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Found 4 results

  1. [CAPTION=100%]The fourth week of the 2016 WSOP schedule keeps recreational players in mind.[/CAPTION] Week 3 of the 2016 World Series of Poker turned into the World Series of Jason Mercier, and the Week 4 schedule offers a few opportunities for that to continue while there's also a bit of a focus on smaller buy-in, bigger field events with two of the WSOP's famous "gimmick" events running between now and Saturday. Summer Solstice In 2015 the WSOP debuted a new event with 90-minute levels called "Extended Play". The $1,500 buy-in event attracted 1,914 with Adrian Apmann. For 2016 the WSOP has re-branded the event to take advantage of the first day of summer and are calling the event the Summer Solstice. The $1,500 buy-in event runs Monday - Friday and is the first of four events this week targeted towards the always popular "recreational players". The Monster Returns In 2014, fresh off the success of the Millionaire Maker in 2013, introduced another special version of a $1,500 No Limit Hold'em tournament, dubbed the "Monster Stack". While most $1,500 buy-in events have 7,500 starting stacks, the Monster Stack doubles that to 15,000 to give players extra value and wiggle room to play. In the first two years of the event's history it has attracted 7,862 (2014) and 8,192 (2015) players with each champion walking away with over $1.2 million each. The Six Max World Championship While amateurs might be packing the Rio's hallways for the Summer Solstice or Monster Stack, the best No Limit Hold'em players in the world will be playing in the $10,000 Six Max NLHE Championship event. Running Thursday - Saturday, the event usually attracts over 250 players including a number of players who cut their teeth online. Last year Byron Kaverman beat a final table that included Doug Polk, Sam Greenwood and former #1-ranked PocketFives player Paul Volpe to win his first bracelet and $657,351. Mixed Triple Draw Debuts The $2,500 buy-in Mixed Triple Draw event might be one of the strongest fields of the year relative to buy-in. Making its WSOP debut this year, the event rotates between three variations of Triple Draw: Ace to Five, Deuce to Seven and Badugi. All three games, which are popular in the some of the biggest cash games in Las Vegas, will be played with a Limit format. The three-day event goes Thursday until Saturday. Other Notable Events This Week The $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo event finishes up on Tuesday. As of Monday morning Jason Mercier was still in the field, chasing what would be a fourth consecutive $10,000 buy-in event cash. Both the Seniors and Super Seniors events will crown their championship this week while on the opposite end of that spectrum, the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Championship runs next Saturday through Monday.
  2. [caption width="640"] Jason Koon beat Charlie Carrel to win the 0,000 buy-in PokerStars Championship Bahamas Super High Roller (PokerStars photo)[/caption] Jason Koon overcame one of the toughest high roller fields on the poker calendar to win the PokerStars Championship Bahamas Super High Roller and a career-best $1,650,300. For the 31-year-old, the win brought back memories of time when he was playing smaller buy-ins but dreaming bigger. “My first PCA, I was walking out of the casino and before I knew Scott Seiver that well, I saw him walk by me with headphones on, walking to the final table of a $100K or a $25K and being like ‘hell yeah, that’s Scott Seiver and he’s going to play the final table of this $100K’,” said Koon. “I was trying to satellite into the Main. I was thinking, one day I hope I can play those $25Ks and $100Ks. Sitting there with the trophy in front of me was just kind of a surreal moment.” Over the last six months Koon has recorded eight cashes, six of them for at least six-figures and total earnings of $3,909,741. Along with this Super High Roller he’s also won the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event and the WPT Five Diamond Poker Classic High Roller. “It’s just ridiculous. Poker tournaments are silly. That’s all I can say,” said Koon. “I don’t know how much of that is bias is from like ‘oh, I’ve been running well so I’m going to come in and feel good’ and when you’re running bad that’s not the case.” Koon started the final table with the third-biggest stack, trailing only Charlie Carrel and Dan Colman, but got to work on moving up the chip counts. Just and hour into play Koon raised to 100,000 from the button before Bryn Kenney, who won this event last year and has cashed in the event two other times, moved all in for 655,000. Koon called and tabled [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and Kenney turned over [poker card="ah"][poker card="8h"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="ks"][poker card="2c"] flop kept Kenney ahead and the [poker card="6h"] turn was no harm, but the [poker card="qs"] completed Broadway for Koon and eliminated Kenney in seventh place. Almost two hours later, Carrel picked up his first elimination of the final table. Carrel raised to 205,000 from the button before Connor Drinan moved all in from the big blind for just under 700,000. Carrel called and tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"] which put him well ahead of Drinan’s [poker card="ad"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="5c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3h"] flop put Drinan ahead and gave him a gutshot straight draw. The [poker card="ks"] turn flipped the script though and left Drinan drawing thing on the river. The [poker card="ac"] river gave Carrel top two pair and eliminated Drinan in sixth. Byron Kaverman was the next victim, falling victim to Dan Colman in a blind-vs-blind batle. Action folded to Colman in the small blind and moved all in, Kaverman called off his 720,000 stack. Colman had [poker card="9h"][poker card="6h"] while Kaverman had [poker card="ad"][poker card="ts"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2s"] flop put Colman ahead and neither the [poker card="2h"] turn or [poker card="ks"] river were any help for Kaverman and he was out in fifth. Just over an hour later a pair of back-to-back eliminations got the tournament to heads up. Carrel raised to 225,000 from the button before Daniel Dvoress moved all in for 2,000,000. Carrel called and tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="kc"], having Dvoress’ [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"] dominated. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="4h"] flop gave Carrel even more reason to breathe easy, but the [poker card="8h"] turn gave Dvoress a flush draw. The [poker card="ah"] river completed Dvoress’ flush but filled up Carrel to send Dvoress to the rail in fourth place. On the very next hand Colman raised to 3,000,000 and Carrel called from the button. Colman turned over [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"] but got bad news when Carrel showed [poker card="kd"][poker card="kh"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="9d"] board was no help for Colman and he was out in third place. After being responsible for eliminating both Dvoress and Colman, Carrel began heads-up play with Koon holding 8,700,000 of the 12,500,000 chips in play. Over the course of the next two hours, with neither player interested in looking at chop numbers, Koon turned the tables on Carrel and finally put the young Brit away. The two checked through a flop of [poker card="kd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="2s"] and [poker card="8s"] turn. Carrel bet 400,000 after the [poker card="jd"] river and Koon moved all in. Carrel called off his remaining stack and then mucked his [poker card="kc"][poker card="7d"] after Koon showed [poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"] for two pair and the win. The $100,000 buy-in event attracted a total of 54 entries with 41 unique entries for a total prizepool of $5,239,080. Final Table Payouts Jason Koon - $1,650,300 Charlie Carrel - 1,191,900 Dan Colman - 759,660 Daniel Dvoress - 576,300 Byron Kaverman - 445,320 Connor Drinan - 340,540 Bryn Kenney - 275,060
  3. It seems that nothing can stop Justin Bonomo. Nearly six weeks after winning the $10,000 Heads Up Championship at the 2018 World Series of Poker, Bonomo won the biggest buy-in event on the calendar, the $1 million Big One for One Drop for a $10 million score and sole possession of the top spot on poker's all-time earnings list. On top of the pair of WSOP bracelet wins, Bonomo also won the Super High Roller Bowl in Macau in March, the Super High Roller Bowl in Las Vegas, two $25,000 Aria High Roller events and two €25,000 High Rollers at EPT Monte Carlo. On Tuesday night he beat out a final table that included Fedor Holz, Dan Smith, and Byron Kaverman to pass Daniel Negreanu for #1 on the all-time earnings list. In 2018 alone, Bonomo has won $24,945,435. The third and final day of the Big One for One Drop began on the stone bubble with six players still hoping to show some form of positive return on the $1 million of investment. Unfortunately for David Einhorn, who finished third in the inaugural Big One for One Drop, he ended up going home with nothing. Action folded to Einhorn on the button and he raised to 1,100,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="qh"]. Holz folded his small blind but Bonomo defended with [poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"]. The [poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5h"] flop gave Bonomo the chance to check-raise all and Einhorn called. Neither the [poker card="2h"] turn or [poker card="kc"] river were any help for Einhorn and he was eliminated on the bubble. Two hands later, two more players were sent packing in a three-way preflop all in that included a bit of controversy. Kaverman moved all in from UTG holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"], Holz called from UTG+1 with [poker card="tc"][poker card="ts"] before Rick Salomon moved all in for 26,900,000 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"]. Action was back on Holz at which point a discussion at the table began about whether or not one of Salomon's cards had flashed. Tournament director Jack Effel determined it had and ruled that Salomon had to expose the [poker card="ah"] to the entire table. Holz took some time to consider his options and eventually decided to call. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"][poker card="2c"] to give Salomon two pair. The [poker card="qc"] turn gave Kaverman outs to the nut flush and Holz outs to Broadway. The river was the [poker card="td"], giving Holz a set and eliminating Kaverman in fifth and Salomon in fourth place. Three-handed play began with Holz holding nearly 48% of the chips in play. Holz continued to hold that lead, even after Bonomo sent Dan Smith packing in a blind vs. blind battle. Holz folded his button, Bonomo moved all in from the small blind holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="th"] and Smith called off his last 12,500,000 holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"]. The board ran out [poker card="ad"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="js"][poker card="qh"] to give Bonomo the ace-high straight and send Smith out in third. Even after that pot, Bonomo still had an uphill climb ahead of home with just 37.5% of the chips. The pair battled back and forth with Bonomo gaining ground before he took the chip lead after catching Holz bluffing. Holz raised to 2,800,000 with [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"] before Bonomo three-bet to 9,500,000 with [poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"] and Holz called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3s"] flop got Bonomo to bet 5,000,000 and Holz called. The turn was the [poker card="8h"] and Bonomo check-called after Holz bet 11,500,000. The river was the [poker card="6d"], Bonomo checked again and then snap-called Holz's shove. That hand put Bonomo in front with 81.4% of the chips in play. Holz managed to double-up twice but ultimately wasn't able to reverse his fortunes. On the final hand of the night, Bonomo completed with [poker card="as"][poker card="jd"], Holz moved all in with [poker card="ac"][poker card="4s"] and Bonomo called. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="qd"] to give Bonomo the win. Big One for One Drop Payouts Justin Bonomo - $10,000,000 Fedor Holz - $6,000,000 Dan Smith - $4,000,000 Rick Salomon - $2,840,000 Byron Kaverman - $2,000,000
  4. Just like every other year going back to 2004, a fresh start to poker's yearly tournament calendar kicks off with the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure in the Bahamas. This year brings a heightened level of excitement with the PokerStars Players NL Hold’em Championship headlining the event in what is lining up to be a record-setting PCA. Speaking of records, in anticipation of the 2019 PCA festival, PocketFives went looking through the poker history books at HendonMob to find the biggest winners in history from PCA. Here’s what was found. Thanks to a gigantic $3 million payday in 2009, Poorya Nazari holds the record for the largest first-place prize at PCA. He won the 2009 PCA Main Event from a field of 1,347 entries to claim that prize. Three other times in history has the PCA Main Event winner taken home at least $2 million. In 2008, Bertrand 'ElkY' Grospellier took home $2 million, Harrison Gimbel won $2.2 million in 2010, and in 2011 it was Galen Hall scoring $2.3 million. But, none of those players is the top all-time money earner from PCA. That title currently belongs to Bryn Kenney, and it doesn’t appear that Kenney is going to be caught anytime soon. Top 25 PCA All-Time Money List PLAYER EARNINGS 1 Bryn Kenney $6,245,111 2 Steve O'Dwyer $3,800,542 3 Tony Gregg $3,096,596 4 Poorya Nazari $3,000,000 5 Scott Seiver $2,970,620 6 Galen Hall $2,877,080 7 Vanessa Selbst $2,824,640 8 Isaac Haxton $2,583,616 9 Jason Koon $2,555,555 10 Daniel Negreanu $2,521,490 11 Bertrand 'ElkY' Grospellier $2,484,120 12 Harrison Gimbel $2,329,220 13 Dan Shak $2,278,140 14 Cary Katz $2,257,420 15 Byron Kaverman $2,213,355 16 Mustapha Kanit $2,020,200 17 Justin Bonomo $1,991,372 18 Dimitar Danchev $1,985,000 19 John Dibella $1,955,300 20 Ty Reiman $1,937,770 21 Chris Oliver $1,834,160 22 Eugene Katchalov $1,763,220 23 Will Molson $1,750,735 24 Daniel Dvoress $1,607,302 25 Nick Petrangelo $1,581,665 As you can see, Kenney is worlds ahead of the competition, winning more than $2.4 million more than anyone else on the list. That $2.4 million gap alone is good enough for 12th place on this leaderboard. Kenney's largest score from PCA came in the 2016 Super High Roller, an event with a buy-in of $100,000 that saw him win $1.687 million. The following year, Kenney won a $50,000 and $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em events for $969,075 and $392,876, respectively. He also has a trio of third-place finishes over the years worth $873,880, $686,960, and $643,000. Steve O'Dwyer is the second highest money earner from PCA entering 2019, taking home more than $3.8 million in prize money throughout the years. O'Dwyer's a pretty good chunk of change away from Kenney, and he's also more than $700,000 ahead of Tony Gregg in third place. Knowing some of the performances O'Dwyer has put together over the years combined with what's on the schedule for 2019 doesn't make it out of the realm of possibilities that he can catch Kenney in 2019. O'Dwyer has one win in a $100,000 buy-in event and two wins from $50,000 buy-in events at PCA for $1.872 million, $945,495, and $760,500, respectively. The 2019 schedule features the $25,000 buy-in PSPC, three additional $25,000 buy-in tournaments, one $50,000 buy-in event, and two $100,000 tournaments, there certainly won’t be a lack of opportunities for O'Dwyer to win a ton of money in the Bahamas this January. That's not to mention the PCA $10,300 Main Event as well. Looking at the rest of the list for players we could see make big moves on the leaderboard after 2019, Isaac Haxton, Jason Koon, and Daniel Negreanu are a few of the ones to watch, given their appetite for and success in high buy-in tournaments coupled with the robust schedule to suit their palate. Negreanu's largest score out of PCA came in 2011 when he finished second to Eugene Katchalov in the event’s inaugural $100,000 Super High Roller. Negreanu earned a cool $1 million for that result. He followed that finish up by returning to the final table of the event in 2012, when he took fifth for $250,900. In 2018, he took fourth in the same event for $521,140. Another big score Negreanu had from PCA came in the 2017 PCA $25,000 High Roller. In that one, he took fifth for $268,780. Byron Kaverman and Justin Bonomo are also ones from this top 25 list to keep an eye on. For players not currently in the top 25, don't be surprised if you see Mikita Badziakouski, Alex Foxen, Stephen Chidwick, or David Peters take home a ship full of money from the Bahamas and find themselves listed on the updated list of top 25 winners from PCA when the 2019 version is all said and done. Action from the Bahamas kicks off Sunday, January 6, 2019, with the $25,000 buy-in PokerStars Players NL Hold'em Championship from Atlantis Resort & Casino. PovketFives will be on site all the way through until the event's final day on January 16, so stay tuned for more coverage from the 2019 PCA poker series.
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