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Found 7 results

  1. For the better part of Monday night into Tuesday morning, the poker world celebrated the crowning of Josh Arieh as the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. By all accounts, Arieh clinched it when Phil Hellmuth busted out of the final event of the series, the $5K 8-Handed, leaving Hellmuth as the POY runner-up. Articles, like the one we published Tuesday morning, were written certain of Arieh’s victory. But, like in 2019 when Daniel Negreanu was usurped by Robert Campbell due to a point miscalculation, everyone was wrong. Everyone, except Justin Bonomo: https://twitter.com/JustinBonomo/status/1463258866871779328?s=20 Bonomo had it right. The results from WSOP Online Event #10 (which took place Sunday night) were not yet included in the Player of the Year calculations. So, understandably, when word got around that Arieh had won, well, it was reported he won. But in reality, with the missing point differential, Ben Yu, the chip leader headed into the final day of the $5K 8-Handed, actually had a chance to catch Arieh with an outright victory. And he looked poised to do it. So the sweat for Arieh was back on. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463275661074837505?s=20 The tournament started the day with just 30 left and with Yu in control. But Arieh had some help from the inside with his friend (and fellow POY competitor) Shaun Deeb still in the tournament. Deeb was looking for his second bracelet of the series and, maybe, an eye on not letting history repeat itself. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463272967777841152?s=20 For the better part of three hours, the updates kept coming and Yu remained in the tournament. But with just two tables in play, Deeb and Yu battled in a hand where Deeb took some very important chips off of Yu and left the four-time bracelet winner short stacked. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463278563331772419?s=20 Eventually, Deeb busted in 12th place. But the damage was done, Yu couldn’t recover. In the end, the popular Yu ended up finishing in 10th place for $30,286 just narrowly missing out on a last-minute capturing of the POY for himself. After an amazing series with 18 in-the-money finishes and a victory in the $10K Six-Handed Championship, Yu easily earned a 2021 WSOP resume worthy of Player of the Year. But now, finally, the drama came to an end and Arieh can safely celebrate, being officially crowned the 2021 Player of the Year for the 2nd time in 24 hours. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321?s=20 https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463256060546879490?s=20  
  2. A monumental day at the felt on Day 4 of the WSOP Main Event saw just 292 players remain from 1,000 who began the day. When the dust settled, Ramon Colillas was the chip leader with a massive stack of 5,000,000 chips, with some big names not too far behind in his wake. Stephen Chidwick and Ramon Colillas Crack Top 5 With everyone on Day 4 of the WSOP Main Event guaranteed a return of at least $15,000, players had made the money on the final hand of Day 3, so came into today’s play desperate to chip up and make a push towards the latter stages of the world’s biggest poker tournament. Because of this, plenty lost their seats early, with Garry Gates, Kevin Gerhart, and Harrison Gimbel all on the rail before the field was reduced by over 70%. Late in the day, players got into pre-flop clashes that may yet shape the destiny of this year’s spectacular Main Event bracelet. Amid the chaos, several prominent British professionals finished high up the counts, with Stephen Chidwick (4,328,000), Alex Goulder (2,957,000), and Toby Lewis (2,637,000) all finishing way over the average stack. The chip leader at the close of play may have been Colillas, but other major forces hover close by. Matthew Jewett (3,398,000) Fernando Rodriguez (3,442,000), Dragana Lim (3,801,000), and Jason Osser (3,907,000) all finished in the top 10, while Stephen Song (4,417,000) and Demosthenes Kiriopoulos (4,500,000) both got closest to Colillas’s stack. Some players loved the glow of the limelight at the feature table, others, not so much... https://twitter.com/ChancesCards/status/1459444755440435200 ...while Matt Berkey saw a little sunlight in the serendipity. https://twitter.com/berkey11/status/1459444365462433796 Players to bust on Day 4 included Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Billy Baxter, Chris Sandrock, Anton Wigg, JJ Liu, Marle Spragg, Joao Simao, and Ben Yu, with Day 5 sure to bring the number down to less than 100 players as everyone can now legitimately start dreaming of banking that $8 million top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 4 Top 10 Chipcounts: Ramon Colillas - 5,000,000 Demosthenes Kiriopoulos - 4,500,000 Stephen Song - 4,417,000 Stephen Chidwick - 4,376,000 Zachary Mcdiarmid - 4,093,000 Jonathan Dwek - 3,955,000 Jason Osser - 3,900,700 Dragana Lim - 3,801,000 Fernando Rodriguez - 3,442,000 Matthew Jewett - 3,398,000 26 Remain In Little One Event #68 saw the penultimate day of the $1,111 Little One for One Drop take place, with just 26 players surviving a day that began with 229 players in seats. At the close of play, Michael Shanahan (13,465,000) led the field from Brekstyn Schutten (11,305,000) and Scott Ball (10,550,000), with other big names in the top ten including Canadian Sorel Mizzi (6,686,000). Plenty of big names fell by the wayside throughout the day, with Justin Lapka, DJ Alexander, Mukul Pahuja, Alexandre Reard, Carlos Chang, Phil Laak, and Joseph Cheong all falling short of bracelet glory. With just 26 players remaining, the race is now on to claim the WSOP bracelet and top prize of $396,445, with only three bracelet winners remaining of the 26 hopefuls. WSOP 2021 Event #68 $1,111 Little One for One Drop Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Shanahan - 13,465,000 Brekstyn Schutten - 11,305,000 Scott Ball - 10,550,000 Mathew Solitro - 8,500,000 David Jackson - 8,180,000 Derek Gregory - 7,310,000 Sebastian Medina - 7,205,000 Petro Zakusilov - 7,040,000 Ronnie Ballantyne - 7,000,000 Sorel Mizzi - 6,686,000 Jermain Reid Scores Stud Gold In Event #69, Jermaine Reid won the bracelet and $113,459 top prize as the mixed game player conquered the final day of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better. In a thrilling close to the tournament, Reid toppled Peder Berge heads-up to relegate Berge to a cash worth $70,126. On a day where both John Monnette (4th for $33,734) and John Racener ($10,095) fell short of glory that many predicted would be a battle between that pair, Reid took the first bracelet of his career as the Day 1 chip leader rallied late in the tournament to ‘top and tail’ the event and snatch gold. WSOP 2021 Event #69 $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Final Table Results: Jermaine Reid - $113,459 Peder Berge - $70,126 John Hoang - $48,138 John Monnette - $33,734 Esther Taylor - $24,145 Carol Fuchs - $17,658 Espen Sandvik - $13,202 John Racener - $10,095 Joseph Ranciato - $7,900 Perry Friedman - $6,330 Let's Go Crazy (Eights) The delayed Day 1 of the $888-entry Event #70, titled ‘Crazy Eights’, is one of the most value events left on the schedule, with Joseph Herbert leading the way at the close of play with a mammoth 2,100,000 million chip-stack. With Tijan Tepeh (2,050,000), Thomas Larson (1,825,000), Kyle Montgomery (1,420,000) and Sejin Park (1,350,000) in the top 10, it’s a stacked top section of the leaderboard. With 1,104 entries and just 166 players making the money, it took 14 hours of players for just 50 players to remain in the event by the close of Day 1b. With Day 1 canceled yesterday, play goes directly to Day 1c tomorrow as more players will put up $888 and play some Crazy Eights action. WSOP 2021 Event #70 $888 Crazy Eights Top 10 Chipcounts: Joseph Hebert - 2,100,000 Tijan Tepeh - 2,050,000 Adam Croffut - 1,975,000 Josue Aguirre - 1,930,000 Thomas Larson - 1,825,000 Wilbert Chun - 1,660,000 Jacob Rich - 1,550,000 Kyle Montgomery - 1,420,000 David Moses - 1,395,000 Sejin Park - 1,350,000 Bounty Hunters Come To Play Event #71, the $1,500-entry Bounty PLO event saw Matt Mamiya grab the overnight chip lead with 3.1 million chips as 94 players took part on the penultimate day of action and played down to just 15 final day survivors. With Kao Chieng Saechao (2,000,000) still in contention after a great series so far, the top prize of $132,844 will be battled for between just over a dozen hopefuls, all of whom have never won a bracelet as Nick Guagenti’s exit provoked before the final few eliminations reduced the field to just two tables. WSOP 2021 Event #71 $1,500 Bounty PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Matt Mamiya - 3,100,000 Mourad Amokrane - 2,960,000 Paulo Villena - 2,080,000 Kao Chieng Saechao - 2,000,000 Gabe Ramos - 1,600,000 Rodney Horton - 1,595,000 Todd Jacobs - 1,360,000 Ronald Larsen - 1,205,000 Ryan Terpstra - 1,140,000 Matthew Humphrey - 1,075,000 Arieh Busts Main, Bags Big Stack In Event #72 Lastly, Day 1 of the $1,500-entry Mixed NLHE/PLO Event #72 took place, with Canadian player Nohad Teliani (1,107,000) ending the day as a huge chip leader with almost double the stack of second-placed Paul Saso (583,000). With Josh Arieh having busted the WSOP Main Event on Day 4, the Player of the Year contender bagged up a top-six stack of 503,000 chips as he continues to roar through the late stages of the 2021 World Series of Poker in imperious form. WSOP 2021 Event #72 $1,500 Mixed NLHE/PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Nohad Teliani - 1,107,000 Paul Saso - 583,000 Mihai Manole - 578,000 Karan Mehta - 567,000 Kosei Ichinose - 508,000 Josh Arieh - 503,000 Bernard Larabi - 491,000 Mariia Levseieva - 481,000 Rishi Makkar - 459,000 Richard Dixon - 442,000 Finally, everyone is hoping for victory in the Main Event, but Drew ‘BetonDrew’ Gonzalez might have the biggest rail of all if he can turn his 2.1 million chips into a final table stack in the Main Event. It’s fair to say he’s pumped for the next day’s action. https://twitter.com/BetOnDrew/status/1459435621416538112  
  3. It was another hectic week at the 2021 WSOP with one of the biggest tournaments of the year stepping into the spotlight and top-tier players adding to their WSOP legacies. The $50,000 Poker Players Championship brought out the stars and has played down to a final table with Eli Elezra holding the overnight chip lead. Plus, a pair of potential future Hall of Famers in Shaun Deeb and Brian Rast have won their way into rarified air by both winning their career fifth bracelet, and four was the magic number this week with four different players earning their fourth career bracelet. And, of course, Phil Hellmuth took to Twitter to a gripe about the WSOP Player of the Year formula. So let’s get into it, here are the five biggest storylines that made headlines during Week 5 of the WSOP! Hellmuth Goes Off On Player of the Year We’re getting peak Hellmuth here in 2021. He’s winning bracelets, dropping eff-bombs, and burning down the house. After a relatively quiet week from the 16-time champ, it looks like he finally took a look at the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year standings and didn’t like what he saw. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1455092561769472002?s=20 Hellmuth’s fast start to the WSOP has cooled off (so far) in the back half of the schedule with the lead he enjoyed for a few days having slipped away. From the looks of it, this might be the first time Hellmuth has really understood what it takes to win this award, part of which is an unwavering dedication to the grind by playing and trying to cash in everything in sight. READ: Five Former WSOP Players of the Year On How To Win It In 2021 However, Hellmuth has some support out there for his call to revise the POY formula. Daniel Negreanu, a constant contender over the past few years, has been lobbying for WSOP officials to streamline the number of results that are counted, making it so that a min-cash in a lower buy-in holds far less weight. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1455114358757871616?s=20 As of the time of publication, Hellmuth has slipped into fourth place behind two of his series nemesis - Jake Schwartz, who took over the lead, Kevin Gerhart is in second after his second series bracelet win, and Anthony Zinno, who set the Brat off in the $10K Stud. It’s tight at the top, with Shaun Deeb and Ari Engel rounding out the top 6. $50K Poker Players Championship Takes Center Stage For many popular poker players, the $50K Poker Players Championship is the actual Main Event of the World Series of Poker. It’s a mix of nine different games, played by the elite-of-the-elite in those games for an enormous sum of money. This year was no different as 63 runners, including some of the biggest names in the game, gathered in the Amazon room to battle for a spot in the final five players. Late on Tuesday night (Day 3) the players battled to burst the money bubble. Eventually, 2019 WSOP Player of the Year Robert Campbell saw his tournament come to an end when he was ousted in 11th place. The next day the final 10 returned and it didn’t take long for Milke Wattel to be eliminated in 10th for $82,623. Daniel Negreanu surged and then fell, leaving it all on the felt as he exited in ninth place for $91,595. Then, Nick Schulman busted in eighth, swiftly leaving to pick up his $106,120, the first of the six-figure payouts. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456012324372815874?s=20 When the table combined to seven, everything slowed down. Way down. The table battled nearly all day with chips and the chip lead being passed back and forth. In the end, Matt Glantz fell in seventh place collecting $128,236, and was followed by Josh Arieh, appearing at his second final table in as many years, busting in sixth place for $161,422. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456026758638145540?s=20 Eli Elezra held the overnight chip lead, followed by Paul Volpe, Chris Brewer, Dan Cates, and Ryan Leng. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456295274075148291?s=20 The final five will play to a winner on Friday, November 5 where one player will have their name added to the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy and collect the $954,020 first-place prize. Five Bracelets For Deeb, Rast There has been an uncanny number of three-time career WSOP bracelet winners at the series this year. However this week, it was the five-timer club that added a couple new, very notable members. First, Brian Rast took down the $3K Six-Max for his fifth career bracelet for $474,102 and in the process made a case for induction into the Poker Hall of Fame. “Really, the number one thing at this point is kind of just making the Poker Hall of Fame,” Rast said to PokerGO after his win. “I mean, I feel like, I think I’ve done enough in my career and I turn 40 on November 8, so less than two weeks.” https://twitter.com/tsarrast/status/1453640943832166404?s=20 Another likely future Hall of Fame nominee is Shaun Deeb who put on an impressive performance to take down the $25,000 PLO High Roller for $1,251,860, just the third million-dollar score of the series and vaulting him into the 2021 earnings lead. Like, Rast, when all was said and done, Deeb had an eye on the future. But it’s not the Hall of Fame he was looking forward to, it was tracking down Hellmuth in the bracelet chase. “Oh, I’m going to pass Phil [Hellmuth] eventually. It’s going to take me a while, but I’m going to pass Phil. He’s a great player when he’s sharp, but he can’t play every day like me,” he said. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1454743417095790600?s=20 As noted above, Deeb’s win thrust him into the top 5 of the 2021 POY race. Four Is The New Three Earlier in the series, Anthony Zinno picked up his third and then fourth career bracelet. This week he welcomed Brian Yoon, Ben Yu, Farzad Bonyadi, and Kevin Gerhart into the club of players who picked up their fourth in 2021. Most recently, Yoon took down the $10,000 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship for a handsome $240,341 score. His list of bracelets is certainly impressive with prior wins the 2013 Little One For One Drop for $663,727, the 2014 $5K 8-Max for $633,341, and then he won the 2017 $1,500 Monster Stack for $1,094,349. His latest victory puts him up over $3.4 million in earnings. Ben Yu’s WSOP resume is equally impressive having won the $10,000 Six-Handed NLHE Championship for $721,453, his 11th cash of the 2021 series. Looking back on Yu’s success shows him winning four bracelets since 2015 including the $10K Limit in 2015 for $291,456, the $10K Limit 2-7 Championship in 2017 for $232,738, and the $50,000 NLHE High Roller in 2018 for more than $1.6 million. Yu moved into fourth place on the NLHE POY leaderboard behind Daniel Lazrus, Pete Chen, and Jason Koon and 6th on the overall leaderboard. Joining them is Farzad Bonyadi, who took down the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Lowball Championship for $297,051 (on the same day as Rast won his 5th bracelet) for the fourth of his career. His first bracelet win dates back to 1998 when he won a $2,000 Limit Hold’em event for $429,940. Six years later, in 2004, he took down a $1K Limit 2-7 for another $86,980. His third came in 2005 when he won a $2,500 NLHE tournament for $594,960. Finally, on Wednesday, Kevin Gerhart won his second bracelet of the series, fourth overall, in the $1,500 PLO 8 for a $186,789 score. Gerhart won the $10K H.O.R.S.E. earlier this year for a $361,124 payday and has an online bracelet from 2020 and a $1,500 Razz win in 2019. A big week for multiple bracelet winners. Distenfeld Donates to A Good Cause Last week, the poker community showed up for a fellow player who is faced with an unthinkable future but wanted to make one of his poker dreams come true. This week, another act of incredible generosity took place when Gershon Distenfeld pledged his entire winnings from his victory in the $1,500 NLHE Shootout to charity. Distenfeld earned $204,063 with the victory and every single dime is going to be put to the benefit of others. Distenfeld has made no secret that he’s been graced with more than enough wealth to take care of his family and so he plays poker for the competition and, in the result he wins, to help others. “My wife Aviva and I have been blessed with financial means and it’s a core value of ours to give both our money and our time to help make the world a better place,” he told PokerNews after his win. He followed up with a call to action for all bracelet winners to donate 1% of their winnings to the charity of their choice.
  4. Two more WSOP bracelets were won at the Rio on Sunday night as Ben Yu claimed his fourth gold bracelet of his career with a victory in the $10,000 NLHE Six-Handed for $721,453 and Robert McMillan perservered in Event #52, the Seniors Event, for his first-ever WSOP gold and $561,060 as he closed out a famous victory. Ben Yu Wins Fourth WSOP Bracelet Ben Yu won his fourth WSOP bracelet as he closed out the six-handed Event #56 in style, beating Nikita Kuznetsov heads-up to win $721,453. At an exciting final table, play kicked off between the final six players with Mike Sowers holding a big lead with 4.8 million chips to Kuznetsov’s 3.8 million. At that stage, Yu was the short stack, but he still had 49 big blinds to play with, and with WSOP victories in 2015, 2017, and 2018 to call on, he proved dogged enough to grab bracelet number four. The first player of the six to bust was former four-time WSOP bracelet winner Asi Moshe, with the Israeli going down with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"] after his top pair on the flop was shot down by Sowers’ flush after his [poker card="As"][poker card="8s"] hit a flush on the river to win through and condemn Moshe to sixth and $97,660. With five players left, Sowers may have risen to chip leader, but Yu was making moves too, albeit in smaller pots. Steve Yea was busted in fifth place for $137,303 when all-in with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kd"] against Ariel Mantel’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Tc"], with all the chips going into the middle pre-flop. The board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6h"] sending Yea home and further boosting Sowers’s stack. Mantel was on a mission too, however, and a double-up through Sowers opened up the whole tournament. Yu grabbed some from Sowers too as sharks circled in the water. Sowers lost more chips either side of the dinner break and suddenly was out of the event, all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"] against Yu’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6d"] and delivered from the felt by a king on the river. Sowers had banked $198,205 for his deep run and Mantel had it even better when he cashed in third place for $293,578. After some perfectly timed aggression from Kuznetsov weakened Mantel’s stack, the latter was all-in with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Js"]. Yu, by far the chip leader at this stage, called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="7h"] and both he and his heads-up opponent watched in delight as the board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="4c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9h"] busted the unfortunate Argentinian and send Kuznetsov into raptures. “My friend,” he exclaimed in the Thunderdome. “Russian people love you!” Heads-up, Yu had an almost unassailable lead, sitting with 16.8 million playing his Russian frenemy’s 2.8 million. While Kuznetsov had laddered, he could not manage a further ascent, and fell away when his [poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"] was shot down by Yu’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jh"], who had no little trouble holding through the sweaty [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="3h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8d"] board. Yu’s victory, worth $721,453, gave him his fourth bracelet, with his Russian opponent winning $445,892 for coming second. WSOP 2021 Event #56 $10,000 Six-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Ben Yu - $721,453 Nikita Kuznetsov - $445,892 Ariel Mantel - $293,578 Mike Sowers - $198,205 Steve Yea - $137,303 Asi Moshe - $97,660 McMillan Closes Out Emotional Seniors Victory When the nine-handed final table began, McMillan was one of the shortest stacks, sat on just 6 million chips, way behind Christopher Cummings, who had started the day as chip leader and continued that trend to the final table, sat behind 24.3 million as the action got underway. That lead had increased by the time that Daniel Lujano became the first player to bust, crashing out in ninth place for $58,425 when his shove with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="2s"] ran into Jonathan Ingalls with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8s"] and couldn’t catch up. Next to go was Todd Hansen, who busted in eighth place for $73,873 when Ingalls again claimed another victim. This time, Ingalls had [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Tc"] and put his opponent all-in, with Hansen calling with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8d"] on a flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], but the turn [poker card="2c"] and river [poker card="2d"] couldn’t save Hansen. Ingalls was on the rise and he wasn’t the only one, with Dennis Jensen also chipping up, specifically at the expense of Louis Cheffy when he busted in seventh for $94,030. Cheffy shoved with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"], but would need to hit as Jensen called with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"] and didn’t on the jack-high board. Despite those heroics, Jensen spent the next mini session watching the stack he’d worked so hard to accumulate disappear. On a board showing [poker card="Kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="8d"], Jensen led out then called off Robert Davis’ all-in. Jensen was at risk with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Tc"] for top pair on the flop, but he was behind Davis’ [poker card="7s"][poker card="3s"] and stayed there through the [poker card="2s"] river to bust in sixth for $120,484. In fifth place, it was the overnight chip leader Christopher Cummings who fell after the day got away from him and he cashed for $155,401 instead of playing for the title. Cummings moved all-in with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"] and was called by Daniel Stebbins with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ad"]. The queen-high board provided no sweat for Cummings, who was drawing dead by the river. With four players left, Ingalls met with his exit as Davis claimed another scalp. This time, Davis had [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Th"] and Ingalls was all-in pre-flop and at risk with the dominated [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9s"]. The board of [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2d"] saw Ingalls hit his card on the turn only for it to provide his opponent with the winning straight as he crashed out in fourth place for $201,753. Three-handed, Davis had a big lead, sitting with 73 million chips to McMillan’s 21 million and Stebbins with just 14.2 million. That changed as Stebbins doubled through Davis with jacks holding against queen-ten suited and as play continued, the stacks evened up with each man grabbing the initiative at a different time. Stebbins it was who busted third for $263,640, but when he did so it was to the new chip leader in McMillan. Stebbins rivered a straight with [poker card="Th"][poker card="7h"] on a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"][poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"], but the same card gave McMillan and unassailable full house with the [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] in his hand for Stebbins to depart. McMillan, so short earlier in the day, now had a better than 2:1 chip lead. It took next to no time for the winner to close it out. McMillan raised to a flop of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2d"] then saw a turn of [poker card="Kd"], sitting with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9c"]. Davis had come all that way with [poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] but put McMillan to the ultimate test with a shove on the turn, only for McMillan to find the call and watch the end the tournament play out in his favor when the [poker card="Ks"] landed on the river. WSOP 2021 Event #52 $1,000 Seniors Event Final Table Results: Robert McMillan - $561,060 Robert Davis - $346,743 Daniel Stebbins - $263,640 Jonathan Ingalls - $201,753 Christopher Cummings - $155,4016 Dennis Jensen - $120,484 Louis Cheffy - $94,030 Todd Hansen - $73,873 Daniel Lujano - $58,425 Less Than 50 Remain In COLOSSUS In Event #55, the massive Colossus event, which costs just $400 to enter, saw 1,181 players whittled down to just 49 by the close of play, with four former WSOP bracelet winners in Anatolii Zyrin (9,675,000), Vincas Tamasauskas (6,025,000), Brett Apter (3,000,000) and Carlos Chang (1,775,000) all making Day 3. The Day 2 chip lead is held by Rafael Fernades with 23,300,000 chips, who is followed in the counts by John Trinh (18,850,000) and Elad Kubi (18,675,000), meaning a big lead is in place for Day 3. With others such as Avi Cohen (12,675,000) and Matthew O’Meara (12,400,000) also making the top 10, it’s a stellar field who will return to battle for the bracelet on Day 3. WSOP 2021 Event #55 $400 Colossus Top 10 Chipcounts: Rafael Fernandes - 23,300,000 John Trinh - 18,850,000 Elad Kubi - 18,675,000 Michael Lee - 16,900,000 Avi Cohen - 12,675,000 Matthew O'Meara - 12,400,000 Penh Lo - 12,175,000 Yonatan Basin - 12,000,000 Lucas Kulbe - 11,925,000 Alexandre Malod - 11,900,000 Wong Leads $10K 2-7 Triple Draw Final 8 Event #57 saw 43 Day 2 players play down to just eight as Danny Wong had the kind of dominant day at the Rio that many of us can only dream of. Wong bagged up an incredible 1,755,000 chips by the close of play, with second-placed Brian Yoon (1,170,000), the only other player with over a million chips. Elsewhere in the final eight, players such as Joao Vieira (290,000) and Brandon Shack-Harris (275,000) will both be attempting to prove that a short-stacked player can win from this position yet again, but others won’t have that chance having busted on Day 2. Those included stars of the felt such as Dan Smith, who finished 9th for $24,910, Nathan Gamble (10th for $20,057), and five-time bracelet winner and POY boss Shaun Deeb, who departed in 13th place for $16,552. WSOP 2021 Event #57 $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Final Table Chipcounts: Danny Wong - 1,755,000 Brian Yoon - 1,170,000 Wil Wilkinson - 945,000 Don Nguyen - 565,000 Jordan Siegel - 300,000 Joao Vieira - 290,000 Brandon Shack-Harris - 275,000 Mike Thorpe - 110,000 Doyle Brunson Plays The Super Seniors In the Super Seniors Event #58, there was a magical moment inside the Rio as Doyle ‘Texas Dolly’ Brunson arrived to play, sitting down in Level 6 of the popular event. Brunson, who wore his trademark cowboy hat, is now 88 years old and looks unlikely to add to his incredible haul of 10 WSOP bracelets. Despite that, he remains a poker legend and while he lasted only an hour, his face ended up on thousands of people’s camera rolls. Brunson would not make Day 2 of the event, leaving the Rio in his ride-on chair to applause from many players and fans at the felt, but another WSOP legend did make the cut. Sammy Farha finished second to Chris Moneymaker in 2003 as the WSOP Main Event of that year precipitated a ‘poker boom’ we are all still enjoying the reverberations from. Farha totaled 204,100 by the close of play, good for one of the biggest stacks that remain as players such as Jack McClelland, Bill Klei, and Lisa Roberts all joined Doyle on the rail. Now that would be some cash game if they decided to set it up. Finally, it’s not just fans on the rail whose heads turned when Doyle Brunson zoomed into the room on his motorized cart. The 16-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth couldn’t wait to snap a selfie in the name of positivity. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1454953641442299906 WSOP 2021 Event #58 $1,000 Super Seniors Event Selected Chipcounts: Farhad Davoudzadeh - 414,000 Steve Schneider - 433,000 Gary Bain - 235,000 Ron Lemco - 231,600 Arthur Schiavo - 222,800 Randy Vee - 222,000 Hal Marcus - 220,000 Sammy Farha - 204,100 Martin Yates - 175,000 Valerii Lubenets - 175,000 Tag Team Back Again In Event #59, players joined forces to play in a ‘Tag Team’ event that cost $1,000 to enter and seemed to bring with it Hallowe’en fancy dress as standard. Jeff Platt - who reached fourth place in Event #43, the Double Stack, teamed up with fellow PokerGO broadcaster Brent Hanks to pay tribute to Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu in the... weirdest way possible. https://twitter.com/BuffaloHanks/status/1454948036937863171 At the felt, Hanks and Platt did very well, making the top 10 with 166,500 chips by close of play. The chip leaders were Mike Ruter and Samy Dighlawi (338,000), while the intriguing and powerful duo of Xuan Liu and Melanie Weisner bagged up 159,000 to put themselves in a very strong position for the win too. WSOP 2021 Event #59 $1,000 Tag Team Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Mike Ruter & Samy Dighlawi - 338,000 Haven Werner & Thomas Taylor - 295,000 Keith Doering & Bill Schaeffer - 235,500 Nikita Luther & Kunal Patni - 195,000 Mike Watson & Sarah Goddard - 169,500 Jeff Platt & Brent Hanks - 166,500 Alexey Mishuk & Alon Eldar - 160,000 Alon Eldar & Unknown - 160,000 Melanie Weisner & Xuan Liu - 159,000 Nellie Park & Joey Weissman - 144,500 Yockey Leads $50K PPC Day 1 Finally, Event #60 took place, with the $50,000 Poker Players Championship one of the highlights of the schedule for many fans, especially those of mixed games. With 43 entries on Day 1, there could well be just as many entries on Day 2, with registration closing after 10 levels and a break. One player barely got into his seat before he was all-in, but Scott Seiver survived and his opponent ended the night as the short stack. https://twitter.com/scott_seiver/status/1454938088753360902 With 39 players still in the hunt from their initial stack, only Jake Schwartz, Matt Ashton, Michael Noori, and Albert Daher went to the rail and will not be able to re-enter. Daniel Negreanu ended the day on just 77,000 chips. It was a different story for Bryce Yockey, who led the field with 653,000 chips by the time the bags came around, with 2019 WSOP Main Event runner-up Dario Sammartino (520,500) and Chris Vitch (504,500) his closest challengers. Others to thrive on Day 1 included Eli Elezra (460,500), Randy Ohel (457,000), Shaun Deeb (448,500), Yuval Bronshtein (440,500) and Brian Rast (437,000), all of whom made the top 10, while the aforementioned Seiver eventually bagged up 366,000 chips. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $1,000 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Bryce Yockey - 653,000 Dario Sammartino - 520,500 Chris Vitch - 504,500 Eli Elezra - 460,500 Randy Ohel - 457,000 Shaun Deeb - 448,500 Yuval Bronshtein - 440,500 Chad Campbell - 439,000 Brian Rast - 437,000 Ryan Leng - 433,000
  5. The World Series of Poker’s $50,000 Poker Players Championship is heralded by many top-flight players in the poker world as the real championship event of the series. In order to lay claim to the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy, a player not only needs to have an expert-level mastery of the entire mix of games, but also needs to face down the "best of the best" in terms of competition. In short, it takes a well-rounded, complete player in order to win. The truth is, making picks for the $50K is a tough task - especially this year. Everything needs to be considered from a player’s history in the event to the momentum they have when it gets started. Plus, it's hard to know if some of the top talents that normally would never miss the PPC will even show up (ex. Phil Ivey). So, taking all of that into consideration, we’re shooting our shot and dropping the latest edition of First-Round Picks with the names and ranks of the players we think are most likely to not only run deep in 2021 but hoist the trophy when the last chip has been collected. These players are first-rounders for the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. #1. Shaun Deeb Unlike the Super High Roller Bowl, where Michael Addamo was sun running headed into the event, there’s no clear top pick when it comes to the Poker Players Championship. The field attracts an absolutely elite field of players who are proficient in all the games. Honestly, an argument can be made for a multitude of grinders to be ranked #1. Here’s why it’s Shaun Deeb. In the past five years of the $50K Poker Players Championship, only one player has made the money three times - Shaun Deeb. In 2017 he finished in seventh place for $164,286, in 2018 a 10th place finish brought him $111,447, and then in 2019, he made the final table falling in fifth for $232,058. History shows Deeb loves to compete in the PPC and the PPC has loved him back. An undeniable master of mixed games, Deeb has proven time and time again that he knows how to close. He’s a four-time WSOP bracelet winner with more than $5 million in earnings at the series alone and each of his bracelets has come in different disciplines. Impressive, but that's not all he brings to the table. To back that up take a look at what he’s done online. He holds five PokerStars SCOOP titles, all in mixed games and, even more impressively eight World Championship of Online Poker titles, only two of which are in NLHE. In summary, Deeb is dangerous in any tournament against any opponent. The 2018 WSOP Player of the Year is off to a fast start in terms of cashes in 2021, with nine at the time of this writing (tied for third overall), including a final table in the $1,500 Seven Card Stud. If there’s one thing going against him it's that while he’s racking up scores, he’s not really breaking through into the deepest parts of the tournaments yet. It’s unlikely he’s even close to satisfied right now. His goal of earning the 2021 Player of the Year title is going to require some stronger second-half results and the PPC could do just the trick to get him back in the thick of things. #2. Michael Mizrachi It feels silly to not have Mizrachi, the only player to win this event three times, as the top pick…after all, like we just said, he’s won it THREE TIMES. But one has to wonder just how lucky can one guy be. He first took the PPC down in 2010, earning a massive $1,559,046 payday. He did it again just two years later for another $1.4 million. Finally, in 2018, Mizrachi completed the hat trick and earned his third spot on the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy for more than $1.2 million. In addition, he also scored fourth place in the event in 2016 for another $380,942. He has a knack for owning this event and just last week he made an appearance at the 2021 series, finishing in 11th place in the Eight Game Mix. One should expect Mizrachi to find his way into this $50K and shouldn’t be surprised if he makes a deep run. But Mizrachi is also a high-risk, high-reward play because in addition to being one of the toughest players he’s also a blowtorch, and had been known to burn bright but flame out early. All eyes will be on the 3x champ to see what happens this year. #3. Brian Rast No matter how long Brian Rast is away from the poker tables, when he returns to them he’s as dangerous an opponent as you will find. A two-time winner of the PPC, Rast took it down in 2011 for $1,720,328 and then again in 2016 for $1,296,097. Rast also went deep in 2018 where he finished in 8th place for over $144,000. Additionally, he’s already found himself deep in a pair of Championship Events already. First, he finished in 15th place in the $10K Omaha 8 Championship for $18,750, and then just three days later, Rast nearly made the final table in the $10K Limit Hold’em Championship where he fell in 11th place for another $18,506. Add to that a cash in the NL 2-7 Lowball event and it feels like Rast is simply getting warm before making a big splash in the PPC. For Rast, the real question is - will he be in the field? The fact that he’s been playing in the series already is a good indication that he will, but with career earnings of more than $21 million (and we gotta assume a ton of BTC for as often as he tweets about it), perhaps he just wakes up and says “not today.” #4. Benny Glaser The UK’s young mixed game phenom Benny Glaser has all the makings of a PPC champion. The three-time WSOP bracelet winner almost exclusively plays non-NLHE variants with his WSOP wins coming in Omaha 8 and Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw. In addition, Glaser has come very close in a number of other WSOP mixed game events including a runner-up finish this year in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. bringing him a $341,274 payday. His WSOP resume reads of a player who excels at any game that involves any number of cards. The warning signs in picking a crusher like Glaser are that his last bracelet win was back in 2016, however his 2018 fifth-place finish in the PPC shows he’s more than capable of getting to the end. #5. Phil Hellmuth After capturing his record-extending 16th WSOP gold bracelet in Deuce to Seven Hellmuth declared that the $50K PPC title is what he wanted next. The truth is, in previous years Hellmuth wouldn’t be in the top 10 first-round picks, much less the top 5. But this is 2021 and The Poker Brat is on a mixed game sun run that no one could have predicted. You’ve already heard the stats: five final tables, all in mixed games, with a bracelet in hand. He’s off to the best start to a WSOP in his lengthy career and is currently sitting atop the Player of the Year race at the halfway point in the series. Sure, he has his doubters and they would be quick to point out that Hellmuth’s only cash in this event came back in 2011 (when he finished in 2nd place for more than $1 million) and that this field will be the elite of the elite. But isn’t that who he’s been playing in the series so far? So, it may be risky picking Hellmuth this high, but in 2021 it’s an even riskier proposition not to. #6. Dan Zack Dan Zack may be the savvy pick at number six. He’s another one of the crop of young crushers who consistently proves he has a mastery of all the games. He also hasn’t kept it a secret how much he’d love to win Player of the Year, for which he currently is sitting in 12th place. He's just one big score away from being in the thick of it. At the time of this writing, Zack leads all cashes in 2021 with 11 total, including a final table in the $1,500 Eight Game Mix and a (soft) final table bubble in the $10K Stud where he finished in 10th place. He won his first gold bracelet in 2019 in the $2,500 Limit Mixed Triple Draw, but doesn’t have a history in the PPC. Expect that to change. #7. Daniel Negreanu There’s nothing Daniel Negreanu would love more than to win a bracelet and the trophy in this particular event. He’s stated it so many times that, along with the Player of the Year title, this is the tournament he consistently looks forward to the most. There’s no need to expand on the six-time WSOP bracelet winner’s resume except to note that in the past five years, Negreanu has made the money twice (including a final table in 2017) for a total of just under $400,000. The real reason “Kid Poker” is so high on this list is, in addition to his skill of course, is his momentum. He has plenty of it headed into this event. Negreanu has cashed ten times in the series (thus far) including a final table in the $3K H.O.R.S.E. and a final table bubble in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. The question will be if with everything he has going on being one of the game’s biggest ambassadors, can he let everything else fall to the wayside and zero in on what he really wants. If he’s feeling it, and he wants it - he’s a legit threat to win it all. #8. Anthony Zinno What a year it’s been already for Anthony Zinno who is currently the only two-time bracelet winner of the series. In back-to-back fashion, Zinno famously earned gold in the $10K Stud for $182,872 after being the subject of a classic Hellmuth rant. Then he came right back and took down $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. for another $160,636. In non-mixed game news, Zinno reminded people that’s he’s also a No Limit Hold’em crusher with a 12th place finish in the $50,000 High Roller for another $80,000, making it six cashes for the series. And if you hadn’t heard, Zinno created a club of which he’s the only member. With four WSOP bracelets and three World Poker Tour titles, he proved he’s one of the best in the game today and he heads into the PPC with a massive wave of momentum. Looking for action in the $50K PPC? Check out PocketFives Stakingwhere we will be selling pieces for Daniel Negreanu, Josh Arieh, Felipe Ramos, Matt Glantz, Daniel Weinman, and more. Sign up today and get in the action (many at no markup!) Sleeper Picks Julien Martini France’s mixed game master may be well-known for his runner-up finish at the PokerStars PSPC, but he’s also one of the more coveted players for WSOP $25K fantasy due to his ability to grind the entire schedule. While he’s off to a slow start at this year’s WSOP (3 cashes so far), don’t be surprised to see him turn it around in the PPC. David ‘ODB’ Baker Baker just got off a deep run in the $1,500 Razz where he finished in fifth place for $20,732. A two-time bracelet winner, one for a $2,500 8-Game Mix, Baker’s big question mark is if he’ll come out to play or prefer to sweat college or pro football with the tournament starting on the weekend. Ben Yu Three-time bracelet winner Ben Yu has been racking up cashes this year, with a total of 9 as of this writing. He finished in 7th place in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. for more than $75,000 and busted in 20th in the $5K Six-Max for another $21,838. He’s been making the money consistently, now it’s just time for him to break through and capture bracelet number four. The $50K Poker Players Championship gets underway on Sunday, October 31 and the final table will be played out live PokerGO on Friday, November 5.
  6. Largely unknown Mixed Games player Jesse Klein won his first WSOP bracelet after taking down a final table stacked with stars at the 2021 World Series of Poker. The recruitment firm owner went from recreational hopeful to WSOP winner on a final day full of drama as one $25,000 event ended and another began. Hellmuth Rants, Glaser Denied As Klein Pulls Out The WIn All the focus at the start of the third day of WSOP action was on the final table of Event #2, the $25,000 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event which saw another mixed game specialist, British player Benny Glaser, go into the final table with the lead. It took little time for Matt Glantz to become the first casualty of the day as Phil Hellmuth took out his fellow American in Razz with a ten-five, with Glantz paired up and drawing dead on 6th street. Glantz cashed for $52,211. Next to go was DJ Buckley, who lasted just a few minutes more to bust in eighth place for $61,549. Buckley’s elimination to Ben Yu precipitated an extended period of play without a bust-out, but it was not short of drama as Hellmuth exploded at the end of losing a hand to eventual champion Klein. Folding on the river, Hellmuth declared his opponent’s start as "insane" and it was to serve as the opening bout in a war of words between the pair. It was some time before Yu busted in seventh place for $75,260, but that was only the warm-up act to another blow-up from Hellmuth as Klein scooped a second big pot against the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner. The Poker Brat was back as Hellmuth left the table, pacing the floor and cursing at his lack of fortune. Just a few hands later, Hellmuth was gone, out in sixth place for $95,329 after bricking every street in Seven Card Stud against Chad Eveslage. After the event, Hellmuth was keen to point out the benefits of his staying power in bringing his A-Game to the Rio. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1444470919204769803 Hellmuth’s bust-out started a flurry of them. Philip Sternheimer was crushed in the same format by Glaser to leave in fifth place for $124,935. The same winner of that hand took out the aforementioned Eveslage in fourth for $169,218 when Glaser’s pair of sevens with a low ace was enough to win both Hi and Lo to send his American rival to the rail. Glaser led at that stage, but over the course of two hours without an elimination, each man had their periods of domination as the chips moved between each man. French player David Benyamine’s neck was on the block when he lost on 7th street to Klein, who won the pivotal pot to go into heads-up with a massive lead of 10.1 million to Glaser’s 1.5m. Klein won his maiden bracelet not long after the final duel began, with his victory in a Seven Card Stud hand ending an entertaining event. While Glaser, who had already won three WSOP bracelets in his career called off his stack with a smile and will enjoy the second-place prize of $341,274. For Jesse Klein, however, it was the fulfillment of a dream as the recruitment firm owner capped an enjoyable two-day sojourn to Sin City with a WSOP bracelet and $552,182 score. Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Results: Jesse Klein - $552,182 Benny Glaser - $341,274 David Benyamine - $236,626 Chad Eveslage - $169,218 Philip Sternheimer - $124,935 Phil Hellmuth - $95,329 Ben Yu - $75,260 DJ Buckley - $61,549 Matt Glantz - $52,211 Jake Daniels Leads $25K NLHE, Michael Addamo Outsted Many of the H.O.R.S.E. field took to the 6th event on the schedule, the $25,000-entry NLHE High Roller that kicked off on Day 3 of the WSOP. With 135 entries in total, it was Jake Daniels who ended Day 1 top of the pile, bagging up 1,182,000 chips by close of play as one of only two players to "crack a milly." While Daniels was steady throughout, he did not dominate the leaderboard until the final two levels, eliminating Eric Worre and Daniel Negreanu to vault himself to the top of the chip counts, with Michael Liang (1,028,000) and James Chen (835,000) his nearest challengers. Elsewhere in the top 10 players, Jake Schindler (667,000) and Chance Kornuth (570,000) will be major threats when the action resumes on Day 2. Several superstars made the upper echelons of the leaderboard, but plenty of big names hit the rail too. Australia’s most successful tournament player of all-time, Michael Addamo busted both bullets so will not be eligible for re-entry on Day 2. Others to lose their stacks on Day 1 included Stephen Chidwick, Brian Altman, Kenny Hallaert, Koray Aldemir, Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, Ryan Riess, Jeremy Ausmus, Upeshka De Silva, and Niall Farrell whose epic journey to the World Series was common among those from outside the United States. At the close of play on Day 1, just 54 players made the counts, but with entry and re-entry possible on Day 2 right up until the start of play, that number is sure to swell with some of the best players in the world going for gold. Galen Hall was among those to express his relief at playing some live poker for the first time in a very long time. https://twitter.com/galenhall/status/1444423233160187904   Some of the biggest players in the world have already been drawn together for Day 2, with battles between Jake Schindler, Adrian Mateos and Mikita Badziakouski at one table just a single example of the level of quality in the event. Whoever grabs a final table place at the end of Day 2 will have earned it. Event #6 $25,000 No Limit Hold’em High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Jake Daniels - 1,182,000 Michael Liang - 1,028,000 James Chen - 835,000 Scott Eskenazi - 747,000 Jake Schindler - 667,000 Clayton Kalisek - 610,000 Alexandros Theologis - 594,000 Chance Kornuth - 570,000 Ankush Mandavia - 553,000 Brian Rast - 551,000 Brobyn Bags 5 Million During Reunion Day 2 The Reunion, otherwise known as Event #4 on this year’s 2021 WSOP schedule, saw a huge number of entries on Day 1b, as 4,455 players took to the felt and made it into the money. Several high-profile players busted out before 204 players bagged up for the night, with Maurice Hawkins, Shaun Deeb, and Brad Owen just three of the Day 1 casualties. Others thrived at the felt, however, and by close of play, it was Robert Brobyn who bagged the biggest stack of chips, an incredible 5,015,000 of them. That total was way clear of Brobyn’s nearest challenger on the day Tyler Jamieson (3,040,000) and Brobyn’s lead represents the overall tournament lead after two days. Others to pile up plenty of chips on Day 1b included two former WSOP bracelet winners in the form of Ronnie Bardah, who proved a ‘Survivor’ with 2,005,000, and Jeremy Wien (1,640,000). WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Brobyn - 5,015,000 Tyler Jamison - 3,040,000 Jared Ambler - 2,450,000 Ya Yun Liu - 2,445,000 Ryan Messick - 2,410,000 Elvis Toomas - 2,375,000 Darryl Ronconi - 2,030,000 Ronnie Bardah - 2,005,000 Randy Rhee - 1,990,000 Mark Lilomaiava - 1,765,000 Connor Drinan, Rob Mizrachi Top Omaha 8 Final 15 Event #5, the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, saw 230 players whittled down to just 15 by the close of Day 2. Of those 15 players, only Connor Drinan and Robert Mizrachi have won WSOP bracelets before, but with both men at the top of the chipcounts, it could be a ding-dong battle on the final day to see whether Drinan wins his second, Mizrachi wins his fifth or a new player gets their hands on the gold. Day 2 of the event saw players such as Brian Hastings and Shaun Deeb hit the rail on the day the bubble burst with players such as Max Pescatori (80th for $2,400), David ‘Bakes’ Baker (75th for $2,400), Randy Ohel (48th for $3,200), Ari Engel (41st for $3,634) and former two-time WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Hughes (18th for $5,580) all make the money. It’s the potential shoot-out between Drinan and Mizrachi that has us salivating, however, as the final day of the event on Monday will crown a winner. WSOP 2021 Event #5 $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Connor Drinan - 2,415,000 Robert Mizrachi - 1,410,000 Sandy Sanchez - 1,380,000 Pearce Arnold - 1,160,000 Carl Lijewski - 1,095,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,080,000 Kris Kwiatkowski - 1,045,000 Yehuda Buchalter - 1,020,000 Michael Moed - 965,000 Scott Baumstein - 900,000
  7. The record books will reflect that there was an official winner in Event #1 of PokerGO’s 2021 Poker Masters ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em), but it was hardly a definitive one as Shannon Shorr and David Peters effectively “played to a tie” on Wednesday night. After a lengthy, see-saw heads-up battle that lasted nearly two hours, the duo agreed that, in order to play the next event (Event #2), that they would simply split up the remaining prize pool and flip for leaderboard points. In the end, all the chips ended on Shorr’s side of the table and he was crowned the winner of the tournament and given 1st place points. The 12-event Poker Masters kicked off with 82 entries of Event #1 pushing the prize pool to $820,000. After a full day of play, the final seven returned for Day 2 to crown a winner and try to award a $205,000 first-place prize. Coming into the final table with fewer than ten big blinds, Ben Yu wasn’t long for the final table busting in the day’s opening moments when he got all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] against Shorr’s [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"]. When the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"], Yu tapped the table and exited in seventh place for $41,000. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Shorr opened to 100,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"]. In the small blind, Brock Wilson looked down at [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and made the call. Then from the big blind, John Riordan who started the day as the second shortest stack moved all-in for his final 10 big blinds with [poker card="as"][poker card="8h"]. With the action on Shorr, he four-bet shipped all-in having Wilson covered. Wilson quickly released and the cards were put on their backs. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"], giving Riordan top pair and putting him in a good spot to double up. However, the [poker card="qh"] turn quickly put Shorr back in charge as Riordan was left looking for one of just two outs. The [poker card="qc"] river ended Riordan’s day in sixth place, good for $49,200. The final five battled for nearly two hours until the next player made their exit. The blinds had climbed to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and Jonathan Jaffe found himself on the short stack with roughly ten big blinds. When it folded to him in the cutoff with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"], Jaffe moved all-in. It folded through to Wilson in the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and he quickly made the call. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Wilson top pair and a commanding lead in the hand. The turn came the [poker card="5d"] bringing some additional gutshot straight outs for Jaffe. But the [poker card="ad"][ spiked on the river and Jaffe moved his chips into the middle, collected his belonging, and headed to the cage to collect $65,500 for fifth place. After losing a big hand against Peters, one in which Wilson was all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] against Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], Wilson moved to the bottom of the chip counts. At the 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) level, Wilson and Peters clashed again. Peters put in a raise on the button to 225,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Wilson, in the big blind with just under 10 big blinds remaining, defended holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"], giving both players top pair but keeping kickers in play. Wilson checked it over to Peters who bet the minimum, 100,000. Wilson then check-raised all-in and Peters made the call. The turn was the [poker card="ac"], bringing Wilson some chop outs. But the [poker card="3s"] ended Wilson’s run in fourth place, adding $82,600 to his bankroll. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment At three-handed, the chip stacks evened out until at 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) Shorr crept out to a small lead, while Peters and Dylan DeStefano remained neck and neck. On the button, Peters looked down at [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"] and put in a raise to 250,000. After Shorr folded his small blind, action was on DeStefano in the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"] and just under 20 big blinds. He took a long look at Peters and then announced he was all-in and Peters, with the bigger stack, snap-called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"] brought DeStefano a whole host of outs including potential flush, pair and backdoor straight outs. The turn was was the [poker card="ks"], leaving DeStefano with one more chance to his 10 outs. It didn’t come, the river was the [poker card="7c"] and DeStefano wrapped up in third place for $98,400. After taking out DeStefano, Peters started head-up play with a slight chip lead but Shorr was quick to even the stacks. Then the pair went to battle. Shorr built a considerable chip lead of roughly four-to-one and then Peters doubled. Shorr built it back up and Peters continued to hang around and then he took the lead. The pair bounced back and forth each taking turns trying to eliminate the other. All the while, registration for Event #2 was coming to a close and both players were eager to make sure they registered. Peters held a 7.6 million to 2.6 million chip lead over Shorr, at the 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante) level, when he open shipped the big stack holding [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"]. Shorr made the call holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] and it looked like Peters might finally lock up the win. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"] flop gave Shorr a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="9c"] turn. Peters needed a nine on the river to take the hand, but instead the river came the [poker card="qh"] and the pair were back to even with a quarter of an ante difference between them. At that point, they agreed to a deal (that may have been agreed to earlier) and then flipped for leaderboard points. “We’re effectively calling this a draw,” said PokerGO commentator Jeff Platt. “We can do an adjusted chop,” Shorr said, indicating that what little difference there was would be split in the aftermath. They both shipped all-in blind with Shorr winning the hand and being declared the official winner, claiming first-place leaderboard points. Poker Masters Event #1 Final Table Results Shannon Shorr - $205,000 officially* David Peters - $147,600 officially* Dylan DeStefano - $98,400 Brock Wilson - $82,000 Jonathan Jaffe - $65,600 John Riordan - $49,200 Ben Yu - $41,000 * Specific details of the deal were not made public but were discussed in the broadcast.
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