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Found 4 results

  1. It was another hectic week at the 2021 WSOP with one of the biggest tournaments of the year stepping into the spotlight and top-tier players adding to their WSOP legacies. The $50,000 Poker Players Championship brought out the stars and has played down to a final table with Eli Elezra holding the overnight chip lead. Plus, a pair of potential future Hall of Famers in Shaun Deeb and Brian Rast have won their way into rarified air by both winning their career fifth bracelet, and four was the magic number this week with four different players earning their fourth career bracelet. And, of course, Phil Hellmuth took to Twitter to a gripe about the WSOP Player of the Year formula. So let’s get into it, here are the five biggest storylines that made headlines during Week 5 of the WSOP! Hellmuth Goes Off On Player of the Year We’re getting peak Hellmuth here in 2021. He’s winning bracelets, dropping eff-bombs, and burning down the house. After a relatively quiet week from the 16-time champ, it looks like he finally took a look at the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year standings and didn’t like what he saw. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1455092561769472002?s=20 Hellmuth’s fast start to the WSOP has cooled off (so far) in the back half of the schedule with the lead he enjoyed for a few days having slipped away. From the looks of it, this might be the first time Hellmuth has really understood what it takes to win this award, part of which is an unwavering dedication to the grind by playing and trying to cash in everything in sight. READ: Five Former WSOP Players of the Year On How To Win It In 2021 However, Hellmuth has some support out there for his call to revise the POY formula. Daniel Negreanu, a constant contender over the past few years, has been lobbying for WSOP officials to streamline the number of results that are counted, making it so that a min-cash in a lower buy-in holds far less weight. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1455114358757871616?s=20 As of the time of publication, Hellmuth has slipped into fourth place behind two of his series nemesis - Jake Schwartz, who took over the lead, Kevin Gerhart is in second after his second series bracelet win, and Anthony Zinno, who set the Brat off in the $10K Stud. It’s tight at the top, with Shaun Deeb and Ari Engel rounding out the top 6. $50K Poker Players Championship Takes Center Stage For many popular poker players, the $50K Poker Players Championship is the actual Main Event of the World Series of Poker. It’s a mix of nine different games, played by the elite-of-the-elite in those games for an enormous sum of money. This year was no different as 63 runners, including some of the biggest names in the game, gathered in the Amazon room to battle for a spot in the final five players. Late on Tuesday night (Day 3) the players battled to burst the money bubble. Eventually, 2019 WSOP Player of the Year Robert Campbell saw his tournament come to an end when he was ousted in 11th place. The next day the final 10 returned and it didn’t take long for Milke Wattel to be eliminated in 10th for $82,623. Daniel Negreanu surged and then fell, leaving it all on the felt as he exited in ninth place for $91,595. Then, Nick Schulman busted in eighth, swiftly leaving to pick up his $106,120, the first of the six-figure payouts. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456012324372815874?s=20 When the table combined to seven, everything slowed down. Way down. The table battled nearly all day with chips and the chip lead being passed back and forth. In the end, Matt Glantz fell in seventh place collecting $128,236, and was followed by Josh Arieh, appearing at his second final table in as many years, busting in sixth place for $161,422. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456026758638145540?s=20 Eli Elezra held the overnight chip lead, followed by Paul Volpe, Chris Brewer, Dan Cates, and Ryan Leng. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456295274075148291?s=20 The final five will play to a winner on Friday, November 5 where one player will have their name added to the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy and collect the $954,020 first-place prize. Five Bracelets For Deeb, Rast There has been an uncanny number of three-time career WSOP bracelet winners at the series this year. However this week, it was the five-timer club that added a couple new, very notable members. First, Brian Rast took down the $3K Six-Max for his fifth career bracelet for $474,102 and in the process made a case for induction into the Poker Hall of Fame. “Really, the number one thing at this point is kind of just making the Poker Hall of Fame,” Rast said to PokerGO after his win. “I mean, I feel like, I think I’ve done enough in my career and I turn 40 on November 8, so less than two weeks.” https://twitter.com/tsarrast/status/1453640943832166404?s=20 Another likely future Hall of Fame nominee is Shaun Deeb who put on an impressive performance to take down the $25,000 PLO High Roller for $1,251,860, just the third million-dollar score of the series and vaulting him into the 2021 earnings lead. Like, Rast, when all was said and done, Deeb had an eye on the future. But it’s not the Hall of Fame he was looking forward to, it was tracking down Hellmuth in the bracelet chase. “Oh, I’m going to pass Phil [Hellmuth] eventually. It’s going to take me a while, but I’m going to pass Phil. He’s a great player when he’s sharp, but he can’t play every day like me,” he said. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1454743417095790600?s=20 As noted above, Deeb’s win thrust him into the top 5 of the 2021 POY race. Four Is The New Three Earlier in the series, Anthony Zinno picked up his third and then fourth career bracelet. This week he welcomed Brian Yoon, Ben Yu, Farzad Bonyadi, and Kevin Gerhart into the club of players who picked up their fourth in 2021. Most recently, Yoon took down the $10,000 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship for a handsome $240,341 score. His list of bracelets is certainly impressive with prior wins the 2013 Little One For One Drop for $663,727, the 2014 $5K 8-Max for $633,341, and then he won the 2017 $1,500 Monster Stack for $1,094,349. His latest victory puts him up over $3.4 million in earnings. Ben Yu’s WSOP resume is equally impressive having won the $10,000 Six-Handed NLHE Championship for $721,453, his 11th cash of the 2021 series. Looking back on Yu’s success shows him winning four bracelets since 2015 including the $10K Limit in 2015 for $291,456, the $10K Limit 2-7 Championship in 2017 for $232,738, and the $50,000 NLHE High Roller in 2018 for more than $1.6 million. Yu moved into fourth place on the NLHE POY leaderboard behind Daniel Lazrus, Pete Chen, and Jason Koon and 6th on the overall leaderboard. Joining them is Farzad Bonyadi, who took down the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Lowball Championship for $297,051 (on the same day as Rast won his 5th bracelet) for the fourth of his career. His first bracelet win dates back to 1998 when he won a $2,000 Limit Hold’em event for $429,940. Six years later, in 2004, he took down a $1K Limit 2-7 for another $86,980. His third came in 2005 when he won a $2,500 NLHE tournament for $594,960. Finally, on Wednesday, Kevin Gerhart won his second bracelet of the series, fourth overall, in the $1,500 PLO 8 for a $186,789 score. Gerhart won the $10K H.O.R.S.E. earlier this year for a $361,124 payday and has an online bracelet from 2020 and a $1,500 Razz win in 2019. A big week for multiple bracelet winners. Distenfeld Donates to A Good Cause Last week, the poker community showed up for a fellow player who is faced with an unthinkable future but wanted to make one of his poker dreams come true. This week, another act of incredible generosity took place when Gershon Distenfeld pledged his entire winnings from his victory in the $1,500 NLHE Shootout to charity. Distenfeld earned $204,063 with the victory and every single dime is going to be put to the benefit of others. Distenfeld has made no secret that he’s been graced with more than enough wealth to take care of his family and so he plays poker for the competition and, in the result he wins, to help others. “My wife Aviva and I have been blessed with financial means and it’s a core value of ours to give both our money and our time to help make the world a better place,” he told PokerNews after his win. He followed up with a call to action for all bracelet winners to donate 1% of their winnings to the charity of their choice.
  2. The 33rd day of action at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas produced two more WSOP bracelet event winners as Brian Yoon and Anatolii Zyrin both claimed gold for the fourth and second time respectively. For Brian Yoon, it was a 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw victory that saw him overcome the chip leader heading into the final seven, Danny Wong. Yoon Topples Wong after Epic Three-Handed Action With seven players remaining, Wong led with just over 1.5 million chips, with Yoon trailing him on 1.25m. It took almost no time for the first player to be busted, albeit a short time after an extended period of play that had seen ‘Crazy’ Mike Thorpe busted in eighth place to bring about the final table. Jordan Siegel was the unlucky player to leave in seventh for $31,690 when his hopes were ended by the runaway chip leader Wong. The winner in that hand almost instantly claimed another scalp, taking out the talented Brandon Shack-Harris for a sixth-place finish worth $41,270. Shack-Harris, who has cashed on multiple times this series and has been one of the under-the-radar stars of the 2021 WSOP, crashed out with a rough nine eclipsed by Wong’s rough eight. Six became five when Joao Vieira busted for $54,993, as Brian Yoon began his ascent to the top of the leaderboard. Wong was still winning more pots, however, and looked destined for the win such was the rate at which he was raking in chips. Don Nguyen let in fourth for $74,939, before his conqueror, Wil Wilkinson, was busted in third for $104,381 after a period where each of the three remaining players held the lead. By the time Wilkinson busted in third, it had been hours since Nguyen’s elimination. A dinner break, multiple exchanges of the chip lead and just two remained for the bracelet battle. Wong had the lead with 3 million chips to Yoon’s 2.3m, but Yoon’s experience told as the multiple bracelet winner applied pressure on Wong, who remains without gold despite this closest of calls. Wong had the chance to double back in drawing one with seven-high against Yoon’s ten-high completed hand, but a king as his fifth card finished off Wong to give Yoon the bracelet and top prize of $240,341, Wong consoled in some small part by the $148,341 runner-up prize. WSOP 2021 Event #57 $10,000 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Final Table Results: Brian Yoon - $240,341 Danny Wong - $148,341 Wil Wilkinson - $104,381 Don Nguyen - $74,939 Joao Vieira - $54,993 Brandon Shack-Harris - $41,270 Jordan Siegel - $31,690 Zyrin Wins Second Bracelet after Colossal Victory Anatolii Zyrin won the $400-entry Colossus to claim the massive $314,705 top prize and his second WSOP bracelet after beating Michael Lee heads-up. Heading into the final, it was Lee who held a big chip lead, but the dangerous Zyrin hovered in the middle of the pack and came through in the final stages to claim victory. It was Penh Lo who was the first player to bust the nine-handed final table, busting in ninth for $32,240. Lo was all-in with [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"] but couldn’t hold against Eric Kim’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] as the board played out [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3d"] and gave Kim a big stack too. With eight players remaining, Lithuanian player Vincas Tamasauskas was sent home by the leader after misfortune on the river. Raising for all but one chip pre-flop, Tamasauskas had [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"] and was called only by Lee with [poker card="As"]Jh], with Tamasauskas tossing in the final chip on the flop and getting a quick call. The board of [poker card="6c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Js"] was a brutal one for the Lithuanian to take, with Lee’s rivered jack sending him home for $40,885. By the time the next player busted, Lee was still leading, but Zyrin had risen almost to the top of the chipcounts, even after Lee’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"] was enough to see off Martin Gavasci in seventh for $51,180 when Gavasci’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jc"] was dominated to defeat, a king on both turn and river improving Lee’s advantage of the rest of the field. At that stage, Zyrin was spiking, losing one pot then winning an even bigger one, but some players’ stacks were going in only one direction and Eric Kim slid out of contention when his [poker card="Tc"][poker card="Td"] couldn’t hold against Zyrin’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"], the board of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2d"] paying the eventual winner off in a crucial flip. Had he lost it, Zyrin would have been very short, but instead, he suddenly looked a massive threat to others’ hopes. Zyrin was starting to build momentum and wasn’t done with the eliminations, immediately taking out another opponent, David Ripley, in fifth for $86,650. Ripley - believe it or not - was all-in and at risk with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="8s"], but Zyrin held [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7c"] and with his foe down to four big blinds, hoovered them up after the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="4c"] board played out. Phuoc Nguyen had been quiet for some time, but couldn’t afford to hang about with the blinds escalating. His last chips went into the idle pre-flop with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Th"], but he had run into a monster, with Kevin Rand holding [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"] and no help came to save Nguyen, who busted in fourth place for $112,730. Three-handed play lasted some time, but Rand was always playing catch-up to both Lee and Zyrin and despite doubling on several occasions, couldn’t keep doing so. He bowed out for a result worth $147,595 when his all-in with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="9c"] started ahead of Zyrin’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jd"] but ended behind on the tantalizing board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"]. Zyrin won that hand and in doing so went into the heads-up battle with 235 million chips, a considerable chunk more than Lee’s 140 million at a big blind of 6,000,000. Despite some brave attempts to play back and double into the lead, Lee’s stack went south and when a flop of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Js"][poker card="8h"] came, Lee bet holding [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2d"], getting a call from Zyrin. The turn of [poker card="Qh"] saw both players check, but on the [poker card="Tc"] river, Zyrin check-shoved a big bet from Lee and when the latter called, he saw that his rivered straight was no match for Zyrin’s turned flush as the Russian held [poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"]. While Lee collected $194,450 for finishing as runner-up, he’d failed in his attempt to win his first WSOP bracelet, instead seeing Zyrin win his second and the top prize of $314,705. WSOP 2021 Event #55 $400 Colossus Final Table Results: Anatolii Zyrin - $314,705 Michael Lee - $194,450 Kevin Rand - $147,595 Phuoc Nguyen - $112,730 David Ripley - $86,650 Eric Kim - $67,025 Martin Gavasci - $51,180 Vincas Tamasauskas - $40,885 Penh Lo - $32,240 Slaughter Leads Super Seniors It was a massive Day 2 of the Super Seniors Event, with just 65 players remaining at the close of the action. There were some very big names in the field on the day the money bubble burst, but while some made the cut, such as Sammy Farha, James Hess and Dan Shak, others such as Barry Greenstein and Karl Pregitzer didn’t, the latter losing to Farha along the way to the 2003 WSOP Main Event runner-up making the money. With two days of the event to go, Slaughter (1,835,000) will be chased keenly by his nearest challengers Randall Bolick (1,755,000), and Bill Stabler (1,725,000) in the coming levels, with play expected to go down to the final table on Day 3. WSOP 2021 Event #58 $1,000 Super Seniors Top 10 Chipcounts: David Slaughter - 1,835,000 Randall Bolick - 1,755,000 Bill Stabler - 1,725,000 Reginald Powell - 1,565,000 Andrew Bodewin - 1,355,000 Jean-Luc Adam - 1,140,000 Robert Chow - 1,100,000 David Smith - 1,080,000 Steve Miller - 1,025,000 Joseph Neiman - 975,000 Tag Team Down to Ten Teams as Weisner and Liu Lose Out There are just ten teams left in the $1,000-entry Event #59, the Tag Team event which sees teams of two players take over from each other when their comrade is against the ropes. On what was a very busy day, only 10 teams of two would stay in the hunt by the close of Day 2, with players such as Melanie Weisner and Xuan Liu falling by the wayside albeit after a great run. https://twitter.com/melanieweisner/status/1455424613781884930 Others fell to the same fate, with PokerGO presenting team Brent Hanks and Jeff Platt shot down when their pocket kings ran into pocket aces to bust. The duo, who dressed as Daniel Negreanu and Phil Hellmuth throughout, would not make the top 10, but Michael Newman and Robert Ormnt did, bagging up the lead with over 2.9 million chips, far and away the biggest stack with their nearest foes Tomer Wolf and David Landell some way back on 1.9 million. WSOP 2021 Event #59 $1,000 Tag Team Final Table Chipcounts: Michael Newman and Robert Ormont - 2,960,000 Tomer Wolf and David Landell - 1,900,000 Mike Ruter and Samy Dighlawi - 1,700,000 Holly Babbitt and Michael Babbitt - 1,345,000 Alfie Adam and Vidur Sethi - 1,315,000 Benjamin Miner and Dmitriy Uskach - 1,065,000 Zachary Erdwurm and Steven Jones - 850,000 Amanda Botfeld and David Botfeld - 790,000 Scott Johnston and Bob Fisher - 455,000 Mike Lutz and Matt Krebs - 430,000 Paul Volpe, Jungleman Top $50K PPC Day 2 The second day of action in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship took place at the Rio and in particular, one player was less than happy with their exit. With 44 players beginning the day, Phil Hellmuth was one who joined the field late to eventually swell the numbers to a total of 63 entries. Things did not go to plan for the Poker Brat. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1455434490583552002 With just 35 players remaining in with a chance of winning one of the most coveted bracelets at this or any World Series of Poker, Paul Volpe (1,092,000) leads the field from Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates (944,000) and Adam Friedman. Plenty of other big names litter the leaderboard, of course, with Daniel Negreanu worth singling out for mention, purely because of the way he has made Day 3 of the event. Down to just 77,000 overnight with no option of rebuying, Kid Poker survived on a big stack of 655,000. With no Shaun Deeb making the cut, ‘DNegs’ could be one to watch as the tournament progresses as players battle to get their hands of the Chip Reese trophy. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Paul Volpe - 1,092,000 Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates - 944,000 Adam Friedman - 913,000 Alex Livingston - 872,000 Chris Vitch - 849,000 George Alexander - 820,000 Brian Rast - 790,000 Yuval Bronshtein - 775,000 Chad Campbell - 764,000 Nick Schulman - 723,000 Deepstack Championship Gets Underway In Event #61, the $600-entry Deepstack Championship, Robert Hankins grabbed the chip lead with 868,000, though this is one of the slimmest leads for some time in 2021 WSOP Events. Hankins leads by a three-bet from Samuel Taylor (838,000) and Radoslav Stoyanov (830,000), with others such as KC Vaughan (743,000) and Ping Liu (702,000) also well placed in the top 10. WSOP 2021 Event #61 $600 Deepstack Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Robert Hankins - 868,000 Samuel Taylor - 838,000 Radoslav Stoyanov - 830,000 Dhaval Mudgal - 786,000 Justin Arnwine - 779,000 KC Vaughan - 743,000 Matas Budginas - 719,000 Ping Liu - 702,000 Nissar Quraishi - 687,000 Alan Ferraro - 686,000 Toma Tops $1,500 PLO Leaderboard In tournament terms, the last event to take place on the schedule was Event #62, the $1,500-entry PLO8 event, which saw Japanese player Tsugunari Toma pile up one of the biggest Day 1 leads of the series. Toma amounted 1,076,000 chips, by far and away more than anyone else and almost as much as his nearest three challengers combined stacks. Day 2 will see the play whittle down to just a handful of players, so watching exactly how Toma gets on will be vital as it looks like anyone who wishes to play for the win will have to go through him first. WSOP 2021 Event #62 $1,500 PLO Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Tsugunari Toma - 1,076,000 Steve Chanthabouasy - 393,000 Paul Holder - 380,000 Maury Barrett - 373,000 Michael Trivett - 342,000 Raymond Henson - 339,000 Sean Remz - 333,000 Nathan Gamble - 328,000 Andrew Yeh - 318,000 Dustin Dirksen - 314,000 Finally, with the World Series of Poker just a matter of two days away, one former champion in particular can’t wait to get into the mix and will hope for some cheers of ‘Aussie, Aussie, Aussie!’ to echo around the Rio one more time. https://twitter.com/JosephHachem/status/1455324002138738690
  3. Two more WSOP bracelets were won at the Rio on Sunday night as Ben Yu claimed his fourth gold bracelet of his career with a victory in the $10,000 NLHE Six-Handed for $721,453 and Robert McMillan perservered in Event #52, the Seniors Event, for his first-ever WSOP gold and $561,060 as he closed out a famous victory. Ben Yu Wins Fourth WSOP Bracelet Ben Yu won his fourth WSOP bracelet as he closed out the six-handed Event #56 in style, beating Nikita Kuznetsov heads-up to win $721,453. At an exciting final table, play kicked off between the final six players with Mike Sowers holding a big lead with 4.8 million chips to Kuznetsov’s 3.8 million. At that stage, Yu was the short stack, but he still had 49 big blinds to play with, and with WSOP victories in 2015, 2017, and 2018 to call on, he proved dogged enough to grab bracelet number four. The first player of the six to bust was former four-time WSOP bracelet winner Asi Moshe, with the Israeli going down with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"] after his top pair on the flop was shot down by Sowers’ flush after his [poker card="As"][poker card="8s"] hit a flush on the river to win through and condemn Moshe to sixth and $97,660. With five players left, Sowers may have risen to chip leader, but Yu was making moves too, albeit in smaller pots. Steve Yea was busted in fifth place for $137,303 when all-in with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kd"] against Ariel Mantel’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Tc"], with all the chips going into the middle pre-flop. The board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="6h"] sending Yea home and further boosting Sowers’s stack. Mantel was on a mission too, however, and a double-up through Sowers opened up the whole tournament. Yu grabbed some from Sowers too as sharks circled in the water. Sowers lost more chips either side of the dinner break and suddenly was out of the event, all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"] against Yu’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6d"] and delivered from the felt by a king on the river. Sowers had banked $198,205 for his deep run and Mantel had it even better when he cashed in third place for $293,578. After some perfectly timed aggression from Kuznetsov weakened Mantel’s stack, the latter was all-in with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Js"]. Yu, by far the chip leader at this stage, called with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="7h"] and both he and his heads-up opponent watched in delight as the board of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="4c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9h"] busted the unfortunate Argentinian and send Kuznetsov into raptures. “My friend,” he exclaimed in the Thunderdome. “Russian people love you!” Heads-up, Yu had an almost unassailable lead, sitting with 16.8 million playing his Russian frenemy’s 2.8 million. While Kuznetsov had laddered, he could not manage a further ascent, and fell away when his [poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"] was shot down by Yu’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jh"], who had no little trouble holding through the sweaty [poker card="As"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="3h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="8d"] board. Yu’s victory, worth $721,453, gave him his fourth bracelet, with his Russian opponent winning $445,892 for coming second. WSOP 2021 Event #56 $10,000 Six-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Ben Yu - $721,453 Nikita Kuznetsov - $445,892 Ariel Mantel - $293,578 Mike Sowers - $198,205 Steve Yea - $137,303 Asi Moshe - $97,660 McMillan Closes Out Emotional Seniors Victory When the nine-handed final table began, McMillan was one of the shortest stacks, sat on just 6 million chips, way behind Christopher Cummings, who had started the day as chip leader and continued that trend to the final table, sat behind 24.3 million as the action got underway. That lead had increased by the time that Daniel Lujano became the first player to bust, crashing out in ninth place for $58,425 when his shove with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="2s"] ran into Jonathan Ingalls with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8s"] and couldn’t catch up. Next to go was Todd Hansen, who busted in eighth place for $73,873 when Ingalls again claimed another victim. This time, Ingalls had [poker card="Ts"][poker card="Tc"] and put his opponent all-in, with Hansen calling with [poker card="8s"][poker card="8d"] on a flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3c"], but the turn [poker card="2c"] and river [poker card="2d"] couldn’t save Hansen. Ingalls was on the rise and he wasn’t the only one, with Dennis Jensen also chipping up, specifically at the expense of Louis Cheffy when he busted in seventh for $94,030. Cheffy shoved with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ks"], but would need to hit as Jensen called with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"] and didn’t on the jack-high board. Despite those heroics, Jensen spent the next mini session watching the stack he’d worked so hard to accumulate disappear. On a board showing [poker card="Kc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="8d"], Jensen led out then called off Robert Davis’ all-in. Jensen was at risk with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Tc"] for top pair on the flop, but he was behind Davis’ [poker card="7s"][poker card="3s"] and stayed there through the [poker card="2s"] river to bust in sixth for $120,484. In fifth place, it was the overnight chip leader Christopher Cummings who fell after the day got away from him and he cashed for $155,401 instead of playing for the title. Cummings moved all-in with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Tc"] and was called by Daniel Stebbins with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ad"]. The queen-high board provided no sweat for Cummings, who was drawing dead by the river. With four players left, Ingalls met with his exit as Davis claimed another scalp. This time, Davis had [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Th"] and Ingalls was all-in pre-flop and at risk with the dominated [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9s"]. The board of [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2d"] saw Ingalls hit his card on the turn only for it to provide his opponent with the winning straight as he crashed out in fourth place for $201,753. Three-handed, Davis had a big lead, sitting with 73 million chips to McMillan’s 21 million and Stebbins with just 14.2 million. That changed as Stebbins doubled through Davis with jacks holding against queen-ten suited and as play continued, the stacks evened up with each man grabbing the initiative at a different time. Stebbins it was who busted third for $263,640, but when he did so it was to the new chip leader in McMillan. Stebbins rivered a straight with [poker card="Th"][poker card="7h"] on a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Js"][poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"], but the same card gave McMillan and unassailable full house with the [poker card="8s"][poker card="8c"] in his hand for Stebbins to depart. McMillan, so short earlier in the day, now had a better than 2:1 chip lead. It took next to no time for the winner to close it out. McMillan raised to a flop of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2d"] then saw a turn of [poker card="Kd"], sitting with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9c"]. Davis had come all that way with [poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] but put McMillan to the ultimate test with a shove on the turn, only for McMillan to find the call and watch the end the tournament play out in his favor when the [poker card="Ks"] landed on the river. WSOP 2021 Event #52 $1,000 Seniors Event Final Table Results: Robert McMillan - $561,060 Robert Davis - $346,743 Daniel Stebbins - $263,640 Jonathan Ingalls - $201,753 Christopher Cummings - $155,4016 Dennis Jensen - $120,484 Louis Cheffy - $94,030 Todd Hansen - $73,873 Daniel Lujano - $58,425 Less Than 50 Remain In COLOSSUS In Event #55, the massive Colossus event, which costs just $400 to enter, saw 1,181 players whittled down to just 49 by the close of play, with four former WSOP bracelet winners in Anatolii Zyrin (9,675,000), Vincas Tamasauskas (6,025,000), Brett Apter (3,000,000) and Carlos Chang (1,775,000) all making Day 3. The Day 2 chip lead is held by Rafael Fernades with 23,300,000 chips, who is followed in the counts by John Trinh (18,850,000) and Elad Kubi (18,675,000), meaning a big lead is in place for Day 3. With others such as Avi Cohen (12,675,000) and Matthew O’Meara (12,400,000) also making the top 10, it’s a stellar field who will return to battle for the bracelet on Day 3. WSOP 2021 Event #55 $400 Colossus Top 10 Chipcounts: Rafael Fernandes - 23,300,000 John Trinh - 18,850,000 Elad Kubi - 18,675,000 Michael Lee - 16,900,000 Avi Cohen - 12,675,000 Matthew O'Meara - 12,400,000 Penh Lo - 12,175,000 Yonatan Basin - 12,000,000 Lucas Kulbe - 11,925,000 Alexandre Malod - 11,900,000 Wong Leads $10K 2-7 Triple Draw Final 8 Event #57 saw 43 Day 2 players play down to just eight as Danny Wong had the kind of dominant day at the Rio that many of us can only dream of. Wong bagged up an incredible 1,755,000 chips by the close of play, with second-placed Brian Yoon (1,170,000), the only other player with over a million chips. Elsewhere in the final eight, players such as Joao Vieira (290,000) and Brandon Shack-Harris (275,000) will both be attempting to prove that a short-stacked player can win from this position yet again, but others won’t have that chance having busted on Day 2. Those included stars of the felt such as Dan Smith, who finished 9th for $24,910, Nathan Gamble (10th for $20,057), and five-time bracelet winner and POY boss Shaun Deeb, who departed in 13th place for $16,552. WSOP 2021 Event #57 $10,000 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Final Table Chipcounts: Danny Wong - 1,755,000 Brian Yoon - 1,170,000 Wil Wilkinson - 945,000 Don Nguyen - 565,000 Jordan Siegel - 300,000 Joao Vieira - 290,000 Brandon Shack-Harris - 275,000 Mike Thorpe - 110,000 Doyle Brunson Plays The Super Seniors In the Super Seniors Event #58, there was a magical moment inside the Rio as Doyle ‘Texas Dolly’ Brunson arrived to play, sitting down in Level 6 of the popular event. Brunson, who wore his trademark cowboy hat, is now 88 years old and looks unlikely to add to his incredible haul of 10 WSOP bracelets. Despite that, he remains a poker legend and while he lasted only an hour, his face ended up on thousands of people’s camera rolls. Brunson would not make Day 2 of the event, leaving the Rio in his ride-on chair to applause from many players and fans at the felt, but another WSOP legend did make the cut. Sammy Farha finished second to Chris Moneymaker in 2003 as the WSOP Main Event of that year precipitated a ‘poker boom’ we are all still enjoying the reverberations from. Farha totaled 204,100 by the close of play, good for one of the biggest stacks that remain as players such as Jack McClelland, Bill Klei, and Lisa Roberts all joined Doyle on the rail. Now that would be some cash game if they decided to set it up. Finally, it’s not just fans on the rail whose heads turned when Doyle Brunson zoomed into the room on his motorized cart. The 16-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth couldn’t wait to snap a selfie in the name of positivity. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1454953641442299906 WSOP 2021 Event #58 $1,000 Super Seniors Event Selected Chipcounts: Farhad Davoudzadeh - 414,000 Steve Schneider - 433,000 Gary Bain - 235,000 Ron Lemco - 231,600 Arthur Schiavo - 222,800 Randy Vee - 222,000 Hal Marcus - 220,000 Sammy Farha - 204,100 Martin Yates - 175,000 Valerii Lubenets - 175,000 Tag Team Back Again In Event #59, players joined forces to play in a ‘Tag Team’ event that cost $1,000 to enter and seemed to bring with it Hallowe’en fancy dress as standard. Jeff Platt - who reached fourth place in Event #43, the Double Stack, teamed up with fellow PokerGO broadcaster Brent Hanks to pay tribute to Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu in the... weirdest way possible. https://twitter.com/BuffaloHanks/status/1454948036937863171 At the felt, Hanks and Platt did very well, making the top 10 with 166,500 chips by close of play. The chip leaders were Mike Ruter and Samy Dighlawi (338,000), while the intriguing and powerful duo of Xuan Liu and Melanie Weisner bagged up 159,000 to put themselves in a very strong position for the win too. WSOP 2021 Event #59 $1,000 Tag Team Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Mike Ruter & Samy Dighlawi - 338,000 Haven Werner & Thomas Taylor - 295,000 Keith Doering & Bill Schaeffer - 235,500 Nikita Luther & Kunal Patni - 195,000 Mike Watson & Sarah Goddard - 169,500 Jeff Platt & Brent Hanks - 166,500 Alexey Mishuk & Alon Eldar - 160,000 Alon Eldar & Unknown - 160,000 Melanie Weisner & Xuan Liu - 159,000 Nellie Park & Joey Weissman - 144,500 Yockey Leads $50K PPC Day 1 Finally, Event #60 took place, with the $50,000 Poker Players Championship one of the highlights of the schedule for many fans, especially those of mixed games. With 43 entries on Day 1, there could well be just as many entries on Day 2, with registration closing after 10 levels and a break. One player barely got into his seat before he was all-in, but Scott Seiver survived and his opponent ended the night as the short stack. https://twitter.com/scott_seiver/status/1454938088753360902 With 39 players still in the hunt from their initial stack, only Jake Schwartz, Matt Ashton, Michael Noori, and Albert Daher went to the rail and will not be able to re-enter. Daniel Negreanu ended the day on just 77,000 chips. It was a different story for Bryce Yockey, who led the field with 653,000 chips by the time the bags came around, with 2019 WSOP Main Event runner-up Dario Sammartino (520,500) and Chris Vitch (504,500) his closest challengers. Others to thrive on Day 1 included Eli Elezra (460,500), Randy Ohel (457,000), Shaun Deeb (448,500), Yuval Bronshtein (440,500) and Brian Rast (437,000), all of whom made the top 10, while the aforementioned Seiver eventually bagged up 366,000 chips. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $1,000 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Bryce Yockey - 653,000 Dario Sammartino - 520,500 Chris Vitch - 504,500 Eli Elezra - 460,500 Randy Ohel - 457,000 Shaun Deeb - 448,500 Yuval Bronshtein - 440,500 Chad Campbell - 439,000 Brian Rast - 437,000 Ryan Leng - 433,000
  4. John Monette won his fourth World Series of Poker bracelet as he took down the $10,000-entry Limit Hold’em Championship at the Rio last night. At an entertaining final table that began 10-handed and finished with a thrilling heads-up, Monette won the $245,680 top prize and took home World Series gold. It marked his fourth victory in different poker variants with a Limit Hold’em crown to add to victories in previous events playing 2-7 Lowball Draw, Seven Card Stud, and 8-Game Mix. John Monette Wins $10K Limit It took no time at all for the first player of the final ten to bust as Ray Dehkharghani cashed for $18,506 in 10th place. Dehkharghani moved all-in for just two big blinds with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8s"] and was called by Eric Kurtzman with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Js"]. The flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="7s"][poker card="5c"] immediately put Kurtzman into the lead and that was the way it stayed through the [poker card="7h"] turn and [poker card="3h"] river. Kevin Song became the second player to hit the rail when his [poker card="As"][poker card="Js"] was no good on a flop of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="8s"], with Christopher Chung having flopped bottom set holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"]. The money went in on the [poker card="4h"] turn, but after the [poker card="9h"] river, Song has sung his last, busting in ninth place for $21,149. Despite winning that hand, a prolonged period of play would eventually see Chun himself eliminated next, when his shove holding [poker card="As"][poker card="2s"] was called by John Racener with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"]. The board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9d"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="6d"] saw Chung raise-call his stack off on the turn, which led to his exit in eighth place for $26,561. After Scott Tuttle got short to bust in seventh for $33,979, John Racener went for chip leader earlier in the event to on the rail in sixth place for $44,263. Racener had the best of it with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jd"], but Kurtzman called his shove on the [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="8d"] flop with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="8h"] and after the [poker card="5d"] turn, was fortunate to hit a [poker card="Ks"] on the river. It took a long time to bust a player in the second half of the final table, but Jason Somerville was eventually the unfortunate player to depart in fifth place for $58,697. Somerville was all-in and at risk for just four big blinds with [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] and was called by Nate Silver, whose [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"] prevailed across the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="7c"]Tc] board. Just a few minutes later, Terrence Chan was on the rail too in fourth place for $79,210 after his [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Jh"] couldn’t overtake Monnette’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kd"] with an ace on the turn after a jack on the flop doing the fatal damage to Chan’s stack. Three-handed player saw each man take the lead at a different stage, but when Eric Kurtzman re-raised all in on a flop of [poker card="5c"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4d"], Nate Silver made the call with a gutshot and two overs, holding [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"]. The [poker card="8h"] turn saw Silver move ahead, while Kurtzman cashed for $108,747. Heads up, Silver went into play with a slight lead, holding 3.1 million to Monnette’s 2.5 million. That would grow to a point where Silver had almost double Monette’s chips, but the four-time winner did not earn his reputation from fading away when down to the final duel and ground his way to a point where he himself had a large lead of 5:1. It was then that Monnette pressed home his advantage, and on a board showing [poker card="Tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7c"][poker card="Ks"], a raising war on the turn saw all the chips go into the middle with Silver holding [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Ts"] and Monnette with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"]. The [poker card="6d"] river changed nothing and Monnette was the champion. With Silver earning a silver-place prize of $151,842, it was Monnette who took the bracelet and a victory worth $245,680 Event #16: $10,000 Limit Hold'em Championship Final Table Results: John Monnette - $245,680 Nate Silver - $151,842 Eric Kurtzman - $108,747 Terrence Chan - $79,210 Jason Somerville - $58,697 John Racener - $44,263 Scott Tuttle - $33,979 Christopher Chung - $26,561 Kevin Song - $21,149 Ray Dehkharghani - $18,506 https://twitter.com/tchanpoker/status/1447073883262128128 After winning his first WSOP bracelet in the $25,000 Heads-Up Championship, Jason Koon thanked a poker legend for praising his - and others - achievements. https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1446975609314287617 First Bracelet For Bradley Jansen In Event #15, there was another bracelet winner as Bradley Jansen won his debut bracelet after taking down the final table of the $1,500-entry six-handed event. It was Jeremy Malod who went into play as the chip leader, but Jansen started like a train to push for a strong finish and it paid off handsomely for a top prize of $313,403. The final table got underway with seven players, but Mark Liedtke lost his seat fairly quickly to Jansen. Liedtke was all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] but couldn’t catch Jansen’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"]. French overnight chip leader Jeremy Malod was just as happy to win with queens, as he won a flip against Jesse Yaginuma to reduce the field to five when his [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"] held against the American player’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kh"]. Jeremy Malod would eliminate two of the next three players to go into heads-up with a 3:1 chip lead over the eventual winner, but Jansen managed to turn a straight to win a decent pot to move to within a double-up of the chip lead. As it happened, that took place after a flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"] provoked action, with Malod check-raising before a turn card of [poker card="2s"] got another big bet and call. On the [poker card="Jh"] river, Malod moved all-in, with Jansen snap-calling with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Tc"] for a rivered straight, way better than Malod’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="9d"] for top two pair from the flop. It was all over a short time later, with Malod’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3h"] initially taking the lead against Jansen’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Td"] on the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"] flop with the players committed pre-flop. The turn of [poker card="8h"] changed little, but the [poker card="6s"] on the river gave Jansen a straight and the bracelet along with the $313,403 top prize. The overnight chip leader going into the final day, Malod had to settle for being runner-up and winning $193,711. WSOP 2021 Event #15 $1,500 6-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Bradley Jansen - $313,403 Jeremy Malod - $193,711 Ryan Pedigo - $136,070 Sean Hegarty - $96,919 Ryan Andrada - $70,013 Jesse Yaginuma - $51,305 Mark Liedtke - $38,146 Stephen Song Soars To Milly Maker Chip Lead Event #17 saw a bumper day of action at the felt on Day 1b of the Millionaire Maker. Stephen Song was singing at the end of Day 1b, with the chip lead in the room of 431,000 ahead of Michael Nia (405,000) and Clement Van Driessche (397,000). Others to book a seat on Day 2 included Faraz Jaka (311,000), Maria Konnikova (243,000), Sam Abernathy (229,500) and WSOP Main Event runner-up Tony Miles (201,000). Big names busted, with some of the famous face on the rail being Ronnie Bardah, Ian O’Hara, Sam Razavi, Shaun Deeb and Sofia Lovgren among others. WSOP 2021 Event #17 Millionaire Maker Day 1b Top 10 Chipcounts: Stephen Song - 431,000 Michael Nia - 405,500 Clement Van Driessche - 397,000 Russell Clayton - 394,500 Boris Akopov - 347,000 Sebastien Comel - 338,000 Nabil Cardoso - 337,000 Pierre Calamusa - 337,000 Kou Vang - 334,000 Hayato Nagasawa - 330,000 12 Remain in $2,500 Triple Draw There were 104 survivors to Day 2 of the Mixed Triple Draw Lowball event, but at the end of the penultimate day, only a dozen players made the cut for the final day. With players such as Johannes Becker (13th for $6,579), James Woods (14th for $6,579), and David Benyamine (20th for $5,121) all going close to making the final two tables, stars of the game such as Joao Vieira (435,000) and Mike Gorodinsky (130,000) both snuck into the final day’s play. Chip leader heading into the last day of action is Jason Daly, who stack of 1,595,000 dwarfs even his closest rivals, with Brian Yoon (1,080,000) and Aaron Rogers (1,025,000) closest to hanging onto his coattails. WSOP 2021 Event #18 Mixed Triple Draw Lowball Final 12 Chipcounts: Jason Daly - 1,595,000 Brian Yoon - 1,080,000 Aaron Rogers - 1,025,000 Gary Benson - 935,000 Vladimir Peck - 870,000 Michael Trivett - 750,000 Carlos Rodriguez - 675,000 Brian Tate - 475,000 Hal Rotholz - 455,000 Joao Vieira - 435,000 Venkata Tayi - 390,000 Mike Gorodinsky - 130,000 Zinno, McCelland, Martini Move On In $10K Stud Finally, Event #19 saw 46 players reduced to just 18 as those playing the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship battled for a Day 2 berth. Jose Paz leads the field with 341,000 chips, from top 10 players such as Anthony Zinno (282,500) and Jack McClelland (178,500), with players such as Eli Elezra, Daniel Negreanu, Shaun Deeb, Scott Seiver, Andre Akkari, and David Singer all busting before the end of the days play. WSOP 2021 Event #19 $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Jose Paz - 341,000 Jason Gola - 292,500 Adam Friedman - 291,000 Anthony Zinno - 282,500 Thomas Butler - 195,500 Jack McClelland - 178,500 Matt Grapenthien - 168,500 James Chen - 152,000 Paul Mangine - 150,000 Julien Martini - 132,000 Don’t ever tell the poker world that WSOP bracelets don’t matter. As Ryan Laplante exemplified, players who haven’t won one before can feel the importance of such an achievement when it happens, just like multiple winners can. https://twitter.com/Protentialmn/status/1446501850119692288
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