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  1. [caption width="680"] Robert Mizrachi hunts for his fourth WSOP bracelet in the Stud Championship.[/caption]The 2016 World Series of Poker wrapped up its opening weekend with the Colossus II and the $1,000 Top Up Turbo for the No Limit Hold’em crowd and the Seven Card Stud Championship and the $1,500 Dealers Choice for mixed game junkies. Two events reached the final the table – Stud and Turbo, while the Colussus II heads into Day 3 loaded with talent and the Dealers Choice event returns with the money bubble in mind. Ben Lindenmulder Bags Huge Lead in Colossus II Day 2 of Colossus II had 846 returning players from six starting flights, all of which were in the money, and after eight levels of action just 77 players bagged up for Day 3. Ben Lindemulder finished with nearly 2 million more than second-in-chips Richard Carr. Jeff Fielder, Eugene Fouksman, Amir Lehavot, David Gutfreund, David “ODB” Baker, Ylon Schwartz and Marco Johnson are among the notables that survived the day. Dan O’Brien made a money jump along with 845 other players that advanced for Day 2 and made a deep run into the money after finishing 108th in 2015. Justin Zaki, Craig Varnell, Michael Mizrachi and Harrison Gimbel all finished in the top 300 players. Top Ten Chip Counts Ben Lindemulder – 5,325,000 Richard Carr – 3,550,000 Vincent Moscati – 3,300,000 Farhad Davoudzadeh – 2,845,000 Daniel Dizenzo – 2,560,000 Ben Keeline – 2,540,000 Jonathan Borenstein – 2,460,000 Marek Ohnisko – 2,430,000 Alex Benjamen – 2,390,000 Steven Nichols – 2,240,000 Karl Held Holds Lead in Turbo Final Table The $1,000 Top Up Turbo drew 667 players for the two-day event and the blistering pace of the tournament left just nine players returning for Day 2. Karl Held holds the overnight lead with Hugo Perez just behind him. Hugo Perez, Kyle Julius and Vinny Pahuja look for the first bracelet of their careers while Ben Yu looks for number two after taking down the Limit Hold’em Championship in 2015. The top 101 players cashed in the event out of the $681,300 prize pool but they’re all guaranteed at least $9,506 for their efforts. The second player out locks up five figures but the winner walks with $142,972. Mohsin Charania bubbled the final table in 10th place, while Tim Finne, Micah Raskin and Andy Bloch also made deep runs to final three tables but did not advance. A little further back were Liv Boeree, Kevin Eyster, Jordan Cristos and Benjamin Zamani. Final Table Chip Counts Karl Held – 1,175,000 Hugo Perez – 1,065,000 Bart Lybaert – 810,000 Ben Yu – 760,00 Kyle Julius – 530,000 Nitis Udornpim – 435,000 Christian Blech – 315,000 Vinny Pahuja – 310,000 George Dolofan – 160,000 Robert Mizrachi Leads Seven Card Stud Championship Day 2 of the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship returned 33 players to fight for the 14 spots that pay. After ten levels of action they made the money, the official final table and finished with six players remaining. Robert Mizrachi sits comfortably in first, while 2015 WSOP Player of the Year winner George Danzer returns as the short stack. Accomplished vets Ted Forrest and David Benyamine return and the six players have 14 bracelets between them. Final Table Chip Counts Robert Mizrachi – 1,371,000 Matt Grapenthien – 1,157,000 Steve Weiss – 682,000 Ted Forrest – 447,000 David Benyamine – 363,000 George Danzer – 340,000 Dealers Choice Loaded with Bracelet Winners The Dealers Choice event proved to be a popular event with players since it was introduced in 2014 with 19 games available for players to choose from. The event drew 389 entrants who built a prize pool $525,150 to pay out the top 59 finishers. Former WSOP Ladies champ Svetlana Gromenkova bagged up the lead just shy of the 100,000-chip mark. British bracelet winner Richard Ashby sits in second, New York cash game player Jared Bleznick sits in seventh and the guy that quite literally wrote the book on poker, David Sklansky, also finished inside the top ten. Further down the counts are Sorel Mizzi, Jeff Madsen, Eli Elezra, Aditya Prasetyo and Paul Volpe. Former Team Full Tilt players Andy Bloch and Mike Matusow look for their second cash of the summer while Chris Ferguson looks for his first cash since 2010. Top Ten Chip Counts Svetlana Gromenkova – 99,600 Richard Ashby – 82,300 Yueqi Zhu – 81,000 Michael Banducci – 74,000 Joshua Mullins – 71,900 Bryce Yockey – 67,800 Jared Bleznick – 65,000 David Sklansky – 62,000 Justin Gardenhire – 60,300 Clayton Mozden – 58,900 Bargain Monday for the WSOP The first Monday of the 2016 WSOP is a rare day on the schedule where both events kicking off have the same buy-in. The early event is the first $1,500 NLHE event of the summer and the 3 pm event is the single re-entry No Limit Deuce to Seven Single Draw. In addition to the bracelet events, there is a $1,000 satellite to Tuesday’s $10,000 Heads Up Championship in the Pavilion.
  2. [caption width="640"] Winning the K Triple Draw Championship bracelet was just part of Ben Yu's amazing day (WSOP photo)[/caption] To say that Ben Yu had a good day Monday at the 2017 World Series of Poker would probably be an understatement. First he battled through a typically difficult final table in the $10,000 Triple Draw Deuce to Seven Championship to win his second career bracelet. He then registered late for the $10,000 Limit Hold’em Championship and finished Day 1 of that event with the biggest stack. His win was one of three bracelets awarded on Monday, while four other events were also in action. Frank Maggio Wins Seniors Championship [caption width="640"] Frank Maggio has played the Seniors event every year he's been eligible - now he's the champion (WSOP photo)[/caption] While some of the early events on the WSOP schedule have seen smaller fields than years past, the $1,000 Seniors Championship smashed its record for field size with 5,389 entrants. The field was so big in fact, that it took an extra day to determine the champion. In the end, 56-year-old Frank Maggio of Calumet City, Illinois stood tall to win $617,303 and his first career WSOP bracelet. Maggio is a regular in the Seniors event and also played the Marathon event earlier this week. “I come out here every year since I turned 50 to play in the Seniors event. I cashed a couple of years ago, but this year's a big surprise,” said Maggio. Maggio beat William Murray of Cottonwood, Arizona heads-up. Murray walked away with $381,233 for his runner-up finish. Final Table Payouts Frank Maggio - $617,303 William Murray - $381,233 Dieter Dechant - $281,691 Mark Lillge - $209,715 Anthony Licastro - $157,321 Gina Bacon - $118,923 Lewis LeClair - $90,594 Paul Spitzberg - $69,552 Dan Heimiller - $53,817 Christopher Frank Wins First Bracelet in $1,500 NLHE [caption width="640"] Christopher Frank grabbed the first bracelet of his career in the ,500 NLHE event Monday (WSOP photo)[/caption] The $1,500 No Limit Hold’em events are usually some of the biggest fields of the year at the WSOP, filled with a cross section of younger up and coming pros and recreational players taking their shot at a WSOP event. The final table usually ends up being filled with relatively new faces. That wasn’t quite the case in Event #33 though. Christopher Frank, of Vienna, Austria, beat out a final table that include New Jersey grinder and WSOP bracelet winner, Michael Gagliano, Max Pescatori, Noah Vaillancourt, Georgios Sotiropoulos and Pratyush Buddiga to win $284,833 and his first WSOP bracelet. "I don’t think it really has sunk in yet, but it’s a very good feeling" said Frank. "I’ve been playing the live circuit for pretty long, and I’ve always dreamed of winning something big. And now I’ve done it." This is Frank’s third cash of the 2017 WSOP and pushed his career earnings to nearly $1.5 million. Ryan Leng finished runner-up for $237,776. Final Table Payouts Christopher Frank - $384,833 Ryan Leng - $237,776 Arkadiy Tsinis - $171,208 Pratyush Buddiga - $124,615 Grant Denison - $91,699 Georgios Sotiropoulos - $68,226 Noah Vaillancourt - $51,332 Max Pescatori - $39,060 Michael Gagliano - $30,063 Ben Yu Wins Second Bracelet, Beating "Tough" $10K Triple Draw Final Table Heading into the final table of the $10,000 Triple Draw Championship, Ben Yu was in the middle of the pack surrounded by extremely talented players. By the end of it all though, Yu was the last player standing, posing for the winner’s photo with his second WSOP bracelet in hand. "It was actually a very tough final table," Yu said. "I think the media overblows it. Even a lot of the name players, the ones you've seen have some success, aren't always that great. But this final table and this field was actually really tough.” He’s not wrong. The final table included Mike Matusow, Shawn Buchanan, Mike Watson, Nick Schulman and former #1-ranked PocketFiver Shaun Deeb. Yu toppled all of them to win $232,738 while Deeb had to settle for runner-up status and $142,842. Final Table Payouts Ben Yu - $232,738 Shaun Deeb - $143,842 Nick Schulman - $98,337 Mike Watson - $68,601 Shawn Buchanan - $48,854 Mike Matusow - $35,532 Kerry Goldberg Leading Super Seniors into Day 3 While the Seniors event played down to a winner on Monday, the Super Seniors was getting down to the nitty gritty. Just 22 players remain in the tournament reserved for those 65 or older and Jacksonville, Florida’s Kerry Goldberg sits on top of the chip counts as the only player with a seven figure stack. Goldberg finished Day 2 with 1,224,000 while his closest competitor, Earl Hirakawa, put 728,000 into his bag at the end of the day. The remaining players return at Noon on Tuesday to play down to a winner. Top 10 Chip Counts Kerry Goldberg - 1,224,000 Earl Hirakawa - 728,000 Darrell Ticehurst - 716,000 Veronica Daly - 634,000 James Moore - 559,000 John Isler - 546,000 Ernest Ruybalid - 451,000 Daniel Favreau - 450,000 Stanley Siegel - 363,000 Federico Cuellar - 332,000 Kenny Hallaert On Top of Talented Group in $5K Six Max As far as No Limit Hold’em events go at the WSOP, the $5K Six Max is always on of the toughest fields year-after-year. This year is now exception and with just 18 players left in the field, 2016 November Niner Kenny Hallaert is on top with a talented group of players attempting to chase him down. Hallaert ended Day 2 with 1,767,000, just ahead of former #1-ranked PocketFiver Chris Hunichen, who finished with 1,622,000. Among the other players still in the field are Faraz Jaka (1,213,000), Sam Soverel (865,00), Garrett Greer (626,000), James Obst (585,000), Jonathan Jaffe (442,000) and the shortest remaining stack, Mike Leah (246,000). Leah was more than happy to move on to Day 3, having played Day 1 of the $1,000 NLHE event during breaks. There were 191 players at the start of Day 2, with just the top 87 guaranteed a payday. Included in th group of players who managed to cash were Bernardo Da Silveira Dias, Jason Les, Dietrich Fast, John Racener, Jonathan Little, Dario Sammartino, Niall Farrell, Sam Grafton, Michael Mizrachi, Rocco Palumbo and Jesse Sylvia. The final 18 players get back in action at 2 pm PT on Tuesday. Top 10 Chip Counts Kenny Hallaert - 1,767,000 Chris Hunichen - 1,622,000 Nadar Kakhmazov - 1,262,000 Faraz Jaka - 1,213,000 Rob Kuhn - 1,041,000 Dan Abouaf - 1,041,000 Christian Rudolph - 1,005,000 Sam Soverel - 865,000 Jacob Haller - 651,000 Garrett Greer - 626,000 Eveslage, Salter, Varnell and Seif On Top of $1K NLHE The first regular $1,000 buy-in NLHE event of the summer attracted 2,020 players with just 238 surviving the first 10 levels of play to move on to Day 2. Chad Eeslage and Louis Salter bagged 197,300 and 192,000 respectively to lead the way. Other notable names to move on to Day include Craig Varnell, Mark Seif, Kevin Saul, Vinny Pahuja, Ryan Laplante, Jordan Young, Martin Jacobson, Barry Greenstein, Anthony Spinella and Loni Harwood. Action resumes at Noon PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Chad Eveslage - 197,300 Louis Salter - 192,000 Craig Varnell - 141,300 Mark Seif - 131,200 Johnykutty Sam - 127,500 Gregory Brewer - 117,900 Alex Foxen - 114,000 Terry Schumacher - 111,400 Chad Layne - 108,400 Finn Zwad - 104,000 Ben Yu Shows Up Late, Finishes Up Top After Day 1 of $10K Limit Hold’em Daniel Negreanu called the field in the $10,000 Limit Hold’em event the “softest $10K of the summer” and then went out proved it by finishing with the third biggest stack. The two players above him include defending champion Ian Johns and Ben Yu. Yu registered late after winning the $10K Triple Draw bracelet earlier in the evening. The event drew 120 players - 10 more than it did in 2016. Just 41 advanced to Day 2 however. Included in the group that will be returning for stacks on Tuesday include Phil Hellmuth, JC Tran, Ismael Bojang, Brock Parker, Sorel Mizzi, Shaun Deeb, Jon Turner and Terrence Chan. Top 10 Chip Counts Ben Yu - 360,000 Ian Johns - 272,000 Daniel Negreanu - 260,500 Kevin Song - 246,500 Michael Ross - 240,000 Phil Hellmuth - 225,500 Mark Klecan - 211,000 Joe McKeehen - 209,000 Mike Schneider - 197,000 Tom McCormick - 190,500
  3. There were two bracelet winners on Wednesday at the 2018 World Series of Poker, and one of those wins has provided one of the coolest stories of the summer so far. Meanwhile, two tournaments will return tomorrow very close to the end, with one heads-up and another three-handed. The final table of the SHOOTOUT has also been set, while the $25K PLO High Roller played through its Day 1. Here’s everything you need to know about June 21’s WSOP action. Farhintaj Bonyadi Takes Down Super Seniors Event for $311,451 Against all the odds, Farhintaj Bonyadi defeated Robert Beach heads-up to capture her first WSOP bracelet and the $311,451 first-place prize. She’s now the second bracelet winner in her family, with her son Farzad “Freddy” Bonyadi holding three. The two returned to finish off Event #36: $1,000 Super Seniors No-Limit Hold’em today, with Beach holding a huge chip lead. He had 9 million to Bonyadi’s 2 million, but Bonyadi began to chip up almost immediately, winning several pots without showdown. That gap was closed to a 2:1 chip lead, and then before you knew it Bonyadi held the lead herself. In the final hand, there was a straight on board by the river and Bonyadi triple-barrelled to put Beach all-in. He made the call, having flopped top pair, but Bonyadi had the top end of the straight to secure the win. “She wants to catch me now,” Farzad joked after his mom’s win. “She did it all on her own. I told her to play patiently when she was short and she did it. I think she played masterfully today.” “I’m just so happy,” added Farhintaj, who claims her first tournament victory after two runner-up finishes in the Rio Daily Deepstacks in 2012 and 2016. Final Table Results: Farhintaj Bonyadi - $311,451 Robert Beach - $192,397 Paul W Lee - $140,273 Linda Iwaniak - $103,215 Russell Sutton - $76,655 Alan Denkenson - $57,465 Charles Thompson - $43,489 Neil Henley - $33,227 Bill Fogel - $25,633 Yaniv Birman Wins $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship for $236,238 The second winner of the day had to battle his way through the whole final table on his way to victory. Yaniv Birman entered the Event #38: $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship finale with the chip lead, and successfully overcame a tough final table to bank the $236,238 and the bracelet. [caption id="attachment_619639" align="aligncenter" width="683"] Bracelet #1 for Yaniv Birman[/caption] Along the way, Lars Gronning was the first to fall. He came in as the short stack, and his elimination was quickly followed by the player who eliminated him, Joseph Cappello. James Obst then exited, before Matt Grapenthien and Lee Salem followed suit. Birman never lost the chip lead, despite not eliminating a single player until heads-up. Bracelet winner Ben Yu went out in third, leaving Birman to duel with two-time bracelet winner Jesse Martin. Martin managed to double up, but couldn’t pick up any steam from there. "I barely ever play tournaments so it's fun,” Birman said after his win. “I play once or twice a year. I got here Monday, and this was the first tournament I signed up for. The truth is I don't play much poker anymore. Stud is my favourite game - all types of Stud. I play a lot of high-limit games in L.A. "I'm predominantly a businessman, and I just play poker for fun. [Winning a bracelet] is just a great feeling.” Final Table Results: Yaniv Birman - $236,238 Jesse Martin - $146,006 Ben Yu - $99,340 Lee Salem - $69,928 Matt Grapenthien - $50,669 James Obst - $37,904 Joseph Cappello - $29,306 Lars Gronning - $23,443 Three Remain in DOUBLE STACK One of the two tournaments to play down to just two or three players remaining is Event #34: $1,000 DOUBLE STACK No-Limit Hold’em. Robert Peacock enters the fifth and final day as an overwhelming chipleader with 38,200,000 chips. Joining him will be Nicholas Salimbene (10,400,000) and Joshua Turner (8,400,000). Twenty players returned today, and along the way the likes of Ramin Hajiyev (15th Place - $34,929), Matt Stout (12th Place - $44,407), and Keith Ferrera (11th Place - $44,407), and Tomas Teran Paredes (10th Place - $44,407) exited before the final table was set. Jacky Wong (4th - $219,952), Ralph Wong (5th - $165,342), Daniel Eichhorn (6th - $125,215), James Ostrowski (7th - $95,538), Pfizer Jordan (8th - $73,446), and Takao Shizumi (9th - $56,891) rounded out the final table. The final three return at 12pm Thursday to find a winner. Blinds will be 500K/1M. Final Three Stacks: Robert Peacock - 38,200,000 Nicholas Salimbene - 10,400,000 Joshua Turner - 8,400,000 Heads-Up in $1,500 NLHE The other near-finish on Wednesday night was in Event #37: $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em, which played down to just two. When action resumes tomorrow, it’ll be Eric Baldwin (7,550,000) heads-up against Ian Steinman (2,200,000). Baldwin seeks his second bracelet, having won his first back in 2009, while Steinman will have to overcome a healthy chip deficit to win his first. Throughout the day, we lost the likes of Ryan Goindoo, Thomas Kurtz, Ryan Laplante, Enrico Rudelitz, Jason Wheeler, Kirk Banks, Jay Farber, JC Tran, and Geoffrey Lavinson prior to the final table. The final table so far has seen the eliminations of Enrico Rudelitz (3rd - $140,957), Aaron Massey (4th - $101,819), Robert Georato (5th - $74,434), Michael Finstein (6th - $55,077), Stephen Song (7th - $41,257), Gilsoo Kim (8th - $31,290), and Mathew Moore (9th - $24,032). Things kick off again at 12pm Thursday with blinds at 50K/100K. SHOOTOUT Finale Set At the start of play on Wednesday, 100 players who won their first round tables returned to the Rio to sit around ten ten-handed tables to play round 2. Unsurprisingly, ten players made it through to Day 3 - the final table. There’s no major chip leader in Event #39: $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em Shootout, as all ten players start with near enough the same stacks. Anthony Reategui is one notable to look out for though, as he finished seventh in the $3K SHOOTOUT a couple of weeks ago. Reategui also won a bracelet back in 2005. There were a bunch of notables who failed to win their second tables today, including Scott Blumstein, Phil Hellmuth, Rep Porter, Philip Tom, Justin Liberto, Vlad Darie, Georgios Sotiropoulos, Tom Hall, Demosthenes Kiriopoulos, Arkadiy Tsinis, Jesse Sylvia, William Kakon, and Matthew Waxman. You’ll find the line-up for tomorrow below. Play gets going at 12pm. Anthony Reategui - 672,500 Young Phan - 670,000 Dylan Linde - 668,000 Royce Matheson - 668,000 Corey Dodd - 664,500 Endrit Geci - 663,500 Jesse Kertland - 662,500 Bas de Laat - 661,000 Preston Lee - 656,000 Alexander Lakhov - 654,000 Five Left in Mixed Big Bet They’re down to another final table over in Event #40: $2,500 Mixed Big Bet, and it’s Scott Bohlman who bagged the chip lead when play ended five-handed. And when we say chip lead, we mean a monstrous dominating lead that sees Bohlman holding 60% of the chips in play. His 1,556,000 is most closely followed by Ryan Hughes with 345,000. His huge surge came from several big pots, including making a wheel in a Pot Limit 2-7 Triple Draw hand to eliminate Dario Sammartino. They’ll return to play down to a winner at 2pm Thursday. Final Table Chip Counts: Scott Bohlman - 1,556,000 Ryan Hughes - 345,500 Daniel Weinman - 292,800 Aaron Rogers - 261,800 Marcel Vonk - 100,000 Day 1 of $1,500 Limit Hold’em Wraps Up A new event kicked off on Wednesday: Event #41: $1,500 Limit Hold’em. It attracted 596 runners, but after ten levels just 174 were bagging up chips. Brian Vollick had the best day of the lot, ending proceedings with 71,500. Other big stacks include Rex Clinkscales (69,900), Kurt Maier (68,200) and Jeremy Heartberg (66,200). A few notables who tried and failed in this one include Daniel Negreanu, Andre Akkari, Mike Leah, Humberto Brenes, Phillip Hui, Michael Moore, Todd Witteles, Ryan Laplante, David 'ODB' Baker, Chris Ferguson, and Luis Calvo. When the return tomorrow for Day 2, the blinds will be 1K/2K. Top 10 Stacks: Brian Vollick - 71,500 Rex Clinkscales - 69,900 Cody Riedel - 68,600 Kurt Maier - 68,200 Jeremy Heartberg - 66,200 Daniel Needleman - 64,600 Phil Goatz - 64,200 Jared Woodin - 59,100 Andrew Yip - 55,900 Alan Bittikofer - 55,300 $25K PLO High Roller Kicks Off Well, Daniel Negreanu must have dashed straight over to Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller after busting the Limit Hold’em, and it proved to be a good decision. Negreanu ended the day with the third largest stack out of the 101 survivors, behind only Konstantin Beylin (617,500) and Veselin Karakitukov (549,500). In total there were 192 entries, but registration is still open until the start of level 13. They played 10 levels today, and a few notables who made it through include Chance Kornuth (473,500), Robert Mizrachi (453,000), Artem Babakhanyan (436,000), Chris "BigHuni" Hunichen (374,000), Scotty Nguyen (347,500), Jason Koon (325,000), Brian Rast (312,500), Paul ‘paulgees82’ Volpe (258,500), defending champion James Calderaro (234,500) and Tommy Le (230,000). Play resumes at 2pm tomorrow with blinds at 1,500/3,000. Top 10 Stacks: Konstantin Beylin - 617,500 Veselin Karakitukov - 549,500 Daniel Negreanu - 532,000 Aaron Katz - 525,000 George Wolff - 504,500 David Len Ashby - 498,500 Bogdan Capitan - 496,000 Fraser MacIntyre - 482,000 Craig Varnell - 479,500 Chance Kornuth - 473,500 Tomorrow’s Action (June 21) There are two new events kicking off on Thursday. First up is Event #43: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em, starting nice and early at 11am. Then at 3pm, there’s the Event #44: $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship. Ben Yu took that one down last year for $232,738, defeating Shaun Deeb heads-up.
  4. John Hesp. Michael Ruane. Mark Newhouse. Even William Kasouf. Every year during the World Series of Poker thousands of new faces enter the halls of the Rio All Suite & Casino in hopes of earning a life-changing score. Sometimes though, along with the money, a player's accomplishments and personality introduce them to poker fans around the world, helping them become the next emerging poker star. In some cases, it may be a player who has been on the scene for a number of years and their expertise was able to shine in the summertime to elevate their profile to new heights. In 2018, it was no different. Here are just some of the players who went from being a face in the crowd to one of the breakout stars of the World Series of Poker. John Cynn It should be no surprise that the Los Angeles cash game grinder turned Main Event champion is now known by just about every fan of the game of poker. John Cynn bested the second largest Main Event field in history en route to an $8.8 million payday all in front of the cameras of the Worldwide Leader in Sports, ESPN. The achievement alone puts Cynn’s name in the history books. But it was his play and personality that truly turned him into a star. As the other players hit the rail, Cynn’s visibility on camera increased. Those who tuned in to the broadcast were treated to a poker player who was enjoying every second of the journey while not sacrificing a high level of play. It remains to be seen if Cynn will expand his tournament schedule, being a cash game pro. However, if he does decide to hit the circuit he will command the attention of his fellow players and the media for many years to come. Tony Miles John Cynn's foil in the Main Event was runner-up Tony Miles. From early on during the ESPN coverage, it was clear that Miles was at ease both at the tables and in front of the camera. And it wasn’t just his play and the affable table talk of Miles that endeared him to fans. His backstory of overcoming adversity and his challenges with addiction was instantly relatable to many who watch and play the game. On the final hand of the tournament, Cynn took his time making a call for it all. Miles seemed to step out of character and snub Cynn when it all over with an accusation of a slow roll. The very next day he took to Twitter, owned the moment and made a heartfelt apology. His very human side was on display and his authenticity only drew the public more on his side. Whereas it’s less certain how often we’ll see Cynn on the circuit, there’s a high likelihood that Miles is ready to step into an ambassador-like role. In many interviews he proclaimed his love of poker and ambition to continue playing at the highest levels. Ben Yu It’s true that Ben Yu was already known by his peers as being a world class player. Prior to the 2018 WSOP, he’d already earned two gold bracelets and $2.4 million in earnings. However, even though Yu already had an amazing ten year career, he’d never had a summer like the one in 2018. Los Angeles, CA’s Yu cashed in 15 different events including picking up his third career bracelet by winning the final event of the series, Event #77: $50,000 No Limit High Roller for $1.650 million. He also had a runner-up finish in Event #42, for $866,000. Yu played everything. From the $365 Pot Limit Omaha to the online bracelet events to the Main Event, where he finished in 150th place. When the six weeks were done, Yu’s grind paid off big time. He’d more than doubled his career lifetime earnings to $5.25 million and cracking the top 200 on the All-Time Money List. Kelly Minkin One-time lawyer, Kelly Minkin was already known by those who follow poker as a fierce on-the-felt competitor. Though her poker roots began in 2013, she found greater notoriety in 2015 when she made the final table of a World Poker Tour event as well as making a super deep run in the 2015 WSOP Main Event, earning the media bestowed title of Last Woman Standing. In 2018 Minkin’s Main Event run energized a community when deep in the tournament she found herself holding the overall chip lead. This landed Minkin on the feature table, multiple times, including pulling off big-time bluffs - one of which prompted commentator Nick Schulman to label her play “gangsta”, a term for her play which quickly caught fire. Though Minkin didn’t make the final table, she finished in 50th place for over $156,000. Her score pushed her career total earnings over the $1 million mark. It was the second time in four years she was the Last Woman Standing. Scott Bohlman Three, two, one. Scott Bohlman finished in each of those places this summer. The Illinois native has been a longtime grinder who certainly stepped up his game in 2018. Bohlman, who plays all the games, picked up his first gold bracelet by taking down Event #40: $2,500 Mixed Big Bet for $122,138. He followed that up four days later finishing in sixth in Event #49: $10K PLO Championship for another $157,097. He notched two more six-figure scores late in the series. A runner-up finish in Event #64: $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Eight for $225,210 (a career-high cash) and Event #69: $3,000 PLO 6-Handed for $199,572. In total Bohlman earned over $739,000 over 11 summer cashes, good enough to land him in the top 5 on the WSOP Player of the Year race. To put his summer in perspective, Bohlman’s results would have been good enough to land him as the sixth most productive player in the 25k Fantasy competition. That ranks above players like Justin Bonomo, Mike Leah, and John Racener. Unfortunately for those who drafted, no one picked Bohlman. Next year, that’s likely to change.
  5. There are three bracelet winners to tell you about from Thursday’s 2018 World Series of Poker action: Two first-time winners, and one player who has captured his second piece of poker jewellery nine years after claiming his first. Meanwhile, the $25K PLO High Roller is down to just 35 players. Scroll down to find out who is still in with a shot of winning the enormous $1,402,683 prize. All of that and more in today’s recap of June 21. ErIc Baldwin Wins Bracelet #2, $1,500 NLHE for $319,580 With just two players returning on Thursday to finish Event #37: $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em, it looked very likely that Eric Baldwin would capture his second bracelet. It had been nine years since his first WSOP win, and he held a dominating chip lead over his sole opponent, Ian Steinman. Baldwin began with 7,550,000 against Steinman’s 2,200,000, and Baldwin won a big pot right from the get go. However, Steinman was able to double up with pocket sixes against ace-king, and then looked set to double again with pocket kings against ace-jack. However, a jack on the turn followed by an ace on the river gave Baldwin the win. An emotional Baldwin celebrated with his rail, including his mother, before dedicating the victory to his late father, who passed away three years ago. "In a lot of ways, this one is for him,” he said. "It was a lot of hours of poker and a lot of short-handed play, that really sucks your mental energy," Baldwin added. "But man it's fun! I wish everyone could experience this. It's so cool!” Final Table Results: Eric Baldwin - $319,580 Ian Steinman - $197,461 Enrico Rudelitz - $140,957 Aaron Massey - $101,819 Robert Georato - $74,434 Michael Finstein - $55,077 Stephen Song - $41,257 Gilsoo Kim - $31,290 Mathew Moore - $24,032 Scott Bohlman Takes Down Mixed Big Bet for $122,138 [caption id="attachment_619647" align="aligncenter" width="657"] First Bracelet for Scott Bohlman[/caption] Another event which ended short-handed on Wednesday night was Event #40: $2,500 Mixed Big Bet. That meant three players returned today, and again, there was a dominating chip leader. Scott Bohlman held 60% of the chips in play three-handed, but had stiff competition from WPT champ Daniel Weinman and two-time bracelet winner Ryan Hughes. Both of those managed to double up and one point the stacks were virtually even with Hughes even holding the chip lead. After a break though, Bohlman returned refreshed and eliminated Weinman in third with trips against kings-up in a 5-card draw hand. He then had a 5:1 lead over Hughes, and finished the job with a set against top pair and low draw in a Big O pot. Bohlman’s bracelet win is his 52nd WSOP cash. It seems the 52nd time was a charm, as he is now $122,138 richer. Final Table Results: Scott Bohlman - $122,138 Ryan Hughes - $75,477 Daniel Weinman - $49,541 Aaron Rogers - $33,344 Marcel Vonk - $23,028 Jeremy Harkin - $16,329 Preston Lee is SHOOTOUT Champ, Wins $236,498 Thursday’s third and final bracelet came in Event #39: $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em Shootout, which Preston Lee took down for $236,498. [caption id="attachment_619648" align="aligncenter" width="639"] SHOOTOUT Champ Preston Lee[/caption] The final table of ten took over 12 hours to play out, with a four-hour heads-up duel between Lee and eventual runner-up Corey Dodd taking up four of those. The chip lead switched back and forth between the two, before Lee was finally able to take it down with king-deuce holding up against six-five. Lee said he was mostly a cash game player, but that he’d been playing more online to get back into live tournament poker. That work seems to have paid off, giving him his first bracelet. Final Table Results: Preston Lee - $236,498 Corey Dodd - $146,146 Anthony Reategui - $105,907 Dylan Linde - $76,829 Jesse Kertland - $56,763 Young Phan - $42,476 Royce Matheson - $32,198 Alexander Lakhov - $24,728 Bas de Laat - $19,245 Endrit Geci - $15,180 Just 19 Remain in $1,500 Limit Hold’em The field in Event #41: $1,500 Limit Hold’em has been chopped down from 596 to just 19 after Day 2, with Matt Woodward leading the way with 438,000 chips. He’s most closely followed by Jeffrey Scheibner (427,000) and Robert Nehorayan (418,000). Matt Grapenthien bagged a top ten stack (238,000), and he’s the only bracelet winner remaining in the field. Grapenthien took down the $10K Stud Championship back in 2014. Action resumes at 12pm Friday. Top 10 Stacks: Matthew Woodward - 438,000 Jeffrey Scheibner - 427,000 Robert Nehorayan - 418,000 Matt Russell - 361,000 Brad Albrinck - 323,000 Oleg Chebotarev - 312,000 Kevin Song - 290,000 Brian Vollick - 286,000 Matt Grapenthien - 238,000 Michael Jex - 232,000 Ben Yu Leads Final 35 in $25K PLO High Roller One of the biggest events on the WSOP schedule is down to 35 players from the 230 who entered. Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller has a massive $1,402,683 for the winner, and right now the player closest to it is chip leader Ben Yu. Yu bagged up 3,695,000, having enjoyed a massive spin-up late in the day. Yu had just 200,000 at the dinner break, before busting two players and riding the wave to the largest end-of-day stack. His closest competitors are Jason Koon (2,540,000), Ryan Tosoc (2,220,000), and Shaun Deeb (2,120,000). There are plenty of big names still in the field though, including multiple bracelet winners Scotty Nguyen (2,010,000), Jason Mercier (1,905,000), Robert Mizrachi (1,005,000), Luis Velador (1,045,000), Erik Seidel (725,000), Mike Leah (660,000), Craig Varnell (625,000), Christopher Frank (565,000), David Benyamine (425,000), Sam Soverel (380,000), Paul ‘paulgees91’ Volpe, and Jarred Graham (300,000). Defending champ James Calderaro (705,000) is still in too, as is Tom Marchese (440,000). Adam ‘adamyid’ Owen is the short stack with just 85,000. A few players who failed to cash in this one include Daniel Negreanu, Anthony Zinno, Jens Kyllonen, JC Tran, Scott Seiver, Chris Ferguson and Michael Mizrachi. Play resumes at 2pm, with all players now guaranteed a min-cash of $37,500. Top 10 Stacks: Ben Yu - 3,695,000 Jason Koon - 2,540,000 Ryan Tosoc - 2,220,000 Shaun Deeb - 2,120,000 Scotty Nguyen - 2,010,000 Jason Mercier - 1,905,000 Jonathan Depa - 1,180,000 Luis Velador - 1,045,000 David Prociak - 1,020,000 Robert Mizrachi - 1,005,000 $2,500 NLHE Gets Going One of the two new events to get started on Thursday was Event #43: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em. It attracted 1,071 entries, and after ten levels just 297 remain. While Ashwin Sarin holds the overnight chip lead with 166,200, it’s David ‘dpeters17’ Peters who headlines the top 10 stacks with 140,500. Former PocketFives no.1 player Chris ‘Big Huni’ Hunichen also finished in the top 10 with 131,500. They’ll all return for Day 2 at 12pm tomorrow. Top 10 Stacks: Ashwin Sarin - 166,200 Steve Foutty - 155,800 Josh Bergman - 145,000 Markus Gonsalves - 143,700 David Peters - 140,500 Andrew Brokos - 140,100 Kainalu Mccue-Unciano - 131,800 Chris Hunichen - 131,500 Brett Shaffer - 130,900 Mark Dube - 130,300 Big Names Advance in $10K 2-7 Triple Draw Championship The second new event of the day was Event #44: $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship, which saw 100 players take a shot. When all was said and done after ten levels of play, it was Michael Noori who could call himself the overnight chip leader over the 41 survivors, bagging up 335,000. He’s followed by professional soccer player Max Kruse (282,000). There are plenty of other big names through, including Christopher Kruk (247,500), Luke Schwartz (200,000), Lawrence Berg (171,000), Andrey Zhigalov (170,500), Chris Vitch (159,500), Benny Glaser (156,000), Eli Elezra(155,500), Mike Matusow (136,500), Vanessa Selbst (120,000), Cary Katz (114,000), and Jesse Martin (88,500). Some of those less fortunate today were Daniel Negreanu, John Hennigan, Michael Mizrachi, Stephen Chidwick, John Monnette, Jean Robert-Bellande, James Obst, and David "ODB" Baker. Registration remains open until the start of Day 2 tomorrow, which kicks off at 2pm. Top 10 Stacks: Michael Noori - 335,000 Max Kruse - 282,000 Christopher Kruk - 247,500 Luke Schwartz - 197,000 Lawrence Berg - 171,000 Brant Hale - 171,000 Andrey Zhigalov - 170,500 Quek Sheng - 161,500 Chris Vitch - 159,500 Benny Glaser - 156,000 Tomorrow’s Action (June 22) It will be a busy day in the Rio tomorrow. Not only do we have all the aforementioned events resuming play, but four other events kick off too (albeit one online). At 11am, Event #45: Big Blind Antes $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em (30 minute levels) gets going. That’s then followed by Event #46 $2,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better at 3pm. A little later at 3:30pm, Event #47: $565 WSOP.com ONLINE Pot-Limit Omaha 6-Handed gets started, while the evening sees Event #6D: GIANT - $365 No-Limit Hold’em play out.
  6. The World Series of Poker Player of the Year race featured a new leader almost every week for the duration of the series. Elio Fox jumped to an early lead thanks to his bracelet win and runner-up finish in the $100,000 High Roller all within in the first week. By the middle of June, Fox's epic first week was an afterthought. Post-lim events played a large role in how the final leaderboard shook out. The most competitive race in WSOP history ended (for now) with one of the three-multi bracelet winners from 2018 in front. Shaun Deeb played an incredible amount of volume and is 90 percent of the way toward accomplishing one of his major career goals. Deeb shipped the $10,000 Six-Max a few days after making Day 6 of the Main Event and placing 105th. The bracelet is the second for Deeb this summer and the fourth of his career. Deeb's final haul from the 2018 WSOP includes two bracelets, three final tables, and 16 cashes. 2017 Player of the Year Chris Ferguson is the only player who cashed more times than Deeb and he racked up 17 to lead the category for the second straight year. Second in cashes and second in POY is $50,000 High Roller winner Ben Yu. Deeb defeated Yu heads up in the $25,000 PLO and leads him in POY by a little under 600 points. Yu earned a career-best $1.65 million for his third bracelet win. A few days earlier, Yu took fourth in the DoubleStack Turbo and overall, he concluded his WSOP campaign with four top-four finishes. Yu and Deeb finished in 11th and 12th place, respectively, on the overall WSOP earnings list. The only players ahead of them were Main Event final tablists or a player who cashed in the Big One for One Drop with the exception of one Nick Petrangelo, who won the $100,000 High Roller and took third in the $50,000 edition won by Yu. The player of the moment and third on the POY list is Joe Cada. Cada opened the 2018 summer with a win in the $3,000 Shootout and steadily accumulated from there toward a stellar final two weeks. The 2009 Main Event champion took fifth in his bid at a second title. Following the disappointing finish, Cada jumped in the $1,500 Closer and won the title along with his fourth bracelet in only two days of play. Cada earned a combined $2.7 for the two scores and certified himself a place in the annals of WSOP runs. John Hennigan led the POY race midway through the summer. Hennigan's second-place finish in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship and win in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E was never replicated but he did wind up with 12 cashes in total. Those 12 cashes are 12 more than Hennigan collected in 2017. Hennigan was awarded with a Poker Hall of Fame induction during the Main Event to cap off his best year at the series. Scott Bohlman and Paul Volpe sit in the middle of the 2018 class. Bohlman came close twice to being the first multi-bracelet winner of the summer but settled for second in the $10,000 Stud Hi-Lo and third in the $3,000 PLO Six-Max. Volpe faced off heads up against Deeb in the $10,000 Six-Max and earned silver for his Main Event post-lim. 'The Main Event' made Day 5 of his nicknamed tournament and set a record with eight cashes in events with a $10,000 buy-in or higher. The No Limit players carved out space in the top-10 as done by Eric Baldwin and Justin Liberto. Between the two players, they went to the payout cage 25 times and all but two of their ventures were for events that didn't have NLH in the title. Heavy-hitters Mike Leah and Anthony Zinno round out the important part of the leaderboard. Neither player added a second bracelet despite having five final tables between them to close another victory out. Zinno made up the trophy difference at The Venetian where he won the CardPlayer $5,000 event for $466,670 to wrap up his summer schedule. The race concludes on November 2 at WSOP Europe at King's Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic. Deeb confirmed on the Poker Life Podcast he would be in attendance at it remains to be seen who from the top-10 will join him. Top 10 2018 WSOP Player Of The Year Points Position Name Points 1 Shaun Deeb 4,334.06 2 Ben Yu 3,746.04 3 Joe Cada 3,531.86 4 John Hennigan 3,499.91 5 Scott Bohlman 3,155.88 6 Paul Volpe 2,859.76 7 Eric Baldwin 2,516.30 8 Justin Liberto 2,459.84 9 Mike Leah 2,354.13 10 Anthony Zinno 2,330.37
  7. Another busy day! Three more bracelets were won on Saturday at the 2018 World Series of Poker, one of which went to a former PocketFives no.1 player. Meanwhile, a final table was set, with a controversial figure in the poker world holding the chip lead over the final six. Here’s all the news from June 23. Shaun Deeb Wins Third Bracelet In $25K PLO High Roller ($1.4M) Last year, Shaun Deeb got heads-up versus Ben Yu in the $10K Limit 2-7 Triple Draw Championship. Yu got the best of it that day, forcing Deeb to settle for second place. Former no.1-ranked player Deeb got his revenge on Saturday though, denying Yu his third bracelet. He won the heads-up to win Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller for his third WSOP bracelet, and a massive score of $1,402,683. With six players returning on the day, the two had battled through a tough line-up which included Ryan Tosoc (6th), Jason Koon (5th), defending champion James Calderaro (4th), and Poker Hall of Famer Scotty Nguyen (3rd). Nguyen held the chip lead coming into the day, but Deeb grabbed the chip lead early. Tosoc stuck around for just four hands before making an exit, getting it in with middle pair and a flush draw versus Yu’s top pair, which held. Koon fell next, jamming with top pair but getting called by Deeb with two pair and failing to catch up. Calderaro put up a great title defence, but ultimately fell in fourth. He got unlucky to do so, with him and Deeb both getting it all in with the same top two, but Deeb hit a runner-runner backdoor straight for the KO. Three-handed, Yu doubled Nguyen to leave the 1998 Main Event champ short. Nguyen them jammed with two kings and a ten-nine, which Yu called with two queens and an ace-three. An ace hit the flop, and that proved enough. Heads-up, Deeb and Yu swapped the chip lead a couple of times, but in the end the match was short. Yu got it all-in on a low board with an overpair, straight draw and flush draw, while Deeb had a bigger overpair and a gutshot. The board bricked for Yu, giving Deeb the win. “No one really ever put me in a bad spot,” Deeb said after his victory. “I was able to control the pot sizes the way I wanted to almost every hand. That really helps, to not get in an inflated pot with a marginal hand. Everyone played their best game, I just ran the best. “I think I have a great shot at Player of the Year right now so I think I’m gonna battle, hop in every event I can and just enjoy myself.” Final Table Results: Shaun Deeb - $1,402,683 Ben Yu - $866,924 Scotty Nguyen - $592,875 James Calderaro - $414,134 Jason Koon - $295,606 Ryan Tosoc - $215,718 Spain’s Mario Prats Garcia Wins First Bracelet ($1K NLHE Turbo) Another super fast day played out in Event #45: Big Blind Antes $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em (30 minute levels), with 41 players getting down to a winner in less than seven hours. Mario Prats Garcia ended up victorious, taking down his first bracelet and the $258,255 first-place prize. Garcia has had close calls in the past, including a runner-up finish last year, but now has a piece of WSOP jewellery. [caption id="attachment_619661" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Mario Prats Garcia Wins First Bracelet[/caption] He defeated PocketFiver Matthew ‘theginger45’ Hunt heads-up for the title, securing the win after just three hands. Hunt took the first pot, then managed to double-up in the second. But the third would end it all, when Hunt made a straight only for Prats Garcia to have a flush. You can find the rest of the final table results below, while some of 1,712 entries who went deep in this one include Justin Oliver (37th - $5,376), Manig Loeser (33rd - $6,505), Conor Beresford (32nd - $6,505), Esther Taylor (21st - $7,967), Joseph Cheong (19th - $7,967), Kathy Liebert (18th - $9,877), and Athanasios Polychronopoulos (11th - $15,730). After his win, Prats Garcia said: "Super excited, I'm super happy. I thought I could never get back here and the FT was hard. I sucked out a couple of guys and I got all the chips! I'm super excited and nervous." Final Table Results: Mario Prats Garcia - $258,255 Matthew Hunt - $159,532 Sebastian Dornbracht - $114,909 Michael Wang - $83,663 Mark Schluter - $61,580 Gregory Worner - $45,828 DJ MacKinnon - $34,486 Martin Staszko - $26,245 Lander Lijo - $20,202 Nicholas Seiken Wins Bracelet in First Ever 2-7 Tournament Here’s one for the books: Nicholas Seiken, normally a NLHE player, had never played a stand-alone 2-7 Triple Draw tournament before entering Event #44: $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship. Three days later, he’s a bracelet winner and $287,987 better off. [caption id="attachment_619663" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Nicholas Seiken Wins First Bracelet[/caption] Seiken first played the game in an 8-game mixed event, and clearly took to it like a deuce to water as he defeated a tough final table today which included bracelet winner Randy Ohel, three-time bracelet winner Farzad Bonyadi, one-time bracelet winner Hanh Tran, Christopher ‘Apotheosis’ Kruk, Matt Glantz, and start-of-day chip leader Michael Noori. "I played the 2-7 Triple Draw in the 8-Game and I was like, 'I like triple draw, I want to play some triple draw,” Seiken said after his win. "The only thing that gave me a shot was having so many chips because I was playing against such good players. I had a big stack and I wanted to sit on it for a while. I didn't want to take marginal spots. I folded hands that I should be playing because I didn't want to get out of line, getting in massive pots with guys like Randy." Ohel would be his heads-up opponent, and in the final hand Ohel made a jack-nine but that was crushed by Seiken’s seventy-six. Final Table Results: Nicholas Seiken - $287,987 Randy Ohel - $177,992 Kristijonas Andrulis - $125,190 Farzad Bonyadi - $89,078 Matt Glantz - $64,131 Jason Gray - $46,722 Hanh Tran - $34,450 Christopher Kruk - $34,450 Michael Noori - $25,712 MattEMenz Wins First Ever Online PLO Bracelet Yesterday we told you how a bracelet in Event #47: $565 WSOP.com ONLINE Pot-Limit Omaha 6-Handed was awarded, making it the first online PLO bracelet handed out. However, the tournament went deep into the early morning hours Friday night, so we didn’t have a winner when we went to publish. We can now tell you that it was Matthew ‘MattEMenz’ Mendez who took it down for a $135,077 score, defeating a tough final table which included Anthony Zinno and Ankush ‘pistons87’ Mandavia. Mendez is also the first bracelet winner to play outside of Nevada. Mendez took this one down from the comfort of his New Jersey home. Final Table Results: Matthew 'mendey' Mendez - $135,077 Marton 'GS.GURU' Czuczor - $82,865 Anthony 'heheh' Zinno - $57,299 Alex '3shotwonder' Smith - $40,256 Ankush 'rickrosstheb' Mandavia - $28,745 Ao 'Maimai1990' Chen - $20,859 Chris Ferguson Leads Final 6 in $2,500 NLHE After 1,071 players took a shot, a final table of six has now been set in Event #43: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em. The player holding the chip lead is none other than 2017 Player of the Year Chris Ferguson. Ferguson is seeking his sixth bracelet, and is in good shape with a massive 5,680,000 stack. He’ll be joined by Timur Margolin (3,520,000), Ismael Bojang (2,610,000), Michael Marder (1,765,000), Dylan Linde (1,330,000), and bracelet winner Ryan Laplante (700,000). A huge pot gave Ferguson the big lead. Seth Davies was all-in with pocket fives and Bojang called with ace-king. Ferguson then woke up with pocket kings, busting Davies and getting a big double through Bojang. There’s $507,274 up top in this one, while all six are currently guaranteed $87,189. The finale kicks off at 12pm Sunday. Final Table Stacks: Chris Ferguson - 5,680,000 Timur Margolin - 3,520,000 Ismael Bojang - 2,610,000 Michael Marder - 1,765,000 Dylan Linde - 1,330,000 Ryan Laplante - 700,000 MONSTER STACK Kicks Off Event #48: $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em MONSTER STACK got going with Day 1A on Saturday, with 2,246 players taking part. Ten levels later and just 723 advanced. There are multiple notable PocketFivers who bagged top 10 stacks, including Jon ‘PearlJammer’ Turner, Marc ‘sluglife’ MacDonnell, Shyam ’s_dot111’ Srinivasan, and Kenny ‘SpaceyFCB’ Hallaert. It’s James Karamanis who leads the field though, bagging up 163,600 when the bags were brought out. Others who made it through include Calvin ‘cal42688’ Anderson (116,600), Daniel Strelitz (90,600), Bart Lybaert (77,400), and Annette Obrestad (68,500). Some of those who failed to find a bag today include Phil ivey, Phil Laak, Joe Cada, Greg Raymer, Scott Blumstein, Arkadiy Tsinis, Dara O'Kearney, Kenna James, Mike Leah, Parker Talbot, and Antoine Saout. Day 1B begins at 10am tomorrow. Top 10 Stacks: James Karamanis - 163,600 Jonathan Turner - 156,500 Jerome Tan - 153,300 Colin McHugh - 149,400 Marc MacDonnell - 148,200 Shyam Srinivasan - 146,000 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - 135,300 Francesco Zollo - 132,000 Kenny Hallaert - 124,600 Almedin Imsirovic - 119,200 Final 15 in Mixed Hi-Lo 8 Out of the 402 players who took a shot in Event #46: $2,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better, only 15 remain after another ten levels on Day 2. There are three players in contention for their second bracelets: Eric Rodawig, Cyndy Violette, and Hani Awad. However, it’s Ian Shaw who holds the overnight chip lead. The bubble burst today at 61 players, and a few who failed to reach the cash include Daniel Negreanu, Phil Ivey, Shanon Petluck, Nicholas Derke, Tommy Hang, Robert Campbell, John Hennigan, Barry Greenstein, Jeff Lisandro, Phil Hui, Marco Johnson, Kate Hoang, and Jesse Martin. Some of those who did make a profit include Scott Abrams (60th for $3,736), Joe Hachem (49th for $3,891), Konstantin Puchkov (47th for $4,165), Robert Mizrachi (45th for $4,165), Ian Johns (38th for $4,577), Scott Clements (33rd for $4,577), Jameson Painter (23rd for $5,969), and Ron Ware (21st for $5,969). Action gets going again at 2pm tomorrow, and they’ll play down to a winner. Whoever that ends up being will bank $214,291, while they’re all currently guaranteed $7,074. Final 15 Stacks: Ian Shaw - 575,000 Tyler Groth - 540,000 Daniel Ospina - 530,000 Brendan Taylor - 488,000 William Shelton - 458,000 Paul Tedeschi - 361,000 Levon Torosyan - 320,000 Eric Rodawig - 301,000 David Brookshire - 297,000 Carl Restifo - 294,000 Eddie Blumenthal - 272,000 Cyndy Violette - 223,000 Delmiro Toledo - 139,000 Hani Awad - 117,000 Jeffrey Mitseff - 115,000 Hughes, Lamb, Ingram Advance in 10K PLO As the $25K High Roller came to an end, Event #49: $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed Championship got going, attracting 439 runners. Ten levels later and 175 players will be returning for tomorrow’s Day 2, all led by chip leader Ryan Hughes who ended with 475,400. He’s joined at the top of the counts by Veselin Karakitukov (350,800) and Ben Lamb (314,100). A few notables who made it through include poker Youtuber Joey Ingram (258,500), Michael Kamran (290,000), four-time bracelet winner Michael Mizrachi (275,100), Stephen Chidwick (245,300) and six-time bracelet winner Layne Flack (206,400). They’ll all be back at 2pm Sunday for Day 2. Top 10 Stacks: Ryan Hughes - 475,400 Veselin Karakitukov - 350,800 Ben Lamb - 314,100 Lautaro Guerra - 296,600 Hok Yiu Lee - 292,600 Michael Kamran - 290,000 Matthew Schreiber - 280,000 Michael Mizrachi - 275,100 Orlando Romero - 273,500 Jonathan Kamhazi - 270,000 Tomorrow’s Action (June 24) Sunday June 24 is mostly a day of additional Day 1s. At 10am you’ve got Day 1B of the Monster Stack, while at 7pm it’s Day 1D of the PLO Giant. The only new event to begin kicks off at 3pm: Event #50: $1,500 Razz. However, we should have at least two new bracelet winners to tell you about, so make sure you come back tomorrow for all the news.
  8. There may have only been one 2018 World Series of Poker bracelet winner within the Rio on Friday, but two bracelets were actually awarded. That’s because an online event played out into the early morning hours, as 657 PLO players took their shot on the virtual felt. There was still no winner at the time of publishing, so we’ll have to bring you that info tomorrow. Speaking of PLO, the $25K High Roller has reached a stacked six-handed final table which includes a former PocketFives no.1 player. Here’s everything you need to know about June 22 at the WSOP. Robert Nehorayan Wins First Bracelet in $1,500 Limit Hold’em ($173,568) After three days of play, Robert Nehorayan has come out on top of the 596 players who took part in Event #41: $1,500 Limit Hold’em. For his efforts, he’s banked the lion’s share of the $804,600 prize pool, $173,568, as well as his first gold bracelet. Nehorayan came into the day third in chips, and managed to maintain a big stack as the 19 players returning were whittled down to a final table. Things were a bit swingier from there on, and four-handed saw Terricita Gutierrez hold almost half of the chips in play. However, after losing a few big pots in a row, she found herself short and ended up busting in fourth. Kevin Song and David Gee joined Nehorayan in three-handed play, and a big pot between all of them would take it down to two. Gee was all-in with jack-seven against Song’s pocket aces and Nehorayan’s king-seven. It must have been Nehorayan’s day, as his hand ended up winning to bust Gee in third and take a 3:1 chip lead into heads-up. The two players battled though, and at one point Song managed to take the lead. In the end though, Song was all-in with eight-six suited against Nehorayan’s ten-seven off, and a ten on the flop got the job done. "It feels pretty good,” said Nehorayan after the win. “I got a little frustrated throughout the match but fortunately I was able to overcome my emotions. The cards helped too obviously." Final Table Results: Robert Nehorayan - $173,568 Kevin Song - $107,242 David Gee - $73,860 Terricita Gutierrez - $51,733 Michael Jex - $36,860 Brad Albrinck - $26,725 Oleg Chebotarev - $19,723 Matt Russell - $14,820 Matt Woodward - $11,343 Scotty Nguyen, Shaun Deeb, Ben Yu, Jason Koon Reach $25K PLO Finale There’s going to be one heck of a final table on Saturday, with six players returning in Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller. It’s 1998 Main Event champion and five-time bracelet winner Scotty Nguyen who holds the chip lead, followed by defending champion in this event James Calderaro. If he can win this one back-to-back, it’ll certainly be an amazing achievement. Especially when you consider his other competition. Former PocketFives no.1 Shaun Deeb comes in third in chips, followed by Ben Yu, Jason Koon, and finally Ryan Tosoc. Just 35 of the 230 runners returned for Friday’s Day 3, and along the way we lost the likes of Jarred Graham, Paul ‘paulgees1’ Volpe, Adam ‘adamyid’ Owen, Tom Marchese, Erik Seidel and Mike Leah. David Benyamine went out in 7th, bringing the day to an end. He found himself all-in on a flop with middle pair and a straight draw versus Nguyen’s top pair and the higher end of the straight draw. The turn and river bricked, and Benyamine hit the rail to collect $161,020. All six players are guaranteed $215,718 when they take their seats tomorrow at 2pm. There’s a massive $1,402,683 up top for the champ. Final Table Stacks: Scotty Nguyen - 7,010,000 James Calderaro - 6,445,000 Shaun Deeb - 6,305,000 Ben Yu - 4,775,000 Jason Koon - 2,905,000 Ryan Tosoc - 1,300,000 Down to 34 in $2,500 NLHE Day 2 of Event #43: $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em saw the 1,071-strong field chopped down further to just 34 players, and leading them all overnight is Seth Davies. He bagged up 1,305,000, but he’ll be joined by some tough competitors tomorrow including Jeff Hakim (1,164,000), Javier Fernandez (1,093,000), Andrew Brokos (625,000), Daniel Buzgon (570,000), Ismael Bojang (497,000), David Peters (480,000), Chris Ferguson (402,000), Ryan Laplante (292,000), and Andreas Klatt (230,000). Where there are survivors there must be casualties, and few of those who failed to make it through the day include Asi Moshe, Justin Bonomo, Humberto Brenes, Kristen Bicknell, Chance Kornuth, Georgios Sotiropoulos, Peter Eichhardt, Dutch Boyd, Maria Konnikova, David “Bakes” Baker, Nick Shulman and John Racener. The final 34 are all in the money, with $12,345 locked up. All eyes will be on the $507,274 winner’s prize though, when play kicks off again at 12pm Saturday. Top 10 Stacks: Seth Davies - 1,305,000 Jeff Hakim - 1,164,000 Javier Fernandez - 1,093,000 Chris Edwards - 720,000 Edan Sucov - 682,000 Jonathan Cohen - 677,000 Andrew Brokos - 625,000 Daniel Buzgon - 570,000 Andre Haneberg - 551,000 Samuel Gagnon - 524,000 $10K 2-7 Triple Draw Championship Down to 13 Michael Noori is once again your overnight chip leader in Event #44: $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship, having bagged the lead after Day 1 too. His 870,000 stack sits atop the pile, and he’s followed by Christopher ‘Apotheosis’ Kruk (658,000), Quek Sheng (645,000), Randy Ohel (602,000), and Jason Gray (569,000). Other notables to advance to Day 3 include PocketFives former no.1 Calvin ‘cal42688’ Anderson, although he’s short with 168,000. Matt Glantz and Farzad Bonyadi will both be back tomorrow, with Bonyadi seeking his fourth bracelet after his mom, Farhintaj, won her first a couple of days ago. Out of the 100 players who entered, 41 would make today’s Day 2 including Jordan Siegel (17th), Todd Brunson (16th), Andrew Kelsall (15th), and Mike Matusow (14th) who all went deep. The min-cash is currently $14,864, while there’s $287,987 up top. Action resumes at 2pm. Final 13 Stacks: Michael Noori - 870,000 Christopher Kruk - 658,000 Quek Sheng - 645,000 Randy Ohel - 602,000 Jason Gray - 569,000 Hanh Tran - 423,000 Farzad Bonyadi - 392,000 Nicholas Seiken - 384,000 Kristijonas Andrulis - 304,000 Matt Glantz - 198,000 Steven Tabb - 170,000 Calvin Anderson - 168,000 Tyler Meservy - 65,000 Turbo Time in the 1,000 No-Limit Hold'em (30 minute levels) A fast-paced Day 1 of Event #45: Big Blind Antes $1,000 No-Limit Hold'em (30 minute levels) was played out today, with just 41 of the 1,712 field making it through. Two-time bracelet winner Steven Wolansky bagged the chip lead with 620,000, winning a huge pot to eliminate Pierre Neuville towards the end of the night. All-in with ace-queen against Wolanksy’s ace-eight suited, Wolansky flopped a backdoor flush draw and hit runner runner to win. Joining him at the top of the remaining counts are DJ MacKinnon (532,000), Michael Wang (355,000), King Lun Alan Lau (350,000), Mike Hauptman (338,000), Lander Lijo (290,000), Joseph Cheong (280,000) and Robin Hegele (245,000). Meanwhile, other notables to advance include Athanasios Polychronopoulos (156,000), Kathy Liebert (245,000), Esther Taylor (126,000), and Kelly Minkin (136,000). Plenty of well-knowns tried and failed today, including Joe McKeehen, Martin Jacobson, Greg Raymer, Ryan Riess, Scott Davies, Heidi May, Nipun Java, Michael Gathy, Niall Farrell, Ben Keeline, and David "ODB" Baker. However, they all exited before the bubble burst at 257 players. Some of those who made it into the cash include Kenny Hallaert (251st - $1,501), Aditya Agarwal (246th - $1,501), Steven van Zadelhoff (230th - $1,549), Maria Konnikova (227th - $1,549), Tristan Wade (221st - $1,549), Barry Greenstein (209th - $1,549), Chris Moorman (181st - $1,621), Jesse Capps (177th - $1,720), Kristen Bicknell (175th - $1,720), Benjamin Dobson (156th - $1,720), Nipun Java (150th - $1,851), Bart Lybaert (110th - $2,019), Brian Yoon (85th - $2,503), and Loni Harwood (74th - $2,843). Play resumes tomorrow at 12pm Saturday, with $258,255 and a WSOP gold bracelet awaiting the winner. Top 10 Stacks: Steven Wolansky - 620,000 DJ MacKinnon - 532,000 Michael Wang - 355,000 King Lun Alan Lau - 350,000 Michael Hauptman - 338,000 Rick Offley - 320,000 Lander Lijo - 290,000 Joseph Cheong - 280,000 Mario Prats Garcia - 280,000 Elliott Peterman - 272,000 Negreanu, Ivey Advance in Mixed Omaha/Stud Event #46: $2,500 Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better also got going Friday, with 402 players taking part. After ten levels, just 152 remain. At the top of the counts is Sergio Ramirez with 139,700, followed by the likes of Eric Rodawig (123,400), Kate Hoang (76,900), Scott Abrams (74,400), Robert Mizrachi (62,500), Felipe Ramos (52,600), Daniel Negreanu (42,200), Jesse Martin (31,900), Marco Johnson (28,000) and Phil Ivey (8,100). While that line-up is pretty stacked, it could have been even more so had any of this lot made it through the day: Phil Hellmuth, John Racener, Linda Johnson, Joe McKeehen, Frank Kassela, David Bach, Frankie O'Dell, Eric Buchman, Benny Glaser, Allen Kessler, Michael Gathy, Max Pescatori, Brandon Cantu and Mike Leah. The bubble is set to burst at 61 players, and there’s $214,291 reserved for the champ. Play gets going again at 2pm tomorrow. Top 10 Stacks: Sergio Ramirez - 137,900 Eric Rodawig - 123,400 David Prociak - 91,000 Magnus Edengren - 87,400 Eddie Blumenthal - 83,100 Gary Bolden - 78,300 Paul Edwards - 76,300 Scott Abrams - 74,400 Bruce Hoyt - 74,100 Kate Hoang - 71,700
  9. Shaun Deeb's third career World Series of Poker bracelet win came with an added bonus. The $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller champion now leads the WSOP Player of the Year race as of June 25. Deeb owns 2,662.25 points with 1,236.4 of them coming from his $1.4 million payday. Elio Fox drops to third as his hot run fades for the first time since the start of the WSOP when he won the $10,000 Super Turbo Bounty and finished second in the $100,000 High Roller. Fox is in third place behind another bracelet winner in 2018. John Hennigan went on a two-week run that finished up with a second-place finish in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. Hennigan earned that silver medal immediately after winning his fifth bracelet in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. The Poker Players Championship finished with Hennigan leading POY only to be overtaken by Deeb a few days later. Deeb also cashed in the PPC, taking 10th. Hennigan and Deeb cashed together in the PPC and the $2,500 Big Bet Mix and are separated by less than 100 points on the leaderboard. Deeb leads the WSOP with 10 cashes this summer, tied with 2017 Player of the Year Chris Ferguson. Two bracelet winners in No Limit Hold'em events are up to the fourth and fifth place positions, respectively. Mario Prats Garcia surges to the fourth spot thanks to his first trip to the WSOP winner's circle in the $1,000 Big Blind Ante Turbo. Prats Garcia finished second in a $1,500 NLHE event in 2017 and bettered the result this year. Other cashes for Prats Garcia this summer include a Day 2 appearance in The Colossus, 62nd place in Millionaire Maker, and a min-cash in the DoubleStack. Eric 'basebaldy' Baldwin now has a bracelet for both wrists. The $1,500 No Limit Hold'em champion claimed $319,580 for the heads up win over Ian Steinman along with 1,075.90 points. The win was the sixth cash for Baldwin, whose previous best result the last five weeks was a 22nd place run in the $3,000 Six-Max. Joe Cada and Paul Volpe are treading water in the top-10 but have added few points since their respective bracelet wins in the early days of the WSOP. All of Volpe's five cashes this summer are in events of at least a $10,000 buy-in. Ben Yu put on a show and made the podium twice in two different games. Yu placed third in the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship and fell to Deeb in second place at the $25,000 PLO final table. The PLO result is Yu's largest career tournament cash of $866,924. Yu is tied for third in 2018 WSOP cashes with nine. Bracelet winner Daniel Ospina almost became the first player of the summer to win two but fell two spost shy in the $2,500 Omaha/Stud Hi-Lo event. In only three cashes, Ospina is up to ninth place. Dylan Linde made two consecutive final tables and launched himself into the top-10 as a result. Linde took fourth in the $1,500 NLHE Shootout and then fifth in the $2,500 No Limit Hold'em event. Top 10 2018 WSOP Player Of The Year Points Thru 6/26 Position Name Points 1 Shaun Deeb 2,662.25 2 John Hennigan 2,556.43 3 Elio Fox 2,010.14 4 Mario Prats Garcia 1,751.25 5 Eric Baldwin 1,738.42 6 Paul Volpe 1,733.12 7 Joe Cada 1,692.71 8 Ben Yu 1,587.71 9 Daniel Ospina 1,504.22 10 Dylan Linde 1,453.43
  10. When Ali Imsirovic took his seat at the final table of Poker Masters Event #5: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em he was likely the least known poker pro of the star-studded six. But even though Imsirovic, the 2018 Borgata Spring Poker Open Champion, may not be one of the faces regularly seen during high-stakes broadcasts, he didn’t let the moment get away from him. He navigated the tough final table and in the end, claimed his first Poker Masters title and a career-high cash of $462,000. Generally considered one of the toughest high-stakes tournament players in the world, Aria regular Jake Schindler started the day with a healthy chip lead. On the other end of the chip counts, poker celebrity Daniel Negreanu had just a few big blinds left to try and make something happen. Joining the pair in the final six was Ben Yu, Brian Rast, Jason Koon, and Imsirovic. Roughly 20 minutes into play Negreanu took a stand with his short stack. Yu raised from the hijack holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] and Negreanu flat called holding the [poker card="5c"][poker card="2c"]. Leaving himself less than a third of a big blind, Negreanu put it at risk on the [poker card="td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5d"] flop. Yu called and the board ran out with the [poker card="3s"] on the turn and the [poker card="7s"] on the river leaving Negreanu’s small pair unimproved. Negreanu hit the rail in sixth place for a $99,000 score. It is his second sixth-place finish of the 2018 Poker Masters. The eliminations continued just minutes later when Imsirovic raised in the cutoff with [ak][poker card="kd"]. Koon, who now held the shortest stack remaining, shipped the chips holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="tc"]. Imsirovic made the quick call and Koon soon discovered he was dominated. The flop left little hope for Koon as it came [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"][poker card="4c"]. Looking for some running cards, the [poker card="qs"] provided a few outs to the straight for the Triton SHR Short Deck Champion. But when the [poker card="9h"] completed the board, Koon was eliminated in fifth place. He adds another $132,000 to his over $11.3 million in earning in 2018. This was Koon’s third cash of the series. As the final table wore on, Schindler lost the chip lead, lost a substantial hand that doubled up Ben Yu and found himself as the short stack with four players left. Folded to Schindler in the small blind, he open shipped his five big blinds with [poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"]. Imsirovic in the big blind quickly called showing down [poker card="ac"][poker card="9s"]. Both players whiffed the [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="4h"] flop. But when the [poker card="ad"] turned, Schindler was drawing dead. The river brought an inconsequential [poker card="8s"] and Schindler headed to the cashier for his $165,000 fourth-place payday. Rast, who had the chip lead when Schindler hit the rail, then lost a pair of very big hands. First, doubled up Imsirovic and then quickly second doubled up Yu when Yu hit a 3-outer on the river. It wasn’t much longer after that second double through that Rast had to play for it all. Imsirovic, now the chip leader, was applying pressure to both shorter stacks. He moved all in from the button with [poker card="6s"][poker card="6d"]. Rast, in the big blind made the call only seeing the [poker card="ac"]. The [poker card="3d"] was his second hole card and he was going to have to catch up to stay in the game. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"][poker card="8c"][poker card="th"][poker card="2h"] offering no help to Rast. Rast collected $214,500 for third place. Heads up play between Yu and Imsirovic didn’t last very long. After a few hands, Imsirovic limped on the button with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"]. Yu moved all in from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="6d"] and Imsirovic made the quick call. It was a flip for Yu’s tournament life and to give Imsirovic the win. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"], providing a set for Imsirovic and Yu needed running cards to catch up. The turn was the [poker card="2h"] leaving Yu with no outs. He finished the tournament as the runner-up and earned $330,000 for his efforts. Imsirovic takes the first place prize of $462,000 holding pocket fives. In his winner’s interview dedicated the performance to his father who he credited with teaching him strategy games. “A year ago I was watching [Stefan Sontheimer] win everything and I was like it would be really cool if I could do that in a few years. I’m very surprised it came this fast but I’m super fortunate and I want to dedicate this win to my dad.” Event #5 Final Table Payouts 1. Ali Imsirovic - $462,000 2. Ben Yu - $330,000 3. Brian Rast - $214,500 4. Jake Schindler - $165,000 5. Jason Koon - $132,000 6. Daniel Negreanu - $99,000
  11. The final table of Event #3 ($25,000 Pot Limit Omaha) of the 2018 Poker Masters was headlined by Brandon Adams making his third straight final table appearance but by the end of it all, two-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner Keith Lehr stood tall to claim the win. Adams, who finished fourth in Event #1 and then won Event #2, and Lehr were joined at the final table by Dan Shak, Ben Yu, Jonathan Depa, and Isaac Haxton. It took nearly three hours before the first elimination on Monday. From UTG, Dan Shak raised to 140,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] before Jonathan Depa re-raised to 480,000 with [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"] and Shak called all in. The board ran out [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="9s"][poker card="ad"][poker card="4c"] to eliminate Shak in sixth place. Even though he came into the final table with the second biggest chip stack, Brandon Adams fell short in his run for back-to-back titles thanks to Ben Yu. Action folded to Yu on the button and he raised to 175,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"][poker card="qh"][poker card="4h"] and Adams called from the big blind with [js[poker card="th"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"]. Adams then checked after the [poker card="td"][poker card="5d"][poker card="5h"] flop and Yu bet 125,000. Adams tanked for nearly a full minute, using a time bank in the process, before moving all in for 715,000. Yu called. The [poker card="4s"] turn and [poker card="4c"] river actually improved Yu's hand and eliminated Adams. It took almost a full hour before the next elimination happened. Isaac Haxton raised to 280,000 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qh"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3c"] and Jonathan Depa defended the big blind with [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4d"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"] was followed by a bet from Depa and an all in call from Haxton. The turn was the [poker card="jh"] and the river was the [poker card="th"] to give Depa runner-runner two pair to send Haxton out in fourth. Ben Yu lasted just one more hand. Yu raised to 280,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6d"] on the button and Lehr defended his big blind with [poker card="qs"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6s"]. Lehr checked the [poker card="jc"][poker card="th"][poker card="9s"] flop to Yu and then snap-called Yu's shove. The turn was the [poker card="jh"] and the river was the [poker card="8d"] and Yu was out in third. Heads-up play started with Depa holding less than a single big blind more than Lehr and took just 20 minutes to get to a winner. Now down 3-1 in chips, Depa completed from the button with [poker card="7h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2s"] and Lehr checked his option with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5d"] to send both players to a [poker card="js"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"] flop. Lehr bet 240,000 and Depa raised to 720,000. Lehr announced he was all in and Depa called and found out he was ahead with two pair. The [poker card="8c"] turn flipped the script though and gave Lehr a bigger two pair. The [poker card="5s"] river changed nothing and Lehr eliminated Depa to claim his first career Poker Masters title. Final Table Payouts Keith Lehr - $333,000 Jonathan Depa - $222,000 Ben Yu - $148,000 Isaac Haxton - $92,500 Brandon Adams - $74,000 Dan Shak - $55,500 With his fifth-place finish, Adams continues to lead the overall points standings for the Poker Masters title and accompanying Purple Jacket. Poker Masters Standings Through Event #3 Brandon Adams - 510 Keith Lehr - 300 David Peters - 300 Jared Jaffee - 210 Jonathan Depa - 210 Brian Green - 210 Isaac Haxton - 180 Jake Schindler - 150 Ben Yu - 150 Rainer Kempe - 150
  12. Another opportunity to capture a gold bracelet arrives when the World Series of Poker Europe returns to the King’s Casino in Rozvadov from October 9 - November 2. The three-week festival includes 10 bracelet events, including the €5 million guaranteed Main Event, and €13 million guaranteed over the span of the series. Streamlined Schedule The schedule of events in 2018 is slightly trimmer, down to 10 events from 12 a year ago. But the loss of the One Drop charitable events doesn’t stop the schedule from offering a slate of tournaments that will appeal to everyone from the recreational bracelet hunter to the Super High Roller. In addition to the €10,350 Main Event with a €5,000,000 guarantee, there are two high rollers, including a €100,000 Super High Roller. Pot-Limit Omaha specialists have plenty to play as the game makes three appearances over the three weeks at three different buy-in levels. Also, two of the summer’s most popular branded tournaments, the Colossus and Monster Stack, have European counterparts again this year. A Look Back 2018 marks the 11th year of the WSOPE. In previous years, the event was held all over Europe from London to France to Germany. For the second time in as many years, this year, it takes place at King’s Casino in Rozvadov, Czech Republic. Last year, 888poker online qualifier Marti Roca de Torres turned his satellite investment into a 1.1 million Main Event victory. One that he parlayed into a sponsorship from the site. The only thing that overshadowed the Spaniard’s Main Event win was the attention paid to the WSOP Player of the Year race. That was eventually secured during the WSOPE by the controversial Chris Ferguson. Roca de Torres is just one of an extensive list of notable names that have taken down the WSOP Europe Championship bracelet in years past. At the first WSOPE in London in 2007, a young Annette Obrestad became the youngest WSOP bracelet winner and the first WSOPE champion winning £1,000,000 at just 18 years old. The years after saw a string of high profile players capture the title including John Juanda, Barry Shulman, James Bord and Elio Fox. In 2012, the leader in all-time WSOP bracelets won, Phil Hellmuth earned his 13th by taking down the Main Event in Cannes, France. Joining him in the years after, both Adrian Mateos and Kevin McPhee joined the WSOPE Main Event winner’s club. What To Watch For Of course, there will be a spotlight on who will become the next European Main Event Champion. At the same time, all eyes will be on the current WSOP Player of the Year race. At the top of the leaderboard is former top-ranked PocketFiver Shaun ‘shaundeeb’ Deeb. Deeb had a phenomenal summer campaign in Las Vegas. He accumulated 16 total cashes, earning more than $2.4 million. He also picked up two new WSOP bracelets bringing his career total to four. Deeb has a healthy points lead and will likely make the trip to Rozvadov to earn more. However, there are a couple players within striking distance that could change the face of the POY race if they attend the series and book a win or two. Deeb’s closest competition is Ben Yu. Like Deeb, Yu also had a magnificent 2018 WSOP. He cashed in 15 events and took home the bracelet in Event #77: $50,000 NLHE High Roller for $1.65 million. Both Yu and Deeb have had plenty of recent success in Pot Limit Omaha events. So, if we see the pair in Rozvadov, look for fireworks in the PLO tournaments if they both go deep. Joe ‘jcada99’ Cada and recent Poker Hall of Fame inductee John Hennigan are third and fourth on the WSOP leaderboard respectively. Neither player is well-known for traveling the circuit to play. So, it would be a surprise to see either of them on the other side of the world racking up points in this race. The World Series of Poker Europe beings on October 9 with the start of the €550 Colossus and will come to an end when the 12th WSOPE Main Event Champion is crowned on November 2. WSOP Europe Schedule of Events Date Event # Event 10/9 1a €550 Colossus No-Limit Hold'em - €1,000,000 Guarantee 10/10 1b 10/11 1c 10/12 1d 10/13 1e 10/14 2 €1,650 6-Handed Deepstack NLHE -- €200,000 Guarantee 10/15 3A €550 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed -- €100,000 Guarantee 10/16 3B 10/17 4 €1,100 Turbo Special Bounty Hunter No-Limit Hold'em -- €200,000 Guarantee 10/18 5A €1,100 Monster Stack No-Limit Hold'em -- €1,000,000 Guarantee 10/19 5B 10/20 5C 10/21 6 €1,650 Pot Limit Omaha/NLHE Mix -- €200,000 Guarantee 10/22 7 €2,200 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed -- €200,000 Guarantee 10/24 8 €25,000 High Roller No-Limit Hold'em - €1,000,000 Guarantee 10/26 9 €100,000 Super High Roller - €5,000,000 Guarantee 10/27 10A €10,350 WSOP Europe Main Event - €5,000,000 Guarantee 10/28 10B
  13. In June, the poker world is consumed with results and stories coming out of the World Series of Poker. This year was no different with players, like Michael Mizrachi, accomplishing previously inconceivable feats and legends, like Doyle Brunson, hinting that their time playing the game may have finally come to an end. Here are some of the biggest stories that made headlines in the month of June. World Series of Poker Takeover If you follow poker, then it is impossible to get away from the World Series of Poker in June and here at PocketFives, we brought you wire-to-wire coverage of the biggest tournaments taking place at the Rio in Las Vegas. Some of the biggest names in the game were crushing the highest stakes and taking home new hardware to add to their poker legacy. Additionally, amateurs were making dreams come true by winning life-changing money and fulfilling their poker dreams. Relive some of the summer glory by checking out some of the most popular headlines from the WSOP. Read: Siever Takes Down $10K Limit, Nguyen Wins MONSTER Stack Read: WSOP Social Media Fun Ramps Up In Week One Read: Just How The **** Are You Supposed To Bead John Smith? Read: Matt Mendez ‘Goes From Cards’ And Chips To WSOP History Maker Doyle Brunson Hints At Retirement In the midst of the 2018 World Series of Poker, news came down that Doyle Brunson - who had given up WSOP tournaments in recent years - registered for the $10K No Limit Deuce To Seven event. It was “probably the last one I’ll ever play.” he tweeted. However, after comments he had made to Poker Central, it looked as if this was not only his last tournament but that he was planning on walking away from the game of poker at the end of the summer. “I’m planning on retiring after the summer,” Brunson said citing that he wished to spend more time with his wife Louise, who was in declining health. Brunson then went on a deep run in Event #23, eventually finishing in seventh place. He tipped his hat and left the Rio to a standing ovation. Brunson has not yet stepped away from the game, regularly appearing both in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio as well as on camera playing the highest mixed games on PokerGO. He had recently commented that his wife has been feeling better. Read: Doyle Brunson Spent 30 Hours Taking the Poker World Back In Time Read: Doyle Brunson Announces Retirement, Goes Deep in $10K 2-7 Shaun Deeb Wins Third WSOP Bracelet “I think I have a great shot at Player of the Year right now so I think I’m gonna battle in every event I can and just enjoy myself.” - Shaun Deeb, Back in June, the writing was on the wall. Former #1-ranked PocketFives member Shaun Deeb was on a heater and on a collision course with the 2018 WSOP Player of the Year award. Deeb picked up his third WSOP bracelet this summer when he outlasted Ben Yu heads-up in the $25K PLO event during Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller for a massive score of $1.4 million. Deeb went on to pick up his fourth bracelet of the summer during Event #74: $10,000 No Limit Hold’em 6-Handed Big Blind Ante for another $814K - essentially propelling him to his first WSOP Player of the Year title. Read: WSOP - Former #1 Shaun Deeb Wins $25K PLO For 3rd Bracelet ($1.4M) Michael ‘The Grinder’ Mizrachi Wins His Third $50K PPC Title The $50K Poker Players Championship is still one of the most coveted titles in poker. Which makes it all the more impressive that in June of 2018 Michael Mizrachi took down the event for an incredible third time, beating Poker Hall of Fame member John Hennigan heads-up for the title. “It’s quite an accomplishment,” Mizrachi said, reflecting on his win. “To win the first one was amazing. The second was great. The third one is unheard of.” His third PPC victory was the fourth bracelet win of his career and awarded him a $1.2 million payday. It was the sixth seven-figure cash of his storied career. Read: WSOP - Michael Mizrachi Wins Third $50K PPC Title ($1.23M) Read: 5 Things - The Poker Players Champions Deserves More Celebration Alex Foxen, Kristen Bicknell Chop Venetian $5K A tinge of controversy surrounded the $5,000 $1 Million Guaranteed Mid-Stakes Poker Tour Main Event at the Venetian when well-known poker power couple Kristen Bicknell and Alex Foxen ended up chopping the event heads-up. Foxen, the high-roller powerhouse, officially took home the win, the trophy and $239,000 for first. His better-half Bicknell, took home $200,000 as the runner-up. However, after the tournament, there were some accusations of soft-play on social media between the couple. When the play became three-handed, Kahle Burns declined a three-way deal. When he fell in third place for $120,000, there was some over-analysis of hands that were played on the live stream and discussion over how to handle a situation where an actual couple is competing at a final table. Read: Alex Foxen Tops Venetian $5K To Headline Non-WSOP Events ‘C Darwin2’ Takes Down June PLB It was yet another month at the top of the PocketFives Monthly PLB for the Swedish superstar ‘C Darwin2’ in June. He had held over the rankings for the better part of 2018 and his dominance continued into early summer. Despite pulling back on volume, ‘C Darwin2’ managed a few major scores in June. In the first week he took down the Winamax Mini Las Vegas High Roller for $46,404. He also managed a runner-up finish in the June 17 edition of the PokerStars $2,100 Bounty Builder High Roller for over $25,000. In total, he posted eight five-figure scores in the month. In the end, it wasn’t really a close race in June as ‘C Darwin2’ held a nearly 1000 PLB point lead over his closest competition, Denmark’s ‘x_zola25’.
  14. The record-setting WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic wrapped up at Bellagio in Las Vegas, with the $10,400 Main Event attracting a huge field of 1,001 entries and featuring some of poker's biggest names. In addition to the Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule featured several events with five-figure buy-ins and one with a six-figure price of entry. Here are the winners from a tremendous week of poker in Sin City. The biggest winners overall from these high buy-in events, excluding the $10,400 Main Event, were Jake Schindler, Jason Koon, Seth Davies, Chris Hunichen, and Dominik Nitsche. Although he didn't earn the most money, it's certainly worth noting that Sam Soverel cashed in four of these events for a total of $314,500. No one else cashed in more than two. Ladines Wins First $10,000 PLO Event The first two high roller events on the schedule were both $10,000 buy-in pot-limit Omaha tournaments. The first one attracted 35 entries for a $350,000 prize pool and saw the top five places make the money. Joshua Ladines took the event’s title and $128,090 top prize, with both Brian Rast and Sam Soverel finishing in the money. Joshua Ladines - $128,090 John Riordan - $102,910 Jonathan Abdellatif - $56,000 Brian Rast - $35,000 Sam Soverel - $28,000 Soverel Takes Second $10,000 PLO Event In the second $10,000 PLO event, a group of familiar faces was back in the money. Soverel topped the field of 29 entries to win the title and $116,000, Ladines finished third for $46,400, and WPT Five Diamond wonder boy Ryan Tosoc scored fifth for $23,200. Tosoc notably finished second in the Season XV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $1.134 million before going on to win the event in Season XVI for $1.958 million. Sam Soverel - $116,000 Jonathan Depa - $75,400 Joshua Ladines- $46,400 Michael Song - $29,000 Ryan Tosoc - $23,200 Hennigan Captures $10,000 8-Game Mixed Title If you know Bellagio, you know it’s home to the most iconic high-stakes poker room in the world, Bobby’s Room. It’s where the game’s elite compete for astronomical cash-game stakes, but during WPT Five Diamond some of those players shifted their focus to tournament play, specifically in the $10,000 buy-in 8-Game Mixed High Roller. The tournament generated 24 entries, and it was none other than five-time World Series of Poker gold bracelet winner and WPT Champions Club member John Hennigan taking home the top prize of $110,400. John Hennigan - $110,400 Ben Yu - $67,200 Randy Ohel - $38,400 John Racener - $24,000 Loeser and Fox Chop First $25,000 High Roller In the first of three $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on this year’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic slate, 42 entries were generated to create a prize pool of $1.05 million. The top six places paid, and the top two spots went to Manig Loeser and Elio Fox in a chop that earned each player more than $300,000. Loeser scored first place for $321,300, and Fox took second for $308,700. Manig Loeser- $321,300 Elio Fox - $308,700 Jake Schindler - $168,000 Dan Smith - $105,000 Cary Katz - $84,000 Nick Petrangelo - $63,000 Petrangelo Wins Second $25,000 High Roller The second $25,000 buy-in tournament attracted 47 entries and generated a $1.175 million prize pool. The top seven places reached the money, with several notables cashing. None earned more than Nick Petrangelo, though, who chopped the event heads up with Sergio Aido to take home the winning prize of $289,944. Aido scored $287,634 for second. Petrangelo was coming off a sixth-place result for $63,000 in the first $25,000 event of this series. Soverel, who finished in the money of the first two high rollers on the schedule, including winning one for $116,000, finished sixth in this event for $70,500. Nick Petrangelo - $289,944 Sergio Aido - $287,634 Seth Davies - $256,672 Ben Yu - $117,500 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - $94,000 Sam Soverel - $70,500 Rainer Kempe - $58,750 Davies Victorious in Third $25,000 High Roller The third and final $25,000 high roller tournament on the WPT Five Diamond schedule drew 50 entries for a $1.25 million prize pool. The top eight places reached the money, and it was Seth Davies taking the title and $341,920 in first-place prize money. The win came just days after Davies took third in the previous $25,000 high roller event during the series of $256,672, as you can see above. Davies did a deal with Isaac Haxton in second place, who earned $320,580. The money was filled with notable high rollers, including Alex Foxen taking third for $175,000. Foxen has had himself quite a 2018 and is closing it strong both on the live felt and the virtual felt. In the online world, Foxen recently achieved a new all-time high in the top 100 of the PocketFives Online Poker Rankings. You'll also notice Soverel's name appearing in the in-the-money places once again, this time for fifth place, worth $100,000. Seth Davies - $341,920 Isaac Haxton - $320,580 Alex Foxen - $175,000 David Peters - $125,000 Sam Soverel - $100,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $75,000 Rainer Kempe - $62,500 Elio Fox: $50,000 Schindler Defeats Koon for $100,000 Super High Roller Victory The final big buy-in event from the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule this year was the $100,000 Super High Roller. The event drew 37 entries to Bellagio for a $3.7 million prize pool and the top six spots reached the money. Earning the $1.332 million first-place prize was Jake Schindler. Adding that score to the $168,000 he won earlier in the series for taking third place in one of the $25,000 high rollers, Schindler scored $1.5 million in prize money at Bellagio this December. Schindler beat out Jason Koon for the win, and Koon took home $888,000 for his second-place finish. Jake Schindler - $1,332,000 Jason Koon - $888,000 Chris Hunichen - $592,000 Dominik Nitsche - $370,000 Ben Tollerene - $296,000 Talal Shakerchi - $222,000
  15. Chalk up another win for Bryn Kenney in 2019. This time, there was no deal to be made as Kenney knocked out four of his final five opponents en route to a lightning-fast victory in the US Poker Open Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold’em for $450,000. The 60-entry field was narrowed down to a high-rolling who’s who final table of six. Kenney and Ben Yu were among the chip leaders however, there were four other formidable players in Nick Petrangelo, Keith Tilston, Nick Schulman and, eventual runner-up, Jake Schindler, who were all capable of coming from behind. Final Table Payouts 1. Bryn Kenney - $450,000 2. Jake Schindler - $300,000 3. Ben Yu – $210,000 4. Keith Tilston - $150,000 5. Nick Schulman - $120,000 6. Nick Petrangelo - $90,000 It only took a few hands before the bustouts began. The action folded to Nick Petrangelo in the small blind and he jammed with his remaining 13 big blinds holding [poker card="jc"][poker card="6c"]. Kenney, sitting in the big blind, ended up making the call holding [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"]. The flop came [poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="4s"] giving Petrangelo additional outs with a gutshot straight draw. The [poker card="kh"] on the turn put Kenney even further ahead in the hand. The [poker card="3c"]river ended Petrangelo’s run in Event #7 for $90,000. Roughly ten minutes later, Nick Schulman was all in for his tournament life. From the button, Schulman open-shoved his 12 big blind stack with [poker card="qh"][poker card="td"]. Then, from the small blind, Keith Tilston reshoved over the top with [poker card="ac"][poker card="8d"]. Ben Yu got out of the way and, with the cards on their backs, the duo saw a flop of [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"] providing both players a pair. The [poker card="kd"] turn gave Schulman a few more outs to the straight but the [poker card="8s"] river was no help the PokerGO commentator. Schulman finished in fifth place for $120,000, his second recorded cash of 2019. Even though he had just busted Schulman, Tiltson wasn’t long for this final table. Kenney, having both blinds covered, open-shoved from the button with [poker card="3s"][poker card="3c"]. Tilston, in the big blind, ended up making the call with [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"], putting his tournament at stake. The flop came [poker card="2c"][poker card="ts"][poker card="kc"] providing Tilston some additional gutshot outs but the [poker card="7d"] fell on the turn and the [poker card="td"] on the river, giving the hand to Kenney's pocket threes. Tilston bowed out in fourth place for $150,000. It marks his fifth lifetime cash at the USPO. Ben Yu, who entered the day as the final table chip leader, clashed with Kenney in a huge hand which, in the end, left Yu crippled. Only a few hands after that confrontation, Kenney finished the job. Yu, with less than three big blinds, stuck it in from the small blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="6d"] and Kenney snap called holding the [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="3c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="kh"][poker card="as"][poker card="9s"] giving Kenney the flush and ending Yu’s run in third place. Yu picked up $210,000 for his efforts, his third cash of the 2019 USPO series. Kenney held a massive chip lead headed into heads up play, but Schindler started chipping away at it by winning the first few hands. However, as he had for the entirety of this brief final table, Kenney ended up on top in the most important hand. Kenney limped the button with the [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"] and Schindler shipped his [poker card="ac"][poker card="7d"] which Kenney quickly called. The flop [poker card="2d"][poker card="9c"][poker card="kh"] flop put Kenney in the lead. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and the river the [poker card="8s"] securing the win for Kenney and providing Schindler the runner-up result and $300,000 in prize money. Kenney, the Aussie Millions Main Event winner, takes home $450,000 for the victory, sending his lifetime career live earnings north of $27,000,000. The final table for Event #8: $25,000 8 Game Mix takes place on Thursday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  16. The 2019 U.S. Poker Open has really been about two names so far; Stephen Chidwick and Sean Winter. Chidwick got things off to a strong start by winning Event #1, while Winter had made every final table but hadn't picked up a win. That all changed Sunday night when Winter beat David Peters heads up to win $151,200 and his first USPO title in the $10,000 Short Deck event. Final Table Payouts 1. Sean Winter - $151,200 2. David Peters - $100,800 3. Seth Davies - $67,200 4. Ben Lamb - $42,000 5. Ben Yu - $33,600 6. Stephen Chidwick - $25,200 Chidwick also made the final table but started the day with the second shortest stack ahead of only Ben Lamb. Two double ups allowed Lamb to avoid elimination, whereas Chidwick wasn't so fortunate. Four players limped in front Chidwick before the 2018 US Poker Open champion moved all in for 725,000 with the [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. Seth Davies and Ben Yu both folded their hands but Winter called with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="td"][poker card="6d"] to give Chidwick outs to Broadway. The [poker card="6s"] turn left Chidwick drawing only to one of three aces. The river was the [poker card="kd"] to give Winter a full house and eliminate Chidwick in sixth place. It took 45 minutes before another player hit the rail. From under the gun, Yu moved all in for 655,000 with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"] and only Davies decided to look him up, calling with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"]. The board ran out [poker card="jc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6s"] to completely miss Yu and eliminate him in fifth place. Lamb managed to last just one more hour before falling in fourth place. Winter limped with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"] again before Lamb moved all in for 1,780,000 with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"]. Winter called and then watched the [poker card="ad"][poker card="js"][poker card="7s"][poker card="ks"][poker card="8s"] runout secure Lamb's fourth-place finish. Winter picked up yet another victim 45 minutes later. Davies limped with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"] before Winter moved all in from the button with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Davies called off his last 3,525,000. The [poker card="js"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6h"] put Davies in dire straits and the [poker card="kh"] turn and [poker card="7d"] river both failed to save him from a third-place result. Thanks to the three players he had eliminated, Winter started heads-up play with a nearly 3-1 chip lead over Peters. It took almost exactly an hour for Winter to put the finishing touches on his first USPO title. Winter shoved all in with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"] and Peters called all in with the [poker card="jd"][poker card="9s"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"][poker card="9d"] flop gave Winter two pair. The turn was the [poker card="th"] to give Peters outs to a straight. The river was the [poker card="as"] and Peters was eliminated in second place. The win gives Winter a total of four straight final table appearances in the 2019 USPO. He also has a second-place finish, a sixth-place finish, and a fifth-place finish. Those results and this victory moved Winter to the top spot on the overall 2019 USPO leaderboard through four events. USPO Top 10 After Event #4 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 2. Stephen Chidwick 3 $354,950 340 3. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 4. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 5. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 6. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140 7. David Peters 1 $100,800 140 8. Seth Davies 2 $94,500 140 9. Joseph Cheong 1 $112,500 100 10. Martin Zamani 1 $83,200 100   The final table for Event #5: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Monday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  17. Busting out of a World Poker Tour event usually means a miserable end to one's poker trip. Aaron Mermelstein was having none of that. After busting in 53rd place in the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown on Tuesday, Mermelstein jumped into the $25,000 High Roller event and the Pennsylvania poker player beat a final table that included the reigning GPI Player of the Year, a former WSOP Main Event champ and a WSOP Europe Main Event champ to pick up the second biggest score of his career. Ben Yu didn't come to the final table with the shortest stack, but with just six big blinds to work with, the three-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner didn't have a lot of decisions to make. On the first hand of play, he moved all in for 295,000 with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"] only to have James Calderaro called with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"][poker card="as"] flop left Yu drawing to perfect-perfect running fours. The [poker card="qs"] turn gave him outs to a chop but the [poker card="jd"] river sealed his fate with a ninth place finish. Just a few minutes later, Brandon Adams ended up on the wrong side of an unavoidable preflop all in situation. Adams and Joe McKeehen got all the money in with Adams holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"] and McKeehen well ahead with [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"]. The ace-high flop gave McKeehen top set and left Adams drawing dead through the turn and river on his way to an eighth place finish. The player who did start the final table with the shortest stack, Alan Schein, laddered up two spots inside of the first 10 minutes before finally busting. Calderaro raised to 110,000 with [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] and Schein moved all in for 435,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="9s"]. Calderaro called and then stayed ahead through the [poker card="7s"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"] flop. The [poker card="kc"] turn was also safe but the [poker card="jd"] river give Calderaro a pair to win the pot and eliminate Schein in seventh. Niall Farrell raised to 100,000 from the button holding [poker card="as"][poker card="qh"] before Mermelstein moved all in from the big blind with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"]. Farrell called all in and moved ahead on the [poker card="qd"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5s"] flop. The [poker card="7d"] turn gave Mermelstein a gutshot which the [poker card="6c"] river completed to give Farrell a sixth place result. McKeehen, who started the final table with the chip lead, got into a hand with Shannon Shorr that resulted in Shorr's departure. On a flop of [poker card="qs"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6d"], McKeehen bet 160,000 only to have Shorr check-raise all in for a little over 1,000,000. McKeehen called and turned over [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"] which put him ahead of Shorr's [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"] holding. Shorr was unable to improve after the [poker card="as"] turn and [poker card="jh"] river and was out in fifth. The former WSOP Main Event champ wasn't done there. McKeehen raised to 150,000 from UTG with [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] and Calderaro moved all in for 425,000 from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="5c"] and McKeehen called. The board ran out [poker card="qc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"] to send Shorr home with a fourth place finish. Unfortunately for McKeehen, the next hour wasn't as kind to him and he wound up busting in third. Mermelstein raised to 175,000 from the button, McKeehen moved all in from the small blind for 1,555,000. Foxen moved all in from the big blind and Mermelstein folded. McKeehen tabled [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"] and was in rough shape after Foxen turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="ah"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"][poker card="js"][poker card="5h"] wasn't good enough to save McKeehen from elimination. Heads up play started with Mermelstein holding 55% of the chips in play. Over the next hour, Mermelstein never surrendered the chip lead and eventually found a spot to pick off Foxen. From the button, Foxen raised to 350,000 and Mermelstein called. The flop came [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="4c"] and Mermelstein check-raised all in and Foxen called and then got bad news after Mermelstein turned over [poker card="th"][poker card="ts"] for top set while Foxen showed [poker card="js"][poker card="td"] for top pair and a runner-runner straight draw. The [poker card="ac"] turn crushed any hope Foxen had, giving Mermelstein the title and a $618,955 payday. Final Table Payouts Aaron Mermelstein – $618,955 Alex Foxen – $545,000 Joe McKeehen – $305,665 James Calderaro – $210,295 Shannon Shorr – $136,935 Niall Farrell – $100,255 Alan Schein – $83,140 Brandon Adams – $70,915 Ben Yu – $68,470
  18. The 2019 World Series of Poker continued on Saturday with another massive field in the Big 50 as that event quickly hurtles toward a record for the largest WSOP event ever. Ben Heath Leads Talented Final 12 in $50K High Roller Players were able to register for the $50,000 No Limit Hold'em (Event #5) until the mid-way point of Day 2. This lead to a total of 110 entries and a final prize pool of $5,280,000. Just 12 players remain in contention for the bracelet and the first place prize of $1,484,085. Leading the way is Britain's Ben Heath. Finishing with 5,255,000, Heath managed to go from starting the day second in chips to sitting atop the chip counts. Russian Dmirty Yurasov spent a good amount of time as the chip leader and was only eclipsed in the last level of the night. Yurasov bagged up 4,800,000. Elio Fox sits third with 4,695,000. Chip Leader Coaching's Chance Kornuth ended up in fourth place with 4,510,000. Top 10 Chip Counts Jake Schwartz - 117,600 Julien Martini - 117,400 Jordan Siegel - 95,000 Brayden Gazlay - 91,000 John Racener - 83,100 Jason Daly - 81,300 Andrey Zhigalov - 77,500 Wes Self - 74,500 Layne Flack - 66,200
  19. There’s a reason that summer in Las Vegas is often called ‘poker player summer camp’ and it’s not just because the World Series of Poker is going on. During the summer bracelet chasing takes center stage in Sin City but over the past decade, many other Las Vegas poker rooms have battled with the WSOP for the hearts and minds of the poker playing public by consistently scheduling competing summer series that offer players excellent value through great structures and big guarantees. Here's a quick look around the city at some of those non-WSOP tournaments keeping poker players in action. ARIA Poker Classic and High Roller Series There are basically two tournament series happening at the same time inside the ARIA. The first is for the everyday player. It's filled with buy-ins right around the $400 and $240 buy-in level, The ARIA Poker Classic. The second is home to the high rollers - small fields, high buy-in, and elite competition - The ARIA Summer High Roller Series. Even though the Rio has offered some big buy-in tournaments early in the WSOP schedule, many of the biggest names in the game have been spending more time in the ARIA this summer simply because it’s where the biggest games are. Before he was embroiled in controversy for folding out of order at the WSOP, Sam Soverel bested the 23 player field in Aria High Roller 11 on May 30 for a $235,880 payday. He was joined in the money by David Peters (runner-up, $189.620), Jake Schindler (3rd, $92,000) and Poker Central founder Cary Katz (4th, $57,500). Australia’s Michael Addamo won the $10,000 buy-in ARIA High Roller 12 on June 4 for $136,000, defeating Germany’s Manig Loeser heads up. Loeser finished in second place taking home $88,400 for his efforts while fellow countryman Rainer Kempe finished in third for $54,400. Spain’s Juan Dominguez is having a nice start to his summer as he went back-to-back at the ARIA. First, he topped the 45 player field of the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 13 for $153,000 and the very next day he won the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 14 for another $126,682. Ben Yu was the official runner-up, taking home $125,318 while the familiar faces of Jake Schindler (3rd, $67,500), Manig Loeser (4th, $45,000) and Ali Imsirovic (5th, $36,000) also made final table appearances. The 2019 Wynn Poker Classic One of the nicer properties on the Las Vegas strip, the Wynn/Encore hosts the Wynn Poker Classic and through the first week and a half, players have been turning up en masse to play in their daily offerings. The Wynn has been offering multiple $1K+ buy-in tournaments and some well-known names have been showing up for them. On June 3, 484 runners showed up for the $1,100 in which the UK’s Louis Salter took home the $98.452 first-place prize and defeated a final table that included Connor Drinan (runner-up, $64,295) and Lily Kiletto (7th, $13,907). The next day 432 players jumped into the $1,600 buy-in which saw Florida’s Evan Teitelbaum hold off one-time WSOP Main Event champion Joe McKeehen to take down the $138,209 first place prize. McKeehen settled for $89,018 as the runner-up. Other notable final table players included Mark Radoja (5th, $31,068) as well as Entourage and Ballers music supervisor Scott Vener (9th, $12,468). Keven Stammen bested the 618 runners of the $550 daily on June 6 for a $50,940 payday while Justin Liberto defeated Germany’s Bart Lybaert on June 8 to win a $1,100 tournament for $94,659. Lybaert’s $61,412 runner-up prize helped push him to over $3M in career earnings. The DeepStack Championship Poker Series at The Venetian The Venetian continues to provide large field tournaments for players looking for action outside the Rio. They have a partnership with the Mid-States Poker Tour for some of their larger events but also provide daily tournaments for players looking for buy-ins under $1,600. Although the Deepstack Series starts in the middle of May, the $1,100 ‘Summer Kickoff ‘ Event from May 27-29 brought out 518 runners where World Poker Tour Champion Brian Altman took home the $90,905 first-place prize. He defeated Robert Kuhn who ended up with $84,390 as the runner-up. The final table included popular Twitch Poker streamer Ricky ‘RatedGTO’ Guan who finished in fourth for $36,364, a top-3 score for his young career. Pot Limit Omaha cash game grinder Sasha Liu outlasted the 144 runners in the $800 Pot Limit Omaha 8-Max Bounty to take down the $20,161 first-place prize. Canadian Kevin Barton fell in second place for a $11,995 payday.
  20. In the lead up to the World Series of Poker every year, there always ends up being a discussion about who the best player without a WSOP bracelet is. Two players whose names have come up in those conversations each permanently removed themselves from contention on Thursday by winning one of poker's most highly coveted trophies. Daniel Strelitz topped a final table that included Shannon Shorr, Maria Ho, and Ali Imsirovic to win the $5,000 No Limit Hold'em event while Yuval Brohnstein maneuvered his way to victory in the $1,500 NO Limit Deuce-to-Seven event. Those were just two of the eight events on Thursday's schedule that also included the Big 50 nearing its conclusion. Daniel Strelitz Wins $5,000 No Limit Hold'em Daniel Strelitz has a World Poker Tour title to his name along with a few high profile runner-up finishes. What he was missing was a WSOP bracelet. That was until Thursday. Strelitz beat Shannon Shorr heads up to win the $5,000 No Limit Hold'em event for $442,385. The 29-year-old poker pro admitted to feeling some relief after going 38 WSOP cashes without a win. “I finally got it off my back,” Strelitz said. “I came close a few times, and it’s kind of disappointing. But it wasn’t like I was desperate. But it’s still just a massive relief. I’m super happy.” The final table started six-handed, but one of those players was missing. Ali Imsirovic, who started third in chips, misunderstood the final table start time and was late arriving to the table. He overcame that slight mishap to finish fourth. Maria Ho, fresh off of her third place finish in the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown, couldn't overcome a short stack and finished fifth. Arsenii Karmatckii finished sixth. The win moved Strelitz past $4 million in lifetime earnings. Final Table Payouts Daniel Strelitz - $442,385 Shannon Shorr - $273,416 Ognjen Sekularac - $186,050 Ali Imsirovic - $129,018 Maria Ho - $91,211 Arsenii Karmatckii - $65,764 Maria Mcalpin - $48,377 Pauli Ayras - $36,323 Michael O'Grady - $27,848 Yuval Bronshtein Grabs $1,500 No Limit Deuce Bracelet Over the last 12 years, Yuval Bronshtein has earned 67 WSOP cashes and a little more than $1.1 million in earnings. Nine times he's been at a final table. Yet prior to Thursday, the 34-year-old had never been heads-up for a bracelet. He finally got that opportunity on Thursday and made the absolute most of it. Bronshtein beat Ajay Chabra, who started the day with the chip lead, once play reached heads up to win the $1,500 No Limit Deuce event for $96,278. “Ajay is a great player. I got to play with him yesterday and I couldn’t beat him in a pot. I had a feeling he was going to go deep in this tournament, be one of the last three at least," Bronshtein said. "However, I have a lot of experience playing heads up, not particularly in this game, I only play this game once a year, but I’m very good at heads up.” Despite not being able to close out a WSOP event prior to Thursday, Bronshtein knew if he was patient and kept working, he'd eventually find an opportunity to do it. “It feels amazing. It’s exactly what I thought it would be like. I’m not surprised I’ve always felt I could win one of these tournaments," Bronshtein said. "Glad to finally wrap one up, I’m definitely really happy about it. This has been a really big goal of mine since I started playing poker. It’s been my number one goal.” Chabra, who finished 22nd in this event last summer, earned $59,591 to nearly double his lifetime WSOP cashes to $148,107. Jerry Wong finished third for $39,986. Final Table Payouts Yuval Bronshtein - $96,278 Ajay Chabra - $59,491 Jerry Wong - $39,986 Steven Tabb - $27,477 Michael Sortino - $19,313 Bjorn Geissert - $13,892 Craig Chait - $10,232 Frank Kassela - $7,722 Femi Fashakin Leads Big 50 Final Table From 28,371 entries, just seven players remain in contention for the $1,147,449 first place prize in the largest live poker tournament ever. Florida native Femi Fashakin heads into the final day of play with the chip lead of the Big 50 and just six other players stand in his way. Fashakin will be in unfamiliar territory on Friday. He's never made a final table and has just $59,706 in lifetime earnings. The minimum he's guaranteed now is $182,192. By the time play wraps up on Friday, one player will have accumulated 1.427 billion chips. Action resumes at Noon PT and will be streamed live on CBS All Access. Final Table Chip Counts Femi Fashakin - 314,000,000 Walter Atwood - 297,000,000 Rafi Elharar - 227,500,000 Paul Cullen - 191,500,000 Nicholas Chow - 170,000,000 Adrian Curry - 126,000,000 Daniel Ghobrial - 101,000,000 Only Swingruber, Garcia, Yu, Lehr Remain in $10,000 Heads Up Championship Friday is Final Four day in the $10,000 Heads Up Championship event with three previous bracelet winners still in contention. Colossus I winner Cord Garcia, three-time bracelet winner Ben Yu, and two-time bracelet winner Keith Lehr are joined by relatively unknown Sean Swingruber. Garcia beat Ricky Guan and Matthias Eibinger to advance to the final day of play. He'll face Swingruber in the semi-finals. Swingruber, a Los Angeles poker pro, defeated Jan Lakota and Jimmy D'Ambrosio on Thursday. D'Ambrosio did what many in this event have failed to do over the years. He beat John Smith. The pair met up in Round of 16 at the start of Day 2 with D'Ambrosio coming out on top of the two-time runner-up. Yu worked his way through Richard Tuhrim and Kristen Bicknell on his way to the semi-finals. Lehr beat Simon Bruns and Jake Schindler to advance. Play resumes on Saturday at Noon and will be streamed live on PokerGO. Jason Acosta Leads Final 28 in $1,500 HORSE Day 2 of the $1,500 HORSE event saw the field shrink from 291 players to just 28. New Jersey poker player Jason Acosta ended Day 2 on a heater and bagged up the chip lead with 754,000. WSOP Circuit crusher Valentin Vornicu sits fifth in chips and Chris Klodnicki and Phillip Hui also finished with top 10 stacks. Mark Gregorich, Andre Akkari, and Tony Ma, also managed to advance to Day 3. Some of the notables that busted out in the money on Thursday included Anthony Zinno, David Bach, Daniel Zack, Jim Collopy, Chris Wallace, David 'ODB' Baker, and Chris Ferguson. Action resumes at Noon and is scheduled to play down to a winner. Top 10 Chip Counts Jason Acosta - 754,000 Jason Stockfish - 646,000 Sergey Altbregin - 485,000 Danny Woolard - 434,000 Valentin Vornicu - 421,000 Gary Kosakowski - 417,000 Ashish Gupta - 367,000 Raul Paez - 333,000 Chris Klodnicki - 323,000 Phillip Hui - 316,000 Romain Nussmann Leads $1,500 Six Max Final 26 Day 2 of the $1,500 Six Max No Limit Hold'em event continued with fast and furious action with 263 players being sent to the rail. France's Romain Nussmann finished on top of the final 26 players with 8,095,000. He's more than 1 million chips ahead of Singapore's Ong Dingxiang, who finished with 7,080,000. There's then a significant gap before the third biggest stack, Pierce Mckellar with 4,990,000. Isaac Baron and Day 1 chip leader Richard Hasnip both finished with top 10 chip stacks. Play resumes at 2 PM on Friday and will play down to a winner. Top 10 Chip Counts Romain Nussmann - 8,095,000 Ong Dingxiang - 7,080,000 Pierce Mckellar - 4,990,000 Kainalu Mccue-Unciano - 2,760,000 Nicolas Careme - 2,400,000 Henry Lu - 2,175,000 Isaac Baron - 2,050,000 Stephen Graner - 2,045,000 Vadim Shlez - 1,730,000 Richard Hasnip - 1,615,000 Ott Brothers Advance to Day 2 of $1,500 Shootout The $1,500 NLHE Shootout, the first shootout of the 2019 WSOP, drew 917 players with 100 of them making it through their first table to advanced to Day 2. Some of the notables to advance to Day 2 include Maurice Hawkins, Jennifer Tilly, Qui Nguyen, Kelly Minkin, Loni Harwood, Joe Cada and Pennsylvania poker playing twins Daniel and Dillon Ott. There is no chance that the Ott brothers will both make the final table though. Both ended up on the same Day 2 table. Day 2 will feature ten 10-handed tables each playing down to a winner. Those 10 will make up the official final table which will play on Saturday. Deeb, McMaster, Foxen Bag Top 10 Day 1 Stacks in $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 Yarron Bendor leads the 90 players who survived Day 1 of the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship event but there's a star-studded group chasing him. David Benyamine, Shaun Deeb, Alex Foxen, and Derek McMaster, who won the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo event earlier this week, all finished with top 10 stacks. John Racener, Mike Wattel, Mike Matusow, Benny Glaser, and Nick Schulman are also still alive with better-than-average stacks. The first day of play drew 173 players, up from the 169 who played this same event last year, and registration remains open until the start of Day 2. Top 10 Chip Counts Yarron Bendor - 375,500 David Benyamine - 291,500 Shaun Deeb - 263,000 Delmiro Toledo - 258,000 Derek McMaster - 240,000 Robert Stevanovski - 227,000 David "Bakes" Baker - 221,000 Alex Foxen - 218,000 Tom Koral - 216,500 Ken Aldridge - 201,500
  21. Just over two weeks after winning a €50,000 Short Deck event at King's Casino in Rozvadov, Jonathan Depa picked up another short deck title on Thursday after beating Alex Foxen heads-up in the Poker Masters $10,000 Short Deck event. The last four cashes on Depa's Hendon Mob profile are all in the game of Short Deck. "Heaters are always fun," Depa said. "I don't really play that many tournaments. To win two tournaments in two weeks is pretty awesome and it's always nice when you're just basically winning every all in." [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] The final table included a Poker Hall of Famer, a former November Niner, the reigning GPI Player of the Year, the reigning High Roller of the Year and a three-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner. None of them were a match for Depa though. Jorryt van Hoof, who finished third in the 2014 WSOP Main Event, limped with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"] before Sam Soverel raised all in to 940,000 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"]. Action folded back to Van Hoof and he used a time extension before calling. The board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="qh"][poker card="ac"] to give both players two pair and leave Soverel, who won the PokerCentral High Roller of the Year title in 2018, out in sixth place. On the next hand, Ben Yu moved all in with [poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"] and Depa called with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] to give Yu to pair and a straight draw. The [poker card="kd"] turn gave Depa the advantage back and after the [poker card="7s"] completed the board, Yu was eliminated. First to act, van Hoof moved all in for 1,330,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and Foxen also moved all for 1,890,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kd"] forcing Depa and Seidel to fold. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"] flop gave Foxen a stranglehold on the pot and the [poker card="6c"] turn gave him a full house to eliminate van Hoof in fifth place as the meaningless [poker card="tc"] completed the board. Foxen continued to enjoy the role of executioner and his next victim was Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. Seidel opened by moving all in for 1,230,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"] and Foxen mvoed all in behind him with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and Depa folded. Foxen fell behind on the [poker card="9s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] flop, but the [poker card="7c"] turn gave Foxen straight and flush draws. The [poker card="6c"] river completed Foxen's flush and eliminated Seidel in third. Thanks in part to those two eliminations, Foxen began heads-up play with 72% of the chips in play. The pair played for more than 90 minutes before Depa completed the comeback. Foxen opened by moving all-in with [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"] and Depa called with [poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"]. Foxen was unable to double up on the [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9s"] runout and was eliminated in second place giving Depa the title. Final Table Payouts Jonathan Depa - $133,200 Alex Foxen - $88,800 Erik Seidel - $59,200 Jorryt van Hoof - $37,000 Ben Yu - $29,600 Sam Soverel - $22,200
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