fought on, though, and it was eventually Perkins who busted in sixth place. Kenney was the one to bust Perkins, holding the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"] to Perkins’ [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Td"]. With six players left and the blinds at 150,000-300,000 with a 300,000 big blind ante on Hand #88, Zang shoved all in for 11,375,000 from the small blind with the [poker card="8d"][poker card="7d"]. Kenney was in the big blind with a stack of 7,775,000 and called holding the [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. The flop, turn, and river ran out [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="Qs"] and Kenney survived a big sweat to score the double. Rajkumar was next out, busting in fifth place on Hand #91. Like Perkins, Rajkumar also ran into the aces of Kenney. That allowed Kenney to take the chip lead, but it didn’t last long because Zang flopped top two pair versus Kenney’s top pair on Hand #100 and doubled through Kenney. Despite Zang doubling through him, Kenney powered on and began to run away with the lead for some time. It looked like it really was going to be Kenney’s tournament, and even more so after he busted Chidwick in fourth place. Kenney didn’t stop there, busting Smith in third and taking quite a large chip lead into heads-up play. Heads-up play didn’t last too long, but it was the underdog Zang who stormed back in the match. First, Zang found a double up with pocket sixes against Kenney’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qd"] to close the gap. Then, Zang moved into the chip lead after he made a full house and allowed Kenney to bluff off some chips to him. Shortly after that, it was all over. On the final hand, the two found the money in the middle on the [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] flop. Kenney had the [poker card="As"][poker card="6s"] for a flush draw, and Zang had the [poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"] for top pair. The turn was the [poker card="9c"] and the river was the [poker card="Kd"] to secure Zang the win.
  2. Triton Poker set out to make poker history this week and they most certainly will and in more ways than one. Not only does the Triton Million’s £1,050,000 buy-in ($1,273215) make it the largest buy-in tournament in history, but with 54 players helping generate a prize pool of £54,000,000 ($65,611,361) the first place prize of £19,000,000 ($23,085,479) makes it the largest single tournament payout of all time. Million Dollar Payouts It’s not just first place that is going to find themselves flush after the Triton Million comes to an end. With an astronomical buy-in, Triton officials decided to flatten out the payouts opting to award 11 of the 54 registered players (20%) some piece of the prize pool. Granted, the players that just squeak into the money will be earning little more than their money back ($1,335,923) but a final table finish, resulting in a payday of $1,457,371 would make for a career-high cash for 20 of the participants including pros Andrew Robl, Vivek Rajkumar, Michael Soyza, and Matthias Eibinger. Triton Million Official Payouts Place Approx USD 1 $23,074,354 2 $14,176,836 3 $8,743,966 4 $5,355,679 5 $3,643,319 6 $2,671,767 7 $2,088,898 8 $1,700,266 9 $1,457,371 10 $1,335,923 11 $1,335,923 Eight-Figure Paydays The massive payouts of the Triton Million will add two more players into the extremely elite club of poker players who have earned themselves an eight-figure payday at the poker table. The addition of the first and second place scores makes for a total of ten $10M+ paydays in history and offers the current All Time Money List leader Justin Bonomo and the UK’s Sam Trickett the honor of being the first player to accomplish that remarkable score twice in their career. Until the Triton Million only the World Series of Poker’s $1 Million buy-in Big One For One Drop and the WSOP Main Event offered players the opportunity to hit such heights. The only exception was the 2016 Big One For One Drop Monte-Carlo Extravaganze one-off where Elton Tsang took home over $12.2 million in the invite-only tournament that excluded all of the world’s top players. History of Eight-Figure Paydays Year Event Place Player Payout 2019 Triton Million 1st TBD $23,085,479 2012 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Antonio Esfandiari $18,346,673 2014 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Daniel Colman $15,306,668 2019 Triton Million 2nd TDB $14,176,836 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza 1st Elton Tsang $12,248,912 2006 WSOP Main Event 1st Jaime Gold $12,000,000 2012 WSOP Big One For One Drop 2nd Sam Trickett $10,112,001 2014 WSOP Main Event 1st Martin Jacobson $10,000,000 2018 WSOP Big One For One Drop 1st Justin Bonomo $10,000,000 2019 WSOP Main Event 1st Hossein Ensan $10,000,000 All Time Money List Possibilities With so much money in the prize pool, there are bound to be some major ramifications to the ever-shifting All Time Money List. At the start of the Triton Million, there were seven players that could possibly surge to the top of the list and overtake current list leader Justin Bonomo. Bonomo himself could put an amazing amount of distance between himself and the rest of the field as he currently holds a roughly $3.1 million lead over the #2-ranked Daniel Negreanu and over $9 million from the #3-ranked Erik Seidel, neither of which are in the Triton Million field. Here’s a look at the players that could make major moves on the ATML should Bonomo not be able to hold them off. Bryn Kenney - With over $34.9 million in total earnings, Kenney could become the new king of the ATML with a win or even a second-place finish. A third-place finish and he will leapfrog Negreanu for second place on the list and any cash will vault him over Seidel in third place, where he only sits $716,117 behind the legend. Jason Koon - The Triton ambassador has been steadily climbing the ATML, currently sitting in 8th place with $28,925,059 in earnings. A victory would send him north of $51 million and into first. A second-place finish in the event is not good enough to take over the top spot but it would put him in second place and within striking distance of #1 at $43 million. Dan Smith - A last-second invite from Bill Perkins puts Smith into the ATML leader mix, where he currently sits at #9 with $27,921,940. His situation is identical to Koon's - a win and he soars to over $50 million. Mikita Badziakouski - The nosebleed crusher from Belarus recently climbed into the #15 spot on the ATML and a win could put him in the top spot with over $48 million. A second-place finish would put him at just over $39 million, currently good for third place. Stephen Chidwick - Generally considered one of the very best tournament players on the planet, the UK savant has the exact same situation as Badziakouski as he only sits less than $3,000 behind him on the ATML. David Peters and Fedor Holz - Peters currently sits at #5 on the ATML and the German phenom, Holz sits right behind him at #6. Both players were among the first five players eliminated from the tournament ending their bid to climb the ATML ladder. Becoming An Instant Legend To say that first place in the Triton Million is massive is an understatement. But just how big is it? To put this first-place prize in perspective, had a player never cashed before, the first place prize alone would put you ranked at #19 on the All-Time Money List. That’s ahead of one of the most famous poker players on the planet, Phil Hellmuth, who has spent over 30 years accumulating his career total of $22,999,083. Second place also puts you in the midst of legends. The over $14 million payday would slot you in at #41 all-time, just ahead of recent bracelet winner Joseph Cheong and right behind 2009 WSOP World Champ Joe Cada. Finally, if the Triton Million third-place prize of over $8.7 million was your first Hendon Mob entry, you would just make it inside the top 100. You start your career at #100 all-time and you’d be the player to knock poker legend Johnny Chan out of the top 100.
  3. The 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series wrapped up its festival of high-stakes events in London last week. There were seven events, headlined by the £1,050,000 buy-in Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity and several million-dollar scores were had. Chief among them was Bryn Kenney with his £16,890,509 result, that converted to $20,563,324. The monstrous score earned Kenney the largest payday in poker history and put him atop the all-time money list. Kenney wasn’t the only big winner, though. Here’s a look at the biggest winners from the 2019 Triton Poker Super High Roller Series London. Top 20 2019 Triton Poker Series London Money List 1. Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509 ($20,563,324) 2. Aaron Zang - £13,779,491 ($16,775,920) 3. Dan Smith - £7,245,300 ($8,820,778) 4. Stephen Chidwick - £5,383,800 ($6,553,948) 5. Wai Kin Yong - £4,426,695 ($5,386,804) 6. Paul Phua - £3,582,305 (4,359,418) 7. Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 ($3,652,345) 8. Justin Bonomo - £2,871,600 ($3,494,073) 9. Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 ($2,678,386) 10. Timothy Adams - £1,899,000 ($2,311,845) 11. Alfred De Carolis - £1,720,000 ($2,094,011) 12. David Benefield - £1,578,600 ($1,919,582) 13. Chin Lim - £1,561,300 ($1,900,134) 14. Wai Chan- £1,550,300 ($1,887,269) 15. Xu Liang - £1,452,900 ($1,767,878) 16. Ben Heath - £1,393,100 ($1,695,407) 17. Charlie Carrel - £1,321,000 ($1,601,853) 18. Linus Loeliger - £1,284,000 ($1,560,327) 19. Christopher Soyza - £1,242,300 ($1,511,921) 20. Jason Koon - £1,177,500 ($1,428,868) Kenney sits atop the series’ leaderboard thanks to his historic score. An interesting note about the score is that, while it broke the record for poker’s largest single tournament score, it was for a second-place finish in the event. Aaron Zang, who is second on this list, actually won the Triton Million event, but a deal with Kenney allowed Kenney to take more money. As a brief aside, Kenney’s 2019 has been absolutely incredible. He’s won nearly $30,000,000 in 2019 and this year alone would have him ranked #10 on poker’s all-time money list. Of note, Kenney won the Aussie Millions Main Event and was the fifth biggest winner from that entire series. Dan Smith and Stephen Chidwick are third and fourth on the list, respectively, and both placed in this positions in the Triton Million. But unlike Kenney and Zang ahead of them, Smith and Chidwick cashed in more events than just the £1,050,000 headliner. Smith took 15th in the £25,000 6-Handed No Limit Hold’em Turbo event for £45,300 ($55,150). Chidwick cashed in three other events for an additional £973,800 ($1,185,001) on top of the £4,410,000 ($5,368,947) he cashed for in the Triton Million. Chidwick took sixth in the £50,000 Short Deck Ante-Only event, seventh in the £100,000 Triton Main Event, and ninth in the £100,000 Short Deck Main Event. The next two names on the list, Wai Kin Yong and Paul Phua, did not cash in the Triton Million, so their performances over the course of the rest of the series must have been pretty good if they landed this high on the leaderboard. Yong won the £100,000 Triton Main Event for £2,591,695 ($3,154,064), and the player he beat was Phua, who took £2,558,305 ($3,113,429) for second place after the two struck a deal. Yong then took second in the £100,00 Short Deck Main Event for £1,835,000 ($2,232,740). Interestingly enough, Phua also went deep in that one, finishing fourth for £974,500 ($1,185,725). Phua added a third cash to his performance. Timothy Adams found himself as the 10th biggest earner from the series, having cashed a total of three times including once in the Triton Million. Outside of the top 10, David Benefield, Chin Lim, Wai Chan, Jason Koon, and Isaac Haxton also cashed three times at the festival. All told, 24 players cashed for at least $1,000,000 at the series. The 20 listed above were joined by Winfred Yu, Sam Greenwood, Haxton, and Rui Cao as seven-figure winners.
  4. The Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity will be a record setter when action kicks off Thursday. The £1,050,000 buy-in tournament will make it the biggest buy-in in poker history, and the event comes with a unique format. It's a freezeout where recreational/businessmen players can enter via invite only. Those invited can then issue one invite of their own to a guest/professional players. As of Wednesday morning, 26 pairings had been named, but it's the 'what could have beens' that are equally as intriguing. Let's take a look at a handful of recreational-professional pairings that we would've liked to have seen compete in the Triton Million. Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth It's no secret that Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth have a close relationship. We've seen it on Hellmuth's social media accounts all too often. A former Facebook executive and now a successful investor, Palihapitiya fits the mold of the perfect recreational poker player to enter this field. He's played poker in the past, including the first-ever World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop that cost $1,000,000 to enter, and has three WSOP cashes and two World Poker Tour cashes. Being good friends with Hellmuth makes Hellmuth the perfect invitee for Palihapitiya, and getting the polarizing 15-time gold bracelet winner in the field would be very entertaining. Isai Scheinberg and Daniel Negreanu Now this, this is a pairing, and we'll call it 'getting the band back together.' The founder of PokerStars, Isai Scheinberg, paired with the company's former golden boy, Daniel Negreanu. It would be absolutely tremendous to see, and we all know both parties have enough money to afford the gigantic £1,050,000 buy-in. We all know how skillful and experienced of a poker player Negreanu is, but Scheinberg has conquered the felt before, too. He won the UKIPT Isle of Man High Roller in the same year that Negreanu finished second in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. Tiger Woods and Antonio Esfandiari How can we not want to have Antonio Esfandiari, 'the magician,' the first-ever $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop winner, in the field? In order to make this happen, he needs a recreational player to invite him. Who bigger and better than Tiger Woods? You may be asking yourself, does Woods play poker and what's the connection here? Yes, Woods plays poker. He might not be entering the priciest tournaments in the world as some of these other recreational players are, but he’s the host of Tiger's Poker Night as part of Tiger Jam, held in partnership with the World Poker Tour each year, so he knows the game. On more than one occasion, Esfandiari has been one of the celebrity professionals to attend Tiger's Poker Night. Dan Fleyshman and Phil Ivey How do we get Phil Ivey in this field? We pair him with Dan Fleyshman, that’s how. Fleyshman doesn’t dabble in poker as he once did, but he’s still around the game enough that he could perform well in this tournament. One of his claims to fame is being the youngest founder of a publicly traded company and he's an active businessman and investor. Ivey is Ivey. His star power alone is worthy of entry into a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament, and we all know he has the chops to perform on the felt. He knows Fleyshman, so the pairing works, and we’d absolutely love to see Ivey in the field. David Einhorn and Erik Seidel Investor and hedge fund manager David Einhorn may not be a professional poker player, but he’s as avid a recreational player as they come. He's been known to compete in the highest buy-in poker tournaments the world has to offer, and he took third place for $4,352,000 in the first-ever $1,000,000 buy-in poker tournament the world has ever seen. With Einhorn being a New York guy, a perfect pairing would be Erik Seidel. Seidel is currently third on poker’s all-time money list with more than $35,000,000 in winnings, he’s an eight-time WSOP gold bracelet winner, and also a WPT champion. Although he’s of an older generation of players, Seidel continues to be a crusher on the high-stakes poker scene and has plenty of experience against the fellow professional players in the field. Haralabos Voulgaris and Daniel Colman Since Haralabos Voulgaris' new gig with the Dallas Mavericks, he hasn't been around the poker scene much. Not that the former professional sports bettor was grinding every tournament under the sun before he became the NBA team's Director of Quantitative Research and Development, but Voulgaris was known to get down in the high-stakes arena. Having played a couple million-dollar buy-ins before, this event is right in his wheelhouse. Voulgaris and Daniel Colman have a relationship that saw Voulgaris on Colman’s rail when Colman won the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. It would also be fitting to see Colman return to poker’s public stage in the largest buy-in event in the game’s history. Evan Mathis and Alex Foxen Maybe we’re reaching here, maybe we’re not, but these are dream scenarios so let’s keep rolling with it. Evan Mathis spent 12 years in the NFL and was one of the league’s top offensive lineman. He won a Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos and reached the Pro Bowl on two occasions. According to Spotrac, Mathis has estimated career earnings from football at more than $21,000,000. He recently grabbed headlines when he sold a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle for nearly $3 million. That’s enough to pay for his entry, his guest’s entry, and have plenty left over. Sticking with the football tie-in, Mathis’ guest could be Alex Foxen, a former football player for Boston College. These two would be quite the presence on and off the felt and both have the skills to compete. Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess Another fantasy Triton Million pairing is Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess. This would give us who is arguably poker’s strongest mainstream connection, Seymour, in the field and the three-time Super Bowl winner has plenty of experience on the felt. He just came off a 131st-place finish in the WSOP Main Event. A huge sports enthusiast and a player friendly with Seymour is Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 WSOP Main Event and also a WPT champion. Steve Aoki and Brian Rast The last dream pairing we'll look at involves superstar DJ Steve Aoki and top poker player Brian Rast. The two know each other, so the connection works for the invite, and Aoki has been known to play a bit of poker in his spare time. With Aoki being billed as one of the richest DJs in the world, the cake-tossing music maker should have enough cash to enter. If not, Rast can certainly front or find the money to get Aoki in so that he can play in the event. How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  5. The Triton Super High Roller Poker Series is about to make history. On Thursday, August 1 the Triton Million: A Helping Hand For Charity tournament will begin and it’s £1,050,000 buy-in will make the three-day event the biggest buy-in in poker history. Some of the biggest names in the game of poker will make their way to the UK to participate in this historic event that blends nosebleed stakes with an effort to raise money for a host of charitable causes. From every buy-in, £50,000 will be raised to benefit charities that include REG, the Caring For Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Invitations Please It’s not just the super-sized buy-in that makes playing in this tournament unique. The Triton Million was searching for a way to make sure the event wasn’t simply packed with pieced-out pros. They wanted to give recreational players and business professionals a reason to participate, so that made the event invitation only - with a twist. A Triton Poker Series committee handed out invitations only to non-professional players and then allowed them to invite one player each, which could be a pro player. The result is a field consisting of one half ‘recreationals’ and the other half, super high roller poker pros. For the first six hours, each half will be separated. The pros will only play against other pros and the recs will battle the recs. Then, there will be a redraw and the tournament will proceed as usual. With only 23 business professionals signed up, pro players needed to find themselves an invite from a like-minded counterpart. Here are those pro players that made a connection or two and will be taking a seat at the Triton Million. Bryn Kenney [caption id="attachment_625864" align="alignnone" width="903"] Bryn Kenney (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Bryn Kenney is in the midst of a career year. The regular super high roller and former #1-ranked GPI player has spent the better part of 2019 destroying the biggest buy-ins in the world, claiming three seven-figure scores this year alone. In addition to taking down the 2019 Aussie Million Main Event for over $914,000, Kenney has posted some of the biggest results of his career in previous Triton Poker Super High Roller Series. In March, he finished as the runner-up in the Triton Jeju Main Event for a career-high cash of $3,062,513. He followed that up with back-to-back victories during Triton Montenegro bringing him scores of $1.4 million and $2.7 million in a three-day span. His incredible run has vaulted him to the rarified air of the top 5 on the All-Time Money List, where he currently sits at #4. He is also currently resting as the #2 player on the 2019 Money List, second only to the winner of the World Series of Poker Main Event, Hossein Ensan. Kenney was invited to the Triton Million by Poker Central founder Cary Katz. Tom Dwan [caption id="attachment_625865" align="alignnone" width="903"] Tom Dwan (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Tom Dwan is arguably one of the most popular poker players in the history of the game. When his exciting, aggressive style of play was featured in the pre-Black Friday televised cash games heyday, the young man known as ‘Durrrr’ became iconic as the representative of the young crop of online grinders who helped push the game of poker to the next level. Nowadays, a Tom Dwan sighting is rare. Especially in a tournament. It’s generally understood that Dwan spends his time grinding the largest cash games in the world in Macau, only buying into tournaments when the stakes are at their highest, like the Triton Million. In fact, Dwan only has five recorded tournament results since 2011, two of which were invitational events. His last tournament cash was from June 2018 where he had a final table finish during the Triton Jeju Short Deck event for $252,320. In April 2019, Dwan was named an official Triton Poker ambassador. Dwan was invited to the Triton Million by the founder of the Triton Series himself, Paul Phua. Justin Bonomo [caption id="attachment_625867" align="alignnone" width="903"] Justin Bonomo (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] It wouldn’t be a Super High Roller event without the current king of the All-Time Money List, Justin Bonomo. For roughly a two year stretch between 2017-2018, it seemed like there wasn’t a nosebleed tournament where Bonomo didn't end up with all the chips. With just over $45 million in career earnings, Bonomo has a trophy case filled with super high roller scores including the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl China for $4.8 million, the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl title in Las Vegas for $5 million and the 2018 $1M The Big One For One Drop at the World Series of Poker for $10 million. Bonomo’s last outright victory took place this past March when he conquered the field in the first Short Deck event of the 2019 Triton Juju SHR Series taking home just over $586,000. Bonomo was invited to the Triton Million by Ferdinand Putra. Fedor Holz [caption id="attachment_625869" align="alignnone" width="903"] Fedor Holz (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Despite having ‘retired’ from poker, German poker savant Fedor Holz is still very much categorized as a pro. Hailing from a country packed with some of the greatest minds in the game, Holz sits at #1 on Germany’s All-Time Money List (#6 in the world) thanks to his over $32M in career earnings. Like many players who will be attending Triton Million, Holz found the majority of his success in the high rollers, where he absolutely dominated the scene in 2016. At the time Holz went on his outstanding tournament tear, the poker world had not seen anything like it. Holz took down the 2016 Triton Philippines Main Event title for over $3 million as well as the WSOP’s $111,111 High Roller for One Drop for nearly $5 million in a campaign that brought his over $16 million for the year. Nowadays, Holz spends much of his time working in business endeavors off the felt, including his midset app, Primed Mind. However, it was just last year that Holz finished as the runner-up to Justin Bonomo in the $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop, taking home $6 million for his efforts. Holz was invited to the Triton Mliion by Antanas ‘Tony G’ Guoga. Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates [caption id="attachment_625872" align="alignnone" width="903"] Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] One of the most unique and entertaining players on the SHR circuit is Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates. A regular in the nosebleed cash games in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Cates is known as a fearless player willing to take on anyone, anywhere, and at any stakes. When Cates isn’t busy producing steamy poker themed music videos, he has found plenty of success on the Triton tour. In 2016 he took home the Triton SHR Series Sanctity Cup title, just days before finishing third in the same series Main Event for over $1 million. He also took home another Triton trophy in May 2019 taking down the NLHE/Short Deck Mix event for just over $500,000. Cates was invited to the Triton Million by Malaysian businessman Richard Yong. Plenty of other pro players were able to find an invite into the tournaments and they are listed below, with their businessman/recreational counterpart in parentheses. David Peters (Stanley Choi) Rui Cao (Wai Kin Yong) Jason Koon (Bobby Baldwin) Mikita Badziakouski (Liang Yu) Timofey Kuznetsov (Ivan Leow) Stephen Chidwick (Alfred DeCarolis) Wai Leong Chan (Chin Wei Lim) Christoph Vogelsang (Chow Hing Yaung) Nick Petrangelo (Pat Madden) Sam Greenwood (Sosia Jiang) Elton Tsang (Qiang Wang) Tan Xuan (Zang Shu Nu) Martin Kabrhel (Leon Tsoukernik) Matthias Eibinger (Open Kisacikoglu) Igor Kurganov (Talal Shakerchi) Sam Trickett (Rob Yong) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Andrew Robl (Andrew Pantling) Vivek Rajkumar (Rick Solomon) Danny Tang (Winfred Yu) Michael Soyza (Ben Wu) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code “POCKET5S” for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  6. London won't be burning with boredom this week. The biggest buy-in poker tournament ever takes over London this week with many of the world's best high roller poker players playing at the invite of big-swinging recreational players. The Triton Million is a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament with unique rules designed to provide some level footing for the businessmen and women against some of poker's elite and all of the action will be streamed live. Leveling the Playing Field Not just anybody can play though. The Triton Million features a unique format designed to ensure the tournament isn't a shark fest. Triton organizers invited 23 recreational players, mainly businessmen and women, and each of them is allowed to invite one professional poker player as their guest. In an attempt to create a fair playing environment, recreational players will be separated from the pros for the first six levels of play with a full re-draw taking place following the sixth level. At that point, all players will be inter-mingled with the exception that recreational players can not be seated with the pro they invited until reaching the final table. Players are also not permitted to wear any form of clothing that covers their face or head. This includes scarves, funnel neck sweatshirts, turtle neck jumpers, hats/caps. All-Star Calibre Field As with any Triton Poker event, Paul Phua and Richard Yong will be in the field as two of the recreational players. They'll be joined on the recreational side by the likes of Bobby Baldwin, Cary Katz, Rob Yong, Talal Shakerchi, Tony G, and Leon Tsoukernik. Fedor Holz, Tom Dwan, Jason Koon, Sam Greenwood, Bryn Kenney, Mikita Badziakouski, Stephen Chidwick, Nick Petrangelo, and Timofey Kuznetsov are just a sprinkling of the players who have accepted an invite to play. There are currently 47 players registered including two additions made late Monday when hedge fund manager Bill Perkins invited Dan Smith to play. The only recreational player who has so far chosen not to extend an invite to a pro is Rick Salomon. The History of $1 Million Buy-In Poker Tournaments The £1,050,000 buy-in - roughly $1,285,000 US - make this just the fifth tournament in history to have a seven-figure buy-in. The previous four were all World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop events. The first Big One for One Drop in 2012 featured 48 players and was won by Antonio Esfandiari and represents the largest prize pool of the four. Year Event Entries Winner Prize pool 2012 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 48 Antonio Esfandiari $42,666,672 2014 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 42 Dan Colman $37,333,338 2016 €1,000,000 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza 28 Elton Tsang $27,437,564 2018 $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop 27 Justin Bonomo $24,840,000 The 2016 event in Monte Carlo was only open to recreational players and was won by Elton Tsang. Multiple Charities Set to Benefit Like the Big One for One Drop, the Triton Million also has a charitable angle. £50,000 from each buy-in goes to Triton Million beneficiaries, a hand-selected collection of charities including Caring for Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity Foundation, Sarawak Children's Cancer Society, Malaysian Red Crescent, One Drop, and Raise for Effective Giving (REG). Full Triton Super High Roller London Schedule The Triton Million is the star of a seven-event Super High Roller London schedule that includes a mix of traditional No Limit Hold'em and Short Deck Hold'em spread over the eight days of play. Event # Buy-In Game Dates 1 £25,000 Six Max No Limit Hold'em Turbo July 31 2 £1,050,000 Triton Million for Charity August 1-3 3 £50,000 No Limit Hold'em August 2-3 4 £100,000 Main Event August 4-5 5 £25,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 5-6 6 £100,000 Short Deck Main Event August 6-8 7 £50,000 Short Deck Ante Only No Limit Hold'em August 7-8 How to Watch the Triton Million Triton Poker has an established history of hosting live streams of their events to huge audiences around the world with commentary in multiple languages. Previous tournaments have been streamed on YouTube and Twitch, but the all three days of Triton Million will be streamed for free on PokerGO beginning, August 1 at 8 AM ET. Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman will be in the booth calling all of the action. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  7. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series London kicks off this week with the biggest buy-in in tournament poker history as the highlight. Deemed the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity, the event has a gargantuan £1,050,000 buy-in, of which £1,000,000 goes to the prize pool and £50,000 goes towards charitable causes. The Triton Million takes place at London Hilton on Park Lane and is sponsored by partypoker LIVE. It is scheduled as a three-day event from August 1-3. Charitable causes to benefit include Caring For Children Foundation, R.E.G., Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Triton Million Provides Unique Twist The Triton Million has a freezeout format with a rather unique twist to it. It’s invite-only. Invited players were issued invitations from a committee, and these players are of the recreational or businessman or woman variety. Those fortunate enough to receive invitations can then issue one invitation of their own to a guest player. The guest player can be a professional poker player. This allows for the field to be at least a 50% businessmen. For the first six hours of tournament play, the two player pools will be separated, such that the recreational/businessmen and women compete against one another and the guests/professionals play against one another. Furthermore, players will be asked to dress in formal attire for the final table. The Triton Million field has 25 businessmen signed up. Let’s take a look at them. Paul Phua [caption id="attachment_625843" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Paul Phua (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Paul Phua has been around the ultra high-stakes poker scene for nearly a decade now, amassing more than $11,400,000 in live tournament earnings and cashing in some of the richest poker events in the world. He has two victories on record, first in the Aspers £100,000 High Roller in 2012 for £1,000,000 ($1,621,297) and second in the Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €100,000 High Roller for €752,700 ($825,619). As for his business exploits that have earned him a fortune, Phua has been a well-known junket operator for some of the world’s richest and he’s been in the news as the "world's biggest bookie," having his Caesars Palace villa raided in July 2014 for running an illegal gambling operation. The raid came just about a month after Phua was arrested in Macau under similar charges. Phua's guest player for the Triton Million is Tom Dwan. Cary Katz [caption id="attachment_625842" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Cary Katz (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Cary Katz is the man atop the Poker Central organizational chart, having founded the company in 2015. Prior to that, he was founder and CEO of one of the largest student loan companies in the United States. On the felt, Katz has nearly $20,000,000 in live tournament earnings, including a career-best score of €1,750,000 ($1,929,203) when he finished fifth in the 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. In January 2018, Katz won the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100,000 Super High Roller to the tune of $1,492,340, and he placed eighth in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop for $1,306,667. Katz's guest player for the Triton Million is Bryn Kenney. Rob Yong [caption id="attachment_625844" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Rob Yong (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Rob Yong is the owner of Dusk Till Dawn Poker & Casino in Nottingham, UK. Under Yong’s watchful eye, Dusk Till Dawn was built into what is considered to be one of the best card rooms in the world, with top-tier brands such as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, partypoker, and UK & Ireland Poker Tour holding events there. Yong is now heavily involved with partypoker and partypoker LIVE, helping to grow these two brands in the online and live realms, respectively. Although his live tournament results amount to only a little more than $330,000, Yong has been a regular at some of the highest stakes in the world, specifically when it comes to cash games. At the table, he’s an entertaining competitor who doesn’t shy away from risk and will liven up any game. Yong's guest player for the Triton Million is Sam Trickett. Talal Shakerchi [caption id="attachment_625845" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Talal Shakerchi (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Talal Shakerchi is a player from the recreational/businessmen category that could likely fit into the professional poker player category. He doesn’t have the most live tournament earnings, with more than $7,300,000 won in his career, but make no mistake about it, Shakerchi is a grinder. For quite some time, Shakerchi kept his online poker name a secret so others in the high-stakes community wouldn’t realize his ability or the amount of volume he was putting in. On the business side, Shakerchi is an investment manager, running Meditor Capital Management Limited, which he founded. Shakerchi's guest player for the Triton Million is Igor Kurganov. Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga [caption id="attachment_625841" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Antanas Guoga, who is best known as 'Tony G' in the poker world, is another player listed in the recreational/businessmen category that could very well be considered a professional poker player. At least that’s what he used to be. Now a politician and Lithuanian Member of the European Parliament, Guoga is rarely seen on the poker scene these days. He is the founder of PokerNews.com and TonyBet. Guoga boasts more than $6,000,000 in live tournament earnings and became famous for his brash table talk. His biggest cash came at the European Poker Tour Grand Final €25,500 High Roller in 2009, when he took third for €420,000 ($552,239). He won the 2005 European Poker Championships Main Event for £260,000 ($456,822) and placed second in the World Poker Tour €10,000 Grand Prix de Paris for €339,930 ($414,478) in 2004. Guoga's guest player for the Triton Million is Fedor Holz. Additional Triton Million players from the recreational/businessmen category are listed below, with their guest players in parentheses. Richard Yong (Dan Cates) Stanley Choi (David Peters) Wai Kin Yong (Rui Cao) Bobby Baldwin (Jason Koon) Liang Yu (Mikita Badziakouski) Ivan Leow (Timofey Kuznetsov) Alfred DeCarolis (Stephen Chidwick) Chin Wei Lim (Wai Leong Chan) Chow Hing Yaung (Christoph Vogelsang) Pat Madden (Nick Petrangelo) Sosia Jiang (Sam Greenwood) Qiang Wang (Elton Tsang) Zang Shu Nu (Tan Xuan) Leon Tsoukernik (Martin Kabrhel) Orpen Kisacikoglu (Matthias Eibinger) Ferdinand Putra (Justin Bonomo) Rick Salomon (Vivek Rajkumar) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Winfred Yu (Danny Tang) Andrew Pantling (Andrew Robl) Ben Wu (Michael Soyza) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  8. If you were somehow able to plug your headphones into the music that plays in Bryn Kenney's head every day, you might find yourself suddenly out of step. Kenney does not keep pace with his companions and, quite clearly, the man hears a very different drummer. When the final table of the Triton Million event wrapped up, it was Aaron Zang posing for winner photos and doing the requisite post-win interviews with the assembled media after having won the biggest buy-in poker tournament in history. But just a few feet away, Kenney was busy arranging for his $20.5 million payout - nearly $4 million more than Zang and the largest single score in poker history - for finishing as the runner-up. Kenney now sits alone atop the Hendon Mob's all-time earnings list with $55.5 million in live tournament winnings, a position he long expected to hold. The reality of it though is finally hitting the 32-year-old. "I guess it's sinking in a bit. It feels pretty sick, almost surreal. Even though I always said that I would get it," Kenney said. "It's cool to set a goal for yourself and to hit it. It's amazing." Now that he's got the #1 spot, Kenney - who has never displayed a lack of confidence - doesn't think anybody else is ever going to catch him. Justin Bonomo, who held the #1 spot before Kenney, now sits second, some $7 million behind. "I just feel like everybody is a nice bit behind me now. I'm at the top of my game, playing so well, feeling so good. There's just lots of high roller tournaments, lots of Super High Roller Bowls and, maybe, more million dollar buy-ins where I just feel like I'm the most comfortable and most relaxed," Kenney said. "Whatever the biggest high roller there is at the time, that's what I've always done well in." The Triton Million was the fifth tournament with a seven-figure buy-in and each time the results have caused seismic shifts on the all-time money list leading many to question the legitimacy of that list. Kenney hears it, sees it on social media, but isn't going to let that diminish the pride he feels after hitting such an almost unreachable goal. "I don't really care at all. People will try to find the reason to criticize anything that they can. It doesn't really bother me. They'll look for any reason to try to shade you or put you down. I mean, I just laugh at any of it," Kenney said. When Kenney and Yang got heads-up, with an $8.9 million difference between first- and second-place payouts, Kenney was more than happy to chop and become the first player to win $20 million in a single tournament. Had Kenney not chopped, and the result stayed the same, Kenney would have taken home $14.1 million for finishing second and Yang would have collected $23 million and put his name in the record books. "As soon as we got heads up, he just asked if I wanted to chop and it was just so much (money). So I was like, 'Oh wow. Why not?' No reason to risk it. Play for six, seven mill, lose a few hands unluckily and lose," Kenney said. " I still wanted to win... (it was) a little brutal to lose the trophy." It's unlikely any of the professional poker players in the Triton Million had 100% of themselves. Kenney won't go into exact details on exactly how much of himself he had, but he'll certainly hint at it. Before the tournament began, Kenney declared that he had more of his personal net worth at stake in this event than any of the other 53 entries. "It was somewhere in the 30% to 40% range," Kenney admitted. "Just myself and this tournament, I just said, 'Fuck it. I don't care.' I just felt like I was gonna win it. If I didn't, I would've been fine to accept it. I just wanted to fire big on myself in the biggest tournament of all time." With six-figure buy-in tournaments now running throughout the year, Kenney doesn't think he's going to play too many events that aren't $100,000 buy-ins or bigger and he's unlikely to miss any event that Triton puts on, no matter where they are in the world. "I really wouldn't mind if I never played another tournament except for Triton and Aussie Millions," Kenney said. That's music to the ears of the Aussie Millions organizers, who will be glad to learn their reigning Main Event champion will be back to try and defend his title. "I love it there. It's a good time of the year. I told my family I was going to take them to Australia before this win even, anyway. I was planning on taking my whole family for Christmas and New Year's to Sydney and then from there I'll wind up going to Melbourne," Kenney said. In the days leading up to the Triton Million, Kenney went looking extra action. He offered to bet on him and his "recreational player" partner, Cary Katz, against any other duo. He found plenty of takers and ended up adding what he claims was more than a Triton Million min-cash was worth to his haul when all was said and done. "Nobody won any of the bets that they had against me and I didn't really turn down any bets either. One bet chopped, but other than that, I scooped every bet that everybody wanted against me. It was just such fun times," Kenney said. "Most of it happened before the final table even started because a lot of the teams that I bet against, all of their players were out when we made the money. So it was already over once the money hit." Entering into the biggest buy-in tournament of all-time requires a very high level of self-confidence. Kenney was happy to book extra bets because he looked at the tournament format and felt it played right into his strengths. "I just thought I was more prepared than everybody else. I thought it was a tournament that was set for me. I kind of just wanted to talk shit to everybody too, and maybe get in everyone's head a little bit and make them think that I was overconfident and maybe was just going to be overzealous and maybe not as prepared as I was," Kenney said. "Me against everybody, just the way I like it." The Triton Million had a number of rules different from nearly any other poker tournament in the world. The rules were geared towards making the event a first-class affair from start to finish, top to bottom. Players couldn't cover their face with a scarf, or sunglasses or a cap, with exceptions for players at the TV table bothered by the lights. There was also a dress code for the final table. "A formal suit will be required to be worn at the final table," the rules read. Kenney had no intention of wearing a suit though, at least not a conventional sports coat, dress shirt, tie combination. The proud New Yorker showed up wearing an outfit he had made during a recent trip to Japan that showcased his love for his hometown. While the seven other players at the final table all showed up embracing the sports coat look, Kenney says nobody from Triton said a word to him about his attire before play began and feels he was still better dressed than some of his opponents. "Everybody knows me. Even the people in charge, they kind of knew that I wasn't going to come in with a suit because it's not really my style. But at the same time I was going to come in with something swag. I mean everybody else wore a suit," Kenney said. "I didn't do anything disrespectful. I didn't mean anything disrespectful at all. I mean, if everyone was coming (dressed) in Tom Ford suits and dressing all A-plus, top-top, no problem. You want me to get a Tom Ford suit? That's fine. But you know if people are bringing their Marshalls suit for the million dollar tournament, I mean, I don't really see the need for me to wear some whatever suit too." Standing by himself on top of the all-time money list, Kenney scrolls through the names below him and sees a number of players who follow and preach the 'Game Theory Optimal' gospel and takes an extra bit of pride in knowing he got where is by doing things his own way. "That's the thing. Poker is a game of making good decisions and maybe if you're doing all this and thinking you need to play the same way always, maybe you're kind of overlooking some things that you should also be looking at," Kenney said. "I feel like poker is a much more complicated game than people really give it (credit for) and anyone thinking that it's just a numbers game, that you could crunch numbers and make the same decisions always, I really think that they couldn't really be more off."
  9. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. Even though it was August, the WSOP Main Event was back in the headlines, as a player that was disqualified from the tournament had a terrorism charge brought against him and another player was being sued over a staking deal. Ken Strauss Arrested and Charged for Terroristic Threat Ken Strauss, who was disqualified from the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event, was taking into custody and charged with making terroristic threats against a Las Vegas casino. The charge stemmed from Strauss’ social media activity at the end of July. In a tweet, Strauss threatened the Venetian Resort. WSOP Main Event Seventh-Place Finisher Sued Another big story from August that had WSOP Main Event ties was a lawsuit involving seventh-place finisher Nick Marchington. The 21-year-old Marchington won $1.525 million for his result, but he was soon hit with a lawsuit from two men who claimed to have bought a 10% piece of his WSOP Main Event action. David Yee and Colin Hartley, partners in C Biscuit Poker Staking, alleged that Marchington attempted to back out of a staking deal after he had agreed to sell 10% of his action to them for the WSOP's $5,000 Six Max No Limit Hold’em and Main Event tournaments. There were many questions surrounding the situation, most of which focused on the conversations had between the two parties and if the deal was on or off. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Aaron Zang Wins Poker’s Richest Tournament With a buy-in of £1.05 million, the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity became poker’s richest tournament. It was also set to award some absolutely mammoth paydays. Topping the field of 54 entries was Aaron Zang, who won £13.779 million. But, Zang wasn’t the event’s biggest winner. A heads-up deal between Zang and Bryn Kenney saw Kenney take home £16.89 million. The conversion rate put the score north of $20.4 million for Kenney, making him the holder of poker’s largest single score from a live tournament. Triton Million Results 1st: Aaron Zang - £13,779,791* 2nd: Bryn Kenney - £16,890,509* 3rd: Dan Smith - £7,200,000 4th: Stephen Chidwick - £4,410,000 5th: Vivek Rajkumar - £3,000,000 6th: Bill Perkins - £2,200,000 7th: Alfred DeCarolis - £1,720,000 8th: Timothy Adams - £1,400,000 9th: Wai Leong Chan - £1,200,000 10th: Chin Wei Lim - £1,100,000 11th: Winfred Yu - £1,100,000 *First and second prizes as a result of a heads-up deal. For more on this incredible tournament, go back and read the PocketFives recap. Bryn Kenney Doing His Own Thing and Crushing Speaking of Bryn Kenney, PocketFives’ Lance Bradley had the opportunity to sit down with Kenney for an interview. Even though he’s younger, Kenney isn’t often thought of as the same wizard-like player that his peers are. Kenney would be the first to admit it, too, but with a style all to his own he put together a tremendous year of poker in 2019. Checking in on Kenney’s stats on Hendon Mob, we can see that Kenney has more than $56 million in live tournament earnings and is atop poker’s all-time money list. As we mentioned before, he’s also the holder of poker’s largest single score from a live tournament. In 2019, Kenney won more than $30 million. Take some time and read the special feature story on this special player. PSPC Going To Barcelona in 2020 The first-ever PokerStars Players Championship was a smashing success, becoming the largest $25,000 buy-in event in poker history. PokerStars wanted to run it back, only in a different location, and announced that the PSPC would be heading to Barcelona, Spain. Taking place August 20-24, the 2020 PSPC will be part of the European Poker Tour stop in Barcelona that is ever so popular with players. Platinum Passes are back and currently being given out through a variety of promotions from PokerStars, and this event is anticipated to be even larger than the first. ‘Girafganger7’ Wins Monthly PLB in August 'Girafganger7,' a former top-ranked online poker player in the world, earned his second PocketFives Monthly PLB title by topping the leaderboard in August. He put in a ton of volume and accumulated 2,399 points from more than 120 results. He won just over $125,000 from those results. His August was highlighted by a win in the PokerStars High Roller Club: $530 Bounty Builder HR for $13,519.
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