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Found 9 results

  1. Event #48 of the 2014 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas is a $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo Split Eight or Better tournament that drew 991 players two days ago when it began. Now, the field is down to 11 and a champion will be crowned on Thursday. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- Two-time bracelet winner Scott BigRiskkyClements (pictured) leads the way with a stack of 699,000, ahead of second place Jeff Madsen, who has three bracelets of his own. Clements' last one came in 2007 in a Pot Limit Omaha event for $194,000, while his other piece of hardware came in 2006 in an Omaha Hi-Low Split tournament and was good for $301,000. He'll look to make it three Omaha bracelets on Thursday. Clements busted Ryan Paulf on Wednesday during one of his key hands. Paulf showed Ac-5h-6d-Ad, while Clements had As-Kh-4h-3d. When the board ran out 3h-3s-6s-2h-Qd, Clements scooped the entire pot, winning the high and low, sent Paulf out the door in 15th place, and boosted his own stack by 113,000. Clements also sent Jeffrey Amasaki to the rail in 21st after hitting two pair in a hand that didn't have a qualifying low. The longtime PocketFiver has $3.5 million in online scores, the largest of which was worth nearly $300,000 and came by virtue of a win in an FTOPS Two-Day Event in 2011. He has FTOPS and SCOOP titles and has also taken down the Sunday Million, Sunday 500, and Hotter $55 on PokerStars, just to name a few. He won the WPT's North American Poker Championships in 2007 for $1.5 million. Two tables will reconvene on Thursday to play down to a winner, who will bag $270,000. Here's how the field stacks up: 1. Scott BigRiskky Clements - 699,000 2. Jeff Madsen - 654,000 3. Dylan Wilkerson - 552,000 4. Tyler Patterson - 425,000 5. Derek masterace222 Raymond - 420,000 6. Cody Crawford - 403,000 7. J.R. Flournoy - 400,000 8. Tom Schneider - 315,000 9. Gary Kosakowski - 249,000 10. Brian Brubaker - 175,000 11. Philip Sternheimer - 167,000 Meanwhile, the $50,000 Poker Player's Championship is down to its final eight players, with Brandon Shack-Harris leading the way with a stack of 4.1 million, well out in front of the 3.4 million belonging to Abe Mosseri. If you've never heard of Shack-Harris, he won a bracelet last year in a Pot Limit Omaha event and has turned in a second place and a third place in WSOP tournaments already this year. Mosseri has cashed once at this year's WSOP and will look to capture his second career bracelet. It's worth noting that Melissa Burr, who will enter the final table in seventh place, is the first woman ever to cash in the Poker Player's Championship. The New Jersey poker community member has been on a tear so far this year, making two final tables and logging three top-10 finishes. Here's how the final table of the 2014 WSOP Poker Player's Championship looks: 1. Brandon Shack-Harris - 4,101,000 2. Abe Mosseri - 3,485,000 3. Frank Kassela - 2,507,000 4. John Hennigan - 1,878,000 5. Chun Lei Zhou - 1,389,000 6. Jesse Martin - 840,000 7. Melissa Burr - 661,000 8. Allen Kessler - 439,000 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP news, brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. The title of 2014 World Series of Poker Player of the Year officially belongs to George Danzer (pictured). The German won three WSOP bracelets in 2014, becoming the sixth player ever to win three bracelets in a single year. In that elusive department, he joins Puggy Pearson, Ted Forrest, Phil Hellmuth, Phil Ivey, and Jeffrey Lisandro. Danzer solidified his place at the top of the Player of the Year leaderboard after recording his third bracelet at WSOP APAC in Australia in an Eight-Game Mix tournament, his tenth WSOP cash this year. Here are his in the money finishes in 2014; all are in Las Vegas unless otherwise noted: 5th Place, $70,308, Event #5: $10,000 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw 1st Place, $294,792, Event #18 $10,000 Razz 39th Place, $5,517, Event #25: $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 9th Place, $49, 061, Event #32: $10,000 No Limit Hold'em Six-Handed 1st Place, $352,696, Event 38: $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 48th Place, $3,759, Event #47: $1,500 Ante Only No Limit Hold'em 44th Place, $6,107, Event #54: $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 22nd Place, AU$4,754, APAC Event #1: $1,100 No Limit Hold'em Accumulator 6th Place, AU$7,399, APAC Event #6: $1,650 Dealer's Choice 1st Place, AU$84,600, APAC Event #8: $5,000 Eight-Game Mix Prior to this year, Danzer had six WSOP cashes, his worst being a 14th place finish. He is #17 on the all-time money list for Germany, according to the Hendon Mob, with a little over $2 million in live winnings. Second place in the WSOP Player of the Year race went to Brandon Shack-Harris (pictured), who had nine WSOP cashes this year including one bracelet, which came in a $1,000 Pot Limit Omaha event. Shack-Harris had four top-three finishes this year, one of which was worth nearly a million bucks for taking second in the Poker Player's Championship. Shack-Harris is from Chicago and is #12 on the all-time money list for Illinois, according to the Hendon Mob. Here's how the 2014 leaderboard shook out: 1. George Danzer - 923.50 points 2. Brandon Shack-Harris - 806.70 points 3. John Hennigan - 557.88 points 4. Daniel Negreanu - 519.08 points 5. Ismael Bojang - 467.91 points 6. Daniel Colman - 452.40 points 7. Justin ZeeJustin Bonomo - 449.63 points 8. Richard Ashby - 413.55 points 9. Brock t soprano Parker - 406.25 points 10. Calvin cal42688 Anderson - 398.20 points Congrats to George Danzer for being this year's WSOP Player of the Year! Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  3. The first day of July crowned one new bracelet winner, left six players to return in the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship and two more events return a handful players for Day 3. The $888 Crazy Eights event brought out the crowds with two flights in the re-entry event. Safiya Umerova Upsets Niall Farrell for First Bracelet in $1,500 Shootout [caption width="600"] Safiya Umerova came back from down 3-1 in chips heads-up to win her first bracelet.[/caption]Day 3 of the $1,500 No Limit Hold’em Shootout kicked off with two six-handed tables, they made the final table at nine players and upstart Safiya Umerova defeated Niall Farrell for her first bracelet and $246,046. “I think women poker players are underestimated, it happens to me." Umerova said. “They underestimate my thinking and my game overall. I’ve only been playing poker for a very short time. It’s exciting, this is a great start for my career.” “I dream big. I want to be the best poker player in the world,” she added. “I know I am not there yet, but I want to have the most gold bracelets anyone has ever had. That’s the goal. That’s what you’re supposed to go for, right?” Heads-up play began with Farrell holding a 3-1 chip advantage but Umerova won a key pot when all in with queens. Farrell held [poker card="ac"][poker card="9d"] but two queens on the flop doubled up Umerova’s stack. A few hands later, down 3-1, he shoved holding queen high and Umerova called with an ace. An ace hit on the flop and Umerova became the second female bracelet winner in as many days. Final Table Payouts Safiya Umerova - $246,046 Niall Farrell - $163,158 Michael Mixer - $118,109 Yuliyan Kolev - $86,513 Damian Salas - $64,129 Raymond Ho - $48,115 Daniel McAulay - $36,543 Daniel Tang - $28,101 Alexander Lakhov - $21,881 Brandon Shack-Harris Leads Final Six in $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship Day 3 of the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship began with 28 returning players after a brutal Day 2 bubble and after ten levels of play Brandon Shack-Harris leads the six-handed Day 4 table. Matthew Parry, Loren Klein, Melad Marji, Harley Stoffmaker and Tommy Le round out the final six. It’s an odd lineup for the event with the unknowns totaling 11 WSOP cashes while Shack-Harris, Klein and Le have 51 cashes and more than $2.5 million combined. Jason Mercier, Mike Watson, Taylor Paur, Mike Matusow and Erik Seidel all made the money but ultimately found the rail. Play resumes Saturday at noon and will be live-streamed with hole cards. Final Six Chip Counts Brandon Shack-Harris – 5,425,000 Matthew Parry – 4,775,000 Loren Klein – 3,530,000 Melad Marji – 2,930,000 Harley Stoffmaker – 2,265,000 Tommy Le – 1,600,000 Jay Farber, James Akenhead and James Akenhead Headline Day 3 in $3,000 No Limit Hold’em The $3,000 No Limit Hold'em event began with 287 returning players for Day 2 and after ten levels of play the field was trimmed to 31 players – well short of the intended final table mark. Tony Ruberto bagged up the lead with three November Niners sliding into the top 10. James Akenhead, Simon Deadman and Daniel Rudd lead a contingent of British players after finishing in the top 20. Andrew Lichtenberger, Tristan Wade, John Hennigan and John Racener also advanced but in the bottom half of the counts. Players return at noon on Saturday with over $500,000 on the line for the winner and they’ll play to a winner is crowned. Depending on the finish of the PLO Championship and the lineup, it could be live-streamed later in the day on WSOP.com. Top Ten Chip Counts Tony Ruberto – 1,165,000 Jay Farber – 1,077,000 Nick Yunis – 1,056,000 Thomas Miller – 970,000 Linglin Zeng – 858,000 James Akenhead – 851,000 Erhan Iscan – 798,000 Pierre Neuville – 770,000 Salvatore Dicarlo – 763,000 Sevan Markarian – 690,000 Allen Le & John Monnette Lead Stacked Field of 27 to Day 3 in Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo The Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo event of three variants is new for the 2016 WSOP schedule and the field returned 207 players to Day 2. Ten levels of play reduced the field to 27 survivors littered with bracelet winners but Allen Le and John Monnette were the only two players to finish above the 500,000-mark. Gary Bolden, Bart Hanson and Keith Ferrera landed in the top 10 counts while Timothy Burt, Gavin Smith, David Bach and Jason Somerville all return with shorter stacks. Michael Mizrachi, John Holley, Mike Leah and Ted Forrest made deep runs into the money but didn’t survive the day. Play resumes for Day 3 at noon as one of three events playing to a winner. Top Ten Chip Counts Allan Le – 562,500 John Monnette – 531,000 Cody Crouch – 435,500 Yuval Bronshtein – 348,000 Gary Bolden – 323,500 Philipp Eirisch – 311,500 Alexey Makarov – 278,000 Bart Hanson – 217,500 Keith Ferrera – 206,000 Mark Johns – 193,500 Two Flights for Crazy Eights Event Combine for 2,816 Entrants The multiple re-entry $888 Crazy Eights Eight Max No Limit Hold’em event ran two of the four opened flights on Friday and combined for 2,816 entrants collectively. Despite those huge numbers, only 36 players advanced from Flight 1A and 50 survivors from Flight 1B – 86 total. Andy Spears bagged the most with 499,000 from the late wave and Daniel Fried led the first flight. Dimitar Danchev, Loni Harwood, Jason Les, Allen Kessler and Jennifer Shahade standout from the 36 Flight 1A survivors. John Gordon, Scott Davies and Hank Sitton advance from Flight 1B pool of 50 advancing players. Day 2 returns to action Sunday at 2 pm in the Amazon Room, bringing all four flights together for the first time. Flight 1C has cards in the air at 10 am and Flight 1D gathers for a start at 4 pm on Saturday. Top Ten Chip Counts A & B Combined Andy Spears – 499,000 Daniel Fried – 366,000 Gytis Bernatavicius – 360,000 Francis Rusnak – 341,000 DNR – 336,000 Joshua Field – 323,000 Lev Mimma – 315,000 Jennifer Shahade – 285,000 Henry Grunzweig – 279,000 Joep Raemaekers – 278,000 Saturday’s Crazier Eights & Poker Players Championship The WSOP will be stretched to its limits on Saturday with three events playing down to a winner in the Amazon Room, while shoehorning in two more flights of the $888 Crazy Eights event. Then the prestigious $50,000 Poker Players Championship kicks off at 3 pm, scheduled for five days and arguably brings together the toughest field each year.
  4. The 2016 WorldSeries of Poker hosted three final tables Saturday, though only one finished, alongside Day 1 of perhaps the most prestigious tournament of the year and the final two flights of the $888 Crazy Eights wrapped up. Brandon Shack-Harris Wins Second Bracelet in $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship [caption width="640"] Brandon Shack-Harris won his second bracelet in the Pot Limit Omaha Championship for 4,300.[/caption]The $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship played its fourth and final day on Saturdya day with six players returning to the final table. Brandon Shack-Harris returned with the lead, defeated Loren Klein heads-up and won his second career gold bracelet at his second final table of the Series. “This is definitely the most gratifying moment for me in my poker career,” Shack-Harris said after winning. “I had really tough people on my left all the time and they would play back at me. I was having to play out of position all the time.” Klein won the PLO/NLH Mixed event a week ago and challenged Shack-Harris. “I didn’t want to play Loren heads-up,” he said. “He plays a very unorthodox style. We played some street PLO, he plays great.” Experience played a factor with the three least experienced players hitting the rail first. Harley Stoffmaker collected just his second WSOP cash ever with his final table run. Mattew Parry nearly tripled his career earnings with his finish and Melad Marji's cash was almost ten times the largest cash of his career. Final Table Payouts Brandon Shack-Harris - $894,300 Loren Klein - $552,713 Tommy Le - $376,667 Melad Marji - $261,652 Matthew Parry - $183,337 Harley Stoffmaker - $133,918 Junayed Khan - $98,748 Dominique Mosley - $74,339 Andrew Lichtenberger and Craig Blight Return Heads-Up in $3,000 No Limit Hold’em The 31 players returning for Day 3 of the $3,000 No Limit Hold’em event knew they had a tall order in front of them to play to a winner. Ten levels of action left Andrew Lichtenberger a 3-1 chip lead over Craig Blight. Lichtenberger bagged up 12,765,00 and Blight with 4,100,000 after Chris Johnson busted on the final hand of the night in third place. The pair had the option to play an additional level after Johnson’s bust but they declined to play on. A trio of former November Niners began Day 3 in the top ten counts but Pierre Neuville (19th), James Akenhead (18th) and Jay Farber (15th) fell short of the final table. Tristan Wade was the first player eliminated on Day 3 and soon John Racener, John Hennigan and Simon Deadman followed him to the rail. Final Table Payouts TBD - $569,158 TBD - $351,721 Chris Johnson - $249,336 Mac Shorabhi - $179,015 Linglin Zeng - $130,191 Erhan Iscan - $95,925 Thomas Miller - $71,617 Roger Teska - $54,190 Daniel Wagner - $41,563 Five Players Remain with Gavin Smith Leading $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo Mix The $1,500 Omaha Hi-Lo Mixproved to be popular enough that the structure wasn’t quite enough to finish as scheduled. Day 3 saw ten levels of action with 27 players returning and five remained at the end of play with Gavin Smith holding the lead. Smith holds a considerable lead over Philipp Eirisch and Allan Le – all over one million chips. Cody Crouch and Keith Ferrera return as the short stacks. The field reached official final table past midnight with Gary Bolden, David Bach and Yuval Bronshtein earning at least $15,059 each but fell short. John Monnette bubbled the final table for his seventh cash of the Series. Final Five Chip Counts Gavin Smith – 1,800,000 Philipp Eirisch – 1,175,000 Allan Le – 1,125,000 Cody Crouch – 565,000 Keith Ferrera – 320,000 Scott Seiver Leads $50,000 Poker Players Championship Many in poker believe the $50,000 Poker Players Championship to be the toughest and most prestigious tournament of the year and 87 of the world’s best entered the event. Registration remains open until the start of Day 2 but for now the prize pool sits at $4.176 million and Scott Seiver leads the field of 84 survivors. Robert and Michael Mizrachi both finished in the top ten counts, Robert won the Seven Card Stud Championship earlier in the Series and Michael is the only player to win this event twice. Just outside the top stacks are Jason Mercier, Todd Brunson and Dan Smith. Paul Volpe, Daniel Negreanu, Jesse Martin and Justin Bonomo return with above average stacks. Brian Hastings, George Danzer and Dzmitry Urbanovich return as the short stacks. Howard Lederer entered the event and bagged up to advance while Stephen Chidwick, Keith Gipson and Abe Mosseri were the three eliminated players on Day 1. Top Ten Chip Counts Scott Seiver – 593,000 Timofey Kuznetsov – 557,600 Robert Mizrachi – 500,200 Brian Rast – 463,900 Erik Sagstrom – 457,700 John Monnette – 454,300 Michael Mizrachi – 433,000 William O’Neil – 427,600 Anthony Zinno – 418,000 Talal Shakerchi – 395,100 Flights C & D Push $888 Crazy Eights Field to 6,761 Total Entrants The final two flights of the $888 Crazy Eights event drew 1,715 for Flight 1C and 2,230 for Flight 1D – bringing the total entrants to 6,761. The early flight advanced 62 survivors, the late flight brings 58 players forward and Day 2 has a total of 206 returning players. Vlad Darie bagged up 454,000 for the lead in Flight 1C but is second overall behind Andy Spears’ 499,000 form Day 1B. Six players from the final flight snuck into the top ten overall with Steven Tabb and Brandon Ienn both breaking the 400,000-chip mark. Notables from the 10 am flight include Steve Sung, Darren Rabinowitz, Greg Raymer and John Gale. From the late flight are Sam Stein, Brent Roberts, Matt Vengrin, Vinny Pahuja and Chris Ferguson. Top Ten Chip Counts, Flights ABCD Combined Andy Spears – 499,000 Vlad Darie – 454,000 Steven Tabb – 446,000 Brandon Ienn – 429,000 Muhammed Rahim – 395,000 Fabrizio Gonzalez – 383,000 Aaron Johnson – 375,000 Chase Johnson – 368,000 Daniel Fried – 366,000 Joseph Mussat – 362,000 Big Bet Sunday After a week stretch that included a few new events the WSOP shifts back into more familiar gears on Sunday. A $1,500 No Limit Hold’em event kicks off at 11 am and the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha HiLo event gets cards in the air at 3 pm.
  5. The Rio hosted one 2016 World Series of Poker final table – the last Stud event on the schedule and the vaunted $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event brings six players to final table Friday. Registration closed on Day 2 in the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller, the Tag Team event has nine remaining and two budget-priced, big bet games kicked off for the arriving Main Event crowd. David Prociak Outduels Brandon Shack-Harris and John Monnette for First Bracelet [caption width="640"] David Prociak faced off against two of the best Limit players today and came out on top.[/caption]David Prociak was the short stack at the final table of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event with nine players remaining and had two of the game’s best Mixed Game tournament players and a couple guys with 20 WSOP cashes in Calvin Anderson and Jameson Painter ahead of him. Prociak played beyond his experience and battled his way all the way back to his first bracelet and $156,546. “I can’t put it into worlds, there’s nothing I can say,” Prociak said moments after besting Shack-Harris heads-up. “I’m still in shock. I came in to the day with a lead but lost it pretty quick to him (Shack-Harris) in five straight pots.” “I was able to put it all behind me and kept him from putting it on me,” he added. “I’ve been locked in all week – waking up when I’m supposed to and eating healthy." Prociak's win is just his third WSOP cash in his first year at the WSOP. He previously cashed in Colossus II and finished 30th in the $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Mixed Event. Shack-Harris won his second career bracelet a week ago in the Pot Limit Omaha Championship and recorded his third final table of the summer. He also played the entire final table wearing a hooded polar bear jacket. Monnette’s Series improved to eight cashes with five final tables. He’s made $319,906 for his efforts of a runner-up and third place finishes. Bryan Devonshire finished 10th and Al Barbieri 12th. Final Table Payouts David Prociak - $156,546 Brandon Shack-Harris - $96,750 John Monnette - $66,601 Alex Livingston - $46,652 Louis Russo - $33,263 Gaurav Kalro - $24,148 Jameson Painter - $17,855 Calvin Anderson - $13,452 Yue Due Holds Half the Chips in Play with Six Remaining in $5,000 No Limit Event The penultimate day of the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event returned with 47 players and the pace of elimination was a bit brisker than planned, so the field played down to six players before stopping. Yue Du holds half the chips in play with 11.73 million in the bag. German standout and three-time bracelet winner Dominik Nitsche is second in chips with 3.66 million and Jason Mercier’s better half, Natasha Barbour, sits in the middle with 2.45 million. Austrian Ismael Bojang, Michael Gentili and Marius Gierse round out the table. Matt O’Donnell (7th), Sertac Turker (8th) and Arne Coulier (9th) made the final table but didn’t survive the day. Kane Kalas bubbled the final table in 10th place as Andy Hwang, Byron Kaverman and Isaac Baron all made deep runs. Final Table Chip Counts Yue Du – 11,730,000 Dominik Nitsche – 3,665,000 Natasha Barbour – 2,455,000 Ismael Bojang – 1,785,000 Michael Gentili – 1,415,000 Marius Gierse – 730,000 Nine Tag Teams Advance, Polk/Fee Lead by Wide Margin Day 2 began with 130 returning teams and ten levels of action has the field trimmed to a final table headlined by Doug Polk and Ryan Fee. They have 1.2 million in the bag and John Gale and TJ Shulman sit second with 606,000. Top pros Mohsin Charania and Marvin Rettenmaier sit third, Jonathan Little has a team with his parents, James Dempsey and Chris Godfrey formed a team and Bart Lybaert, Adam Owen, Benny Glaser and Owais Ahmed formed a four-man squad that returns. Leo Wolpert and Ryan Laplante finished 22nd, Michael, Robert, Eric and Daniel Mizrachi finished in 26th place and Jeff Gross, Brian Rast and Antonio Esfandiari finished in 28th place. Final Table Chip Counts (by Last Player Sitting) Doug Polk – 1,243,000 John Gale – 606,000 Mohsin Charania – 505,000 Michael Padula – 475,000 James Dempsey – 447,000 Niel Mittelman – 425,000 Adam Owen – 293,000 Reuben Peters – 209,000 Larry Little – 113,000 Elite Field of 20 Return in $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller Day 2 returned 95 survivors with chips and 21 player waited until the start of action to get in the event. Ten levels of action trimmed the field down to 20 players with Ludovic Geilich on top with 3,025,000 in the bag. Michael and Robert Mizrachi sit second and third in chips one day after Michael finished fourth in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship and the same day they cashed in 26th place with brothers Eric and Daniel in the Tag Team event. Ryan D’Angelo, Sean Winter and Paul Volpe finished in the top ten with Dan Smith, Cary Katz and Yevgeniy Timoshenko in the second half of the counts. Day 2’s additional entrants that skipped Day 1 pushed the prize pool to $4.37 million. The top 28 players made the money with Sam Stein, Taylor Paur, Rep Porter and Isaac Baron earning a payout before busting. Top Ten Chip Counts Ludovic Geilich – 3,025,000 Michael Mizrachi – 2,435,000 Robert Mizrachi – 2,245,000 Ryan D’Angelo – 1,640,000 Sean Winter – 1,560,000 Paul Volpe – 1,430,000 Chris Lee – 1,245,000 Veselin Karakitukov – 1,215,000 Tommy Le – 1,200,000 Jens Kyllonen – 1,165,000 Event 63: $1,000 No Limit Hold’em The budget No Limit event at 11 am drew a huge crowd of 2,452 entrants and after a long day at the felt 268 players remain. Daniel Weinman missed out on the overall led by a few chips but is one of 15 to bag up six-figure stacks. Matt Jarvis, Hiren Patel, Nick Guagenti, Tony Dunst and Mark Radoja all bagged up above average stacks. The field combined for a $2,206,800 prize pool for the top 368 finishers. All returning players have $1,750 guaranteed but the big money up top nabs all the attention – the top four players earn six-figures with the winner walking with $339,254. Top Ten Chip Counts Frederick Goff – 144,300 Daniel Weinman – 140,400 Raffaele Castro – 130,000 Patricia Kananda – 127,600 Michael Wang – 127,300 Paolo Cusinato – 117,600 Sean Gibson- 117,500 Massoud Eskandari – 114,900 Sergio Cabrera – 114,800 James Salters – 104,900 Event 64: $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha HiLo The afternoon event picked up 478 entrants and ten levels of play reduced the field down to 156 players. Jon Turner built the largest stack but Allan Le, Kyle Bowker and Leif Force all bagged up in the top five spots. 2005 Main Event Champ Joe Hachem landed in the top ten with Ashton Griffin, Ari Engel and Ben Yu with stacks way above average. Richard Ashby, Scott Clements, Ylon Schwartz and David Paredes also return. The field built a $1,291,290 prize pool for a little less than half of the returning field – 71 players. First place earns $294,960 and top three spots earn six-figures. Top Ten Chip Counts Jon Turner – 116,900 Allan Le – 112,700 Tark Abboud – 111,500 Kyle Bowker – 110,700 Leif Force – 110,500 Sirous Jamshidi – 109,800 Anil Gurnaney – 101,300 Terrance Bott – 97,000 Joe Hachem – 95,200 Timothy Vukson – 94,800 Expensive Chairs in the Amazon Room or Playing for a Bracelet in Underwear The $111,111 High Roller for One Drop returns Friday for one of the most expensive buy-ins this side of the Atlantic. The event drew X in 2014 when Tony Gregg earned $x for his first bracelet. For those that prefer much less media attention the online bracelet with unlimited re-entries starts at 1 pm and plays down to the final six for a live final table in the Amazon Room. The Ladies Championship returns with a 90% discount of the $10,000 buy-in for female players. Technically, men can enter but their +EV argument takes a huge hit.
  6. We might not have seen any new bracelet winners in Monday’s 2018 World Series of Poker action, but we did see two exciting final tables set for tomorrow. Both the $10K PLO Championship and the $1,500 Razz will return tomorrow with all players around one table, and they won’t stop until two shiny new bracelets are handed out. Meanwhile, the MONSTER STACK ploughed through another day and hundreds of players, and the $10K Limit Hold’em Championship kicked off. Here’s everything you need to know about June 25 at the WSOP. Final Table Set in $10K PLO Championship, Shack-Harris Leads Final 6 Brandon Shack-Harris seems to always rise to the occasion within the halls of the Rio. Over the years he has amassed 30 WSOP cashes, adding up to $2.8 million in earnings, and he’s won two bracelets. He’s now in prime position to bag a third. Shack-Harris will return tomorrow as the chip leader in Event #49: $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed Championship, ending the day with 7,730,000. He’s got tough competition from the likes of fellow two-time bracelet winners Ryan Hughes (5,140,000) and Loren Klein (4,240,000), as well as three-time bracelet winner Rep Porter (2,680,000), former November Niner Jerry Wong (2,150,000), and recent bracelet winner Scott Bohlman (1,855,000). A few notables we lost during the day include Scotty Nguyen, Anton Morgenstern, Anton Tsang, Ryan Laplante, Mike Leah, and Poker Life Podcast host Joey Ingram. Ingram doesn’t usually play tournaments, preferring to play cash games, but his 17th place finish for $28,502 marks his biggest career cash. The final table kicks off at 2pm tomorrow. There’s a $1,018,336 first-place prize awaiting the winner, while everyone has now locked up a nice payday of $157,097. Final Table Stacks Brandon Shack-Harris - 7,730,000 Ryan Hughes - 5,140,000 Loren Klein - 4,240,000 Rep Porter -2,680,000 Jerry Wong - 2,150,000 Scott Bohlman - 1,855,000 Owen and Urbanovich Headline Razz Finale The second final table to be set on Monday was in Event #46: $1,500 Razz. They’re down to the final nine, with Kevin Iacofano and Michael Mckenna holding the top two counts, with 514,000 and 477,000 respectively. However, it’s PocketFivers Adam ‘adamyid’ Owen and Dzmitry ‘Colisea’ Urbanovich who we’ll be keeping a close eye on. They come in fourth (Adam) and seventh (Urbanovich) in chips, and the mixed game experts are both looking for their first piece of WSOP jewellery. In fact, nobody on this final table has won a bracelet, so we’re guaranteed a first-time winner tomorrow. That wouldn’t have been the case if any of the big names who went out today would have made it. The likes of Phil Hellmuth, Barry Greenstein, John Hennigan, Benjamin Scholl, Matt Grapenthien, Max Pescatori, and Brandon Cantu were just a few who went out before the bubble burst. When it did, we lost a few bracelet winners including Chris Bjorin (50th - $2,322), Benny Glaser (44th - $2,471), Cyndy Violette(39th - $2,471), John Cernuto (34th - $2,702), John Racener (33rd - $2,702) and Ylon Schwartz (26th - $3,034). There’s $125,431 and the bracelet for the winner, while all nine are guaranteed $7,881. Play resumes at 2pm Tuesday. Final Table Stacks: Kevin Iacofano - 514,000 Michael Mckenna - 477,000 Thomas Taylor - 410,000 Adam Owen - 340,000 Jay Kwon - 295,000 Kyle Montgomery - 261,000 Dzmitry Urbanovich - 248,000 Jeanne David - 194,000 Jeffrey Mitseff - 191,000 MONSTER STACK Day 2 In The Books There were 2,085 of the total entries 6,260 returning today for Day 2 of Event #48: $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em MONSTER STACK, but when play wrapped up today just 259 remaining. Two-time bracelet winner Steve Billirakis holds the overnight chip lead with 1,399,000. Next up in the counts are James Stewart (1,220,000), Raul Manzanares Lozano (1,176,000) and David Neiman (1,160,000). Others still in with a shot include Aditya Agarwal (1,100,000), bracelet winners Gaurav Raina (357,000), Jackie Glazier (275,000) and Nipun Java (101,000), as well as Jimmy Guerrero(940,000), Kurt Jewell (768,000) and Aliaksei Boika (597,000). We lost a whole lot of players in this one. The multiple bracelet winners who returned today, making the money but failing to find a bag at the end, include Alexandru Papazian (930th place), Jack Duong (886th place), Jared Hamby (837th place), Benjamin Zamani (833rd place), Athanasios Polychronopoulos (789th place), Peter Eichhardt (702nd place), Will Givens (676th place), Phillip Hui (670th place), Scott Davies (639th place), Blair Hinkle (626th place), Mark Radoja (589th place), Loni Harwood (521st place), Ryan Riess (520th place), Ronnie Bardah (487th place), Tuan Le (501st place), Calvin Anderson (423rd place), Dan Heimiller (412th place) and Alex Bilokur (359th place). The 259 players will return at 11am Tuesday with $5,140 locked up. The winner will receive $1,037,451. Top 10 Stacks: Steve Billirakis - 1,399,000 Tommy Nguyen - 1,264,000 James Stewart - 1,200,000 Raul Manzanares Lozano - 1,176,000 David Neiman - 1,160,000 Raj Singh - 1,141,000 Sihao Zhang - 1,106,000 Francis Rusnak - 1,021,000 Ryan Lee - 983,000 Rittie Chuaprasert - 941,000 Bounty Hunting in $1,500 NLHE Event #51: $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em Bounty got going today, with 1,982 players creating a $2,675,700 prize pool. After ten levels on Day 1, 298 players have advanced to Tuesday’s Day 2. That means a whole lot of bounties have already been handed out. In this event, you get $500 for every player you eliminate, so if you bust three players, you’re already freerolling. The eventual winner will no doubt bank thousands in bounties alone, as well as picking up the $272,504 that’s reserved for first place. Right now the player closest to that is Alex Whitenstall (197,800), who bagged the chip lead. He’s followed by Ranno Sootla (171,000), Sean Getzwiller (143,000), Michael Steele (122,900) and Christian Nolte (121,900). Other notables who will return for Day 2 tomorrow include Paawan Bansal (98,700), Jeff Gross (78,500), brothers Ralph Massey (73,300) and Aaron Massey (72,300), Martin Mathis (70,400), Ivan Deyra (57,400) and Maria Konnikova (35,900). Where there are survivors there must be casualties, and some of those who handed their bounty chips over today include Phil Hellmuth, Sean Deeb, Kristen Bicknell, Alex Foxen, Phil Laak, Chris Ferguson, Bertrand Grospellier, Chris Moorman, Mohsin Charania, Joey Weissman, Allen Kessler, Anthony Reategui, Heidi May, Ben Yu and Maria Lampropulos. Action resumes at 12pm Tuesday. The bubble burst right at the day of play, meaning all players have secured $1,415. Top 10 Stacks: Alex Whitenstall - 197,800 Quyen Hoang - 178,000 Samuel Miller - 177,400 Ranno Sootla - 171,000 Juan Vecino - 156,300 Evan Lavallee - 143,700 Sean Getzwiller - 143,300 Justin Liberto - 137,800 DID NOT REPORT - 129,800 Artem Metalidi - 127,400 $10K Limit Hold’em Championship Gets Going The next championship event on the schedule kicked off on Monday, with 101 players taking a shot in Event #52: $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship. Leading the 43 survivors overnight is Michael Moore with 268,500, followed by Joao Vieira (211,000) Ofir Mor (205,000), and Nick Schulman (202,000). The latter of those four was one of the last entries, and certainly made up for lost time, while Mike Leah was the last one to get in. He too had a great short day of play, bagging up 125,000. Other notables who advanced include Anthony Zinno, Juha Helppi, Benny Glaser, Andre Akkari, Maria Ho, Chris Klodnicki, Ismael Bojang, Jeff Lisandro, and John Hennigan. The same can’t be said for Daniel Negreanu, Kevin Song, Erik Siedel, Shaun Deeb, James Obst, JC Tran, and Defending champion Joe McKeehen, all of whom hit the rail throughout the day. The 43 will be back at 2pm Tuesday for another day of Limit action. Registration is open until then. Top 10 Stacks: Michael Moore - 260,500 Joao Vieira - 211,000 Ofir Mor - 205,000 Nick Schulman - 202,000 Christopher Chung - 171,500 Jameson Painter - 169,500 Philip Cordano - 165,000 Ken Deng - 163,000 Anthony Zinno - 159,000 Ray Henson - 154,500 Tomorrow’s Action (June 26) There are two new events ready and waiting to get started on Tuesday June 26. If you’re up early enough, at 11am you can hop into Event #53: $1,500 Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better. Decide to have a lie in? At 3pm, you could play Event #54: Big Blind Antes $3,000 No-Limit Hold’em.
  7. On Saturday, Alex Foxen tweeted that he was looking to make some bracelet bets for the 2019 World Series of Poker. Sifting through the responses, it appears he found a few takers. One of the first players to pop into Foxen’s mentions was recent WPT L.A. Poker Classic winner David 'ODB' Baker, who offered $20,000 per bracelet against Foxen. After a little bit of back and forth between the two, they settled on the original offer from Baker at $20,000 per bracelet. Baker then tweeted that his "shop is open for business" and took in a few "friendly" offers of his own. He booked $2,000 per bracelet with both Brandon Shack-Harris and Brian Hastings. Back to Foxen, Adrian Mateos was one of the players to join in the fun. He asked Foxen if he’d bet on mutual no-limit hold’em events played and it appears Foxen accepted. If they were accepted, the two likely worked out the details out of public view. Rainer Kempe was next in line and offered a similar bet to what Mateos did, for mutual no-limit hold’em events played. If we’re understanding the details correctly, Kempe and Foxen are on for the first bullet of every no-limit hold’em event they both play this summer. A min-cash wins $1,000 from the other person, an official final table appearance wins $5,000, and a bracelet wins $25,000. Dominik Nitsche chimed in at the end and said he’d like the same bet, but there was no visible confirmation from Foxen. Foxen did like the tweet, though. Foxen has yet to win a WSOP gold bracelet, but he's still relatively new to the poker scene. He had some notable live tournament results in 2015 and 2016, but his 2017 is really what put him on the map. That year, Foxen won more than $1.7 million on the felt after having won just over $500,000 in the five years prior combined. In 2018, Foxen had an even bigger year with more than $6.6 million won. In 2019, he’s already won more than $3 million entering the 2019 WSOP. Foxen had just four cashes at the 2018 WSOP, but one of those was a final table to kick off the summer. At the 2017 WSOP, Foxen cashed 14 times and then added two more cashes at WSOP Europe. Among those cashes in 2017 were two final tables and three other top-15 finishes.
  8. When World Series of Poker officials announced in mid-April that the 2020 WSOP was being postponed due to the uncertainty over the coronavirus pandemic, they promised that players would be playing for "WSOP glory from their homes" this summer. That promise was met last week when the WSOP announced a total of 85 online bracelet events with 31 set for WSOP.com for players in Nevada and New Jersey, and another 54 for players outside of the United States to be battled for on GGPoker.com. The response from some of the poker community wasn't all that positive with a large number of complaints focused on the fact that these events will award each winner a WSOP bracelet. "My reasoning is likely separate from many others as I was indifferent to holding (a bracelet) until I learned of the significance it has with friends I love who love the game," said Brandon Shack-Harris, who won a bracelet in 2014 and another in 2016. "I realized that some people go their whole lives dreaming of realizing what I was lucky to stumble onto, and had been taking for granted." Shack-Harris took to Twitter to tell the story of how Chad Brown being awarded an honorary WSOP bracelet before his passing in 2014 and subsequently learning how much the bracelet meant to Brown forced to him to better recognize and appreciate the personal significance of the award. The history behind and prestige of the bracelet is front of mind for Shack-Harris and others who fear that WSOP executives aren't keeping that in mind as they make decisions. "The WSOP does a fantastic job with some things like holding tournaments for an inordinate number of participants and incorporating all types of game formats," said Shack-Harris. "I don't think the entity itself cares much about poker overall, and there are frequently sloppy executions of various aspects of the series that have demonstrated this assumption." Shack-Harris lists the increasing number of reentry events, smaller buy-in events, and WSOP Europe and WSOP Asia-Pacific as evidence that the WSOP has sacrificed the value of a bracelet. He believes the WSOP should follow examples from major sporting championships like tennis' Wimbledon or golf's The Masters in regards to the exclusivity of the titles. "Not every player is going to agree with every business decision you make. But we are guided by the simple principle that we want the WSOP to mean as much as it can to as many people around the world as possible not the same as it once did to a few," said Ty Stewart, Executive Director of the WSOP. "Our mission and our opportunity is to present the poker world to the rest of the world and paint the game in a positive light." Not all players believe the decision to turn to online poker in light of the unprecedented circumstances created by the pandemic is a bad direction. Mike Leah, who won a WSOP bracelet in 2014 at WSOP APAC, thinks the pandemic provided a catalyst for Series officials to expand their offering. "The thing that it really did for them is it gave them an urgency to find a partner outside of the US which I think is amazing because instead of being forced to play on WSOP.com, there's another avenue for WSOP prize pools and bracelets and that's probably the biggest positive that came out of this," said Leah. The postponement of the 2020 WSOP live series came with a caveat that organizers were targeting the fall to host some form a live event in 2020. Shack-Harris believes that adding 85 bracelet events without solidifying plans for the live series sets a dangerous precedent. "I think there will likely still be a live series later in the year, and offering up 85 online events for a bracelet with no transparency regarding the potential of a live format going or not going bothers me more than anything else," said Shack-Harris. "If people make arrangements to play online because they feel this is their only shot at a bracelet this year, and then a postponed series shows up out of the blue, I think it's somewhat deceitful, but probably great business." Despite their intentions to hold a live event in Las Vegas this year, Stewart isn't sure how that can happen as the coronavirus situation changes frequently. Current Nevada gaming regulations limit the number of players at a table to no more than six and not all poker rooms are even open. Travel restrictions in place would also significantly limit the number of players who could attend from outside of the United States. "We have no concrete pathway to the offline event. We have a partner who is absolutely all-in. We have the opportunity to organize massive prize pools, deliver buzz and energy for the industry, and perhaps most of all, engage an entirely new segment of players," Stewart argued. "I’m looking at WSOP Online as the biggest ever marketing vehicle for international players and the only failure will be if we can’t convert many of them to playing WSOP Las Vegas when we’re back in session." The online series puts the lack of online poker regulation in the United States into the spotlight once again. Only players physically located in Nevada or New Jersey will be able to play the bracelet events on WSOP.com and GGPoker does not accept players from the United States. Pennsylvania has had regulated gaming, including poker, available since last summer, but Stewart indicated the company is still in the development process of getting up and running in that state and was unable to give a timeline for their launch there. This leaves a large percentage of the United States on the outside, unable to play without traveling and Leah believes a high number of the complaints are coming from players who simply can't play. "I think if you went through the people that have negative feedback or complaints about this, probably at least 80% of them are from people who are not in New Jersey or Nevada or the rest of the world or somewhere where they can play," said Leah. "I'd be disappointed as well, but people have been disappointed about unregulated poker in the US for a long time so this is just something that brings it to the forefront again." The complete GGPoker event schedule has not been posted, but it is expected to include only Hold'em and Omaha event. The 31-event schedule from WSOP.com also includes only those two games. The lack of mixed games - traditionally a staple of the WSOP schedule - has also upset many players that feel the online product isn't a proper reflection of the history of the Series. "I'm disappointed too and you best believe you may see even more mixed games at the next live WSOP," said Stewart. "But while much of the summer schedule will feel familiar to the spirit of WSOP at the Rio, this is WSOP Online, and online is dominated by flop games. If we gave GGPoker a little more time to develop, who knows. But we are not going to ask them to rush a new unproven derivative to the market in time for the summer." Some in the industry have made the suggestion that the bracelets awarded this summer shouldn't be held in the same regard as events won in a live tournament. The argument is similar to the one that people made when Caesars expanded the tournament offering to Europe with bracelet events in 2007 and Asia-Pacific in 2013. Rob Yong, owner of the Dusk Till Dawn cardroom in England and partypoker partner, floated the idea of awarding silver bracelets for events not held in Las Vegas. "I understand the argument, the sentiment of it, but I also know that a lot fewer people would play," said Leah. "With bracelets, they'll be even bigger but if you take them away you're going to lose some of the interest and obviously the prize pools will be smaller and make people not want to play as much. I think a lot fewer people will play. If it's a bracelet event I know I'm going to do my best to play every single event." Leah, who lives in Canada, has already begun the search for full-time childcare for his one-year-old son to ensure he can play as many of the 54 events as possible. Stewart thinks any attempt to diminish any bracelet win is going to be difficult given the expected turnout for the online events and feels comparison of various events and eras isn't worth the headache. "The relative value of bracelets is not up to me to determine; large fields vs high rollers, Europe fields vs 1990’s Binion’s," Stewart said while indicating the bracelet design for these 85 events is a differentiating factor. "But I have my strong point of view on this series. Based upon the numbers we project for most of the events, these will statistically be some of the hardest bracelets to win, ever. And the prize pools will be such that it will be very difficult to try and diminish the accomplishment." The original 2020 WSOP schedule had a total of 101 events, with 14 of them being played exclusively on WSOP.com. A sevenfold increase in the number of online events is a gigantic leap with huge revenue opportunities for the WSOP. Leah doesn't think the online events will ever be able to replace or replicate the summer camp, bucket list feel that the live tournament series is famous for. "I don't think anything's ever going to change the annual WSOP in Vegas every summer because that's everyone's favorite thing of the year. But adding to it, maybe an online bracelet series at some point in the year on WSOP.com and GG ends up being an annual thing and I could see that as being a pretty positive thing." Going from 85 online events this year to a smaller number next year goes against the WSOP's previous expansion online. Since launching online events in 2015, the total number of them on the schedule has gone from one (2015, 2016) to three (2017) to four (2018), to nine (2019) with 14 originally scheduled for 2020. Stewart believes the unique set of circumstances presented to them this year doesn't mean they'll end up with a similar schedule once a full schedule can be played live in Las Vegas. "I don’t foresee we’ll have this number of online events again. But there certainly is a place for online bracelets on an every year basis," Stewart said. "I am optimistic this year will be huge, and then we can evaluate. Everything we do is on a year to year basis to test the reception. The same players against the idea of a vast online series now may be demanding it in the future."
  9. When World Series of Poker commentator David Tuchman reached out to Nathan 'surfbum' Gamble to provide guest commentary for the final table of Event #6 ($600 Omaha Hi-Lo 8-or-better), Gamble was happy to accept. Hours later, Tuchman had an opening for a PLO8 analyst on his WSOP Twitch broadcast as 30-year-old professional mixed game specialist Gamble was, indeed, at the final table in search of a second career World Series of Poker gold bracelet and the first-place prize of over $89,000. For anyone paying close attention, Gamble’s ascension to the upper echelon of the mixed games could be viewed through his incredible PLO8 resume. Since 2017, the World Series of Poker has held ten PLO8 or PLO8 variant tournaments. Gamble has cashed in six of them, winning two. Gamble won his first WSOP event back in 2017, taking down the $1,500 PLO8 event that year for over $223,000. But back then, for him, it was a very different experience. His final table was shoved into the back of the Amazon Room of the Rio, giving way for the $50K Poker Players Championship to take the main stage. Gamble had one family friend on his rail and when it was over, his "surreal victory" was enjoyed mostly by himself. Plenty has changed in the three years since his first bracelet win. Gamble is a bit of "pros pro", a game starter in the Wynn’s $80/$160 Mixed. In his nearly two years since moving to Las Vegas to pursue playing live poker professionally, he’s evolved into being thought of as a "guy who kinda knows what he’s doing" into a regular in the high limit mixed games community - with what feels like "the full support of the industry" behind him. When you talk to Gamble, it’s clear that his love of mixed games is less about the money, a and more the people he’s met along the way. “I don’t play much No Limit anymore. if you look at my cashes I’ve played the Main Event one time. I made a deep run in it but I never played it again. In mixed games, people are more open, more talkative and it’s more dynamic,” Gamble said. “It’s a lot more of that fun environment that, even if you are winning or losing, people enjoy themselves.” It’s this community that Gamble credits in his continued passion for all facets of poker, not just No Limit Hold’em. “It’s the camaraderie. We’ve built a pretty large community at this point and we’ll have people just stop in and ask ‘What are ya’ll doing? You’re so fun and you’re talkative,’" Gamble says, his Texas roots showing. “We’ve had people sit down simply because we’re having fun and enjoying ourselves. It’s almost like what you would hear about back in the day about Bobby’s Room. People they’re no way they’re playing for real money, they’re so friendly…but half of us literally go out for lunch and we hang out and enjoy each other’s company but at the same time it’s competitive on the felt.” Gamble’s interest strayed from No Limit Hold’em from the get-go. He recalls playing free-to-play online poker when he was 13, looking to build a bigger free chip bankroll. “I noticed that the Pot Limit Omaha side played bigger and you could build up chips faster,” he said, “It was more swingy and more 'gambley'.” Eventually, his dad gave him $11 to play a tournament, which, when it was canceled he was allowed to keep. He took that $11 and found an edge playing in alternate forms of poker. Where people were lacking skill he says he “instantly found a niche.” He honed his mixed game skills in the pre-Black Friday tables of Full Tilt Poker, putting in work in PLO while others were battling in No Limit. “I would get in 100 reps a day of PLO8 Sit & Go’s, and that’s why I think it’s extremely hard to learn the game now because it’s not online, there’s no sit and goes. You have two or three tournaments weekly so it’s very difficult for people to learn,” he recalled. “I just happened to be fortunate enough to learn a game that there’s not a lot of work done on.” And here in the 2020 World Series of Poker, that work is continuing to pay off. On Monday night Gamble found himself in line to add to his PLO accomplishments. “At every single break for the first ten hours of the tournament, I was between first and fifth in chips. And I told people, ‘this is just flowing, I’m on the right trajectory, everything is going as smoothly as can be.” But at the final table, the one he was supposed to be commentating on, he found himself short-stacked, and doubt began to creep in. Was he really going pull of another gold-bracelet moment? Rather than talking to an audience, he spoke to himself. “But then you say, ‘OK, I’ve been here before, I know what to do and if the cards break slightly in my favor - I’m a favorite to win this.’" “When the very last card came off…that’s when it all hit. Up until then, I was just in a zone. And you don’t even realize it, you are just in a complete, absolute zone. I didn’t know what we were playing for, I didn’t really care what we were playing for but as soon as that card hit I instantly realized I won it,” he said. “The adrenaline hit and it took me back to when I won my first bracelet in 2017 where you're in disbelief and it doesn’t feel real.” But there’s a distinct difference this year from 2017, and it’s not due to society’s current pandemic. “This year, through playing mixed games, I’ve met some of the most incredible players in this community. So, on break, I would call Brandon Shack-Harris and we would talk things through. I talked with Ali Nejad…I just had a rail that was really there to support me and that meant a lot,” he said. ”I don’t know if I would have won if it wasn’t for my rail and the people I’ve made friends with since the first one. I really do owe them. The difference between the first and the second was the first was all me, the second was due to the community I’ve grown a part of.” “That, to me, means more than the actual bracelet.”
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