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Found 4 results

  1. Ali Imsirovic scored yet another victory inside PokerGO’s Las Vegas studio on Wednesday after taking down the penultimate event (Event #7: $25,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for his third career PokerGO Cup event victory and $365,500. With the victory, Imsirovic soared past $16 million in live career earnings, just another testament of the young phenom being one of the toughest players in the game today. At the start of the 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) level, four of the six players were sitting with less than 20 big blinds, including Darren Elias who, at his fourth final table of the series, had just over 10 bigs in his stack. Sam Soverel opened the action to 80,000 with his [poker card="ac"][poker card="5s"], next to act was Imsirovic who flatted holding the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"]. Elias was in the small blind and three-bet shipped for a total of 405,000 and Soverel let go of his hand. Imsirovic, however, did not fold. He made the call and putting Elias at risk. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="2d"], handing Imsirovic top pair and leaving Elias looking for an eight. The turn was the [poker card="4h"] and the [poker card="3h"] completed the board, sending Elias out in sixth place for $64,500. On the very next hand, Cary Katz shipped his final 325,000 all-in holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] and, once again, it was Imsirovic happy to make the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="td"] flop brought Karz some chop outs to go along with his bottom pair. However, the [poker card="6s"] on the turn and the [poker card="5d"] river was no help to the PokerGO founder and in back-to-back hands Imsirovic took out two. Katz hit the cage to collect his $86,000 fifth-place prize and snap-enter Event #8. After Ausmus found a double, Nick Schulman was the lone short stack with roughly 10 big blinds. When it folded to Ausmus in the small blind, he opened shoved on Schulman holding the [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"]. In the big blind, Schulman looked down at the [poker card="ah"][poker card="5d"] and made the call with his tournament on the line. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"], keeping Schulman in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] giving Ausmus a double-gutter to go along with his pair outs to eliminate Schulman. The [poker card="qd"] hit the river, bringing Ausmus top pair and sending Schulman out in fourth place, good for $118,250. Three-handed play saw Imsirovic build a tower of chips, holding a better than four-to-one lead over Soverel in second place with 1.1 million. When the blinds hit 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante), Ausmus had himself roughly 13 big blinds and found a great spot to potentially double yet again. From the button, Imsirovic moved all-in with the chip lead holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"]. In the small blind, with 640,000 total, Ausmus picked up [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"] and called for the rest of his stack. In the big blind, Soverel let go of the [poker card="ah"][poker card="7s"] and let Imsirovic know he had the same hand. That said, the flop came [poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"], bringing one of the last two sevens in the deck and putting Imsirovic’s hand in the lead. The turn was the [poker card="4s"], offering Ausmus chop-outs to a five. But the river came the [poker card="3h"] and Ausmus’ day was done in third place for $161,250. Imsirovic held a better than five-to-one chip lead over Soverel when the pair sat down heads-up to determine a winner. But Soverel hung around, closed the gap between them, and eventually took the chip lead. Although Soverel held the momentum, a pivotal hand swung the match back in Imsirovic’s favor. With the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante) Soverel raised the button to 175,000 with his [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"] and Imsirovic called holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="2d"]. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2c"], giving Imsirovic trips. Imsirovic checked to Soverel who bet 75,000. Imsirovic raised to 350,000 and Soverel opted for a quick call. The turn came the [poker card="ad"] and Imsirovic led for 700,000, which Soverel quickly called. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Imsirovic shipped his stack for 1.9 million. Soverel, with just 2.1 million behind, took his time, asked for a count, and eventually shrug-called hoping to win it right here. But Soverel was shown the trips and was left with just 210,000 in his stack. The very next hand, the pair got it all-in and Imsirovic’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="4d"] outflopped Soverel’s [poker card="ah"][poker card="2c"] as the board came [poker card="8d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="qd"][poker card="9h"]. Soverel’s second-place finish was good for $236,500 while Imsirovic celebrated his third career PokerGO Cup event win with the $365,500 first-place prize. PokerGO Cup Event #7 Final Table Results Ali Imsirovic - $365,500 Sam Soverel - $236,500 Jeremy Ausmus - $161,250 Nick Schulman - $118,250 Cary Katz - $86,000 Darren Elias - $64,500
  2. Just one day after finishing as runner-up to Jake Daniels in Event #3 of the 2022 PokerGO Cup, Jeremy Ausmus was back at the final table in Event #4 ($15,000 NLHE), only this time he went the distance and topped the 65-entry field for the win and a $263,250 payday. Ausmus started the day near the bottom of the chip counts, but didn’t have to wait very long for his opportunity to chip up. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) Justin Saliba put in a raise to 100,000 from the cutoff with the [poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus picked up the [poker card="ts"][poker card="td"] on the button and three-bet shipped his final 755,000. After Bill Klein folded his small blind, table short stack Jesse Lonis looked down at [poker card="as"][poker card="ac"] and called for the rest of his 660,000 stack. Faced with two all-in, Saliba went for the double KO and called with his pocket jacks. The three saw a flop of [poker card="th"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"] sending Ausmus from worst to first with a set of tens. The [poker card="6s"] hit the turn and when the [poker card="5h"] completed the board, Ausmus nearly tripled up and Lonis was headed for the door, aces cracked, in sixth place for $58,500. Ausmus then overtook Brock Wilson for the chip lead, leaving Saliba as the new short stack. During the next level, 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Wilson opened from the button to 140,000. Saliba picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] in the small blind and committed his final four big blinds. Wilson made the call, putting Saliba at risk. The flop came [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="4d"], keeping Saliba ahead but providing some chop opportunities. Everything changed with Wilson binked the [poker card="jh"] on the turn to take the lead. Saliba was drawing to a king, but the [poker card="4c"] came on the river ending his tournament in fifth place for $78,000. During the same level, Klein was sitting with fewer than 10 big blinds and was looking to find a way back up the leaderboard. After Wilson put in a raise to 120,000 from under the gun with [poker card="jc"][poker card="9d"], Klein moved all-in from the small blind for 480,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="td"]. Cary Katz woke up with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] in the big blind and just made the call. Wilson bowed out and Katz flopped trips on the [poker card="qd"][poker card="qs"][poker card="5s"] flop. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] and Klein was drawing dead to river. Klein, who started the day third in chips, fell in fourth for $97,500. Once again, Ausmus found himself on the bottom of the chip counts when three-handed play started. But it wasn’t long before he picked up a big pot off Katz and left the PokerGO founded with just four big blinds. The blinds were at 50,000/100,000 when Ausmus picked up [poker card="as"][poker card="ac"] in the big blind and put in a raise big enough to put Katz all-in. With just 400,000 total and 200,000 committed with the big blind and ante, Katz stuck the rest of his chips in with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="9s"] and saw the bad news. The board ran out [poker card="js"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3h"] sending Katz out in third place for $126,750. Wilson had a two-to-one chip lead over Ausmus headed into heads-up play and it appeared that both were trying to work out whether there was a deal to be made. But nothing was said and the pair played on. Slowly, Ausmus chipped away at Wilson’s lead. The tide really turned when Ausmus picked off a big bluff attempt by Wilson with bottom pair to assume the chip lead. Ausmus never looked back, widening the gap and opening a roughly six-to-one chip lead. On the final hand, Wilson moved all-in with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="4h"] and Ausmus made the call with the [poker card="qs"][poker card="3c"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4s"], giving Wilson bottom pair and hope for a double. But the turn was the [poker card="qh"], putting Ausmus way ahead. The river was the [poker card="jc"] and it was all over. Wilson earned a second-place score of $195,000 while Ausmus booked the win and a $263,250 payday. Side note: PocketFives Staking backers had 17% of Brock Wilson’s action - a roughly $25 stake yielded more than $330. Looking to start backing? Sign up right here. PokerGO Cup Event #4 Final Table Results Jeremy Ausmus - $263,250 Brock Wilson - $195,000 Cary Katz - $126,750 Bill Klein - $97,500 Justin Saliba - $78,000 Jesse Lonis - $58,500
  3. Sean Perry put on a show as he battled back from just two big blinds to score the victory in Event #2 ($10,000 NLHE) of the 2022 PokerGO Cup for $200,000. High roller final tables can often be a serious affair with top players battling in silence in search of a big-time payday. However, this particular final table was one of the most entertaining of the year with its loose and engaging vibe and plenty of table talk. There were side bets, all-in blind raises and shoves, and improbable comebacks. In fact, PokerGO founder Cary Katz and Bryn Kenney even agreed to swap outfits if they got heads-up. In addition to the pure entertainment of this table, there was another storyline that had emerged. Kenney was tracking down Justin Bonomo to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob’s All-Time Money List. Kenney needed a third-place finish or better to make it happen. The final table fireworks started on just the second hand of the day. With the blinds at 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Kenney opened from under the gun to 80,000 with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"]. Next to act was Dan Shak who three-bet shipped his 1 million chip stack with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"]. It folded around to Perry in the big blind who woke up with [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"]. Perry re-shipped all-in for 1.3 million forcing a fold from Kenney. Shak, at-risk and dominated, needed help in order to survive however the board ran out [poker card="8s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2h"] keeping kickers in play. Perry received a near full double-up and Shak made his way to the cage to collect his $48,000 sixth-place prize. During the 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) level, Elias, who had made back-to-back PokerGO Cup final tables played a pivotal pot with Kenney. Kenney made it 100,000 to go from the cutoff holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Elias, who had just doubled through Kenney, defended his big blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="2s"] giving Elias top pair and he quickly checked it over to Kenney who continued for 60,000, which Elias called. The turn was the [poker card="jh"], bringing in the gutshot straight for Kenney who, when checked to, fired again - this time for 210,000. Elias called once again. The river came the [poker card="7d"] and this time when Elias checked, Kenney put together a hefty 785,000 bet. Elias only had 900,000 left in his stack. After burning through multiple time banks, Elias made the call. Kenney surged to the chip lead and Elias was left with just over two big blinds. Elias went out on the very next hand, finishing in fifth place for $64,000. The dynamics changed quite a bit with four left. Katz went from the short stack to the chip lead after tripling through Ball and Kenney. Then Ball took back the lead, after sending Kenney to the bottom of the chip counts. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante) Kenney remained active and doubled up when his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"] got it in the middle against Perry holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"] and the board ran out [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ac"][poker card="5h"] leaving Perry with just two big blinds. But Perry battled back, doubling in multiple hands to not only get back in the game but bring all four chip counts effectively even. The wild swings continued when Perry and Kenney agreed that if it folded to Perry in the small blind, the two would go all-in blind. With that on the table, both Ball and Katz folded. Perry made good on his word, sticking in 1.6 million (20 big blinds) with the [poker card="td"][poker card="2h"] and Kenney made the call with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"]. The board ran out [poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"] giving Perry a pure double up with his pair of deuces and sending him to the top of the chip counts. Things got even more hectic when, at 50,000/100,000 (100,000 ante), Ball opened from under the gun to 200,000. When it folded to Perry in the small blind, he looked down at [poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"]. Normally, this might be an uneventful fold. However the final four players were playing the "nine-four" game (the equivalent of the popular seven-deuce game) where if someone won a hand with any nine-four combo, the rest of the table would pay that player a $5K bounty. So, with that in mind - Perry shoved his chip lead, and Ball snap-called. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] giving Perry the lead with his pair of nines. The turn was the [poker card="3c"] and Ball was left with just ten outs. The river was the [poker card="4d"] shipped Perry the hand and the $15,000 side bet from the other players. Ball, who finished in fifth place in Event #1, fell in fourth place for $80,000. That wasn’t the only other significant result from that hand, with Ball eliminated, Kenney was guaranteed to retake the top spot on the Hendon Mob All-Time Money List. Soon thereafter, Kenney slipped in the chip counts and found himself chasing Katz and Perry, both of who had more than 40 big blinds. But after doubling through Perry once, Kenney and Perry got it all in again with Perry just barely covering Kenney. Perry raised the button to 200,000 with the [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Kenney shipped 2.7 million in the small blind with his [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"]. After Katz folded, Perry pretty quickly made the call and put Kenney at risk. The flop came [poker card="8s"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3c"] giving Perry middle set and leaving Kenney with just a 2% chance to survive. The turn was the [poker card="kd"] and the new All-Time Money List leader was drawing dead to the [poker card="5h"] river. Kenney did what he needed to do, finishing in third place for $96,000, besting Justin Bonomo on the ATML by a little more than $10,000. After a short break, Perry and Katz returned to finish the tournament with Perry holding a slight chip lead. Within just a couple of hands Perry, extended that lead and looked to close it out. On the ninth hand of head-up play, Perry moved all-in from the button with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="3h"] and Katz, with roughly 10 big blinds behind, called for it all holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"]. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2h"] flop kept Katz in the lead to double up but brought Perry both flush and backdoor straight outs. The [poker card="jd"] turn was safe for Katz, but the river came the [poker card="3c"], pairing Perry's kicker and eliminating Katz as the runner-up for $144,000. PokerGO Cup Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $200,000 Cary Katz - $144,000 Bryn Kenney - $96,000 Scott Ball - $80,000 Darren Elias - $64,000 Dan Shak - $48,000
  4. It was a dominant wire-to-wire final table performance by Australian high stakes tournament crusher Michael Addamo in Event #11 ($50,000 No Limit Hold’em) of the 2021 Poker Masters. A short two-hour affair that saw Addamo enter with the chip lead, eliminated all four of his final table opponents, and walk away with the $680,000 first-place prize. “It’s pretty nice, of course,” Addamo said about adding a Poker Masters win to his long list of poker accomplishments. “I’m pretty happy.” “I had such a great stretch of hands and I pretty much had it the whole time on the final table,” he told PokerGO. “So I can’t credit it to any good bluffing skills. Just good fortune.” That good fortune started on the second hand of the final table. With blinds at 15,000/30,000 (30,000 bb ante), PokerGO boss Cary Katz ran right into Addamo when he raised to 95,000 from under the gun holding [poker card="jd"][poker card="jc"]. When it was Addamo’s turn to act in the small blind, he three-bet to 250,000 with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"]. The action was back on Katz, who four-bet shipped his 26 big blind stack only to be snap-called by Addamo. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="6d"] providing no help to Katz who needed to hit a jack to stay alive. The [poker card="5d"] turn and [poker card="td"] river ended Katz’s day early in fifth place. “That was fun,” Katz quipped as he packed up his belongings and headed to the cage to pick up his $119,000 score. Addamo went back to work. Twenty minutes later, he opened to 60,000 from the button with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"]. In the small blind, Alex Foxen three-bet to 500,000, leaving himself with less than ten big blinds behind. David Coleman in the big blind let go of his [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] and Addamo wasted no time in four-betting enough to force Foxen all-in. Foxen obliged and saw his hand was dominated. The [poker card="as"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3d"] flop didn’t change much, keeping Addamo’s ace-high ahead and giving both backdoor straight possibilities, if they can hit each other’s kicker. The [poker card="3h"] eliminated any straight potential and, like Katz, Foxen was left looking for a river jack to survive. The river came the [poker card="7h"] and Foxen found himself on the rail in fourth place, collecting $187,000. The brisk pace of play continued as Addamo continued to leverage his chip lead to apply pressure on his opponents. During the same level, Coleman raised the button to 60,000 with the [poker card="th"][poker card="td"] and after Jason Koon let go of his [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] in the small blind, Addamo decided to defend his big blind with the [poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6h"] keeping Coleman’s pocket tens ahead but offering Addamo a gutshot straight draw. Addamo checked it over to Coleman bet 55,000 off his 700k stack. Addamo took a few moments and opted for a call. The [poker card="8c"] spiked on the turn and Addamo’s straight came in. Addamo then took the lead and bet out for 75,000, which Coleman called. The [poker card="ad"] hit the river and after taking a few more moments, Addamo shoved and a visibly irritated Coleman was put to the test. With just under 20 big blinds left, Coleman went into the tank and eventually made the fold. The blinds went up to 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) and Addamo continued to chip up. Both Koon and Coleman slipped under 20 big blinds and Addamo was taking every spot to force the two short stacks into uncomfortable spots. Another hour passed and the blinds climbed again to 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante) and by this time Addamo had 75% of the chips in play. Coleman’s time came when Addamo open-shoved from the small blind with his [poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"] and Coleman, down to roughly five big blinds, looked down at the [poker card="qd"][poker card="js"] and went with it, calling all-in. It was a flip for Coleman’s tournament life and the flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"][poker card="6s"], giving Coleman some additional outs. The [poker card="8d"] hit the turn, and Coleman added even more outs - 14 in total, one time. But Addamo was running too good and when the [poker card="8s"] fell on the turn, Coleman stood, shook Addamo’s hand, said “good luck guys” and made his exit in third place, good for $272,000. With a four-to-one chip lead, Addamo went to work on closing out the tournament. Koon hung around, looking for spots to turn the tide but he was never able to build a chip stack over 1 million at the end. The final hand had Koon ship a stack of just under 20 big blinds with [poker card="kc"][poker card="6d"] from the button and Addamo, after asking for a count, made the casual call holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] flop gave Koon some additional gutshot straight outs. However, the turn came the [poker card="4c"] and the river was the [poker card="kh"], keeping kickers in play and forcing Koon to settle as the runner-up which was good for $442,000. For his dominating performance, Addamo earned $680,000 and climbs to more than $9 million in career live earnings. 2021 Poker Masters Event #11 Final Table Results Michael Addamo - $680,000 Jason Koon - $442,000 David Coleman - $272,000 Alex Foxen - $187,000 Cary Katz - $119,000
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