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  1. Largely unknown Mixed Games player Jesse Klein won his first WSOP bracelet after taking down a final table stacked with stars at the 2021 World Series of Poker. The recruitment firm owner went from recreational hopeful to WSOP winner on a final day full of drama as one $25,000 event ended and another began. Hellmuth Rants, Glaser Denied As Klein Pulls Out The WIn All the focus at the start of the third day of WSOP action was on the final table of Event #2, the $25,000 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event which saw another mixed game specialist, British player Benny Glaser, go into the final table with the lead. It took little time for Matt Glantz to become the first casualty of the day as Phil Hellmuth took out his fellow American in Razz with a ten-five, with Glantz paired up and drawing dead on 6th street. Glantz cashed for $52,211. Next to go was DJ Buckley, who lasted just a few minutes more to bust in eighth place for $61,549. Buckley’s elimination to Ben Yu precipitated an extended period of play without a bust-out, but it was not short of drama as Hellmuth exploded at the end of losing a hand to eventual champion Klein. Folding on the river, Hellmuth declared his opponent’s start as "insane" and it was to serve as the opening bout in a war of words between the pair. It was some time before Yu busted in seventh place for $75,260, but that was only the warm-up act to another blow-up from Hellmuth as Klein scooped a second big pot against the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner. The Poker Brat was back as Hellmuth left the table, pacing the floor and cursing at his lack of fortune. Just a few hands later, Hellmuth was gone, out in sixth place for $95,329 after bricking every street in Seven Card Stud against Chad Eveslage. After the event, Hellmuth was keen to point out the benefits of his staying power in bringing his A-Game to the Rio. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1444470919204769803 Hellmuth’s bust-out started a flurry of them. Philip Sternheimer was crushed in the same format by Glaser to leave in fifth place for $124,935. The same winner of that hand took out the aforementioned Eveslage in fourth for $169,218 when Glaser’s pair of sevens with a low ace was enough to win both Hi and Lo to send his American rival to the rail. Glaser led at that stage, but over the course of two hours without an elimination, each man had their periods of domination as the chips moved between each man. French player David Benyamine’s neck was on the block when he lost on 7th street to Klein, who won the pivotal pot to go into heads-up with a massive lead of 10.1 million to Glaser’s 1.5m. Klein won his maiden bracelet not long after the final duel began, with his victory in a Seven Card Stud hand ending an entertaining event. While Glaser, who had already won three WSOP bracelets in his career called off his stack with a smile and will enjoy the second-place prize of $341,274. For Jesse Klein, however, it was the fulfillment of a dream as the recruitment firm owner capped an enjoyable two-day sojourn to Sin City with a WSOP bracelet and $552,182 score. Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Results: Jesse Klein - $552,182 Benny Glaser - $341,274 David Benyamine - $236,626 Chad Eveslage - $169,218 Philip Sternheimer - $124,935 Phil Hellmuth - $95,329 Ben Yu - $75,260 DJ Buckley - $61,549 Matt Glantz - $52,211 Jake Daniels Leads $25K NLHE, Michael Addamo Outsted Many of the H.O.R.S.E. field took to the 6th event on the schedule, the $25,000-entry NLHE High Roller that kicked off on Day 3 of the WSOP. With 135 entries in total, it was Jake Daniels who ended Day 1 top of the pile, bagging up 1,182,000 chips by close of play as one of only two players to "crack a milly." While Daniels was steady throughout, he did not dominate the leaderboard until the final two levels, eliminating Eric Worre and Daniel Negreanu to vault himself to the top of the chip counts, with Michael Liang (1,028,000) and James Chen (835,000) his nearest challengers. Elsewhere in the top 10 players, Jake Schindler (667,000) and Chance Kornuth (570,000) will be major threats when the action resumes on Day 2. Several superstars made the upper echelons of the leaderboard, but plenty of big names hit the rail too. Australia’s most successful tournament player of all-time, Michael Addamo busted both bullets so will not be eligible for re-entry on Day 2. Others to lose their stacks on Day 1 included Stephen Chidwick, Brian Altman, Kenny Hallaert, Koray Aldemir, Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, Ryan Riess, Jeremy Ausmus, Upeshka De Silva, and Niall Farrell whose epic journey to the World Series was common among those from outside the United States. At the close of play on Day 1, just 54 players made the counts, but with entry and re-entry possible on Day 2 right up until the start of play, that number is sure to swell with some of the best players in the world going for gold. Galen Hall was among those to express his relief at playing some live poker for the first time in a very long time. https://twitter.com/galenhall/status/1444423233160187904   Some of the biggest players in the world have already been drawn together for Day 2, with battles between Jake Schindler, Adrian Mateos and Mikita Badziakouski at one table just a single example of the level of quality in the event. Whoever grabs a final table place at the end of Day 2 will have earned it. Event #6 $25,000 No Limit Hold’em High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Jake Daniels - 1,182,000 Michael Liang - 1,028,000 James Chen - 835,000 Scott Eskenazi - 747,000 Jake Schindler - 667,000 Clayton Kalisek - 610,000 Alexandros Theologis - 594,000 Chance Kornuth - 570,000 Ankush Mandavia - 553,000 Brian Rast - 551,000 Brobyn Bags 5 Million During Reunion Day 2 The Reunion, otherwise known as Event #4 on this year’s 2021 WSOP schedule, saw a huge number of entries on Day 1b, as 4,455 players took to the felt and made it into the money. Several high-profile players busted out before 204 players bagged up for the night, with Maurice Hawkins, Shaun Deeb, and Brad Owen just three of the Day 1 casualties. Others thrived at the felt, however, and by close of play, it was Robert Brobyn who bagged the biggest stack of chips, an incredible 5,015,000 of them. That total was way clear of Brobyn’s nearest challenger on the day Tyler Jamieson (3,040,000) and Brobyn’s lead represents the overall tournament lead after two days. Others to pile up plenty of chips on Day 1b included two former WSOP bracelet winners in the form of Ronnie Bardah, who proved a ‘Survivor’ with 2,005,000, and Jeremy Wien (1,640,000). WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Brobyn - 5,015,000 Tyler Jamison - 3,040,000 Jared Ambler - 2,450,000 Ya Yun Liu - 2,445,000 Ryan Messick - 2,410,000 Elvis Toomas - 2,375,000 Darryl Ronconi - 2,030,000 Ronnie Bardah - 2,005,000 Randy Rhee - 1,990,000 Mark Lilomaiava - 1,765,000 Connor Drinan, Rob Mizrachi Top Omaha 8 Final 15 Event #5, the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, saw 230 players whittled down to just 15 by the close of Day 2. Of those 15 players, only Connor Drinan and Robert Mizrachi have won WSOP bracelets before, but with both men at the top of the chipcounts, it could be a ding-dong battle on the final day to see whether Drinan wins his second, Mizrachi wins his fifth or a new player gets their hands on the gold. Day 2 of the event saw players such as Brian Hastings and Shaun Deeb hit the rail on the day the bubble burst with players such as Max Pescatori (80th for $2,400), David ‘Bakes’ Baker (75th for $2,400), Randy Ohel (48th for $3,200), Ari Engel (41st for $3,634) and former two-time WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Hughes (18th for $5,580) all make the money. It’s the potential shoot-out between Drinan and Mizrachi that has us salivating, however, as the final day of the event on Monday will crown a winner. WSOP 2021 Event #5 $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Connor Drinan - 2,415,000 Robert Mizrachi - 1,410,000 Sandy Sanchez - 1,380,000 Pearce Arnold - 1,160,000 Carl Lijewski - 1,095,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,080,000 Kris Kwiatkowski - 1,045,000 Yehuda Buchalter - 1,020,000 Michael Moed - 965,000 Scott Baumstein - 900,000
  2. The record books will reflect that there was an official winner in Event #1 of PokerGO’s 2021 Poker Masters ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em), but it was hardly a definitive one as Shannon Shorr and David Peters effectively “played to a tie” on Wednesday night. After a lengthy, see-saw heads-up battle that lasted nearly two hours, the duo agreed that, in order to play the next event (Event #2), that they would simply split up the remaining prize pool and flip for leaderboard points. In the end, all the chips ended on Shorr’s side of the table and he was crowned the winner of the tournament and given 1st place points. The 12-event Poker Masters kicked off with 82 entries of Event #1 pushing the prize pool to $820,000. After a full day of play, the final seven returned for Day 2 to crown a winner and try to award a $205,000 first-place prize. Coming into the final table with fewer than ten big blinds, Ben Yu wasn’t long for the final table busting in the day’s opening moments when he got all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] against Shorr’s [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"]. When the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"], Yu tapped the table and exited in seventh place for $41,000. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Shorr opened to 100,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"]. In the small blind, Brock Wilson looked down at [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and made the call. Then from the big blind, John Riordan who started the day as the second shortest stack moved all-in for his final 10 big blinds with [poker card="as"][poker card="8h"]. With the action on Shorr, he four-bet shipped all-in having Wilson covered. Wilson quickly released and the cards were put on their backs. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"], giving Riordan top pair and putting him in a good spot to double up. However, the [poker card="qh"] turn quickly put Shorr back in charge as Riordan was left looking for one of just two outs. The [poker card="qc"] river ended Riordan’s day in sixth place, good for $49,200. The final five battled for nearly two hours until the next player made their exit. The blinds had climbed to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and Jonathan Jaffe found himself on the short stack with roughly ten big blinds. When it folded to him in the cutoff with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"], Jaffe moved all-in. It folded through to Wilson in the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and he quickly made the call. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Wilson top pair and a commanding lead in the hand. The turn came the [poker card="5d"] bringing some additional gutshot straight outs for Jaffe. But the [poker card="ad"][ spiked on the river and Jaffe moved his chips into the middle, collected his belonging, and headed to the cage to collect $65,500 for fifth place. After losing a big hand against Peters, one in which Wilson was all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] against Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], Wilson moved to the bottom of the chip counts. At the 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) level, Wilson and Peters clashed again. Peters put in a raise on the button to 225,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Wilson, in the big blind with just under 10 big blinds remaining, defended holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"], giving both players top pair but keeping kickers in play. Wilson checked it over to Peters who bet the minimum, 100,000. Wilson then check-raised all-in and Peters made the call. The turn was the [poker card="ac"], bringing Wilson some chop outs. But the [poker card="3s"] ended Wilson’s run in fourth place, adding $82,600 to his bankroll. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment At three-handed, the chip stacks evened out until at 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) Shorr crept out to a small lead, while Peters and Dylan DeStefano remained neck and neck. On the button, Peters looked down at [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"] and put in a raise to 250,000. After Shorr folded his small blind, action was on DeStefano in the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"] and just under 20 big blinds. He took a long look at Peters and then announced he was all-in and Peters, with the bigger stack, snap-called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"] brought DeStefano a whole host of outs including potential flush, pair and backdoor straight outs. The turn was was the [poker card="ks"], leaving DeStefano with one more chance to his 10 outs. It didn’t come, the river was the [poker card="7c"] and DeStefano wrapped up in third place for $98,400. After taking out DeStefano, Peters started head-up play with a slight chip lead but Shorr was quick to even the stacks. Then the pair went to battle. Shorr built a considerable chip lead of roughly four-to-one and then Peters doubled. Shorr built it back up and Peters continued to hang around and then he took the lead. The pair bounced back and forth each taking turns trying to eliminate the other. All the while, registration for Event #2 was coming to a close and both players were eager to make sure they registered. Peters held a 7.6 million to 2.6 million chip lead over Shorr, at the 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante) level, when he open shipped the big stack holding [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"]. Shorr made the call holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] and it looked like Peters might finally lock up the win. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"] flop gave Shorr a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="9c"] turn. Peters needed a nine on the river to take the hand, but instead the river came the [poker card="qh"] and the pair were back to even with a quarter of an ante difference between them. At that point, they agreed to a deal (that may have been agreed to earlier) and then flipped for leaderboard points. “We’re effectively calling this a draw,” said PokerGO commentator Jeff Platt. “We can do an adjusted chop,” Shorr said, indicating that what little difference there was would be split in the aftermath. They both shipped all-in blind with Shorr winning the hand and being declared the official winner, claiming first-place leaderboard points. Poker Masters Event #1 Final Table Results Shannon Shorr - $205,000 officially* David Peters - $147,600 officially* Dylan DeStefano - $98,400 Brock Wilson - $82,000 Jonathan Jaffe - $65,600 John Riordan - $49,200 Ben Yu - $41,000 * Specific details of the deal were not made public but were discussed in the broadcast.
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