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Found 7 results

  1. British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser won his fourth WSOP bracelet of a career defined by his World Series of Poker greatness as he closed out the heads-up battle to seal victory in the $10,000-entry Razz Championship. Glaser the Closer as Carlton Finally Overcome Taking his seat on the final day of the event, Glaser had only one opponent to topple, after Everett Carlton had fought so hard yesterday that the finale had to be delayed by 24 hours. But in the end, there was no denying the British pro, who bagged his fourth WSOP bracelet after an hour-long rollercoaster heads-up battle to the finish. Carlton took Glaser’s lead at one point and threatened to put himself in a dominant position for victory. Instead, Glaser chipped away at his opponent before taking the lead back and grinding his opponent down to the point where he had simply no chips left to fight with. It was a powerful display of exactly the skills that Glaser has established over so many years playing specifically WSOP Events at the Rio. After the win, Glaser thanked his supporters online as he celebrated his latest incredible mixed game victory. https://twitter.com/BennyGlaser/status/1461897898124353537 WSOP 2021 Event #78 $10,000 Razz Championship Final Table Results: Benny Glaser - $274,693 Everett Carlton - $169,773 Yuri Dzivielevski - $123,254 Erik Sagstrom - $90,859 John Monnette - $68,025 Yehuda Buchalter - $51,739 Erik Seidel - $39,987 Phil Hellmuth - $31,411 Schemion Wins First-Ever Bracelet After Long Wait Ends in Style German poker superpower Ole Schemion won his first-ever WSOP bracelet in the $1,979-entry Poker Hall of Fame Bounty event. At a final table where he went into play with a huge lead, Schemion used his stack and his considerable skills to get the job done in stunning fashion in the Thunderdome at the Rio. With six players making the final day, it didn’t take long for that number to be reduced. Jerry Wong busted in sixth place to Schemion when Wong shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"] and Schemion called with [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"]. The board of [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5h"][poker card="Ac"] saw Schemion win another important hand and increase his lead over the remaining four players. James Alexander busted in fifth place for $37,965 when he moved all-in pre-flop with [poker card="As"][poker card="7s"] and Marc Rivera called with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"]. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Kh"][poker card="6s"] saw Alexander exit, but his conqueror only laddered one more rung, busting in fourth for $52,569. Rivera’s final hand was a call from Schemion’s shove with [poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"]. Rivera was way ahead with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"], but while the flop of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"] kept him ahead and the turn card of [poker card="Qd"] was safe, the [poker card="4h"] on the river gave Schemion the straight and sent the Philippines player home. Minutes later, Giovani Torre busted in third place to send play heads-up. Schemion shoved once again, moving all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] and getting a call from Torre with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"] looked to have all but locked the hand up apart from diamonds for the Portuguese player, but an incredible runout of a [poker card="Ts"] turn and [poker card="Tc"] gave Schemion trips instead to send Torre to the cash desk with a payout slip worth $73,175. Heads-up, Schemion had eight times his opponents stack, and it took no time at all after a short break for the event to conclude in the German’s favor. Canadian player Ben Underwood had made it all the way to second place, but his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jd"] couldn’t catch Schemion’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5s"] as a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"] gave the German the top prize of $172,499 and Underwood a runner-up result worth $106,618. WSOP 2021 Event #79 $1,979 Hall of Fame Bounty Final Table Results: Ole Schemion - $172,499 Benjamin Underwood - $106,618 Giovani Torre - $74,175 Marc Rivera - $52,569 James Alexander - $37,965 Jerry Wong - $27,951 In Event #80, the third bracelet of four to be won on a mammoth day of action went to Robert Cowan as an all-British heads-up played out in the Amazon Room at the Rio. At the six-handed final table, reached after the elimination of WSOP 2021 Event #80 $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Robert Cowan - $280,916 Robert Emmerson - $173,613 Uri Reichenstein - $116,106 Dylan Weisman - $79,368 William Benson - $55,485 Karel Mokry - $39,688 An exciting conclusion to the $800 Deepstack Event #81 saw Jason Wheeler take home his first-ever WSOP bracelet after many years on the professional poker circuit. On a day where Will givens held the lead going into the action, 121 players played down to a winner in dramatic fashion. After players such as the aforementioned Givens (39th for $4,605) joined other like Justin Lapka (47th for $3,920) and Melanie Weisner (66th for $2,933) on the rail, the unofficial final table was reached in record time, with Wheeler the shortest stack of ten. Doubling up quickly with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] of Antoine Goutard, however, Wheeler grabbed some chips and more importantly momentum as he began his ascent to the top of the leaderboard. After Maxwell Sabel busted in 10th place, Robert Hill busted in ninth place for $18,968 when his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jd"] couldn’t catch the pocket kings of Julian Velasquez on a queen high board after the chips all went in pre-flop. John O’Neal busted in eight for $24,165 when Goutard held again, his [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"] standing up to O’Neal’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kd"]. When Ralph Massey busted to Velasquez in seventh place, his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6s"] dominated and defeated by the Colombian’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"], an ace and two queens on the board saw Velasquez take the lead, but with players like Garry Gates and Wheeler himself chipping up, the power dynamics at the table were shifting every orbit. Shelok Wong busted in sixth place for $40,376 when his ace-high couldn’t top Velasquez’ top pair on the turn, and Goutard busted very soon after when his [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"] was shot down by Diogo Veiga’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qd"], leving the French player on the rail in fifth for $52,943. Garry Gates knows plenty about finishing fourth in a major tournament, as he came in that exact position in the Main Event just a couple of years ago, but he will regret this bust-out almost as much. ‘Not finishing fourth again’ was never said by Gates, however, and it was a good job as his [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Qh"] was shot down by Velasquez’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"] on a board where an ace on the turn ended the drama before 5th street fell. Gates cashed for an impressive $70,077, and he was joined on the rail soon after by Veiga, whose third-place finish earned him $93,627. Veiga’s [poker card="Ac"]6c] didn’t hold as Wheeler’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="9s"] flopped the world on a board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"]. Heads-up, it was Velasquez who took an early lead, but Wheeler was not to be denied, getting there with an all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="4c"]. Velasquez called with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and was favorite to lift the title, but a board of [poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="4d"] saw Wheeler jumping for the ‘wheel’ straight he made on the river. Shortly afterwards, Wheeler’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="As"] held with ease against Velasquez’ [poker card="Ah"][poker card="2c"] as an ace on the turn ended all hope the Colombian had, his tournament devastated by the closing two major hands of the event. WSOP 2021 Event #81 $800 Deepstack Final Table Results: Jason Wheeler - $202,274 Julian Velasquez - $126,252 Diogo Veiga - $93,627 Garry Gates - $70,077 Antoine Goutard - $52,943 Shelok Wong - $40,376 Ralph Massey - $31,087 John O'Neal - $24,165 Robert Hill - $18,968 In the $250,000 Super High Roller event, just five players made the money and lasted to the final day’s play, with Spanish sensation Adrian Mateos a runaway chip leader with more chips than his four remaining opponents combined. With a busy day of action in the event that the elite of poker will be talking about for weeks, Adrian Mateos took the lead and dominated the latter stages as just five players made the money, with over $3 million up top for tomorrow’s winner. Michale Addamo led the field when Day 2 kicked off, but he and Ali Imsirovic saw their control of the field evaporate as the Spanish pro Mateos took over. With Ben Heath maintaining third place from Day 1 by the end of Day 2, he and the other three opponents, Keith Tilston, Seth Davies and John Kincaid, will all be threats to Mateos. Right up until German crusher Christoph Vogelsang’s elimination on the money bubble in sixth, though, Mateos was in control. It will take some performance to stop the young European superstar winning what would be his fourth WSOP bracelet at the age of just 27 years old. WSOP 2021 Event #82 $250,000 Super High Roller Final Table Chipcounts: Adrian Mateos - 25,500,000 Keith Tilston - 8,900,000 Ben Heath - 6,500,000 Seth Davies - 4,550,000 John Kincaid - 3,925,000 A Day 1a of drama in the Closer saw Turkish player Osman Ihlamur bag the chip lead with 1,765,000 chips by the end of play. With players such as Dimitar Danchev (1,635,000) and Wesley Belding (1,620,000) on his tail, Ihlamur will not have it easy on Day 2, but with just 25 players surviving from 802 entries, it was a fast-paced finish to the action as 121 players cashed. Big names such as Kenny Hallaert (1,250,000) and Chris Moorman (1,250,000) will be a threat when Day 2 takes place, but before that happens, there is tomorrow’s Day 1b to consider, where some players who busted bigger buy-in tournaments over the last couple of days will be doing everything they can to bag up one last Day 2 stack and close out the 2021 World Series of Poker in style. WSOP 2021 Event #83 $1,500 The Closer Top 10 Chipcounts: Osman Ihlamur - 1,765,000 Dimitar Danchev - 1,635,000 Wesley Belding - 1,620,000 Chris Moorman - 1,250,000 Kenny Hallaert - 1,250,000 Gergely Kulcsar - 1,200,000 Martins Adeniya - 1,190,000 Joao Simao - 1,100,000 Bin Liu - 1,000,000 Stephen Song - 940,000 An exciting first day of action in the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha Event #84 saw Hungarian player Laszlo Bujtas (1,980,000) bag up the chip lead as Josh Arieh (1,355,000) continued his heater in pursuit of the WSOP Player of the Year title. Ben Lamb (1,755,000) is second in chips, but it is the appearance of Arieh in fourth place of the 33 survivors from 85 entries that catches the eye. The level of players in this $50,000-entry event is really high, and players like Jake Schindler, Dan Shak and Mark Herm all busted along the way as players such as Daniel Negreanu (1.12m) and Dan Cates (1.045m) both made the top 10. With others such as Chance Kornuth (625,000), Shaun Deeb (520,000) and Anthony Zinno (420,000) all still involved, players will battle attempt to win what will be a prestigious bracelet to claim late in the 2021 World Series of Poker. WSOP 2021 Event #84 $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha Top 10 Chipcounts: Laszlo Bujtas - 1,980,000 Ben Lamb - 1,755,000 Alexander Petersen - 1,355,000 Josh Arieh - 1,355,000 Jared Bleznick - 1,270,000 Alex Aleksandrovski - 1,130,000 Daniel Negreanu - 1,125,000 Jeremy Ausmus - 1,125,000 Scott Seiver - 1,070,000 Dan Cates - 1,045,000 After a stunning Main Event win, the new world champion Koray Aldemir tackled some of the fans’ thoughts in an intriguing post on Twitter. https://twitter.com/kooraay90/status/1461900448646848514 Phil Hellmuth is determined to chase down the top of the Player of the Year leaderboard and claim one of the only titles the ‘Poker Brat’ hasn’t won in what has been a glittering career. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1461670956775051270 He’s not going to have it easy, however, after the man at the top of the chart came out of 2021 WSOP ‘retirement’ to make a sprint for the line with just a few days of competition left. Can you imagine if these two are heads up for a bracelet late in the series? We can dream!
  2. Mixed game specialist Benny Glaser had struck out on a few occasions during the 2021 World Series of Poker. After consistently putting himself in the position to dominate in the mixed game events he knows so well, however, the British player is just one player from victory in the $10,000 Razz Championship at the Rio in Las Vegas. Heads-Up For $10K Razz Championship As the final table of nine was set, both Seidel and Hellmuth had spun up their small stacks. Glaser had added a little to his pile, but remained some way behind the chip leader, who at that stage was John Monnette, who already has a 2021 WSOP bracelet to his name. He added a bit more when he eliminated Brad Ruben in ninth place for $25,086, before Hellmuth exited in eighth place, with Yehuda Buchalter’s nine-six the winning hand. Despite winning that hand, Buchalter was still short, but it would be the nine-time WSOP bracelet winner Seidel who was the next player to hit the rail. Busting after a period of play that saw Glaser rise through the ranks and take the chip lead, Seidel lost out to Dzivielevski before Buchalter busted to the Brazilian too. At the next break, it was Swedish player Erik Sagstrom who led the final five, but that situation flipped as Glaser took control of the table, constantly putting pressure on all four players to the extent that one hour later, he had 3.7 million chips, more than double Dzivielevski’s total and vastly more than anyone else, with the other three remaining players super short. John Monnette busted in fifth place, and shortly afterward, Sagstrom was following him to the rail, the second victim in a row of Everett Carlton, who was the player pushing for victory. Dzivielevski busted in third place after Carlton took him out, but the winner of that hand was still well behind Glaser. That was until a series of pots balanced things out and with Glaser holding a slim lead, that was where play ended for the night as the two men agree to come back to the Rio at 3pm local time to conclude the battle for the bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #78 $10,000 Razz Championship Chipcounts Benny Glaser - 3,990,000 Everett Carlton - 2,570,000 Prizes 3. Yuri Dzivielevski - $123,254 4. Erik Sagstrom - $90,859 5. John Monnett - $68,025 6. Yehuda Buchalter - $51,739 7. Erik Seidel - $39,987 8. Phil Hellmuth - $31,411 9. Brad Ruben - $25,086 Schemion Takes Massive Lead In Hall of Fame Bounty The final six players have been reached in the WSOP Hall of Fame Bounty event, which costs $1,979 to enter, and featured players who had won the WSOP Main with a year-appropriate bounty on their heads. With the final table playing out tomorrow, it is the German player Ole Schemion who lead the way, with a big lead of 6.9 million to his nearest rival Giovani Torre, who has 2.7 million. With every other player having 1.5 million or less, Schemion has a huge lead, and is on the brink of winning what would be his first-ever WSOP bracelet despite a career that has seen him win $16m in live events alone. It’s not only Schemion who would be winning his first bracelet as all six remaining players have yet to win gold. On the penultimate day, players such as Michael Gathy, Christian Pham, Maria Lampropulos, and Joao Vieira all busted, so missed out on the $172,499 top prize. WSOP 2021 Event #79 $1,979 Hall of Fame Bounty Final Table Chipcounts: Ole Schemion - 6,905,000 Giovani Torre - 2,720,000 James Alexander - 1,530,000 Jerry Wong - 1,200,000 Benjamin Underwood - 975,000 Marc Rivera - 755,000 Addamo Ahead After $250K Super High Roller Day 1 In the $250,000-entry Super High Roller event, there were 25 total entries, including two rebuys from Jason Koon and Justin Bonomo as Koon bust but Bonomo survived to a top ten finish. In all, 10 levels of play saw just 15 players with their names already in the seat draw for Day 2 after completing Day 1, with Michael Addamo (4,965,000) and Ali Imsirovic (4,875,000) clear at the top. Elsewhere in the top ten, Ben Heath bagged up 3,545,000 as he spent much of the day in pursuit of whichever leader was wearing the metaphorical yellow jersey at the time. Daniel Negreanu (2,305,000) had a strong day at the felt, with Stephen Chidwick doing the same, bagging up slightly more with 2,540,000 chips. Players to bust included the luckless Koon, who sunk $500,000 but ended the day with nothing, while John Lilic busted first and didn’t re-enter. Dan Smith was one of the leaders at one point but lost his stack to Ali Imsirovic late in the day. WSOP 2021 Event #82 $250,000 Super High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 4,965,000 Ali Imsirovic - 4,875,000 Benjamin Heath - 3,545,000 Adrian Mateos - 3,420,000 Timofey Kuznetsov - 2,890,000 Christoph Vogelsang - 2,860,000 Stephen Chidwick - 2,540,000 Daniel Negreanu - 2,305,000 Justin Bonomo - 2,285,000 Sam Soverel - 2,190,000 Weisman, Coleman, Rheem Crack $3K Top 10 In Event #80, Robert Cowan grabbed the lead as the British player bagged up 140 big blinds with which to attack the final day of the $3,000 Pot-Limit Omaha showdown. With players such as Dylan Weisman (1,475,000), David Coleman (1,250,000), and Chino Rheem (1,000,000) all in the top seven, it is sure to be a very exciting final day, where the winner will receive $280,916. With 122 players starting the penultimate day, only 75 made the money. Those landing on the wrong side of that divide included Ari Engel, Jake Schwartz, Esther Taylor, Ali Imsirovic, Brett Richey, Noah Bronstein, and Mark Birdsall, with both final two players on that list bubbling when they exited the event in the same hand. All of the following made money, as Daniel Negreanu, Phil Laak, Christian Harder, Ben Yu, and Gabriel Andrade all claimed profit but missed a very deep run in the event, which has seen 496 players put up the $3,000 buy-in, creating a prize pool worth over $1.3 million. WSOP 2021 Event #80 $3,000 PLO Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Cowen - 2,800,000 Steven Forman - 1,685,000 Dylan Weisman - 1,475,000 Karel Mokry - 1,475,000 David Coleman - 1,250,000 Raphael Schreiner - 1,210,000 Chino Rheem - 1,000,000 Robert Emmerson - 915,000 Jered Bettencourt - 840,000 Senovio Ramirez III - 730,000 One Last Deepstack To Go In the $800-entry Deepstack event, Will Givens bagged the lead as he totaled a whopping 140 big blinds by the close of play. His stack of 2,440,000 chips looked down from a great height on Marc Lange (1,865,000) and William Blais (1,500,000) in his slipstream, while Jason Wheeler (1.27m) also made the top 10. Just 289 players made the money and 121 survived the 1,921 entries, meaning players such as Pat Lyone, Brett Apter, 2021 bracelet winner DJ Alexander, Joseph Cheong, Shaun Deeb and last year’s world champion Damian Salas all bowed out. WSOP 2021 Event #81 $800 Deepstack Top 10 Chipcounts: Will Givens - 2,440,000 Marc Lange - 1,865,000 William Blais - 1,500,000 Jonathan Press - 1,470,000 Christine Park - 1,460,000 Nikolay Yosifov - 1,380,000 Eduardo Amaral - 1,310,000 Serhii Holodiuk - 1,305,000 Jason Wheeler - 1,270,000 John O'Neal - 1,210,000 Landon Tice had some words for anyone complaining about how long the WSOP Main Event final table players took over their decisions on Tuesday and Wednesday night. https://twitter.com/LandonTice/status/1461380100075655168 Have you ever wondered what it’s like to wake up as the world champion? Koray Aldemir can tell you. https://twitter.com/kooraay90/status/1461437559825833984
  3. Tommy Le claimed his second $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship title on Day 27 of the 2021 WSOP as he saw off Jordan Spurlin heads-up to win the top prize of $746,477. Plus, two other titles were won on a day with seven bracelet events in progress at the Rio in Las Vegas. Tommy Le Scores Another PLO Win Tommy Le’s victory in the PLO Championship finale should come as no surprise, with Le also winning the event back in 2017. This time around, the champion defeated plenty of big names at the final table, including four-time WSOP winner Eli Elezra before the day had begun. Just five started in seats as Le took a large lead into the action. The first player to depart was WSOP bracelet winner Jeremy Ausmus, who busted in fifth place for $168,689 when his two pair couldn’t find running cars to top Chris Sandrock’s top set. That pot put Sandrock second in chips and suddenly in contention for the gold, but while Sandrock would take the lead, two hours of play without an exit saw the stacks see-saw wildly and it was during that period that Le took control. Ausmus voiced concerns about the playing cards used at the WSOP earlier the same day. https://twitter.com/jeremyausmus/status/1453076037185638411 Le’s high variance mastery has led to him winning this particular bracelet before and as Artem Maksimov busted in fourth place for $232,236, it wasn’t hard to see why. Piling up 15.3 million, Le’s challengers three-handed had a lot fewer chips, with Sandrock on 4.1 million and Spurlin totaling 1.3 million. If Sandrokc knew that attack was the best form of defense then he was prepared to display it too, taking the lead right back after surging through the next hour of play. PLO is known for wild swings, however, and within a few pots, the gregarious player was on the rail. Sandrock busted in third for $324,800 when his pocket kings in the hole lost to Jordan Spurlin’s aces after the board played out. Heads-up, Spurlin actually had a marginal lead with 10.8 million playing Le’s 9.8 million chips. Le, however, is imperious in the format and he took control before a Spurlin double-up hinted at a miraculous comeback. It was not to be, snuffed out by Le’s aggression and ability to play the variance like a rodeo cowboy mastering control of something so many others find hard to tame. The final hand saw Le river a full house after Spurlin had been all-in on the flop with bottom pair and Le’s top two had ridden the river home to improve even more. Le’s victory wasn’t just worth the top prize of $746,477, but the tile of double WSOP champion in an event so many top pros desire above most others. Spurlin’s consolation prize of $461,360 was not insignificant, but like every player at the final table of the PLO Championship in two of the last four occasions, he had to watch as Le took the gold and the glory. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 PLO Championship Final Table Results: Tommy Le - $746,477 Jordan Spurlin - $461,360 Chris Sandrock - $324,800 Artem Maksimov - $232,236 Jeremy Ausmus - $168,689 Eli Elezra - $124,508 Arthur Morris - $93,406 Ashly Butler - $71,242 Denove Wins Double Stack, Jeff Platt Finished 4th The $1,000-entry Double Stack Event #43 saw Anthony Denove outlast the mammoth field of 3,990 opponents as he closed out a memorable victory on the final day of the four-day event. The drama began with 17 players still in seats, but two big names never made it to the final table, with Jonathan Dokler (15th for $23,877) and Sejin Park (13th for $29,602) both eliminated before the business end of the event. Once the final table of ten players was reached, the bust-outs came quickly, with the first two departees going in the same hand. It was Denove who benefitted from the three-way all-in and emerged with 49 million chips, at the time a huge lead, as Matthew Raffoul was busted in tenth place for $36,949 and former chip leader at the start of the day Michael Wang went in ninth for $46,430. Denove held [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"], with Raffoul’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"] and Wang’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9h"] both committed pre-flop after much thought. The board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3h"] meant that Denove made top set on the flop and put paid to both player’s hopes of a miracle on the river. https://twitter.com/miw210/status/1453167299972661248 Out in eighth place for $58,735 was Joshua Harrison, who big blind all-in call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] came after Frank Lagodich had shoved from the button with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qh"]. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Td"] kept Harrison ahead, but the [poker card="Jh"] turn gave Lagodich Broadway and on the [poker card="5c"] river, the field was reduced to seven players. Out in seventh was Kennth Inouye, who won $74,796 when his shove with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"] ran into David Guay’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] with Guay making a full house on the turn. Inouye was followed from the felt by Steven Stolzenfeld as he busted in sixth for $95,878. Stolzenfeld’s all-in for 8.3 million chips equated to ten big blinds with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] and he was in good shape when Timothy Little called with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5d"]. That wasn’t the case after the board of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Td"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8d"] as Little flushed his opponent away along with his hopes of WSOP gold. Lagodich left in fifth place for $123,710 as he shoved on the river with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] on a board showing [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="5h"] as his two pair was trumped by Guay’s turned set of tens with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Tc"]. Guay was to deliver another player from the table too as he next took out a man many on the rail were hoping would clinch gold. Jeff Platt, famous commentator of PokerGO streams and No Gamble, No Future co-host, busted in fourth place for $160,662. Moving all-in for eight big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"] from under the gun, Platt saw Guay call with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jd"] and a disastrous flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"] set him behind. After the [poker card="Tc"] turn, only one of the three available aces would save Platt, but the [poker card="9s"] fell on the river to send him home in fourth and increase Guay’s lead over his two remaining opponents after back-to-back bust-outs. Some on the rail felt it was unfair to ask Platt to get in front of the camera to set up the final he was taking part in himself! https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1453129783890497539 Little couldn’t improve his stack in the next few hands and busted to Guay too. Little’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3c"] shove was dominated by Guay’s call with [poker card="As"][poker card="8h"] and after the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="9h"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="8s"] board rivered Guay the pot, play was heads-up, with Denove at only a slight disadvantage, holding 76.5 million to Guay’s 83.2 million chips. It took only a short time after a break to decide the winner, with Denore stealing the lead then four-betting all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"], gaining a call from Guay with [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"]. The flop of [poker card="Js"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5h"] kept Denove in the lead and after the [poker card="8s"] turn and [poker card="Kd"] river, he was the champion and winner of his first WSOP bracelet and the $446,983 top prize, with Guay claiming $276,269 for second. WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Final Table Results: Anthony Denove - $446,983 David Guay - $276,269 Timothy Little - $210,004 Jeff Platt - $160,662 Frank Lagodich - $123,710 Steven Stolzenfeld - $95,878 Kenneth Inouye - $74,796 Joshua Harrison - $58,735 Michael Wang - $46,430 Matthew Raffoul - $36,949 Reard Freezes The Competition In Event #47, French player Alexandre Reard won the top prize of $428,694 after surviving a short but intense final day where five players were whittled down to one brand-new bracelet winner. Reard was the first player to bust another as he used his stack throughout the denouement of the event to keep his opponents at arm’s length. It was Qing Liu who busted first of the five, cashing for $97,238 after running [poker card="9s"][poker card="7s"] into Reard’s [poker card="As"][poker card="4s"], with two fours on the flop helping the eventual winner to add another scalp to his tournament haul. Just a few minutes later, play was three-handed as Conrad Simpson busted in fourth for $133,733 when [poker card="Kd"][poker card="2c"] couldn’t overtake Daniel Strelitz’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Three-handed, Strelitz and Reard seemed on collision course and that was borne out by the elimination of Ren Lin in third place for $186,803. Lin moved all-in for ten big blinds with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"] and Strelitz had to call with [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"], the king-high board with no deuce giving Strelitz 10 million, just a little short of the 11 million in front of Reard as both rails cheered on their men. Heads-up, Reard got off to a strong start and after winning the opening exchanges and growing a big lead, had his opponent exactly where he wanted him. Strelitz was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"] and Reard called with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8d"], the board of [poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="Kd"] confirming his victory for what his maiden WSOP bracelet. Strelitz, who was hoping to add another piece of poker history to his wrist, had to settle for the $264,953 runner-up prize. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Final Table Results: Alexandre Reard - $428,694 Daniel Strelitz - $264,953 Ren Lin - $186,803 Conrad Simpson - $133,733 Qing Liu - $97,238 Darren Grant - $71,827 Diogo Veiga - $59,913 Jamie Sequeira - $41,132 Ari Engel Makes Shootout Final Table In Event #48, the $1,500 Shootout saw just 10 players progress as eight 10-anded tables produced a winner. While recognized superstars such as Sam Grafton, Joe Cheong and Brian Yoon all failed to progress, others confirmed their greatness with their second single-table victory in two days. Easily the highest-profile of the 10 to make the final (each on roughly the exact same chips) is Ari Engel, who has already won a WSOP bracelet this Autumn at the Rio and could be extremely hard to catch in the Player of the Year race should he win another. He’ll have some top competition tomorrow battling to stop him from achieving that, though with Orson Young, David Tran, Thomas Boivin and Jonathan Betancur amongst those who conquered their second set of nine opponents to reach the final table. Negreanu, Glaser To Battle At $10K 2-7 Final Table In Event #49, British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser collected the most chips as he goes into the final day of the $10,000-entry No Limit Hold’em 207 Lowball Draw Championship final with 2,101,000 chips. Johannes Becker (1,381,000) and Farzad Bonyadi (1,106,000) were Glaser’s closest challengers on the day, but the Brit has a huge lead and will be a big favorite to clinch what would be his fourth bracelet if he can get over the line tomorrow. Elsewhere, of the eight players remaining, the biggest name is without question Daniel Negreanu. Kid Poker bagged up 517,000 as he made it to the final table where his latest attempt at breaking his WSOP drought continues. Jake Schwartz wasn’t far behind Negreanu, taking 468,000 through to the final day, with Julien Martini the short stack on just 270,000. WSOP 2021 Event #49 $10,000 NLHE 2-7 Lowball Draw Final Table Chipcounts: Benny Glaser - 2,101,000 Johannes Becker - 1,381,000 Farzad Bonyadi - 1,106,000 Dustin Dirksen - 953,000 Ben Diebold - 522,000 Daniel Negreanu - 517,000 Jake Schwartz - 468,000 Julien Martini - 270,000 66 Left In Event #50 Event #50, the $600 Six-Handed PLO/No Limit tournament had a big turnout, with 1,569 entries whittled down to just 66 players by the close of play. It was the two-time WSOP bracelet winner Eric Froehlich who finished the day with the biggest stack, holding 2,550,000 chips at the day’s end. Froehlich was followed in the counts by Kristopher Burchfield (2,530,000) and Alejandro Jaureguireynoso (1,975,000), with players such as Justin Lapka (1,455,000) and Mark Seif (1,230,000) two more bracelet winners who made the top 10 chip counts. WSOP 2021 Event #50 $600 Mixed NLHE/PLO Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Eric Froehlich - 2,550,000 Kristopher Burchfield - 2,530,000 Alejandro Jaureguireynoso - 1,975,000 Mario Arribas - 1,730,000 Michael Thomas - 1,620,000 Justin Lapka - 1,455,000 Hanan Braun - 1,255,000 Mark Seif - 1,230,000 Steve Westheimer - 1,190,000 Colten Yamagishi - 1,165,000 Brian Rast, Manig Loeser In $3K Six-Max Top 10 The final poker event to close down for the day was the $3,000-entry Six-Max Event #51, which enjoyed 997 entries with just 41 making Day 2 with 30-minute blinds throughout. Chip leader at the end of the opening day was Jun Obara from Japan, with Rostyslav Sabishchenko of Ukraine (2,020,000) and American Tuan Phan (2,000,000) rounding out a truly global set of podium positions. With players such as Brian Rast (1,665,000) Uri Reichenstein (1,660,000) and Jon Vallinas (1,655,000) all well positioned in the top 10, there’s every chance of high drama and quality on the final day. WSOP 2021 Event #51 $3,000 NLHE Six-Max Top 10 Chipcounts: Jun Obara - 3,010,000 Rostyslav Sabishchenko - 2,020,000 Tuan Phan - 2,000,000 John Gallaher - 1,700,000 Brian Rast - 1,665,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,660,000 Jon Vallinas - 1,655,000 Matthew Schwagler - 1,475,000 Lachezar Petkov - 1,415,000 Manig Loeser - 1,375,000 If you see two grown men fighting on the back lot of the Rio close to the midday sun, be warned - it's a jungle out there. https://twitter.com/RemkoRinkema/status/1453217722301513730 Finally, no, it's not just you, Randy Ohel. Makes you wonder who could ever... finish him! https://twitter.com/randyohel/status/1452818949297504257  
  4. The World Series of Poker’s $50,000 Poker Players Championship is heralded by many top-flight players in the poker world as the real championship event of the series. In order to lay claim to the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy, a player not only needs to have an expert-level mastery of the entire mix of games, but also needs to face down the "best of the best" in terms of competition. In short, it takes a well-rounded, complete player in order to win. The truth is, making picks for the $50K is a tough task - especially this year. Everything needs to be considered from a player’s history in the event to the momentum they have when it gets started. Plus, it's hard to know if some of the top talents that normally would never miss the PPC will even show up (ex. Phil Ivey). So, taking all of that into consideration, we’re shooting our shot and dropping the latest edition of First-Round Picks with the names and ranks of the players we think are most likely to not only run deep in 2021 but hoist the trophy when the last chip has been collected. These players are first-rounders for the $50,000 Poker Players Championship. #1. Shaun Deeb Unlike the Super High Roller Bowl, where Michael Addamo was sun running headed into the event, there’s no clear top pick when it comes to the Poker Players Championship. The field attracts an absolutely elite field of players who are proficient in all the games. Honestly, an argument can be made for a multitude of grinders to be ranked #1. Here’s why it’s Shaun Deeb. In the past five years of the $50K Poker Players Championship, only one player has made the money three times - Shaun Deeb. In 2017 he finished in seventh place for $164,286, in 2018 a 10th place finish brought him $111,447, and then in 2019, he made the final table falling in fifth for $232,058. History shows Deeb loves to compete in the PPC and the PPC has loved him back. An undeniable master of mixed games, Deeb has proven time and time again that he knows how to close. He’s a four-time WSOP bracelet winner with more than $5 million in earnings at the series alone and each of his bracelets has come in different disciplines. Impressive, but that's not all he brings to the table. To back that up take a look at what he’s done online. He holds five PokerStars SCOOP titles, all in mixed games and, even more impressively eight World Championship of Online Poker titles, only two of which are in NLHE. In summary, Deeb is dangerous in any tournament against any opponent. The 2018 WSOP Player of the Year is off to a fast start in terms of cashes in 2021, with nine at the time of this writing (tied for third overall), including a final table in the $1,500 Seven Card Stud. If there’s one thing going against him it's that while he’s racking up scores, he’s not really breaking through into the deepest parts of the tournaments yet. It’s unlikely he’s even close to satisfied right now. His goal of earning the 2021 Player of the Year title is going to require some stronger second-half results and the PPC could do just the trick to get him back in the thick of things. #2. Michael Mizrachi It feels silly to not have Mizrachi, the only player to win this event three times, as the top pick…after all, like we just said, he’s won it THREE TIMES. But one has to wonder just how lucky can one guy be. He first took the PPC down in 2010, earning a massive $1,559,046 payday. He did it again just two years later for another $1.4 million. Finally, in 2018, Mizrachi completed the hat trick and earned his third spot on the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy for more than $1.2 million. In addition, he also scored fourth place in the event in 2016 for another $380,942. He has a knack for owning this event and just last week he made an appearance at the 2021 series, finishing in 11th place in the Eight Game Mix. One should expect Mizrachi to find his way into this $50K and shouldn’t be surprised if he makes a deep run. But Mizrachi is also a high-risk, high-reward play because in addition to being one of the toughest players he’s also a blowtorch, and had been known to burn bright but flame out early. All eyes will be on the 3x champ to see what happens this year. #3. Brian Rast No matter how long Brian Rast is away from the poker tables, when he returns to them he’s as dangerous an opponent as you will find. A two-time winner of the PPC, Rast took it down in 2011 for $1,720,328 and then again in 2016 for $1,296,097. Rast also went deep in 2018 where he finished in 8th place for over $144,000. Additionally, he’s already found himself deep in a pair of Championship Events already. First, he finished in 15th place in the $10K Omaha 8 Championship for $18,750, and then just three days later, Rast nearly made the final table in the $10K Limit Hold’em Championship where he fell in 11th place for another $18,506. Add to that a cash in the NL 2-7 Lowball event and it feels like Rast is simply getting warm before making a big splash in the PPC. For Rast, the real question is - will he be in the field? The fact that he’s been playing in the series already is a good indication that he will, but with career earnings of more than $21 million (and we gotta assume a ton of BTC for as often as he tweets about it), perhaps he just wakes up and says “not today.” #4. Benny Glaser The UK’s young mixed game phenom Benny Glaser has all the makings of a PPC champion. The three-time WSOP bracelet winner almost exclusively plays non-NLHE variants with his WSOP wins coming in Omaha 8 and Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw. In addition, Glaser has come very close in a number of other WSOP mixed game events including a runner-up finish this year in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. bringing him a $341,274 payday. His WSOP resume reads of a player who excels at any game that involves any number of cards. The warning signs in picking a crusher like Glaser are that his last bracelet win was back in 2016, however his 2018 fifth-place finish in the PPC shows he’s more than capable of getting to the end. #5. Phil Hellmuth After capturing his record-extending 16th WSOP gold bracelet in Deuce to Seven Hellmuth declared that the $50K PPC title is what he wanted next. The truth is, in previous years Hellmuth wouldn’t be in the top 10 first-round picks, much less the top 5. But this is 2021 and The Poker Brat is on a mixed game sun run that no one could have predicted. You’ve already heard the stats: five final tables, all in mixed games, with a bracelet in hand. He’s off to the best start to a WSOP in his lengthy career and is currently sitting atop the Player of the Year race at the halfway point in the series. Sure, he has his doubters and they would be quick to point out that Hellmuth’s only cash in this event came back in 2011 (when he finished in 2nd place for more than $1 million) and that this field will be the elite of the elite. But isn’t that who he’s been playing in the series so far? So, it may be risky picking Hellmuth this high, but in 2021 it’s an even riskier proposition not to. #6. Dan Zack Dan Zack may be the savvy pick at number six. He’s another one of the crop of young crushers who consistently proves he has a mastery of all the games. He also hasn’t kept it a secret how much he’d love to win Player of the Year, for which he currently is sitting in 12th place. He's just one big score away from being in the thick of it. At the time of this writing, Zack leads all cashes in 2021 with 11 total, including a final table in the $1,500 Eight Game Mix and a (soft) final table bubble in the $10K Stud where he finished in 10th place. He won his first gold bracelet in 2019 in the $2,500 Limit Mixed Triple Draw, but doesn’t have a history in the PPC. Expect that to change. #7. Daniel Negreanu There’s nothing Daniel Negreanu would love more than to win a bracelet and the trophy in this particular event. He’s stated it so many times that, along with the Player of the Year title, this is the tournament he consistently looks forward to the most. There’s no need to expand on the six-time WSOP bracelet winner’s resume except to note that in the past five years, Negreanu has made the money twice (including a final table in 2017) for a total of just under $400,000. The real reason “Kid Poker” is so high on this list is, in addition to his skill of course, is his momentum. He has plenty of it headed into this event. Negreanu has cashed ten times in the series (thus far) including a final table in the $3K H.O.R.S.E. and a final table bubble in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. The question will be if with everything he has going on being one of the game’s biggest ambassadors, can he let everything else fall to the wayside and zero in on what he really wants. If he’s feeling it, and he wants it - he’s a legit threat to win it all. #8. Anthony Zinno What a year it’s been already for Anthony Zinno who is currently the only two-time bracelet winner of the series. In back-to-back fashion, Zinno famously earned gold in the $10K Stud for $182,872 after being the subject of a classic Hellmuth rant. Then he came right back and took down $1,500 H.O.R.S.E. for another $160,636. In non-mixed game news, Zinno reminded people that’s he’s also a No Limit Hold’em crusher with a 12th place finish in the $50,000 High Roller for another $80,000, making it six cashes for the series. And if you hadn’t heard, Zinno created a club of which he’s the only member. With four WSOP bracelets and three World Poker Tour titles, he proved he’s one of the best in the game today and he heads into the PPC with a massive wave of momentum. Looking for action in the $50K PPC? Check out PocketFives Stakingwhere we will be selling pieces for Daniel Negreanu, Josh Arieh, Felipe Ramos, Matt Glantz, Daniel Weinman, and more. Sign up today and get in the action (many at no markup!) Sleeper Picks Julien Martini France’s mixed game master may be well-known for his runner-up finish at the PokerStars PSPC, but he’s also one of the more coveted players for WSOP $25K fantasy due to his ability to grind the entire schedule. While he’s off to a slow start at this year’s WSOP (3 cashes so far), don’t be surprised to see him turn it around in the PPC. David ‘ODB’ Baker Baker just got off a deep run in the $1,500 Razz where he finished in fifth place for $20,732. A two-time bracelet winner, one for a $2,500 8-Game Mix, Baker’s big question mark is if he’ll come out to play or prefer to sweat college or pro football with the tournament starting on the weekend. Ben Yu Three-time bracelet winner Ben Yu has been racking up cashes this year, with a total of 9 as of this writing. He finished in 7th place in the $25K H.O.R.S.E. for more than $75,000 and busted in 20th in the $5K Six-Max for another $21,838. He’s been making the money consistently, now it’s just time for him to break through and capture bracelet number four. The $50K Poker Players Championship gets underway on Sunday, October 31 and the final table will be played out live PokerGO on Friday, November 5.
  5. Largely unknown Mixed Games player Jesse Klein won his first WSOP bracelet after taking down a final table stacked with stars at the 2021 World Series of Poker. The recruitment firm owner went from recreational hopeful to WSOP winner on a final day full of drama as one $25,000 event ended and another began. Hellmuth Rants, Glaser Denied As Klein Pulls Out The WIn All the focus at the start of the third day of WSOP action was on the final table of Event #2, the $25,000 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event which saw another mixed game specialist, British player Benny Glaser, go into the final table with the lead. It took little time for Matt Glantz to become the first casualty of the day as Phil Hellmuth took out his fellow American in Razz with a ten-five, with Glantz paired up and drawing dead on 6th street. Glantz cashed for $52,211. Next to go was DJ Buckley, who lasted just a few minutes more to bust in eighth place for $61,549. Buckley’s elimination to Ben Yu precipitated an extended period of play without a bust-out, but it was not short of drama as Hellmuth exploded at the end of losing a hand to eventual champion Klein. Folding on the river, Hellmuth declared his opponent’s start as "insane" and it was to serve as the opening bout in a war of words between the pair. It was some time before Yu busted in seventh place for $75,260, but that was only the warm-up act to another blow-up from Hellmuth as Klein scooped a second big pot against the 15-time WSOP bracelet winner. The Poker Brat was back as Hellmuth left the table, pacing the floor and cursing at his lack of fortune. Just a few hands later, Hellmuth was gone, out in sixth place for $95,329 after bricking every street in Seven Card Stud against Chad Eveslage. After the event, Hellmuth was keen to point out the benefits of his staying power in bringing his A-Game to the Rio. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1444470919204769803 Hellmuth’s bust-out started a flurry of them. Philip Sternheimer was crushed in the same format by Glaser to leave in fifth place for $124,935. The same winner of that hand took out the aforementioned Eveslage in fourth for $169,218 when Glaser’s pair of sevens with a low ace was enough to win both Hi and Lo to send his American rival to the rail. Glaser led at that stage, but over the course of two hours without an elimination, each man had their periods of domination as the chips moved between each man. French player David Benyamine’s neck was on the block when he lost on 7th street to Klein, who won the pivotal pot to go into heads-up with a massive lead of 10.1 million to Glaser’s 1.5m. Klein won his maiden bracelet not long after the final duel began, with his victory in a Seven Card Stud hand ending an entertaining event. While Glaser, who had already won three WSOP bracelets in his career called off his stack with a smile and will enjoy the second-place prize of $341,274. For Jesse Klein, however, it was the fulfillment of a dream as the recruitment firm owner capped an enjoyable two-day sojourn to Sin City with a WSOP bracelet and $552,182 score. Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Results: Jesse Klein - $552,182 Benny Glaser - $341,274 David Benyamine - $236,626 Chad Eveslage - $169,218 Philip Sternheimer - $124,935 Phil Hellmuth - $95,329 Ben Yu - $75,260 DJ Buckley - $61,549 Matt Glantz - $52,211 Jake Daniels Leads $25K NLHE, Michael Addamo Outsted Many of the H.O.R.S.E. field took to the 6th event on the schedule, the $25,000-entry NLHE High Roller that kicked off on Day 3 of the WSOP. With 135 entries in total, it was Jake Daniels who ended Day 1 top of the pile, bagging up 1,182,000 chips by close of play as one of only two players to "crack a milly." While Daniels was steady throughout, he did not dominate the leaderboard until the final two levels, eliminating Eric Worre and Daniel Negreanu to vault himself to the top of the chip counts, with Michael Liang (1,028,000) and James Chen (835,000) his nearest challengers. Elsewhere in the top 10 players, Jake Schindler (667,000) and Chance Kornuth (570,000) will be major threats when the action resumes on Day 2. Several superstars made the upper echelons of the leaderboard, but plenty of big names hit the rail too. Australia’s most successful tournament player of all-time, Michael Addamo busted both bullets so will not be eligible for re-entry on Day 2. Others to lose their stacks on Day 1 included Stephen Chidwick, Brian Altman, Kenny Hallaert, Koray Aldemir, Sam Grafton, Joseph Cheong, Ryan Riess, Jeremy Ausmus, Upeshka De Silva, and Niall Farrell whose epic journey to the World Series was common among those from outside the United States. At the close of play on Day 1, just 54 players made the counts, but with entry and re-entry possible on Day 2 right up until the start of play, that number is sure to swell with some of the best players in the world going for gold. Galen Hall was among those to express his relief at playing some live poker for the first time in a very long time. https://twitter.com/galenhall/status/1444423233160187904   Some of the biggest players in the world have already been drawn together for Day 2, with battles between Jake Schindler, Adrian Mateos and Mikita Badziakouski at one table just a single example of the level of quality in the event. Whoever grabs a final table place at the end of Day 2 will have earned it. Event #6 $25,000 No Limit Hold’em High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Jake Daniels - 1,182,000 Michael Liang - 1,028,000 James Chen - 835,000 Scott Eskenazi - 747,000 Jake Schindler - 667,000 Clayton Kalisek - 610,000 Alexandros Theologis - 594,000 Chance Kornuth - 570,000 Ankush Mandavia - 553,000 Brian Rast - 551,000 Brobyn Bags 5 Million During Reunion Day 2 The Reunion, otherwise known as Event #4 on this year’s 2021 WSOP schedule, saw a huge number of entries on Day 1b, as 4,455 players took to the felt and made it into the money. Several high-profile players busted out before 204 players bagged up for the night, with Maurice Hawkins, Shaun Deeb, and Brad Owen just three of the Day 1 casualties. Others thrived at the felt, however, and by close of play, it was Robert Brobyn who bagged the biggest stack of chips, an incredible 5,015,000 of them. That total was way clear of Brobyn’s nearest challenger on the day Tyler Jamieson (3,040,000) and Brobyn’s lead represents the overall tournament lead after two days. Others to pile up plenty of chips on Day 1b included two former WSOP bracelet winners in the form of Ronnie Bardah, who proved a ‘Survivor’ with 2,005,000, and Jeremy Wien (1,640,000). WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Brobyn - 5,015,000 Tyler Jamison - 3,040,000 Jared Ambler - 2,450,000 Ya Yun Liu - 2,445,000 Ryan Messick - 2,410,000 Elvis Toomas - 2,375,000 Darryl Ronconi - 2,030,000 Ronnie Bardah - 2,005,000 Randy Rhee - 1,990,000 Mark Lilomaiava - 1,765,000 Connor Drinan, Rob Mizrachi Top Omaha 8 Final 15 Event #5, the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, saw 230 players whittled down to just 15 by the close of Day 2. Of those 15 players, only Connor Drinan and Robert Mizrachi have won WSOP bracelets before, but with both men at the top of the chipcounts, it could be a ding-dong battle on the final day to see whether Drinan wins his second, Mizrachi wins his fifth or a new player gets their hands on the gold. Day 2 of the event saw players such as Brian Hastings and Shaun Deeb hit the rail on the day the bubble burst with players such as Max Pescatori (80th for $2,400), David ‘Bakes’ Baker (75th for $2,400), Randy Ohel (48th for $3,200), Ari Engel (41st for $3,634) and former two-time WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Hughes (18th for $5,580) all make the money. It’s the potential shoot-out between Drinan and Mizrachi that has us salivating, however, as the final day of the event on Monday will crown a winner. WSOP 2021 Event #5 $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Connor Drinan - 2,415,000 Robert Mizrachi - 1,410,000 Sandy Sanchez - 1,380,000 Pearce Arnold - 1,160,000 Carl Lijewski - 1,095,000 Curtis Phelps - 1,080,000 Kris Kwiatkowski - 1,045,000 Yehuda Buchalter - 1,020,000 Michael Moed - 965,000 Scott Baumstein - 900,000
  6. The 2021 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas is here and that means there’s simply no time to waste. So, without further ado, let’s get star--- DON’T GO OUT THE NIGHT BEFORE YOUR FIRST TOURNAMENT AND PLAY BEER PONG AT O’SHEA’S WHILE DRINKING SIX IRISH CAR BOMBS THEN THINK IT’S A GOOD IDEA TO STAY UP UNTIL 7 AM AND LOSE 10 BUY-INS ON A $1/$2 TABLE AT THE FLAMINGO. Go out, by all means. Just don’t do that. Have you ever been so hungover that you completely forget what it’s like to not be hungover? Over-partying is easily done in Las Vegas, but a throbbing head and overwhelming nausea is the last thing you want when you’re heading to the Rio to play your first ever WSOP event. Save that for your final night in town. DO GET EXCITED. You’re at the WSOP! You made it! Don’t let some moaning, jaded veteran at your table dampen your spirits. If you feel anxious beforehand, that’s completely normal. Playing for a bracelet is a big deal and you don’t know what will happen. But while anxiety suggests you should fear the uncertainty, excitement views the uncertainly as something to look forward to. So, get excited and enjoy the action. DON’T OVERLOAD ON CAFFEINE. Any anxiety you do feel pre-tournament will only be made worse if you chug four coffees before making your way to the Rio. Instead, find different ways to wake yourself up and save the healing power of coffee for later in the day, like bracelet winner and former #1-ranked online pro Ari Engel does. “I try and go to the gym most mornings and limit caffeine in the morning so it’s more effective in the evening when I’m playing tournaments,” says Engel. DO REGISTER THE NIGHT BEFORE. On the night before your first event, why not stop by the Rio before heading out for dinner? That way, not only will you know what to expect, you can also take care of something that first-timers often overlook: “Make sure you register the day before the tournament, especially if it's a big weekend event,” says WSOP czar Kevin “Kevmath” Mathers. “No one wants to be stuck in a long line when the tournament starts.” Registration is available 24/7. DON’T STRESS YOURSELF OUT. Keep your mornings stress-free by limiting your obligations to others and planning your food/travel the night before. That way you can just relax pre-poker. “I like to give myself time before I go play so that my brain is actually awake and functioning,” says three-time WSOP bracelet winner Benny “RunGodlike” Glaser. “I'll meditate a bit if I have time, so my mind isn’t cluttered with unnecessary things. I also try not to eat huge meals that will slow me down mentally or give me an insulin crash after.” To help matters further when playing, Mathers suggests downloading the Bravo Poker Live app on your phone. “It shows you when tournament breaks are coming, the status of the dinner break, and how close you are to reaching the money.” At the Rio the food options can be limited and expensive, so Kevmath also suggests packing snacks and drinks in your bag, along with other items you consider essential. DO WEAR LAYERS. “The Rio is notorious for keeping the tournament rooms cooler than you're used to,” says Kevmath. “Be sure to bring a hoodie or wear layers that you can add or remove as needed.” And if you have to wear something warm, why not have some fun with it? “When people see me in a stupid bear suit, it's not just because the Rio is an ice cube,” says two-time bracelet winner Brandon Shack-Harris. “I'm from Chicago, so what do I care? I do it because there's a point in the Series where I've bricked infinite tournaments and I'm too mentally fried to read enough Stoic Philosophies to get through tomorrow's $1,500 Limit Hold ‘Em Event.” DON’T RUSH. Break times in big WSOP tournaments can get hectic. Don’t feel obliged to rush. Remember, there are two outcomes when you’re sprinting back to the table trying not to miss a hand: 1. You’re going to be flustered and your heart racing, so chances you probably won’t play the hand to the best of your ability anyway. 2. You’re probably going to be dealt seven-deuce-offsuit. “I try not to race back to the table,” says Shack-Harris. “If I miss a hand, that's fine. Unless running is going to make me happy for some reason, I'm walking, and I'll get there when I get there.” DO AVOID BAD BEAT STORIES. Talk strategy with friends on breaks, sure, but if you catch yourself beginning to tell a bad beat story--or being forced to listen to one--get out of there. “Forget about beats,” says Shack-Harris. “While it's important to acknowledge hands you could've played better, do it once and let them go.” Instead, on breaks, Shack-Harris likes to get outside and find some peace. “I find it helpful to shut my brain off, so I don’t bother looking at my phone,” he says. “Find a quiet spot and think about adjustments you’ll make in the next level. “There have been times where I've grabbed my skateboard mid-tournament and taken it outside for 10 minutes to calm my brain down and get some air. Sometimes you've got to leave the table and reset!” DON’T BEAT YOURSELF UP OVER BUSTING. OK, so you busted the tournament. That sucks. But you know what? You’re still in Las Vegas. “I care less about busting tournaments in Vegas than I do other places because there are so many things to do there,” says Glaser. “There are lots of good bars and clubs, shows, and restaurants to choose from. Or you can even get away from the strip and see some nature, maybe go on a hike somewhere like Red Rock. It can be really nice for resetting and calming the mind.” Just do what your body and mind want to do. “It's such an intense grind and it's so cognitively taxing that it's important to give yourself a rest sometimes,” says Glaser. DO BE KIND TO YOURSELF. Playing at the WSOP is special, whether you’re ticking it off the bucket list or back for the tenth time. But it can be a long grind, so whatever happens, be gentle with yourself. “Throughout the Series, there are ebbs and flows and I’ll make adjustments to stay sane,” says Shack-Harris. “It's important to be kind to yourself and allow yourself to eat shit food if it's going to be convenient or if it will bring your spirits up. Just be aware that you might have to bail in the middle of Level 9 to handle some...extra business.”
  7. Jeremy Ausmus won the second WSOP title of his career, first of the series, as he defeated the final four opponents in Event #3 to win the $1,000-entry COVID-19 Relief Charity Event. With just five players returning to action on Day 2 of the event and the 2021 World Series of Poker, Ausmus overcame a chip deficit heads-up to overnight leader Jesse Lonis to claim his maiden bracelet and the $48,681 top prize. Ausmus Overcomes Lonis, Takes First Title of Autumn It took no time at all for five players to become four as Lonis busted Steve Gross in fifth place for $10,854 when Gross’ eight-four was crushed by queen-five when the chip leader made a Broadway straight on the river. Soon after, Asher Coniff was all-in with ace-six and Lonis was the caller again, this time with pocket sixes. The small pocket pair held to send play to three-handed and Coniff to the rail for $14,919. Lonis was running over the field, and that didn’t stop with the elimination of Mitchell Halverson in third place for $20,960. Halverson was all-in with the best hand, holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jh"]. Lonis called with [poker card="3s"][poker card="3h"] and would need a lot of help on the board. The flop was a safe [poker card="9s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5s"] for Halverson, but the [poker card="3d"] turn spelt disaster and the [poker card="2s"] river didn’t save him. Heads-up saw Lonis go into the duel with a 3:1 chip lead, but Ausmus quickly doubled himself level when his pocket tens held against Lonis’ [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jd"]. The final hand saw Ausmus all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9c"] against Lonis’ [poker card="Kh"][poker card="9h"] and when the board ran out [poker card="Js"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5d"], Ausmus won the WSOP bracelet and $48,681. Event #3 $1,000 COVID-19 Relief Charity Event Final Table Results: Jeremy Ausmus - $48,681 Jesse Lonis - $30,086 Mitchell Halverson - $20,960 Asher Conniff - $14,919 Steve Gross - $10,854 Benny Glaser Leads $25K H.O.R.S.E. The biggest event of the day, in terms of buy-in, the $25,000 H.O.R.S.E., saw a total of 78 players as registration closed with the start of play on Day 2 of the three-day event. British mixed game specialist Benny Glaser dominated much of the day, busting players throughout vital stages of the tournament. While others, such as Stephen Chidwick, were shot down outside the 12 money places. Mike Matusow was another player who at one point looked very strong, only for two hands against Philip Sternheimer and Jesse Klein to leave ‘The Mouth’ on the rail. Cary Katz was the first player to sneak into the money, with his 12th place finish worth $42,162 after Yuval Bronshtein was the bubble boy in unlucky 13th place for no return on his investment. Daniel Negreanu (10th for $46,002) and Roland Israelashvili (11th for $46,002) were both busted on the final hand of the day, with Glaser the beneficiary as his two pair aces and tens beat both Israelashvili and Negreanu’s weaker two pair hands. When play ended, some very big names were still in the hunt with just nine players remaining. Chip leader at the end of Day 2 was Glaser but plenty of big names survived, such as Jesse Klein, David Benyamine, Phil Hellmuth, and Day 1 chip leader Chad Eveslage all making the cut. WSOP 2021 Event #2 $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Chipcounts: Benny Glaser - 2,590,000 Jesse Klein - 1,800,000 Chad Eveslage - 1,695,000 David Benyamine - 1,680,000 Phil Hellmuth - 1,640,000 Philop Sternheimer - 865,000 Ben Yu - 830,000 Matt Glantz - 410,000 DJ Buckley - 160,000 Barnett's A Bracelet Winner The first event on the schedule was Event #1, the $500 Casino Employees Event and that saw a dramatic conclusion crown Caesars Palace employee Jimmy Barnett as the winner. In an event where 419 players created a prize pool of $175,980, Barnett went into a heads-up battle against Jack Behrens with more than double his opponent’s chips and sealed the deal when his flopped flush held against Behrens’ middle pair when the chips went into the middle. Event #1 $500 Casino Employees Event Final Table Results: Jimmy Barnett - $39,013 Jack Behrens - $24,112 Danny Chang - $16,540 Leo Abbe - $11,587 Bryan Garret - $8,294 Bobby Schmidt - $6,069 Chris Minton - $4,542 Rick Cuevas - $3,478 Ronald Baltazar - $2,727 Justin Steinman - $2,191 The Reunion Gets Underway One of the biggest events of the series to look forward to for many recreational players was The Reunion, with a $500 buy-in and massive $5 million guarantee. Day 1a saw an incredible 2,649 players take to the felt in pursuit of glory, with many players simply happy to be at the felt after so long away from the action. For one player, the emotion of cashing in a WSOP event for the first time was too much to take in this heartwarming video captured by Kenna James and posted on Twitter. https://twitter.com/Kenna_James/status/1444163921712017414 It wasn’t only players comparatively new to success who were happy. Even with some long waits at registration desks, players who have seen it such as Mike Gorodinsky advocated patience and good humor as he praised the staff at the Rio who are making it so much easier for everyone. https://twitter.com/gordoMG/status/1444032253026127872 READ: 10 Do’s And Don’ts For World Series of Poker First-Timers At the end of Day 1a in The Reunion, it was Dave Alfa who totaled the biggest stack, with a massive 3,100,000 chips going into his bag. A slew of great players trail in his wake, however, with Konstantinos Gennaios (2,650,000), Ryan Leng (2,400,000), Joey Weissman (2,270,000) Ryan Laplante (1,700,000), and Cate Hall (1,500,000) all bagging up at the close of play. Others weren’t so lucky, with former WSOP Main Event legend Matt Affleck, James Romero, and Amir Levahot all cashed but failed to make Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #4 $500 The Reunion Top 10 Chipcounts: Dave Alfa - 3,100,000 Kostantinos Gennaios - 2,650,000 Ryan Leng - 2,400,000 Joey Weissman - 2,270,000 Greg Armand - 1,890,000 Ryan Laplante - 1,700,000 David Danlag - 1,510,000 Kenna James - 1,500,000 Cate Hall - 1,500,000 Walter Atwood - 1,400,000 Heimiller, Mizrachi In Omaha 8 Top 5 A strong field of 607 played Day 1 of Event #5, the $1,500-entry Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better, with players such as Robert Mizrachi (177,000), JJ Liu (160,500), and Ari Engel (89,500) all thriving on the opening day of the three-day event. At the close of play, Christopher Stephen had the chip lead with a massive 206,500 chips, trailed by players of the caliber of Max Pescatori (37,500), Dan Zack (123,500), and Ian O’Hara (57,000) all surviving the day. WSOP 2021 Event #5 $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Christopher Stephen - 206,500 Dan Heimiller - 177,000 Robert Mizrachi - 173,500 JJ Liu - 160,500 Anatoliy Zyrin - 143,000 Hernan Salazar - 141,000 Allyn Shulman - 134,500 Dan Zack - 123,500 Gary Kosakowski - 120,000 Frankie O'Dell - 112,500
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