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Found 12 results

  1. Jack Hardcastle became the second World Poker Tour champion crowned this week after the UK-based online pro won the $3,200 WPT Montreal Online Main Event on partypoker for a career-high score of $447,859 as well as a seat in the $15,000 2021 WPT Tournament of Champions. The WPT has been firing on all cylinders in the past 24 hours, with two Main Tour titles up for grabs. On Tuesday night, Ilyas Muradi took down the first WPT live event of the year after winning $605,000 at the WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Florida. Now, Hardcastle will join him in having his name etched on the Mike Sexton WPT Champions Cup after outlasting the 888-player field of the WPT Montreal Online Main Event. It didn’t take long after cards were “in the air” before the fireworks to begin. Upeshka De Silva was recently in the news for making the final table of the U.S.-based 2020 World Series of Poker. However, after testing positive for COVID-19 the day before play was set to take place, he was disqualified and paid out ninth place money. It didn’t take him long to bounce back and make another major final table and this time, with it being online, he was guaranteed to get to play. But De Silva started the day as the short stack and after an open by Rayan Chamas with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"], De Silva three-bet jammed with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. While often a chop, the board ran out [poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6c"][poker card="tc"][poker card="3s"] giving Chamas the flush and ending De Silva’s day early in another ninth-place finish for $37,024. After an open by Hardcastle, Germany's Andrei Kriazhev three-bet with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"]. Next to act, Marcel Kunze four-bet shipped his short stack with [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"]. Action folded back to Kriazhev who made the quick call and the duo watched as the flop came [poker card="3s"][poker card="th"][poker card="qc"] keeping Kriazhev in the lead but giving both a gutshot straight draw. The [poker card="jh"] hit the turn, giving Kriazhev the straight and leaving Kunze drawing dead to the [poker card="5c"] river. Kunze was eliminated in eighth place for $46,684. Jakob Meigel had managed to ladder up from his eighth-place starting position, but an hour into the final table, was still grinding a short stack. He raised with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"], leaving himself a few big blinds behind. Hardcastle three-bet with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"] and when folded to, Meigel put the rest of his chips in the middle. The board ran out [poker card="th"][poker card="8c"][poker card="ts"][poker card="4s"][poker card="tc"] allowing Hardcastle’s king kicker to play and sending Meigel out in seventh place for $58,650. The final six played for nearly another hour before Charles Chattha raised on the button with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"]. Out of the blinds, Hardcastle three-bet with [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"] and Chattha pushed nearly 40 big blinds all-in. Hardcastle snap-called and the flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="9s"][poker card="jd"], giving Chattha some straight outs. However, the turn came the [poker card="7d"] and the river was the [poker card="4d"] sending Chattha to the rail in sixth place for $74,119. Kraizhev found himself short and in need to make a move. Leaving himself just a few chips behind, Kraizhev raised with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="th"]. Felix Schulze then raised with [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"] and when folded back to him, Kraizhev put his remaining stack in the middle. Schulze hit his ace right away on the [poker card="ah"][poker card="7h"][poker card="7s"] flop and when the [poker card="4d"] hit the turn, Kraizhev was drawing dead. The [poker card="qc"] river hit and Kraizhev was ousted in fifth place for $95,672. Just minutes after a break, a big hand took out another player. Dan Shak raised with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="3h"] and Schulze flat called with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"]. From the small blind, Chamas three-bet holding the [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"] and after Shak folded Schulze made the call. The flop came [poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"] and Chamas, hitting second pair, open-shipped his big stack. Schulze snap-called with top pair, top kicker and the [poker card="4d"] hit the turn. Schulze was in great shape to double up but the river was the [poker card="kd"] awarding the hand to Chamas and sending Schulze out in fourth place for $139,163. Shak, who started the day as the chip leader, had been active and steady. But with three players left, he found himself as the short stack when his bluff was picked off by Hardcastle. Just minutes later, Hardcastle shipped his stack holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] into Shak who had [poker card="kc"][poker card="js"] in the big blind. Shak made the call. The flop came [poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"] giving Shak plenty of additional flush outs. But the [poker card="8h"] turn and [poker card="5h"] river were of no help and Shak added $212,458 to his extensive bankroll for finishing in third place. When heads up play began, Hardcastle held a significant chip lead over Chamas and he continually applied pressure. But Chamas hung around and evened out the stacks at one point. But some key calls and strong bluffs by Hardcastle allowed him to again grab a large lead. On the final hand of the tournament, Chamas opened with [poker card="jc"][poker card="3s"] and Hardcastle called in the big blind with [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"]. Hardcastle paired his nine on the flop and made the call when Chamas put out a bet on the flop. The [poker card="ks"] came on the turn and Chamas fired again, which Hardcastle called. The river was the [poker card="8d"], giving Hardcastle two pair and when Chamas shipped the rest of his small stack, Hardcastle made the quick call ending the tournament. Chamas finished as the runner-up and took home $308.703 while Hardcastle collected the $447,859 first-place prize and became the latest member of the WPT Champions Club. WPT Montreal Online Main Event Final Table Payouts 1. Jack Hardcastle - $447,859.32 2. Rayan Chamas - $308,703.22 3. Dan Shak - $212,458.57 4. Felix Schulze - $139,163.79 5. Andrei Kraizhev - $95,672.65 6. Charles Chattha - $74,119.22 7. Jakob Miegel - $58,650.26 8. Marcek Kunze - $46,684.79 9. Upeshka De Silva - $37,024.08
  2. When the United States leg of the 2020 World Series of Poker Main Event reached the final table two weeks ago, Louisiana native Joseph Hebert was the chip leader. Having two weeks to prepare for the biggest moment of his poker career, Hebert admitted that the nerves got to him as he took his seat at the Rio on Monday night. "The pressure was overwhelming for sure. When I sat down I was uncomfortable for sure," Hebert said. Hebert didn't break under the pressure though and late Monday night he was the last player standing and was $1.5 million richer because of it. The day began with news that Upeshka De Silva had failed a COVID test and was disqualified from the final table and awarded a ninth place finish. That left just eight players vying for the $1.5 million first place prize and the opportunity to play International leg winner Damian Salas for the bracelet and additional $1 million in prize money. Gershon Distenfeld started the final table with the third smallest stack but lasted just six hands before being eliminated. Ron Jenkins raised to 375,000 from middle position with [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"] before Distenfeld shoved for 1,430,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="kc"][poker card="jc"]. Jenkins called and sweated the [poker card="9h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2h"][poker card="th"][poker card="5h"] runout to eliminate Distenfeld in eighth place. Distenfeld plans to donate his $125,885 winnings to charity. Seven-handed play went on for another 55 hands of play before the next elimination occurred. With blinds of 125,000/250,000, Shawn Stroke shoved his last 975,000 from TG+1 with [poker card="3d"][poker card="3s"], from his immediate left, Harrison Dobin moved all in over the top for 4,200,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"], and Jenkins called all in for 3,280,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="2d"][poker card="2s"] flop kept Jenkins in front and neither the [poker card="th"] turn or [j] river changed anything and Stroke was eliminated in seventh. Down to just four big blinds, Dobin only got to see two more hands. From the button, Hebert raised to 500,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="2d"] and Dobin called off his last 750,000 from the big blind with [poker card="5d"][poker card="3h"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2h"] flop left Dobin in dire straits before the [poker card="qc"] river sealed his fate. The [poker card="9s"] completed the board to send Dobin out in sixth. Hebert was responsible for the next elimination 11 hands later in a blind vs. blind situation. Tony Yuan moved all in for 2,830,000 from the small blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="th"] and Hebert called with [poker card="4d"][poker card="4h"]. Yuan found no relief on the [poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3s"] flop and could only collect his things as the [poker card="7d"] turn and [poker card="9h"] river left Hebert to rake in the pot and bust Yuan in fifth place. Jenkins went back to work eliminating opponents 19 hands later. Action folded to Jenkins in the small blind and he moved all in with [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"] and Ryan Hagerty called all in from the big blind with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8d"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="8s"][poker card="2h"] flop gave both players a pair but left Jenkins in front. Neither the turn or river card saved Hagerty from being eliminated in fourth place. Six hands later, the tournament entered the heads-up portion of play after Hebert sent another player to the rail. Hebert opened to 600,000 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"] and Michael Cannon responded by moving all in from the small blind for 4,800,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qd"] and Hebert snap-called. Hebert was well in front and stayed there as the [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"] didn't gave Cannon any real extra outs and he was eliminated in third. Hebert held a 2-1 chip lead when heads-up play began and it took just one single hand for him toe garner all of the chips in play. From the button, Hebert raised to 700,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] before Jenkins raised to 2,300,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"]. Hebert clicked back all in and Jenkins called with his tournament life on the line. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] flop gave Hebert top pair and left Jenkins hoping for running straight or flush cards or the case queen. The [poker card="4h"] turn meant only one card in the deck could save Jenkins and the [poker card="8c"] river was not it. Hebert eliminated Jenkins in second place and banked the $1,553,256 score while Jenkins had to settle for runner-up status and $1,002,340. Hebert now waits for Salas, winner of the international leg of the tournament, to arrive from Argentina to play him heads-up for the bracelet and an additional $1 million. Salas was apparently denied entry to the United States this week after traveling to Europe in the last 15 days. Hebert plans on spending the next few days learning as much as he can about the former November Niner in preparation for their match. "I really don't much about him. I need to read up on him a little bit more. I was trying to focus on this final table first," Hebert said. "I'm super excited and I can't wait to face him." The finale is expected to be played next Sunday. Final Table Payouts Joseph Hebert - $1,553,256 Ron Jenkins - $1,002,340 Michael Cannon - $529,258 Ryan Hagerty - $387,130 Tony Yuan - $286,963 Harrison Dobin - $215,222 Shawn Stroke - $163,786 Gershon Distenfeld - $125,885 Upeshka De Silva - $98,813
  3. When the World Series of Poker announced that they would be crowning an official Main Event champion in 2020 with a hybrid online-live $10,000 buy-in tournament it was clear that the logistics of making that happen smoothly in the current state of the pandemic would be a challenge. Some of those very challenges presented themselves just hours before the start of the domestic WSOP Main Event Final Table on Monday when it was reported that three-time WSOP bracelet winner Upeshka De Silva has been disqualified from the Main Event due to COVID-19 protocols. De Silva Disqualified Late Sunday night, poker pundit Joey Ingram broke the news that Upeshka De Silva, who was then sitting eighth in chips headed into the WSOP Main Event Final Table, had been disqualified due to testing positive for COVID-19. De Silva has since laid out his story in a series of Tweets that started with him having “slight allergies” on December 15 and 16. After noticing that he’d lost his sense of smell, De Silva said he took a test on December 20 in which he tested positive for COVID-19. After alerting WSOP officials, he was told to still show up to the official test on December 27. The day before, on December 26, De Silva says he tested negative on a nasal swab test. However, ultimately, De Silva tested positive on the official mouth swab test that took place at the Rio on December 27. According to the rules laid out by the WSOP prior to the tournament, De Silva will be regulated to ninth place and collect the $98,813 payday. The news comes as a hit to the Main Event as De Silva is one of the final table's most well-known players. A three-time bracelet winner, De Silva has earned more than $1.6 million in WSOP events in nearly a decade of attending the series. Salas Denied Entry Just hours after the story on De Silva broke, the WSOP’s plans took another detour as Codigo Poker reported that Damian Salas, winner of the international leg of the 2020 WSOP Main Event, was denied entry into the United States because he had traveled to Europe within the past 15 days.   Salas was due to be in Las Vegas to take on the winner of the U.S.-based Main Event on December 30 in a filmed for television million-dollar added heads-up battle that will determine the official winner of the Main Event. It appears that production will simply hold until Salas is able to enter the United States and is now expected to play out on Sunday, January 3. The World Series of Poker has yet to comment on either situation at the time this story was posted.
  4. The 71 players who survived Day 1 of the 2020 World Series of Poker Main Event on WSOP.com returned to the tables on Monday to battle for a seat at the December 28 televised live final table and a shot at the $1,553,256 first-place prize. The Final Nine After roughly seven hours of play, only nine players remained with Louisiana’s Joseph Hebert taking a commanding chip lead into the final table. Hebert was involved in a number of key eliminations down the stretch and ended the day with 13,052,534 in chips, more than 2.5 times anyone else in the field. New York native Shawn Stroke wrapped up the day sitting in second with 5,252,000 in chips, followed closely by New Jersey's Ryan Hagerty in third with 5,071,572. Ye Yuan (4,829,459), Michael Cannon (4,408,847), and Gershon Distenfeld (3,475,481) make up the middle of the pack. Southern California's Ron Jenkins (2,476,746, Day 1 chip leader Upeshka De Silva (2,151,969) and short stack Harrison Dobin (1,581,392) complete the final table. Final Table Chip Counts [table id=145 /] Early Eliminations It didn’t take long for the bustouts to begin as mere moments after the start of Day 2 one of the shortest stacks in the field, Julian Parmann, hit the rail at the hands of Dan Zack after Parmann’s [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"] couldn’t hold against Zack’s [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"] after the [poker card="th"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"] flop. The [poker card="3c"] turn looked good for Parmann but the [poker card="ks"] on the river helped break the dam on the flood of eliminations that occurred before the final table. Parmann wasn’t the only player to exit in the early going as he was joined by the likes of Ryan Laplante, Barry Hutter, and Farid Jattin, all of whom turned their $10K into an $18,274 payday. Of course, the hits kept coming in the first half of the day as the dream of taking down the Main Event ended for some of the most notable names in the field. Nick Schulman (55th, $20,304), Aram Zobian (52nd, $22,334), Darren Elias (50th, $22,334), 2013 WSOP Champ Ryan Riess (47th, $22,334), and Freddy Deeb (46th, $22,334) were among those whose Day 2 was cut short. Big Name Bustouts Bracelet winners fell in bunches at the half-way point. After three-time WSOP bracelet winner Scott Seiver busted in 39th place for $25,718, Mohsin Charania (35th, $29,779), Joseph Cheong (33rd, $29,779), and Jason Somerville (32nd, $29,779) all exited in short order as well. Taylor Von Kriegenbergh (23rd), Maria Ho (22nd), and Jared Griener (20th) were among those who picked up a $35,194 payday after being eliminated with three tables left. March To The Final Table With just two tables remaining, half of the field still needed to go broke before the final nine could celebrate. Unfortunately for WSOP bracelet winner Sean Swingruber, he would not be among them. After Stroke and Yaun flat called, Swingruber shoved his short stack from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"]. Stroke reshoved his stack holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"] and Yuan, who had everyone covered, called with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"]. The board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="js"] to give the pot to Stroke and sent Swingruber home in 18th place. Moments later Michael Hahn made his move by open-shoving his ten big blind stack with [poker card="ah"][poker card="6h"]. Dan Zack made the call from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"] and then Clayton Maguire, who had both covered, three-bet shoved holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"]. Maguire hit his king on the [poker card="kd"][poker card="js"][poker card="5s"] flop, but the [poker card="th"] let Zack hit his gutshot straight. Hahn was drawing dead to the [poker card="9d"] river and he fell in 17th place. After Distenfeld opened, Keith Dovovan three-bet his final ten big blinds holding [poker card="as"][poker card="4s"] only to get called by Yuan in the big blind who has [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The board came [poker card="ad"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8d"] allowing Yaun’s kicked to play and sending Donovan home in 16th place. It was a rough exit for Rody Collazo who got his stack in the middle with [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"] against Hebert and his [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] flop looked good for Collazo, but after Hebert spiked the [poker card="tc"] on the turn, Collazo was down to two outs. The [poker card="9h"] was not one of them and Collazo left in 15th place. A huge hand when down after Stephen Graner raised nearly his entire stack holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"] only to be jammed on by Maguire in the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"]. Then Hebert, the largest stack of the three, re-jammed over the top with [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"]. After Graner put the rest of his stack in, the three watched a board of [poker card="kd"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="8d"] run out. Hebert’s big slick won the pot and eliminated both Graner (14th) and Maguire (13th) in one stroke. Hebert wasn’t anywhere near finished. Next, he got involved in a hand with Martin Zamani where Herbert raised from early position with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"] and Zamani defended his big blind with [poker card="js"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9c"] and Zamani checked it over to Hebert who put in a bet. Zamani then check-raised all-in, which Hebert called.The turn came [poker card="ah"] and the river was the [poker card="6h"]. Both players missed, but Hebert’s ace-king high hand was good enough to take Zamani out in 12th place. Hebert then mixed it up with WSOP bracelet winner Dan Zack. After Zack put in a raise with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="9d"], Hebert flat called holding the [poker card="ks"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3c"] flop meant there was going to be plenty of action. Zack checked his two pair and Hebert put in a bet with his top set, which Zack called. Zack checked the [poker card="jd"] turn and Hebert shoved, putting Zack to the test for all his chips. Zack made the call, which ended his tournament in 11th place before the [poker card="qh"] hit the river. With just 10 players left, Anthony Spinella was sitting on just two big blinds. He moved all in from the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"] and Stroke put in a three-bet with [poker card="as"][poker card="8c"], allowing for the pot to be heads up. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"] flop put Stroke in the lead, but gave Spinella outs to the gutshot straight. The [poker card="js"] produced a few more outs for the WSOP Online bracelet winner, but the [poker card="5s"] was not one of them and Anthony Spinella finished in 10th place, bubbling the final table of the 2020 WSOP Main Event. Payouts 18-10 [table id=146 /] Now the final nine have two weeks to prepare, and quarantine, in preparation for the live final table that will take place at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino on December 28 where one of them will not just earn the over $1.55 million first-place prize but a date to battle the international Main Event winner in a $1 million heads-up contest that will determine who the history books will recognize at the 2020 WSOP Main Event champion. Final Table Payouts [table id=143 /]
  5. The 2020 World Series of Poker Main Event continued on Sunday as United States-based players located in Nevada and New Jersey took their shot at the lone $10,000 buy-in Day 1 flight on WSOP.com in a bid to become the next WSOP World Champion. At the end of 12 hours of play, the field of 705 players had just 71 remaining and three-time WSOP bracelet winner Upeshka De Silva emerged as the overnight chip leader with 1,930,067 in chips. He is followed by ‘vforvictoria’ who sits in a close second place with 1,792,716 in chips and ‘Samthedog76’ who rounds out the top three with 1,529,044 in chips. The healthy field size propelled the prize pool to $6,768,000, far-and-away the largest prize pool in regulated U.S. online poker history. And just like the international portion of the Main Event which held its opening flights on GGPoker, both the first and second-place finishers will be guaranteed paydays of more than $1 million dollars. Final Table Payouts [table id=143 /] The U.S.-based field featured plenty of big-time poker stars and previous WSOP bracelet winners. But at the end of a full 12 hours of play, just 71 from the Day 1 field still had a shot at making the final table which is set to play out live at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino on December 28. The tournament got underway at 12:00 noon local time (3:00 pm ET) with players set to play 22 full 30-minute levels. And while it would take nearly all of the 12-hour day before the final 107 players made the money, the first elimination came swiftly - just a few hands into the tournament. In a classic set-up hand, Chris ‘Pay_Son’ Staats found himself with pocket aces and ‘ATOWNLEWIS’ woke up with pocket kings. After a preflop raising war, all their chips made it into the middle with Staats’ aces holding up and 'ATOWNLEWIS's day ending early. But it wasn’t long before ‘ATOWNLEWIS’ had some company on the rail, as plenty of notable names busted well before the money. Chris Hunichen, Aaron Mermelstein, James Carroll, and 15-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth all made their exits in the first half of the day. Of course, Hellmuth was by no means the only previous bracelet winner unable to advance to Day 2. Phil Galfond, Eric Baldwin, Nathan Gamble, Michael Gagliano, Brandon Adams, Ben Yu, Chance Kornuth, Mike Matusow, Connor Drinan, Michael Mizrachi, as well as former #1-ranked pros Bryan Piccioli, Calvin Anderson, and Shaun Deeb were among those that will have to wait until next year to add to their gold bracelet totals. Daniel Negreanu’s bid for a seventh bracelet, as well as cashing in on a number of $100,000 bracelet bets, came to an end as well. Soon after Adrian ‘Partee’ Buckley had the unfortunate distinction of bubbling the Main Event, when his [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"] lost to ‘Samthedog76’s [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"] in heartbreaking fashion on a [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="th"] runout, Negreanu himself busted out of the tournament, collecting a min-cash of $14,890. Joining Negreanu in surviving the bubble, but not the day included Ian Steinman (105th, $14,890), Jed Hoffman (102nd, $14,890), Matt Affleck (97th, $14,890), Lauren Roberts (88th, $15,566), David Coleman (76th, $15,566) and eight-time WSOP Circuit Ring and gold bracelet winner Michael Lech (74th, $15,566). While many notable names are no longer in the hunt for the 2020 title, there are plenty of players to keep an eye on when play resumes. Taylor Von Krigenbergh and Galen Hall both have top-ten stacks. Fan favorites Nick Shulman, Jason Somerville, and Maria Ho are all still in the running with plenty of chips, and four-time World Poker Tour champion Darren Elias along with 2013 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Ryan Riess are also still in the hunt. The remaining players return to WSOP.com at noon on Monday to play down to the final nine players who will determine a winner, live, on December 28 at the Rio in Las Vegas. At the same time the final eight players in the 2020 GGPoker World Series of Poker Main Event are preparing to play down to a winner on Tuesday, December 15 at King’s Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic. The winner of both the international and the U.S. tournaments will then meet in a heads-up match, with $1 million added, on December 30 at the Rio in Las Vegas to determine the 2020 champion. Top Ten Chip Counts [table id=144 /]
  6. [CAPTION=100%]Pat Lyons wins the WPT Legends of Poker Main Event, earning over $615,000. (Photo credit Joe Giron/WPT)[/CAPTION] Hours after making the World Poker Tour Legends of Poker final table at the Bicycle Casino in Los Angeles, Pat Lyonstweeted: A professional poker player from Hillsborough, California, Lyons' prediction came true, winning $615,346 and a seat into the 2017 WPT Tournament of Champions. The $4,000 Main Event drew a field of 687 entries for a prize pool of almost $2,500,000 paid out to the top 72 players. WPT Champions Club members finishing in the money were Andy Frankenberger, Olivier Busquet, Seth Davies, defending champion Mike Shariati, Chino Rheem, James Mackey and Taylor Paur. The final table was led by 77-year-old William Vo, hoping to pass Doyle Brunson as the oldest player to win a WPT title. Second in chips was Lyons, winner of the Arizona State Poker Championship for over $240,000 in August. A pair of 2015 WSOP bracelet winners – Upeshka De Silva and Benjamin Zamani – held down third and fourth place respectively. Todd Peterson and Rafael ‘Mahalael’ Oliveira rounded out the lineup, as they started with the following chips: Seat 1: William Vo – 5,260,000 Seat 2: Pat Lyons – 4,980,000 Seat 3: Benjamin Zamani – 3,215,000 Seat 4: Todd Peterson – 1,930,000 Seat 5: Upeshka De Silva – 4,475,000 Seat 6: Rafael Oliveira – 780,000 It was a short stay at the final table for Rafael Oliveira, eliminated on the seventh hand. Facing a limp from Benjamin Zamani and a raise from Upeshka De Silva, Oliveira looked down at [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"] and moved his short stack all in. Zamani folded and De Silva called with [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"]. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="th"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6s"] as De Silva made runner-runner trips to end Oliveira’s tournament. Early action at the final table featured a couple of events one would find in a cash game. The players agreed to show one card every time they won a pot. When Pat Lyons wasn't active with his table talk, he wandered away from the table for several hands at a time, even as the chip leader. William Vo had the support of many spectators railing him at the Bike, but he couldn’t maintain his success from earlier in the tournament, finishing in fifth place. Vo lost a huge pot to Todd Peterson, attempting a huge bluff on the river with nine-high as Peterson eventually called, showing two pair. A few hands later, Vo attempted another bluff on the river, shoving with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"] on a [poker card="jc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="qs"][poker card="2h"] board. Zamani called with [poker card="kh"][poker card="jd"] and his pair of jacks left Vo taking home a six-figure payday. Finishing in fourth place was Peterson, knocked out in dramatic fashion by Lyons. The hand started with a raise from De Silva, a three-bet from Lyons and a four-bet shove from Peterson. De Silva folded and Lyons called with [poker card="td"][poker card="tc"], promising the crowd free drinks if he won the hand, as Peterson revealed [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4s"] flop put Peterson in front with nothing changing on the [poker card="5c"] turn. The [poker card="th"] on the river gave Lyons the winning hand and a round of drinks for the spectators as three remained. Three-handed play featured plenty of action as Zamani doubled through Lyons, then De Silva doubled through Lyons to take the chip lead. Zamani then doubled through De Silva by flopping quads to tighten up the chip counts. Lyons would retake the chip lead on the 139th hand of the tournament and never relinquish it again. Upeshka De Silva was now the short stack and was in a good spot to double up, calling with [poker card="jh"][poker card="jd"] against Lyons' shove with [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"]. The board ran out [poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2h"][poker card="ah"][poker card="qd"] as the river once again doomed a player as De Silva finished in third place. Benjamin Zamani already had a runner-up finish earlier in the season at Choctaw, hoping to finish one spot higher but facing an over two-to-one chip deficit against Pat Lyons. Heads-up play lasted less than 20 hands when Zamani shoved with [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"] as Lyons called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"]. The dealer dealt the final five cards: [poker card="9d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="jh"][poker card="ts"], giving Lyons the winning straight and the title. Lyons also receives the WPT Champions Trophy, a Hublot King Power watch and a pair of gold Monster 24k headphones. Zamani settles once again for second place this season to take over the WPT Player of the Year lead with 2,000 points, 750 ahead of James Mackey. The next stop for the WPT takes players to Atlantic City for the Borgata Poker Open. The $3,500 Main Event with a $3,000,000 guaranteed prize pool runs from September 18-23. On September 19th, the WPT Players Forum takes place at 8:30pm as players can provide feedback and suggestions. WPT Legends of Poker Final Table Results: 1st: Pat Lyons - $615,346 2nd: Benjamin Zamani - $341,412 3rd: Upeshka De Silva - $198,720 4th: Todd Peterson - $149,715 5th: William Vo - $113,105 6th: Rafael Oliveira - $85,760
  7. [caption width="640"] Upeshka De Silva was one of three WSOP bracelet winners on Saturday (WSOP photo)[/caption] Weekends at the World Series of Poker are always busy, and the first Saturday of the 2017 WSOP was no exception with six events running at once, including two flights of Colossus and the first of three online events on the schedule. Before the day wrapped up, three players walked away with bracelets including a former WPT Player of the Year, and Bertrand Grospellier bluffed 14-time bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth to get himself to the top of the chip counts in the One Drop High Roller. Upeshka De Silva Wins Second Bracelet in Event #3 ($3,000 NLHE Shootout) The final 10 players returned to Event #3 ($3,000 NLHE Shootout) on Saturday to play down to a winner and after little more than eight hours of play, Upeshka De Silva walked away with the second WSOP bracelet of his career. De Silva beat Louis Helm heads-up to walk away with the win and $229,923. Helm earned $142,115. De Silva’s first bracelet came in 2015 when he won a $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $424,577. “(Helm) played very well. He played a lot better than I anticipated. He played a limp / re-raise-all-in strategy. I kept trying to isolate his weak hands and he kept going all in. He stayed alive for quite a while,” said De Silva. “I felt like my end game was a little bit better. I thought I'd take a lower-variance style and grind him down. He gets a double-up and it's anybody's game.” Jan Schwippert finished fourth at his second final table of the 2017 WSOP. He was part of the team that finished ninth in Event #2 ($10,000 Tag Team Championship) earlier in the week. Olivier Busquet wound up fifth. Taylor Paur, one of 39 former #1-ranked players on PocketFives that we’re tracking all summer long, was the first player eliminated from the final table. Final Table Payouts Upeshka De Silva - $229,923 Louis Helm - $142,115 Linglin Zeng - $103,449 Jan Schwippert - $76,018 Olivier Busquet - $56,397 Casey Carroll - $42,246 John Richards - $31,955 Mark McMillin - $24,410 Jean Gaspard - $18,832 Taylor Paur - $14,675 Reigning WPT POY Can Also Play Non-Hold’em Games Well, Too [caption width="640"] Benjamin Zamani now has two WSOP bracelets to go with his WPT Player of the Year award (WSOP photo)[/caption] Fresh off of winning World Poker Tour Player of the Year, Benjamin Zamani added “two-time WSOP bracelet winner” to his growing list of accomplishments. Zamani beat out 904 other players to win Event #4 ($1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or better) and the second bracelet of his career. He also earned $238,620. Zamani’s final opponent was Jared Hemingway. The pair only played heads-up for a little over an hour after having played for almost 11.5 hours to get to that point. There were 29 players at the start of Day 3 with Christopher Logue leading the way. Logue eventually busted just shy of the final table, in 11th place. Final Table Payouts Benjamin Zamani - $238,620 Jared Hemingway - $147,428 Alex Ferrari - $103,471 Ryan Paluf - $73,647 Gary Vick - $53,171 Forrest Auel - $38,946 Scott Buller - $28,948 Martin Corpuz - $21,839 Dustin Sitar - $16,726 Irish Players Top Flight C and D Chip Counts; Field Size Struggling The second day of Colossus saw a combined 5,426 players enter, bringing the two-day total to 10,828 with just two starting flights left to go on Sunday. There’s a familiar face near the top of the chip counts though. Cord Garcia, who won the inaugural Colossus in 2015, bagged up the second biggest chip stack in Flight D, with 415,000. He’s just 35,000 behind Toby Joyce, the #1-ranked online poker player out of Ireland. Gavin O’Rourke, another Irish player, finished Flight C with 374,000, good enough for the biggest stack from that flight. Unless flights E and F average 5,000 players or more, this will be the smallest Colossus field in the three-year run of the event. In 2015, 22,374 players entered with that number dropping to 21,613 last year. The event is currently 10,785 short of the 2016 field size. Day 1C Top 5 Chip Counts Gavin O'Rourke - 374,000 Mark Johnson Jr. - 368,000 Alexander Borteh - 365,000 Matt Holtzman - 356,000 Haixia Zhang - 330,000 Day 1D Top 5 Chip Counts Toby Joyce - 440,000 Cord Garcia - 415,000 Dan Healey - 341,000 Asher Conniff - 314,000 James Manganaro - 310,000 Grospellier Bluffs Hellmuth to Take Chip Lead into Day 3 To the surprise of nobody, big names continue to populate the One Drop High Roller chip counts through Day 2. Scott Seiver, Dan Colman, Antonio Esfandiari, Doug Polk and Rainer Kempe are just a handful of the players in the top 10 with just 23 left, but after Day 2 action, most people were talking about two players in particular; Bertrand Grospellier and 14-time bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth. Grospellier ended Day 2 on top of the chip counts with 7,040,000 and Hellmuth ended up with the 10th largest stack at 2,870,000 but the two clashed on Saturday in a hand that could have seen Hellmuth end up as chip leader and Grospellier on the outside looking in. With blinds of 30,000/60,000 (10,000 ante), Hellmuth raised to 135,000 from the cutoff and Grospellier defended his big blind. Grospellier then checked after the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"][poker card="qd"] flop, Hellmuth bet 100,000, Grospellier raised to 215,000 and Hellmuth responded with another raise, this time to 470,000. Grospellier called and then check-raised again after the [poker card="3h"] turn, this time to 1,200,000. Hellmuth, left with 2,930,000, decided to fold his [poker card="qc"][poker card="9s"] while Elky showed the [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"] for an incomplete straight draw. Grospellier ended the hand with more than 9,000,000. Day 3 action will begin with play almost on the bubble. Just 20 of the 23 remaining players will cash. Other notables still in the field include Phil Galfond, Igor Kurganov, Connor Drinan and Charlie Carrel. The three shortest stacks at the start of Day 3 belong to Salman Behbehani (835,000), Nick Petrangelo (800,000) and Moritz Dietrich (710,000). Action resumes at 2 pm PT and will be streamed on the PokerGo app. Top 10 Chip Counts Bertrand Grospellier - 7,040,000 Dario Sammartino - 6,080,000 Scott Seiver - 4,920,000 Chris Moore - 4,315,000 Dan Colman - 4,100,000 Andrew Robl - 4,080,000 Rainer Kempe - 3,950,000 Martin Jacobson - 3,805,000 Doug Polk - 3,500,000 Phil Hellmuth - 2,870,000 Sampo Ryynanen On Top of $2,500 Mixed Triple Draw It might not be the most popular game on the WSOP schedule, but Event #7 ($2,500 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball) attracted some of that variations best players on Saturday. Leading the way after the 10 levels of Day 1 is Finland’s Sampo Ryynanen. Ryynanen was the only player to turn their 7,500 chip starting stack into a six-figure stack. Ryynanen bagged up 102,200 while his next closest competitor, Wes Self, finished with 97,000. Jared Bleznick finished third with 91,300. Just 57 of the 225-player field advanced to Day 2. Among the notables to move on were Martin Staszko (70,800), Brandon Shack-Harris (68,800), James Obst (48,000), Paul Volpe (46,000), Jason Mercier (36,000), David ‘ODB’ Baker (34,600 and Jon Turner (26,600). Top 10 Chip Counts Sampo Ryynanen - 102,200 Wes Self - 97,000 Jared Bleznick - 91,300 Joe Wagner - 85,300 Joseph Wagganer - 85,300 James Kwon - 81,400 Matt Schrieber - 79,000 Eric Wasserson - 78,000 Yosuke Sekiya - 75,200 Jason Gola - 72,800 Joseph Mitchell Wins First Online Bracelet Event of 2017 The first online event on the 2017 WSOP schedule, Event #8 ($333 Online NLHE) drew 1,780 players and wrapped up in just a single day. At the end it was Joseph ’ul_gg’ Mitchell coming out on top to win the bracelet and $122,323. Runner-up Mark ‘PLODonkey17’ Scacewater ended up with $73,538.79, but might feel a tad sore after suffering a disconnect during heads-up play that saw most of his chips sent to his opponent. The only non-American to make the final table was Michael 'ooookillthem' Addamo, who finished third for just over $54,000. Final Table Payouts Joseph 'ul_gg' Mitchell - $122,313.75 Mark 'PLODonkey17' Scacewater - $73,538.79 Michael 'ooookillthem' Addamo - $54,043.86 Hao 'Sandongcpa' Sun - $39,592.02 Bobby 'bcmclawh' McLawhorn - $29,204.76 Michael 'TonyPerkis1' Jacoby - $21,828.30 Kevin 'SEQUENCE' Sheetz - $16,559 Casey 'rhin0' Long - $12,645 William 'nomoneyloser' Pan - $9,710
  8. The World Poker Tour has a new champion, after Patrick 'prepprepprep' Serda defeated a field of 792 entries to win the Season XVII WPT Montreal C$5,300 Main Event. Serda came into the final table at Playground Poker Club with the chip lead and successfully battled his way to victory to claim the C$855,000 first-place prize. At the official WPT final table of six, Serda defeated World Poker Tour champion Ema Zajmovic in heads-up play, and he also battled with Sorel Mizzi (3rd place) and WPTDeepStacks champion Upeshka De Silva (5th place). WPT Montreal Final Table Results 1st: Patrick 'prepprepprep' Serda - C$855,000* 2nd: Ema Zajmovic - C$556,000 3rd: Sorel Mizzi - C$410,000 4th: Kauvsegan Ehamparam - C$305,450 5th: Upeshka De Silva - C$230,250 6th: Jiachen Gong - C$175,500 *First-place payout includes a $15,000 entry into the season-ending WPT Tournament of Champions. The final-table eliminations began when Jiachen Gong was sent home in sixth place as the result of a three-way clash. Zajmovic, Gong, and Kauvsegan Ehamparam found all of the money in the middle preflop. Zajmovic and Gong both had ace-queen, and Ehamparam had ace-king. The ace-king held for Ehamparam and he won the pot to triple up, while Gong long to Zajmovic after she made a flush. De Silva was next to go, busting at the hands of Mizzi when his pocket fours couldn’t pull off the upset against Mizzi’s pocket jacks. Shortly after that, Ehamparam was sent home in fourth place by Zajmovic. Three-handed play meant Zajmovic was just two players away from her second World Poker Tour title. Serda and Mizzi were each looking for their first. After being fairly quiet throughout the final table, Serda woke up in a big way when he knocked out Mizzi in third place. Mizzi had fallen short and moved all in from the button for 3.2 million when the blinds were 100,000-200,000 with a 200,000 big blind ante. Serda reraised all in from the small blind for 12.6 million. Zajmovic folded from the big blind and it was Mizzi’s two sizes against the pocket nines for Serda. Mizzi failed to come from behind and was knocked out in third place for C$410,000. With the elimination of Mizzi, Serda was able to enter heads-up play with a slight lead. Serda had 16.15 million to Zajmovic's 15.675 million. Only a handful of hands were played between the two before Serda sealed the victory. The heads-up pots played between Serda and Zajmovic to start didn’t seem like much. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, the two collided to end the tournament. On the final hand, Zajmovic raised to 500,000 on the button. The blinds were still 100,000-200,000 with a 200,000 big blind ante, and Serda opted to three-bet to 1.6 million. Zajmovic came back with a four-bet to 3.8 million, and Serda called. The flop was [poker card="Ts"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6s"] and both players checked to see the [poker card="Ac"] land on the turn. Serda checked, Zajmovic bet 3 million, and Serda called to see the [poker card="3h"] land on the river. Serda checked, Zajmovic moved all in for 8.5 million, and Serda went into the tank. He eventually made the call holding just the[poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"] for a pair of sevens. Zajmovic had air with the[poker card="Kd"][poker card="9s"] and was eliminated in second place. Season XVII WPT Montreal event marked the first in the new four-year partnership between the World Poker Tour and partypoker LIVE. The event attracted 792 entries but failed to reach the C$5 million guarantee on the prize pool. The top 103 places reached the money, and notable finishes were had by WPT Champions Club members Jonathan Little (8th - C$105,500), Amir Babakhani (12th - C$67,000), Mike 'goleafsgoeh' Leah (18th - C$36,500), Marvin Rettenmaier (45th - C$14,978), David Ormsby (55th - C$13,221), Matt Salsberg (99th - C$8,712), and Darryll Fish (102nd - C$8,712). Next up for the World Poker Tour is the Season XVII WPT Seminole Rock 'N' Roll Poker Open at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida. The full festival runs November 14-28, 2018, with the $3,500 Championship Event taking place November 23-28. Photo courtesy of the World Poker Tour.
  9. The first gold bracelet won every summer at the World Series of Poker is always a special one. For the winner, it’s an unbelievable thrill, a tone setter, a bankroll booster, and a stress reliever all at once. For the media and fans, it’s the first of many headline-grabbing triumphs. For other competitors, it represents that there is gold at the end of the long rainbow. All of those things are great, but does success beget further success? Here’s a look at how the first gold bracelet winner of the summer has performed throughout the rest of the WSOP. For this article, PocketFives examined the results of the first winner of an individual open gold bracelet event going back to 2004. This time period can be commonly referred to as the "modern poker era." 2004: James Vogl At the 2004 WSOP, James Vogl topped a field of 834 entries to win the $2,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $400,000. Vogl would go on to cash twice more that summer, but the scores were much smaller than his victory. Vogl finished 27th in the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $7,160 and 12th in the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $12,660. 2005: Allen Cunningham Five-time gold bracelet winner Allen Cunningham was the winner of the first bracelet in 2005. Not only was his victory a big one, as Cunningham won the 2,305-entry $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $725,405, but it ignited quite the summer for the seasoned professional. After the opening win, Cunningham cashed four more times, and each of the additional cashes came in $5,000 buy-in events. First, he took fourth in the $5,000 Pot Limit Hold’em and fourth in the $5,000 Pot Limit Omaha events for $89,865 and $141,245, respectively. Cunningham then placed 29th in the $5,000 Six-Max No Limit Hold’em for $8,490 and seventh in the $5,000 Omaha Hi-Lo for $42,110. All told, Cunningham earned $281,710 after his opening win that summer. Cunningham’s performances were enough to win him the 2005 WSOP Player of the Year award. 2006: Brandon Cantu After Brandon Cantu won the opening $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event for $757,839, he didn’t cash for the rest of the 2006 WSOP. 2007: Steve Billirakis Like Cunningham, Steve Billirakis opened with a win and then earned four cashes afterwards. His opening win was worth $536,287 after Billirakis topped a field of 451 entries in the $5,000 Limit/No Limit Hold’em tournament. He then scored 45th-, 29th-, 16th-, and 33rd-place finishes in future events. Whereas Cunningham won nearly $300,000 in additional prize money, Billirakis’ four other cashes only totaled $57,458. That’s not bad, but it’s not nearly the year Cunningham had. 2008: Nenad Medic Nenad Medic opened the 2008 WSOP with a bang, scoring first place in the stacked $10,000 Pot Limit Hold’em tournament for $794,112. Medic only cashed once more that summer, taking 24th in the $1,000 No Limit Hold’em for $16,496. 2009: Thang Luu Not only did Thang Luu kick off the 2009 WSOP by winning the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Low tournament for his second gold bracelet, but he did so after winning the same event the previous year. In 2009, Luu’s win was worth $263,190. After this, Luu cashed just once for $8,983. 2010: Michael Mizrachi The year 2010 was a banner year for Michael Mizrachi at the WSOP. He opened things up in enormous fashion by winning the famed $50,000 Poker Players Championship for $1.559 million. Mizrachi then put together quite an impressive string of four more cashes and was challenging for the WSOP Player of the Year award that ultimately fell to Frank Kassela. Additional scores were had that year by Mizrachi when he took sixth in the $10,000 Seven-Card Stud Championship for $68,949, eighth in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship for $49,732, and 26th in the $2,500 Mixed for $6,324. Mizrachi wasn’t done there, either. He reached the final table of the WSOP Main Event and scored fifth place for a whopping $2.332 million. 2011: Jake Cody After Jake Cody opened the 2011 WSOP by winning the $25,000 Heads-Up Championship for $851,192, he only cashed twice that summer and both were for less than $20,000. Cody did, however, place seventh in the 2011 WSOP Europe Main Event for €150,000 ($200,379). 2012: Brent Hanks Brent Hanks won the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event to kick off the 2012 WSOP. That event drew 2,101 entries and Hanks scored $517,725. Hanks’ only other cash that summer at the WSOP was a 282nd-place finish in the WSOP Main Event for $38,453. 2013: Trevor Pope The opening to the 2013 summer was a big one for Trevor Pope, as he scored first place in the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event for $553,906. Pope came to the final table with an incredibly large chip lead and rode it all the way to the winner’s circle. After that, Pope cooled off and only cashed two more times. He finished 48th in the $2,500 Four-Max No Limit Hold’em for $5,253 and 13th in the $5,000 Six-Max Pot Limit Hold’em for $19,646. 2014: Vanessa Selbst Vanessa Selbst scored a big victory to open the 2014 WSOP when she won the $25,000 Mixed-Max No Limit Hold’em to the tune of $871,148. Following her opening win that summer, Selbst only cashed once more. Her second cash was a 38th-place finish in the $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo worth $5,517. 2015: Nick Petrangelo Nick Petrangelo had a great 2015. It was his first breakout year that saw him win more than $3.4 million on the live felt. Included in that was a $201,812 gold bracelet victory at the World Series of Poker. Petrangelo won the first piece of jewelry that summer by taking down the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em Shootout atop 308 entries. Despite his big year and first gold bracelet win, not much materialized for Petrangelo over the remaining WSOP events that year. In Las Vegas, he cashed in the $10,000 Main Event for $17,282, and then he took 26th in the €3,250 No Limit Hold’em event at WSOP Europe for €6,035 ($6,863). 2016: Kyle Julius Like Cunningham, Billirakis, and Mizrachi, Kyle Julius, winner of the first gold bracelet in the summer of 2016, cashed four additional times following his trip to victory lane. Julius opened the summer with a win in the $1,000 Top Up Turbo No Limit Hold’em for $142,972. He then record small cashes in the Colossus and $1,500 No Limit Hold’em before returning to a top-10 result in the $5,000 Turbo No Limit Hold’em. In that event, Julius took ninth from a field of 524 entries and won $35,636. That summer, Julius would also take 21st in the $111,111 High Roller for One Drop to add $187,576 to his bankroll. 2017: Upeshka De Silva Upeshka De Silva stormed out of the gate in 2017 with a victory in the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em Shootout for $229,923. He then put together four more cashes - just like Cunningham, Billirakis, Mizrachi, and Julius did in prior years - but De Silva couldn’t quite make it back to a WSOP final table that summer. He did place 30th in the 1,759-entry $2,620 Marathon tournament for $17,491, but that was De Silva’s deepest run outside of his opening gold bracelet win. 2018: Elio Fox In 2018, it was Elio Fox, winner of the 2011 WSOP Europe Main Event, who took the first gold bracelet of the summer. Fox won the $10,000 Turbo No Limit Hold’em event for $393,693. From there, Fox would put together a decent list of three more cashes. He took second in the $100,000 High Roller for $1.798 million, finished 92nd in the $1,500 Millionaire Maker for $8,976, and took ninth in the $50,000 High Roller for $139,699. $357,937 Won and 2.4 Cashes On Average Looking at the whole of it all, the first gold bracelet winners each summer, going back to 2004, averaged $357,937 won and 2.4 cashes that same summer following the gold bracelet win. None of these players were about to earn a second gold bracelet in that same summer, but some did come close by returning to a WSOP final table. Those to perform the latter were Cunningham in 2005, Mizrachi in 2010, Cody in 2011 if you count WSOP Europe, Julius in 2016, and Fox in 2018. Both Cunningham and Mizrachi made it back to three final tables following their opening win. In total, players to win the opening gold bracelet of the summer cashed 36 additional times at the WSOP that year, again that’s if you include WSOP Europe. Of those 36 cashes, six were worth more than six figures and two were in the seven figures. Three times a player landed a score for more than the gold bracelet win, too. Those three times came with Mizrachi in 2010, Julius in 2016, and Fox in 2018. What Does This Mean for Brian Green? The question now is, what does this all mean for Brian Green? He won the first gold bracelet at the 50th annual 2019 World Series of Poker when he topped a field of 204 entries in the $10,000 No Limit Hold’em Super Turbo Bounty event. Green won $345,669. Green now has 25 WSOP cashes. A few times, he put together a nice handful of in-the-money finishes during the summer, so we’ll likely see a fair amount of volume from him given his successful start to the 2019 WSOP. In 2014 and 2015, Green cashed five times each summer at the WSOP. In 2016, he cashed four times. Although he failed to record a WSOP cash in 2017, Green added four more trips to the money in 2018. He frequents the higher buy-in No Limit Hold’em events a lot, so if he makes any additional noise in 2019 it will likely come from one of those tournaments. If we were to take a guess as to how Green will do for the remainder of the 2019 WSOP, we’d say he’ll land three or four more cashes and that there’s a high probability one of those is a score in the six figures.
  10. Sunday's action at the 2019 World Series of Poker included the conclusion of the Seniors Event and a two-time bracelet winner picking up his third. Shaun Deeb spend Sunday building up a big chip lead in the $10,000 Dealers Choice and the one-and-only Phil Ivey bagged chips in an event to move on to Day 2. Howard Mash Wins Seniors No-Limit Hold'em Howard Mash turned 50 earlier this year, making him eligible for the WSOP Seniors Event for the first time. He made the most of his debut, winning the bracelet and $662,594 on Sunday night, beating the second-largest field the event has ever attracted. Mash managed to go from the short stack with four players left to champion only after surviving a comeback attempt by his heads-up opponent Jean Fontaine that necessitated an on-the-fly change in Mash's approach. "I changed my strategy, and I was trying to play small pots with him because I felt like I had an advantage. I tried to keep the pots as small as possible and just grind and grind him down," Mash said. "Then I made a couple of mistakes, I got a little too aggressive trying to end it. But I knew that I had an advantage so as long as I had chips I was in good shape." Mash, a financial advisor from Florida, cashed in the 2018 WSOP Main Event for $42,980. Fontaine earned $409,249 for his runner-up finish. Final Table Payouts Howard Mash - $662,594 Jean Fontaine - $409,249 James Mcnurlan - $303,705 Adam Richardson - $226,996 Donald Matusow - $170,887 Farhad Jamasi - $129,582 Samir Husaynue - $98,981 Mike Lisanti - $76,165 Mansour Alipourfard - $59,044 $1,000 Double Stack No Limit Hold'em Roars Into the Money The 2,327 players who made it through Day 1A and 1B of the $1,000 Double Stack No Limit Hold'em event combined on Sunday for Day 2 and after 10 60-minute levels, only 359 survived. Arianna Son leads with 2,363,000 but former #1 PocketFiver Ari Engel bagged up 16,83,000 for the eighth biggest stack. Among the notables moving on to Day 2 include Rex Clinkscales, Joseph Cheong, Steven van Zadelhoff, Jack Sinclair, Tim West, and Dylan Linde. After the bubble burst, there were 573 who made it into the money but not through to Day 3. This includes Chance Kornuth, Matthias Eibinger, Valentin Vornicu, Maria Lampropulos, Jeff Madsen, Dietrich Fast, TJ Cloutier, and Bryan Piccioli. Action resumes at Noon and will include 10 more levels of play. Top 10 Chip Counts Arianna Son - 2,363,000 Radoslav Stoyanov - 2,000,000 Ignacio Molina - 1,997,000 Enrico Rudelitz - 1,855,000 Unknown - 1,800,070 Romain Nussmann - 1,708,000 Eric Cruz - 1,690,000 Ari Engel - 1,683,000 Silvio Costa - 1,555,000 Robert Schmidt - 1,550,000 Shaun Deeb Leads $10K Dealers Choice with Five Left Reigning WSOP Player of the Year Shaun Deeb was hellbent on defending that title before the Series started. He's picked up six cashes so far, but on Sunday he took a giant step towards his fifth bracelet by finishing Day 3 of the $10,000 Dealers Choice event with the chip lead. Just four players stand between Deeb and the $312,417 first place prize money and 1,017 POY points. Deeb bagged 2,601,000 which puts him 703,000 ahead of the next closest competitor, Adam Friedman. Matt Glantz, Michael McKennea, and David Moskowitz round out the five remaining players. There were only six eliminations on Sunday including Jeffrey Lisandro in 10th, Bryce Yockey in eighth, Phillip Hui in seventh, and Nick Schulman in sixth. Final Table Chip Counts Shaun Deeb - 2,601,000 Adam Friedman - 1,898,000 Matt Glantz - 1,401,000 Michael McKenna - 1,038,000 David Moskowitz - 382,000 Justin Bonomo Headlines $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout Final Table The second day of play in the $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout event took the field from 40 players down to 10 after 10 four-handed tables each played down to a winner. The biggest name at the final table is Justin Bonomo, but he'll have to contend with Andrew Lichtenberger, Martin Zamani, and Alexandru Papazian if he wants to add a fourth bracelet to his collection. Players narrowly missing out on the final table included James Obst, Dario Sammartino, Jesse Sylvia, Rainer Kempe, Taylor Paur, and Kristen Bicknell. The final table begins at Noon PT. Final Table Chip Counts Jan Lakota - 623,000 Ben Farrell - 621,000 David Lambard - 621,000 Andrew Lichtenberger - 614,000 Alexandru Papazian - 609,000 Adrien Delmas - 609,000 Martin Zamani - 601,000 Weiyi Zhang - 599,000 Johan Guilbert - 599,000 Justin Bonomo - 591,000 Phil Ivey Moves Onto Day 2 of $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack Brazil's Jose Carlos Brito finished with the biggest stack at the end of Day 1 of the $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack event, but all eyes on Day 2 will most likely be on Phil Ivey. The 10-time bracelet winner ended Day 1 with 123,000 - 653,000 behind Brito's 776,000. Ivey's not the only big name Phil who bagged and tagged on Day 1. Phil Hellmuth also managed to finish with chips. He enters Day 2 with 231,000. Elio Fox, Manig Loeser, Brock Parker, Ismael Bojang, Kelly Minkin, Chris Moorman, and Kenny Hallaert are just some of the other notables that advanced to Day 2. The event drew 2,808 entries, of which just 671 survived. Play resumes at Noon. Top 10 Chip Counts Jose Carlos Brito - 776,000 Danny Ghobrial - 671,500 Ben Gilbert - 577,500 Dang Toan Nguyen - 555,500 Bruce Rosenberg - 535,000 Carlos Vasconcelos - 525,500 Jimmy D'Ambrosio - 525,500 Brandon Caputo - 514,500 Marco Bognanni - 512,000 Johann Ibanez - 509,000 Upeshka De Silva Wins Third Bracelet in $600 Online NLHE Bounty Event Upeshka De Silva was up late into the night Sunday, but it paid off handsomely when he beat Dave Nodes heads-up to win $600 Online No Limit Hold'em Bounty event for $98,262.73 from the prize pool and the third bracelet of his career. Nodes scored $60,092.28 for his runner-up finish. De Silva's first two bracelets came in 2015 ($1,500 No Limit Hold'em) and 2017 ($3,000 No Limit Hold'em Shootout). Final Table Payouts Upeshka 'gomezhamburg' De Silva - $98,262.72 Dave 'Dave419' Nodes - $60,092.28 davidas777 - $42,962.40 Pretabotones - $31,065.12 Turko - $22,748.04 P. Bateman - $16,854.48 johnsonck - $12,688.40 B3ndTheKnee - $9,583.92 BoatyBoatz8A - $7,380.72 Player of the Year Update Dan Zack now has eight cashes this summer and thanks to the124 points he earned on Sunday after busting the $1,000 Double Stack, he became the first player to move past 2,000 points. The group of three players closely following Zack, Scott Clements, Robert Campbell, and Daniel Strelitz each have between 1,597.26 and 1,642.02 points. RANK PLAYER POINTS 1 Dan Zack 2,093.00 2 Scott Clements 1,642.02 3 Robert Campbell 1,605.08 4 Daniel Strelitz 1,597.26 5 Stephen Song 1,503.76 Monday's WSOP Schedule
  11. Only one bracelet was awarded Tuesday at the 2019 World Series of Poker, but the table has been set for one of poker's biggest names to take center stage on Wednesday. Daniel Negreanu sits on top of the final seven players in the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship, putting him in position to win his seventh career bracelet. Meanwhile, Joseph Cheong used Tuesday to improve his chances of winning his first career bracelet. Joseph Cheong Headlines $1K Double Stack Final Six Three times in his poker career, Joseph Cheong has finished runner-up in a WSOP bracelet event. On Tuesday he did everything possible to give himself the best chance possible to improve upon those results. Cheong finished Day 3 of the $1,000 Double Stack No Limit Hold'em event with 100,300,000 - over 40% of the chips in play - and heads into Wednesday's six-handed final table with the chip lead. The player closest to Cheong is David Ivers with 60,400,000. China's Zinan Xu, who started the day with the chip lead sits third with 53,900,000. Among the 34 players who busted on Tuesday were Jack Sinclair, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Tim West, and recent WPT ARIA Summer Championship winner Matthew Wantman. Action resumes at Noon PT. Final Table Chip Counts Joseph Cheong - 100,300,000 David Ivers - 60,400,000 Zinan Xu - 53,900,000 Andrea Buonocore - 17,800,000 Ido Ashkenazi - 11,700,000 Arianna Son - 4,500,000 Robert Mitchell Wins $800 Deepstack Vegas-based poker pro Robert Mitchell beat Italy's Marco Bognanni to win the $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack event for the first bracelet of his career and nearly $300,000. "Overall, that’s what poker players play for is the bracelet," Mitchell said. "To have one now, it’s on my resume and it feels good." The win comes a little more than a week after the 41-year-old came 17th in the $1,500 No Limit Hold'em Shootout event. This is just the sixth career WSOP cash for Mitchell, but he felt the win was coming. “One-hundred percent I did. I knew I was going to have another shot at it. I’ve been playing poker for a long time and felt like it was long overdue. It’s awesome.” Bognanni had to settle for $183,742 as runner-up. Final Table Payouts Robert Mitchell - $297,537 Marco Bognanni - $183,742 Axel Hallay - $134,817 Francois Evard - $99,752 Benjamin Underwood - $74,435 Kamel Mokhammad - $56,019 Benjamin Moon - $42,524 Zachary Mullennix - $32,561 Nick Jivkov - $25,152 Just 120 Remain in Record-Setting Super Seniors Day 2 of the $1,000 Super Seniors event saw the field go from 838, through the money bubble and stopped with just 120 players still in contention for the bracelet and $359,863 first place prize money. Leading the way is Jay Hong, from California. Hong has a talented group of players chasing him though. Barry Shulman, co-owner of CardPlayer Magazine and winner of the 2009 WSOP Europe Main Event, sits second. His wife, Allyn Shulman, also advanced to Day 3 with an average stack. Other notables still holding on to a shot at the title include Don Zewin, Larry Wright, Tom Franklin, and Humberto Brenes. The schedule calls for an 11 AM PT restart with plans to play down to a winner on Wednesday. Top 10 Chip Counts Jay Hong - 1,838,000 Barry Shulman - 1,270,000 James Plateroti - 1,181,000 Clifford Pappas - 1,165,000 Miles Harris - 1,090,000 Steven Wenrich - 1,074,000 Stuart Hosen - 992,000 Jimmy Crouch - 916,000 Aaron Dolgin - 898,000 Jian Zhang - 858,000 Denis Bagdasarov Bags Day 2 Chip Lead $1,500 PLO Pennsylvania poker player Denis Bagdasarov finished Day 2 of the record-setting $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha event as the only player over 3,000,000 in chips and leads the final 21 players heading into Day 3. The rest of the field includes Ben Zamani, Anton Wigg, Ismael Bojang, and Steve Sung. This is Bojang's 10th cash of the 2019 WSOP and puts him alone atop the leaderboard for most cashes. He also has 72 career WSOP cashes without a win, moving him into sixth all-time on that list behind Roland Israealashvili, Tony Cousineau, Tom McCormick, Allen Kessler, and Shannon Shorr. James Little finished with the fifth largest stack. This is Little's eighth cash of the 2019 WSOP. He's only had three other WSOP cashes in his career. There were 200 players at the start of the day, and after 17 eliminations all remaining players were guaranteed an in-the-money finish. Matt Stout, Ankush Mandavia, Dan Zack, Loren Klein, Kenny Hallaert, Erik Seidel, and Mike Matusow were among the 162 players to cash and bust on Tuesday. The final 21 players are back in action beginning at a Noon PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Denis Bagdasarov - 3,035,000 Glen Cressman - 2,910,000 Johannes Toebbe - 2,905,000 Benjamin Zamani - 2,900,000 James Little - 2,575,000 Anton Wigg - 1,900,000 Ismael Bojang - 1,900,000 Steve Sung - 1,450,000 William Mitchell - 1,405,000 Mihai Niste - 1,245,000 Daniel Negreanu Headlines $10K Seven Card Stud Final Table Daniel Negreanu gave his investors a chance to dance on Tuesday night. Negreanu, who sold pieces of himself to fans and followers before the Series started, has just six other players standing in the way of his seventh career bracelet and a $245,451 payday. Negreanu finished Day 2 of the $10,000 Seven Card Stud event with 1,502,000, nearly 500,000 more than the second biggest stack, belonging to David 'ODB' Baker. Those two are followed by bracelet winners Frank Kassela, John Hennigan, Chris Tryba, and David Singer. The only player at the final table who does not already have a WSOP bracelet is Russian Mikhail Semin. He recently finished sixth in the $10,000 HORSE Championship. Among the players to bust on Tuesday were Scott Seiver, Paul Volpe, Scott Clements, and Michael Mizrachi. Frankie O'Dell, who won the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo event earlier this summer, busted in eighth place. The final table begins at a 2 PM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Daniel Negreanu - 1,502,000 David "ODB" Baker - 1,070,000 Frank Kassela - 919,000 John Hennigan - 682,000 Chris Tryba - 542,000 David Singer - 388,000 Mikhail Semin - 183,000 2,403 Players Flock to $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Deepstack At the start of the day, Adam Lamphere was just one of 2,403 players who entered the $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Deepstack event. After 20 30-minute levels, however, Lamphere was bagging up the chip lead. The Michigan native finished with 1,870,000 from a starting stack of 30,000 and sits 628,000 ahead of the next biggest stack, belonging to Caleb Hershey. A total of 2,208 players were eliminated on Day 1. Some of the 195 players who managed to avoid busting were Ylon Schwartz, Konstantin Puchkov, Jake Schwartz, Rainer Kempe, Mark Gregorich, Jamie Gold, and Matthew Wantman. Former #1-ranked PocketFivers Calvin Anderson, Tim West, and Ari Engel also managed to make Day 2. Day 2 starts at Noon PT and is scheduled to play down to a winner. Top 10 Chip Counts Adam Lamphere - 1,870,000 Caleb Hershey - 1,242,000 Dustin Goldklang - 1,114,000 Tim Finne - 1,110,000 Ylon Schwartz - 1,105,000 Hao Chen - 1,000,000 Andrew Ostapchenko - 915,000 Qi Luo - 900,000 Sean Legendre - 886,000 Henry Tran - 869,000 Jonathan Depa Leads $2,500 Mixed Big Bet Day 1 Day 1 of the $2,500 Mixed Big Bet event, which includes a game rotation of No Limit and Pot Limit games, attracted 218 players and only 55 of them managed to survive to Day 2. Leading that group is Jonathan Depa with 171,600. Jared Bleznick sits second with 149,900 while Arthur Morris is third with 137,000. Ryan Hughes, who came second in this event last year, finished with the fourth best stack at 131,900. Players are just 23 eliminations away from the bubble when action resumes at 2 PM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Jonathan Depa - 171,600 Jared Bleznick - 149,900 Arthur Morris - 137,000 Ryan Hughes - 131,900 Cary Katz - 99,600 Mateus Deoliveira - 95,700 David "Bakes" Baker - 94,900 Joseph Couden - 92,300 Max Kruse - 90,900 Brandon Shack-Harris - 87,500 Player of the Year Update Now properly credited with the 951.7 POY points he earned by winning the $600 Online Knockout Bounty event, Upeshka De Silva leads the WSOP Player of the Year race after passing Dan Zack. De Silva is just 15.82 points ahead of Zack. Scott Clements sits third after picking up an additional 97.7 POY points for his 10th place finish in the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship on Tuesday. POSITION PLAYER POINTS 1 Upeshka De Silva 2,162.02 2 Daniel Zack 2,146.20 3 Scott Clements 1,837.33 4 Robert Campbell 1,605.08 5 Daniel Strelitz 1,597.26 Streaming Schedule
  12. Another televised World Poker Tour final table is set. This time, it’s the Season XVIII WPT L.A. Poker Classic. The event drew 490 entries to Commerce Casino and generated a prize pool of $4.727 million. Just six players remain and they’ll be on hiatus until action resumes at the HyperX Esports Arena in Las Vegas on Thursday, April 2. Leading the way in the chase for the $1.015 million top prize is Balakrishna Patur. Patur brings 6.32 million in chips to the final table. He’ll be joined by two WPT Champions Club members in Matas Cimbolas and James Carroll, Ka Kwan Lau, Scott Hempel, and WPTDeepStacks champion Upeshka De Silva. De Silva will be the short stack with 930,000 when action resumes in April. WPT LAPC Final Table Seat 1: Scott Hempel - 1,670,000 Seat 2: James Carroll - 4,125,000 Seat 3: Matas Cimbolas - 4,310,000 Seat 4: Ka Kwan Lau - 2,250,000 Seat 5: Upeshka De Silva- 930,000 Seat 6: Balakrishna Patur - 6,320,000 [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="Party Poker NJ"] Each of the six is guaranteed a minimum payday of $185,330. Included in the event’s first-place prize is a $15,000 seat to the season-ending WPT Tournament of Champions presented by Baccarat Crystal. How the Final Table Was Reached Day 1 saw Demo Kiriopoulos emerge as the event’s chip leader when the first day of play was in the books. Then it was Isaac Baron atop the field at the end of Day 2. Entering Day 3, 104 players remained and the top 62 were set to reach the money. With 63 players left, WPT Champions Club member Jordan Cristos was all in against fellow WPT champion Daniel Strelitz. According to the WPT Live Updates team, Cristos was all in with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8c"] on the [poker card="8d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"] flop. Strelitz had made the call with the [poker card="Td"][poker card="9d"]. The [poker card="Jh"] on the turn and 8h on the river allowed Cristos to double up, but that would be the last time he doubled up this tournament. Shortly thereafter, still on the money bubble with 63 players remaining, Cristos was all in on the [poker card="Js"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5d"] flop with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jd"]. His opponent, Claude Codru, had the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Ts"]. Once again, it was Cristos needing to fade a draw. This time, the [poker card="Qs"] came right out on the turn and gave Codru an unbeatable flush. The river completed the board with the [poker card="2d"] and Cristos was sent home as the "bubble boy." Once in the money, the eliminations began to stack up, including Barry Greenstein (61st - $16,905), Jesse Sylvia (55th - $18,845), and Lee Markholt (41st - $21,290). To close out Day 3, 39 players remained with Patur on top of the pack. Day 4 saw the field whittled down to 11 players. Baron remained in contention and finished Day 4 as the chip leader, with Hempel sitting second and Patur sitting third. Donald Maloney (37th - $24,375), John Hennigan (34th - $24,375), JC Tran (29th - $28,275), and Dylan Linde (14th - $58,215) were among the casualties on Day 4. Baron couldn’t get anything going on Day 5, though, and he fell in 11th place for $71,950. Charles Kassin and Lau both scored early double ups through Baron, and then De Silva picked off a bluff from Baron. On his final hand, Baron held pocket eights against Hempel’s pocket tens but could not come from behind. Hempel also knocked out WPT Champions Club member Kevin Eyster in 10th place. Strelitz went bust in eighth, and his elimination came in a three-way clash of WPT champions involving Carroll and Cimbolas. Strelitz was all in preflop with side action between Carroll and Cimbolas. On the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="8c"] flop, Cimbolas bet 300,000 and Carroll shoved for more than 5 million. Cimbolas called all in for 1.56 million total with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"]. Carroll had the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="2c"] and then Strelitz had the [poker card="Td"][poker card="9d"]. The turn was the [poker card="4s"] and the river was the [poker card="3s"], keeping Cimbolas’ aces in front and eliminating Strelitz. After Strelitz busted, Shi Chen was sent packing in seventh place to set the official TV final table. Play Resumes in April Guaranteed $185,330 each with the chance to win $1.015 million, the final six players in the WPT L.A. Poker Classic will resume action on Thursday, April 2, at the HyperX Esports Arena in Las Vegas. The WPT L.A. Poker Classic final table is the third delayed final table during Season XVIII of the World Poker Tour. Taking place in the days before it are the finales to the WPT Gardens Poker Championship and WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open. Chance Kornuth leads the WPT Gardens Poker Championship final table, with action set to resume on Tuesday, March 31. Veerab Zakarian leads the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open final table, with action set to resume on Wednesday, April 1. All three of these final tables - the WPT Gardens Poker Championship, WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open, and WPT L.A. Poker Classic - will play out at the HyperX Esports Arena at the Luxor Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas.
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