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Found 4 results

  1. The original home of the World Series of Poker, Binion's Gambling Hall in Downtown Las Vegas is legendary in the eyes of many poker players. But as gamblers shifted their attention from Fremont Street to the Las Vegas Strip, the casino has seen a marked decline in visitors. Now, it's coming under fire for canceling several guarantees in its 2015 Binion's Poker Opendue to a disappointing number of entrants. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- "Due to very low attendance, we have elected to cancel the guarantee on our Binion's Poker Open Events," the poker room said on its Facebook page. The casino will, however, honor the guarantees for its $200 No Limit Hold'em $10,000 Guarantee along with the $50,000 Guaranteed PPC Poker Tour event. All other events will run as normal, they said, just without their original guarantees. The change was brought to light by Allen "Chainsaw" Kessler, who made his displeasure clear in a post on 2+2. "This is unprecedented in Las Vegas and may even be a gaming violation," he griped. The series is slated to run from September 18 to October 4 and features 17 events including No Limit Hold'em, HORSE, and Limit Omaha 8. The events and their guarantees were modest, with buy-ins ranging from $200 to $300. That mattered little in the eyes of many forum posters, who called it unacceptable that the casino cut guarantees at the last minute. "It's really sad to see this happen at Binion's," said one person. "When I first learned about poker, the olds talked about Binion's as this sort of 'gambler's casino' where they followed the gamblers code, where you could always get a fair bet or whatever. It's not the kind of place I would envision them stripping away guarantees." Others were more sympathetic to the casino, lauded as the creator of the WSOP in 1970. "Does it suck that they canceled the guarantees? Yes, of course it does," said a former Binion's dealer. "If the alternative is for an already struggling poker room to bleed thousands of dollars a day and then be faced with whatever consequences that brings from casino management, well, I'm not sure which is worse." A picture of the 1976 WSOP at Binion's is shown (image courtesy UNLV). In the poker room's defense, the fine print for the series does seemingly give it the right to make changes as it sees fit. "Binion's management reserves the right to cancel or amend the schedule at any time," it reads. And as one user highlighted, no one had yet bought into the guarantees that were later canceled. "There is a difference between canceling a guarantee after people have bought in and canceling it with notice," he said. "Does it look bad, yes, but for some people to act like they have somehow been screwed… doesn't make sense to me." Binion's struggles to fill poker tournaments is in stark contrast to the early days of poker's explosion in popularity, when the venue couldn't accommodate all those hoping to play in the WSOP. In 2005, the series was sold to Harrah's (now Caesars), which began hosting the prestigious tournament at the much larger Rio All-Suite Casino and Hotel. In response to the cancellation on the Binion's poker room Facebook page, some players pulled no punches. "You thought you had very low attendance before you canceled the guarantees," said one poster. "What do you think attendance will be now? Should be called Binion's hall of shame! Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  2. There’s nothing quite like the first time. For serious poker enthusiasts, there may be nothing more exciting than making your first trip to Las Vegas to participate in, or simply geek out to, the World Series of Poker. For those lucky people making their first trip to the series in 2018, we have some suggestions on how to fully embrace the WSOP experience. You won’t find any Cirque Du Soleil show recommendations or directions to the best sushi restaurants here, this is simply a guide to diving head first into a complete WSOP summer poker experience in Sin City. Hit The Hall The first time you head to the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino, tell your taxi or Uber driver to take you to the front entrance. Sure, they can drop you off at the “poker entrance” but you should experience the walk down the long hallway that leads to Rio convention area at least once. The closer you get to the action the more you’ll be inundated with banners of former WSOP Players of the Year and Main Event Champions. Doyle, Stu, Chris…Moneymaker. And, yes, Ferguson. They’re (almost) all there. Of the three major tournament areas, the Pavillion is the one you’ll see first. Go inside and take a deep breath in. Yes, some of the smells may be from players who have been up for days, unable or unwilling to shower, but everything in the Pavillion is pure poker. The cricket-like sound of shuffling chips, the floor at the big board announcing a new table of $10-20 Big O and single table satellites filling up and getting underway. The Pavillion houses cash games, satellites, the Daily Deepstack tournaments and occasionally overflow from WSOP bracelet events. For daily grinders, the Pavillion is where a ton of the action happens. Walk the hallway with the vendors, but be wary first-timers: try not to let someone attach a magnetic aura bracelet to your wrist or entice you with a whiff of orange colored oxygen. However, if you see Bart Hanson, Jonathan Little or even PocketFives' own Lance Bradley spending time in a booth, walk on over and see what's up. Interested in some “poker sunglasses”? They’ve got those too. It’s a mini poker market and just maybe you’ll find something you like. Finally, on your first pass check out both the Brazilia and the famed Amazon Room. In 2017 they had moved the televised "mothership" to the Brazilia so make sure you do a slow pass and get a behind the scenes look at what you watch on ESPN or PokerGO. Then hit the Amazon to see the room where so much WSOP history was made. Star Gazing When it comes to seeing stars, a trip to the WSOP is unlike a trip to Hollywood because poker celebrities are just about everywhere you look on any given day. The personalities you watch on TV like Negreanu, Greenstein, and Raymer are often times at the tables grinding it out to try to win another bracelet. There walkways in each of the tournament rooms where one can quite often spot a noted pro from the rail. Often times if you see one of your favorites in the hallway, they’d be happy to hear what a fan you are and pose for a shot for your Insta. Of course, use discretion. Quite often these guys are playing for many thousands of dollars, so use that keen poker instinct to pick an appropriate time to introduce yourself. Get Your Feet Wet, Splash Around If you came to the World Series to play, then it’s time to play. At the WSOP just about every poker experience is at your fingertips. Small stakes to nosebleed cash games are running 24/7. Want to win your way into a bracelet event? There’s an entire section dedicated to single table satellites that start as low as around $125 that can help you win entries to buy-in to bigger events. Tournament aficionados may choose to jump into one of the popular Daily Deepstacks. There’s four that fire daily - 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. They are all one-day events and have a buy-in ranging from $200 - $365. They are noted for having massive fields and pretty big paydays for those that can make it to the end. Take That (Gold Bracelet) Shot It should go without saying that when shot taking, never play with any money you can’t afford to lose. There’s little in the poker world that feels quite like taking a seat in a WSOP bracelet event for the first time. The WSOP gold bracelet has been one of the most enduring accolades in the game and anyone with the gumption and the buy-in can take a shot, make a run and potentially become a hometown hero, returning with a new piece of jewelry. Want to outsmart the masses when it comes to registering? It’s way too easy. Hit the cage when there’s no one around. Registration for every event is open around the clock, so take an unscheduled trip to the convention area at the end of the day or late into the night and register for any event days in advance. The lines can get extremely long for events like the Millionaire Maker and Monster Stack on the day of. Also available, online registering with a credit card via the WSOP’s partnership with Bravo. See Other People So you’ve seen the sights, watched the stars and taken a seat in a WSOP event. It’s been great, but you are sick of the Hash House and All American Bar & Grille. Perhaps, the Rio is wearing on you. Well, for many the entirety of their WSOP experience is actually far more than the series itself. Many major Las Vegas properties throw their own expansive summer poker series and there’s a ton of fun to be had there as well. The Aria poker room is one of the most acclaimed in the city and their Aria Poker Classic features two events daily (one at 11:00 a.m. one at 7:00 p.m.). If you bust in the tournaments at the Aria, you can hop in a cash game, get a pretty great grass-fed burger or slice of Forester pizza at Five50 Pizza Bar. The Wynn has a summer series of their own. Their poker room is one of luxury and their tournament area gives one the feeling like they are playing in an island resort. It doesn’t stop there: the Venetian, Golden Nugget, Binion’s and Planet Hollywood all have an extensive schedule of tournaments and cash game offering to go along with them. So when planning a schedule mix it up and see what’s out there. Whether you plan on heading to Las Vegas for two days or two weeks (or longer) there’s plenty to do for the complete poker fan.
  3. Poker players have always loved the summer in Las Vegas, but it wasn’t until more recent years that their love has extended beyond the walls of the World Series of Poker as more and more events pop up around Sin City. Also gaining in affection recently are mixed games and there are more mixed game tournaments taking place in Las Vegas during the summer than ever before. If you fancy mixed games, you no longer need to look at the WSOP schedule and staying cooped up inside the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino. There are dozens of these events around town. Here are some of the best, non-WSOP mixed game tournaments to play in Las Vegas this summer. Orleans H.O.R.S.E. Championship Where: The Orleans Hotel & Casino When: Sunday, June 2, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $400 Guarantee: $50,000 Starting Chips: 20,000 Click for Structure If you like low buy-in mixed games, the Orleans is a place you’ll want to frequent this summer. Every year, the Orleans does a solid job of putting together an accessible schedule of events for players of all games. On the 2019 Orleans Summer Poker Series schedule is a $400 H.O.R.S.E. Championship event with a $50,000 guaranteed prize pool. Players start with 20,000 in chips and levels are 30 minutes long. Once the event hits the money, the level times increase to 45 minutes. Late entries and re-entries are available until the start of Level 9, and the event is slated as a one-day tournament. Of the $400 buy-in, $335 goes to the prize pool and $65 is withheld for “admin, staffing, and promo fees.” That’s a 16.25% rake. Orleans 8-Game Mix Championship Where: The Orleans Hotel & Casino When: Saturday, June 8, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $400 Guarantee: $50,000 Starting Chips: 20,000 Click for Structure If you're looking for a little more excitement than the limit games of H.O.R.S.E. provide but still want a smorgasbord of variants within one tournament, then the $400 8-Game Mix Championship on the 2019 Orleans Summer Poker Series schedule will be right up your alley. In similar fashion to the H.O.R.S.E. event on the weekend prior, the 8-Game Mix Championship starts players with 20,000 in chips and levels will be 30 minutes before the money and 45 minutes in the money. Six hands of each game will be played, with the standard H.O.R.S.E. rotation in the mix, plus 2-7 triple draw, no-limit hold’em, and pot-limit Omaha. Late entries and re-entries are available until the start of Level 9, and the event is listed as a one-day tournament. Of the $400 buy-in, $335 goes to the prize pool and $65 is withheld for "admin, staffing, and promo fees." That’s a 16.25% rake. Orleans Stud Mix Championship Where: The Orleans Hotel & Casino When: Saturday, June 9, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $400 Guarantee: $50,000 Starting Chips: 20,000 Click for Structure Stud players unite! The 2019 Orleans Summer Poker Series schedule includes a $400 buy-in Stud Mix Championship, featuring seven-card stud, seven-card stud 8-or-better, and razz. Players will start with 20,000 in chips, eight hands of each game will be played, and levels will be 30 minutes before the money and 45 minutes in the money. Late entries and re-entries are available until the start of Level 9, and the event is scheduled as a one-day tournament. Of the $400 buy-in, $335 goes to the prize pool and $65 is withheld for "admin, staffing, and promo fees." That’s a 16.25% rake. ARIA H.O.R.S.E. Where: ARIA Resort & Casino When: Sunday, June 16, at 1 p.m. Buy-In: $1,100 Guarantee: $50,000 Starting Chips: 25,000 Click for Structure ARIA Resort & Casino has stepped up its game this summer by slapping some juicy guarantees on events during the 2019 ARIA Poker Classic. One of those events receiving a welcomed guaranteed is the $1,100 H.O.R.S.E. tournament that starts on Sunday, June 16, and is scheduled as a two-day event. Last year, the 2018 ARIA Poker Classic featured a $70 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event with no guarantee. It attracted 115 entries for a $46,000 prize pool. Doubling the buy-in and adding a guarantee should benefit this event a fair bit. Players start with 25,000 in chips and levels are 40 minutes long, with entry and re-entry available until the end of Level 9. The tournament will be played eight handed. On the $1,100 buy-in, $1,000 will go into the prize pool and $100 will be withheld for entry and staff fees, making for a 9.1% rake. There is a $150 satellite for this event on Saturday, June 15, at 7 p.m. Golden Nugget Mixed Omaha Championship Where: Golden Nugget When: Wednesday, June 26, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $570 Guarantee: $25,000 Starting Chips: 20,000 Click for Structure The Grand Poker Series at the Golden Nugget seems to pick up more and more steam each summer. This time around, there’s plenty on offer, including the $570 buy-in Mixed Omaha Championship event that features pot-limit Omaha 8-or-better, Omaha 8-or-better, and big-O. Players start with 20,000 in chips. Levels are 30 minutes in length, with a bump to 40 minutes at the final table. Entry and re-entry are available until the start of Level 9. With a buy-in of $570, $500 will go into the prize pool and $70 will be reserved for registration fee and staff. That’s a 12.28% rake. Binion’s H.O.R.S.E. Championship Where: Binion’s Gambling Hall & Hotel When: Friday, June 28, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $1,100 Guarantee: None Starting Chips: 60,000 At time of writing, details were scare on the 2019 Binion's Summer Series $1,100 H.O.R.S.E. Championship compared to other series, but here’s what we do know. We know the event is listed to start Friday, June 28, with the first of two starting flights. The second will take place on Saturday, June 29, and both start at 11 a.m. Players start with 60,000 in chips and levels will start at 40 minutes long before they are increased to 60 minutes in length. Last year’s H.O.R.S.E. Championship event at Binion’s had a $585 buy-in and attracted 169 entries. The prize pool generated was $84,500, with James Woods taking home first-place honors and $14,570 in prize money after a four-way chop up top. Once more information becomes available on this event, we will update this section. Golden Nugget H.O.R.S.E. Where: Golden Nugget When: Sunday, June 30, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $360 Guarantee: $20,000 Starting Chips: 15,000 Click for Structure The Grand Poker Series at the Golden Nugget hosts a $360 buy-in H.O.R.S.E. event on Sunday, June 30, at 11 a.m. The event has a $20,000 prize pool guarantee. Players start with 15,000 in tournament chips, with registration and re-entry open until the start of Level 9. Levels will be 30 minutes long leading up to the final table, when they are then increased to 40 minutes in length. Of the $360 buy-in, $300 will go to the prize pool and $60 will be withheld for registration fee and staff. That’s a 16.67% rake. Golden Nugget O.E. Championship Where: Golden Nugget When: Wednesday, July 3, at 11 a.m. Buy-In: $570 Guarantee: $25,000 Starting Chips: 20,000 Click for Structure The Grand Poker Series at the Golden Nugget hosts its O.E. Championship on Wednesday, July 3, starting at 11 a.m. The $570 buy-in event features a $25,000 prize pool guarantee. Players start with 20,000 in tournament chips, with registration and re-entry open until the start of Level 9. Levels will be 30 minutes long leading up to the final table. At the final table, levels are 40 minutes in length. Of the $570 buy-in, $500 will go to the prize pool and $70 will be withheld for registration fee and staff. That’s a 12.28% rake. ARIA Triple Draw Mix Where: ARIA Resort & Casino When: Wednesday, July 3, at 7 p.m. Buy-In: $240 Guarantee: None Starting Chips: 15,000 Click for Structure We understand this event doesn’t have a guarantee on it, but what mixed game player doesn’t love a good mix of triple draw games? The ARIA Resort & Casino hosts a $240 buy-in Triple Draw Mix tournament on the night of Wednesday, July 3. Players start with 15,000 in chips, with registration and re-entry open through the end of Level 6. On the $240 buy-in, $195 will go into the prize pool and $45 will be withheld for entry and staff fees, making for a 18.75% rake.
  4. The name Chris Moneymaker is forever attached to the World Series of Poker. We all know of the storybook run of Moneymaker in 2003 that began with an $86 online poker satellite. Now, 16 years later, Moneymaker is looking to turn another $80 online poker satellite into a life-changing sum of money. "Overall, I feel really good," Moneymaker said later on Day 3 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. "It's been a good day. The first two days were tough, I never caught any cards, but I’m trying to stay patient and realize that this is more of a marathon than a sprint. In years past, I’ve probably sprinted out a little bit too much and buried myself, so I’m trying to stay composed and not get in a hurry." The 2019 WSOP Main Event attracted its second-largest field ever, drawing 8,569 players to the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino. The winner will take home $10 million. That's a far cry from the 839 players to play in 2003 when Moneymaker won it. Although he said there aren't really any comparisons between now and then, Moneymaker did say the turnout this year was a bit like what was experienced in 2004. That’s when the field size grew by more than 1,700 entries to 2,576, showing just how popular and healthy poker was. "There’s really no comparison," Moneymaker said. "We’re breaking the record for the second-biggest crowd ever. It doesn’t even really compare to what we had. I guess the closest thing we could compare it to would be 2004 at Binion's. We had so many people that we were playing 11-handed and I started out playing on my knees in the first hour. The lines to get in Sit & Gos were three, four hours long. It was just insane. Obviously we don’t have that issue here at the Rio. We just have so many people, which is amazing to see that we got over 8,000 people this year. Poker has been growing every year. It’s great to see after everybody was proclaiming that poker was dead a couple of years ago. I’m glad to see that all of the tours seem to be growing and that the game is popular and it’s only going to improve." Going from 7,874 entries in 2018 to 8,569 in 2019 proved quite the rise in attendance, and this is without widespread legalized online poker in the United States. Nevada, New Jersey, and Delaware have regulated online poker, which is a start, and as more states come on board it can only mean good things for the industry and the WSOP. Pennsylvania is next in line. Legislation passed in the Keystone State and now it's just a waiting game for when Pennsylvania online poker is going to launch. A date of July 15 is pegged as the launch date, but there’s plenty of word on the streets that things may be delayed a little bit. Nonetheless, online poker is coming to Pennsylvania and it will be the largest state by quite a big margin to have legal online poker. Of the three states to currently have legal online poker in the US, New Jersey has the largest population at 8.9 million people. Pennsylvania’s population is 12.8 million, so nearly 4 million more. As an ambassador for PokerStars, Moneymaker has a lot of experience pushing for the advancement of legalized US online poker. Although he lives in Tennessee, he’s spent plenty of time in New Jersey with PokerStars. He’ll likely be doing the same once Pennsylvania is on board. "Hopefully, we can get sharing of player pools," Moneymaker said. "For Pennsylvania, I’ll be up there close to when they open to check out the site. I think it’s going to be great. I still think we need a state like California, New York, or Florida [to get on board]. Pennsylvania, landmass wise, is a huge state, but we still need a New York or California to push it over the hump. Once they see the tax revenue dollars coming in from a big state like that, I think that’s when it will start going similar to how marijuana and sports betting have gone." Right now, it’s a waiting game for Pennsylvania online poker players, but launch day will be here before we know it. When legal PA online poker does become available, Moneymaker suggests to take it slow and get yourself acclimated with the current game. "Most people used to play online poker back a certain number of years ago, so start off small, step your toe in, and get used to it again because the game has changed a lot," Moneymaker said. "If you haven’t played in a decade because you used to be an online player and you don’t play anymore, or you’ve been playing live, the online game, if you remember, is quite different. Start small, get your feet wet, and get used to it again." Another tip for Pennsylvania online poker players is to do some research and get up to speed and what’s allowed and what’s not allowed. This can be done while waiting for launch day. "Do some research to find out what tools are out there that you can use as far as HUD trackers and things like that, or if those things are illegal," Moneymaker said. "Make sure that you’re up on all of the regulations and have fun with it."
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