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Found 27 results

  1. As you might know, on Tuesday night, PocketFives was camped out at Borgata in Atlantic City watching the finale of the first ever live PocketFives Open. Accordingly, we missed the premiere of ESPN's coverage of the Big One for One Drop, which created such a buzz in the mainstream world that we felt compelled to record a rerun and write about what ESPN commentator Lon McEachern argued could qualify as the "worst beat in the history of tournament poker." --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsson Poker, a leading global online gaming provider. Betsson Poker is available on Mobile and offers regular promotions to live events around the world along with great bonuses and competitions. Play nowfor a chance to win the a Dream Holiday with the Grand Poker Adventures throughout 2014! --- The Big One for One Drop took place several weeks ago as part of the World Series of Poker and featured 42 players putting up a $1 million buy-in. One of them, PocketFiver Connor blanconegroDrinan (pictured above), called all-in pre-flop with pocket aces in a hand against Cary Katz, who also had aces. It seemed like a sure bet for a chop. In fact, ESPN poker commentator Norman Chad kept spouting lines about the hand and why it was taking so long, including "The edge here belongs to Katz, who holds the ace of spades, the prettiest card in the deck." Chad was right… almost. Meanwhile, Scott Seiver, who was also at the table, pointed out, "I'm not saying this is going to happen, but this is how I busted with 11 left in the $10K last week." Talk about bad karma. Drinan and Katz were both 2% to win heading to the flop, which had two hearts and bumped Katz to 5% to win. The turn was – you guessed it – another heart, improving Katz to 20% to win. Reigning One Drop champion Antonio Esfandiari then uncomfortably said, "I feel like it might." Might it did. The river was the deuce of hearts, instantly drawing profanity and leaving McEachern saying that the hand might be "the worst beat in the history of tournament poker." As Chad chimed in, "A million-dollar buy-in wiped out with aces versus aces." Drinan was sent to the rails and Katz (pictured) raked in a very lucky pot, moving up to second in chips with 114 big blinds. The hand prompted a front page article on Yahoo on Wednesday, the day after the first two hours of the One Drop aired. Outlets like the Toronto Sun, USA Today, and SI.com all wrote about it and my wife, when I told her I was writing about this hand for PocketFives, said, "I saw an article and can tell you what happens." That's how you know it's big. One YouTube version of the hand had a stunning 5.3 million views, which you can add to by clicking here. The One Drop continues next Tuesday on ESPN, which provided the images used in this article. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. [caption width="640"] Daniel Negreanu and Kevin Hart are just two players that could round out the field of the PokerCentral Super High Roller Bowl (PokerStars photo)[/caption] Just about two weeks ago, Aria poker room management was faced with a difficult decision. When registration opened for the 2017 PokerCentral Super High Roller Bowl, a total of 54 players put down a deposit to lock up their spot in the $300,000 buy-in event. Only problem was there were only 35 spots open to the public while the other 15 spots in the 50-player event were being held for invited players only. Degens gonna degen, so the only solution was to hold a lottery, drawing 35 numbered balls out of a tumbler. Each number corresponded to one of the players who had paid the deposit. You can view the final list of 35 names here and you’ll notice it’s missing some of the bigger names in the game today. In an effort to make make things easier on Aria’s Director of Poker Operations Sean McCormack we’ve compiled a list of ten names - five pros and five recreational players – that should be pat of the field when action kicks off May 28. Daniel Negreanu – Poker’s all-time leading money winner was one of those players who paid their deposit and was ultimately left out of the group of 35. It just makes too much sense to get Negreanu into the event. First off, he’s a PokerCentral ambassador, but beyond that he makes for great TV and success in this event would help him get closer to crossing some of his 2017 goals off of his list. Phil Ivey – The high stakes room at Aria – the host of the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl – is named Ivey’s Room after the ten-time WSOP bracelet winner, an honor bestowed on him when the Aria poker room first opened in 2009. Only problem is Ivey probably couldn’t find it without a map since he apparently hasn't spent a lot of time inside the room. To many poker fans out there, Ivey is still the draw and having him in one of poker’s biggest buy-in events feels like a win for everybody. Jason Koon – Another one of the players who lost out on the lottery, Jason Koon might be one of the hottest high stakes players on the planet right now. Since July 2016 he’s cashed ten times, with four of those being wins, for $4,544,781. In January he won the PokerStars Championship Bahamas Super High Roller for $1,650,300. While other players might not want him there, he's certainly earned the invite with his play. Phil Hellmuth – With four days of live TV coverage expected, it’s hard to imagine that Phil Hellmuth won’t find a way to get in front of the cameras. Sure, he can do the commentary like he does for the WSOP Main Event, but Hellmuth loves getting in with the best in the game and showing he can hang. He’s also a PokerCentral and Aria ambassador so it seems likely he’s getting an invite. Mike McDonald – Sure, he’s taken his talents to Twitch lately and is dedicating some time to his PokerShares.com project, but Mike ‘Timex’ McDonald is still a threat on the high stakes tournament scene and has built himself quite the following over the past few years. Besides, who doesn’t want to tune into CBS Sports' coverage of the Canadian guy just staring at everybody? Kevin Hart – The recent PokerStars Championship Bahamas saw comedian Kevin Hart make his super high roller debut. Hart played the $100,000 SHR event, firing two bullets in the event. He made every table he played at a fun one and could be a star of the live broadcast should he find his way to a feature table. Cary Katz – Locks are for doors and windows, but you can safely bet your net worth on Cary Katz getting one of the 15 reserved seats in the PokerCentral Super High Roller Bowl. Why so sure? Well, he’s the founder of PokerCentral and the Super High Roller Bowl is one of his proudest creations. Bobby Baldwin – Sure, he’s a WSOP Main Event champion but even he’s ready and willing to admit that he’s not a professional anymore. Still, having Bobby Baldwin in the tournament would give it a level of prestige and allow the old guard to be represented by one of the best ever. Dan Shak - Yes, he has a day job that he happens to be extremely successful at, but Dan Shak has also amassed $8.7 million in lifetime earnings at the poker table including a seventh place finish in last year's Super High Roller Bowl. He's a regular in the Aria high roller events and has proven on multiple occasions that he's capable of hanging with the younger pros who regularly populate those events. Bill Perkins – If you look at the group of extremely successful businessmen who have entered the world of high stakes tournament poker, none have had more fun that Bill Perkins – and it’s got nothing to do with winning. The hedge fund manager just loves playing poker and the bright lights of the SHRB would be a great place to showcase that.
  3. [caption width="640"] The 2017 Super High Roller Bowl will be the largest field in the three-year history of the event (PokerCentral photo)[/caption] When registration for the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl opened last week a total of 54 players made the initial deposit to secure their spot in the biggest buy-in tournament of the year. Only problem is, there were only 35 seats available. The remaining 15 seats were being held back for ARIA VIPs and high rollers. After holding a lottery for the available 35 seats, there were 19 players left out in the cold and unable to play in the $300,000 buy-in event. On Wednesday the ARIA announced they would be adding six more seats to bring the total to 56 players - eight seven-handed tables. “Based on the success of last year’s Super High Roller Bowl and the overwhelming interest in this year’s event, ARIA believed it was in our best interest to increase the size of the event by six players,” said Sean McCormack, ARIA’s Director of Poker Operations. The 21 open spots will now be at the discretion of McCormack and the rest of the ARIA poker management team. Announcements as to who is filling those available seats could come as early as next week. Some of the bigger names who missed out on the lottery include Daniel Negreanu, Jason Koon, Dan Colman and Dan Smith. READ: 10 Players We Hope to See in the Super High Roller Bowl Field“More players getting a chance to play against some of the best competition in the world and more recreational players getting a chance to measure themselves against those top players in a televised event will only add to the total experience for poker fans,” said McCormack. With the rake-free event expected to sell out all 56 seats, the total prize pool will be $16.8 million with the eventual winner walking away with $6 million. Given the overwhelming popularity of the event and the subsequent expansion of the field, organizers have already determined to expand the field for 2018 to 56 as well. The Super High Roller Bowl runs May 28 - 31 at ARIA Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. Complete list of the 35 players guaranteed a seat in the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl Koray AldemirBryn KenneyStefan Schillhabel Matt BerkeyIgor KurganovJake Schindler Pratyush BuddigaJason LesErik Seidel Christian ChristnerAndrew LichtenbergerScott Seiver Connor DrinanAnkush MandaviaSteffen Sontheimer David EinhornTom MarcheseSam Soverel Antonio EsfandiariDominik NitscheBen Sulsky Isaac HaxtonDavid PetersBen Tollerene Fedor HolzNick PetrangeloChristoph Vogelsang John JuandaDoug PolkHaralabos Voulgaris Byron KavermanBrian RastSean Winter Rainer KempeAndrew Robl
  4. A few days ago Cary Katz contemplated skipping the opening few days of the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure altogether and flying his family to Atlanta to watch his alma mater, the University of Georgia Bulldogs, play in the NCAA Championship football game. He didn't though, and Monday night, just minutes after the game kicked off, Katz capped off an impressive three-day run to win the $100,000 Super High Roller for nearly $1.5 million. "I did think about flying to the game to watch it, but decided I'd rather watch it here with my family, even if it's not live," said Katz. "If Georgia wins, it will be the greatest night of my life for sure," said Katz. It took just 10 hands before the first player was sent packing. Bryn Kenney raised to 110,000 from UTG before Sam Greenwood moved all in from the big blind. Kenney called and tabled A♦A♥ while Greenwood showed K♣K♠. The board ran out J♠8♣6♣9♦J♣ to eliminate Greenwood in seventh place. Ivan Luca picked up the next elimination. The table folded to Luca in the small blind and he moved all in. Isaac Haxton gave some consideration to folding before eventually calling all in for 1,410,000. Luca tabled A♥4♥ while Haxton showed Q♥J♥. The K♠9♣3♣ flop gave Haxton extra outs but neither the K♣ turn or 7♣ river was any help and he was out in sixth. That hand propelled Luca to the chip lead but just two hands later, the Argentinian was shaking hands and heading to the payout window. After losing almost 1,000,000 on one hand against Kenney, Luca went to battle against the American again. Luca raised to 175,000 from the cutoff and Kenney re-raised to 635,000 from the small blind. Luca moved all in for 3,095,000 and Kenney called instantly. Luca turned over A♥J♣ and found himself in bad shape after Kenney tabled A♣K♣. The board ran out 9♦7♣3♥A♦7♥ to send Luca out in fifth place in dramatic fashion. Kenney had a small part in another elimination 28 hands later. Kenney raised to 210,000 from UTG and action folded to Daniel Negreanu in the small blind. He moved all in for 840,000, Justin Bonomo then moved all in over the top from the big blind and Kenney folded. Negreanu turned over K♥K♠ and Bonomo showed A♣J♥. Kenney told the table he folded an ace, leaving Bonomo just two more to hit. The flop came A♦5♦4♣ to put Bonomo ahead. Neither the Q♥ turn or 2♦ river were any help for Negreanu and he was forced to settle for a fourth-place result. Kenney's run eventually ended in a confrontation with Bonomo. Katz folded his button, Bonomo moved all in from the small blind and Kenney called all in from the big. Bonomo showed Q♠10♦ which put him behind Kenney's K♥9♦. The J♦10♣3♥ flop flipped the script though and Kenney was unable to catch back up after the A♥ turn or 4♠ river. The tournament ended just seven hands later. Bonomo moved all in for 3,300,000 and Katz called, having Bonomo covered. Bonomo revealed A♣K♥ while Katz had 8♣8♦. The 9♥3♠2♠ flop changed nothing and Katz remained safe through the Q♠ turn and J♥ river to eliminate Bonomo and win a second career $100,000 buy-in event. Final Table Payouts Cary Katz - $1,492,340 Justin Bonomo - $1,077,800 Bryn Kenney - $686,960 Daniel Negreanu - $521,140 Ivan Luca - $402,700 Isaac Haxton - $307,940 Sam Greenwood - $248,720
  5. Take a quick look at Isaac Haxton's live tournament results over the past few years and you might be surprised by the lack of first place finishes. Considered by many on the high roller scene to be one of the best poker players on the planet, Haxton hasn't won a tournament since January 2017. Haxton's streak of 32 High Roller event cashes without a win came to an end on Tuesday though as Haxton took down Event #4 ($10,000 Short Deck Hold'em) of the 2018 Poker Masters. The win, coupled with a sixth and a fourth place finish in two previous Poker Masters events, have put Haxton just 30 points behind Brandon Adams for the Purple Jacket. “It would be very satisfying to win this whole thing, I have a track record of doing pretty well, but with a lot of second through fifth-place finishes," said Haxton. "Actually winning something is very satisfying.” Dominik Nitsche started the final table with a narrow chip lead over Andrew Robl, but just 45 minutes after the final table began, Nitsche was on his way to the payouts window with the sixth place ticket. Nitsche open-shoved for 1,440,000 with [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"] from first position, Isaac Haxton re-shoved for 3,180,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="ts"] from the cutoff and after some time, Andrew Robl folded [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"] from the button. The board ran out [poker card="qs"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6c"] to give Haston a rivered ten-high straight and eliminate Nitsche in sixth with a $33,000 payout. Some 40 minutes later, Haxton found yet another victim. Cary Katz limped from early position with [poker card="kh"][poker card="qh"] and Haxton moved all in for 3,880,000 behind him with [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. When action folded back to him, Catz called. The [poker card="qc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] flop was a friendly one for Katz, but the [poker card="ah"] turn put Haxton back in the lead. The [poker card="ts"] river gave Haxton an unnecessary two pair and eliminated Katz in fifth for $44,000. Robl spent the next 30 minutes working a short stack and despite two straight double ups, found no further success. Robl open-shoved for 900,000 with [poker card="td"][poker card="9c"] and Ryan Tosoc moved all in over the for 3,970,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="js"], forcing the rest of the table to fold. The [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="th"] flop put Tosoc in the driver's seat and the [poker card="jd"] gave him a full house to eliminate Robl. The fourth place finish came with a $55,000 score. Tosoc, Haxton and Maurice Hawkins battled for almost a full hour before finding the next elimination. Tosoc was down to just 490,000 and decided to open shove with [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"] but Haxton called with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jd"] and stayed ahead through the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"] runout to bust Tosoc in third for $77,000. Despite never having played short deck before and having zero Poker Masters cashes to his credit, Hawkins got heads up with Haxton with the chip lead. Unfortunately for the 11-time WSOP Circuit ring winner, that's as far as he could go. Hawkins open-shoved 4,775,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7d"] and Haxton called with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qd"]. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"] flop kept Haxton in the lead but also gave Hawkins a straight draw. The [poker card="kc"] changed nothing and when the [poker card="qh"] completed the board, Haxton eliminated Hawkins to win his first Poker Masters title and $176,000. Final Table Payouts Isaac Haxton - $176,000 Maurice Hawkins - $115,500 Ryan Tosoc - $77,000 Andrew Robl - $55,000 Cary Katz - $44,000 Dominik Nitsche - $33,000
  6. It's going a very high roller holiday season as Poker Central has announced that the return of the Super High Roller Bowl will be sooner than expected. The fifth edition of one of the most prestigious high roller tournaments of the year now takes place from December 17-19 at the PokerGO Studio at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. The change to hold the newly dubbed Super High Roller Bowl V during the holiday season is a break of recent tradition for Poker Central. Over the past three years, the SHRB was played in late May, acting as an appetite-whetter for the World Series of Poker. Many expected the next tournament to be held at the same time in 2019. The move to December now takes advantage of the popular World Poker Tour Five Diamond schedule while simultaneously closing out the high roller circuit year with its biggest event. The upcoming December event will have many of the same specifics as the previous event held just six months ago. The $300,000 rake-free buy-in will generate a $14,400,000 prize pool with a $5 million first-place prize and championship ring for the winner. With a 48 seat cap, players who wish to have a shot at a seat need to place their $30,000 deposit by Monday, November 26. For those that do put down a deposit, there will be a live-streamed lottery on PokerGO to award players a seat into the tournament. The ARIA reserves eighteen of the 48 seats for ARIA VIP guests. Tournament officials will hand out these seats at their discretion. The five remaining seats are awarded to the top five players in Aria’s 2018 High Roller of the Year rankings. The current points system will be in place right up until the lottery for Super High Roller Bowl V. Currently the five players with the most points include Poker Central founder Cary Katz, Sam Soverel, Jake Schindler, David Peters, and Isaac Haxton. Poker Masters Champion Ali Imsirovic sits just outside the top five in sixth place with regular high rollers Adrian Mateos and Dan Smith not far behind. According to the Poker Central website, there are currently seven more opportunities for the high roller community to accumulate points. High roller events are taking place every day from October 31-November 6. “In its first five years of existence, Super High Roller Bowl has grown into one of the most exclusive and highly coveted poker championships in the world as the pinnacle of the High Roller Triple Crown,” said Vice President of Content for Poker Central, Sam Simmons. “We’re proud to celebrate that milestone in December, as we implement changes that will continue the success of the event for many years to come.” It just six months ago that Justin Bonomo won the previous Super High Roller Bowl for $5 million. The win was a significant contribution to Bonomo ascending to become the new leader of the All-Time Money List. He currently sits with over $43 million in career earnings. Daniel Negreanu finished as the 2018 runner-up, taking home $3 million for his efforts. The PokerGO platform will stream all of the Super High Roller Bowl. Additionally, the NBC Sports Network will air episodes on their website and the NBC Sports App. Super High Roller Bowl History Year Entries Winner Amount Won Prize Pool 2015 43 Brian Rast $7,525,000 $21,500,000 2016 49 Rainer Kempe $5,000,000 $15,000,000 2017 56 Christoph Vogelsang $6,000,000 $16,800,000 2018 48 Justin Bonomo $5,000,000 $14,400,000
  7. The record-setting WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic wrapped up at Bellagio in Las Vegas, with the $10,400 Main Event attracting a huge field of 1,001 entries and featuring some of poker's biggest names. In addition to the Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule featured several events with five-figure buy-ins and one with a six-figure price of entry. Here are the winners from a tremendous week of poker in Sin City. The biggest winners overall from these high buy-in events, excluding the $10,400 Main Event, were Jake Schindler, Jason Koon, Seth Davies, Chris Hunichen, and Dominik Nitsche. Although he didn't earn the most money, it's certainly worth noting that Sam Soverel cashed in four of these events for a total of $314,500. No one else cashed in more than two. Ladines Wins First $10,000 PLO Event The first two high roller events on the schedule were both $10,000 buy-in pot-limit Omaha tournaments. The first one attracted 35 entries for a $350,000 prize pool and saw the top five places make the money. Joshua Ladines took the event’s title and $128,090 top prize, with both Brian Rast and Sam Soverel finishing in the money. Joshua Ladines - $128,090 John Riordan - $102,910 Jonathan Abdellatif - $56,000 Brian Rast - $35,000 Sam Soverel - $28,000 Soverel Takes Second $10,000 PLO Event In the second $10,000 PLO event, a group of familiar faces was back in the money. Soverel topped the field of 29 entries to win the title and $116,000, Ladines finished third for $46,400, and WPT Five Diamond wonder boy Ryan Tosoc scored fifth for $23,200. Tosoc notably finished second in the Season XV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic for $1.134 million before going on to win the event in Season XVI for $1.958 million. Sam Soverel - $116,000 Jonathan Depa - $75,400 Joshua Ladines- $46,400 Michael Song - $29,000 Ryan Tosoc - $23,200 Hennigan Captures $10,000 8-Game Mixed Title If you know Bellagio, you know it’s home to the most iconic high-stakes poker room in the world, Bobby’s Room. It’s where the game’s elite compete for astronomical cash-game stakes, but during WPT Five Diamond some of those players shifted their focus to tournament play, specifically in the $10,000 buy-in 8-Game Mixed High Roller. The tournament generated 24 entries, and it was none other than five-time World Series of Poker gold bracelet winner and WPT Champions Club member John Hennigan taking home the top prize of $110,400. John Hennigan - $110,400 Ben Yu - $67,200 Randy Ohel - $38,400 John Racener - $24,000 Loeser and Fox Chop First $25,000 High Roller In the first of three $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on this year’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic slate, 42 entries were generated to create a prize pool of $1.05 million. The top six places paid, and the top two spots went to Manig Loeser and Elio Fox in a chop that earned each player more than $300,000. Loeser scored first place for $321,300, and Fox took second for $308,700. Manig Loeser- $321,300 Elio Fox - $308,700 Jake Schindler - $168,000 Dan Smith - $105,000 Cary Katz - $84,000 Nick Petrangelo - $63,000 Petrangelo Wins Second $25,000 High Roller The second $25,000 buy-in tournament attracted 47 entries and generated a $1.175 million prize pool. The top seven places reached the money, with several notables cashing. None earned more than Nick Petrangelo, though, who chopped the event heads up with Sergio Aido to take home the winning prize of $289,944. Aido scored $287,634 for second. Petrangelo was coming off a sixth-place result for $63,000 in the first $25,000 event of this series. Soverel, who finished in the money of the first two high rollers on the schedule, including winning one for $116,000, finished sixth in this event for $70,500. Nick Petrangelo - $289,944 Sergio Aido - $287,634 Seth Davies - $256,672 Ben Yu - $117,500 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - $94,000 Sam Soverel - $70,500 Rainer Kempe - $58,750 Davies Victorious in Third $25,000 High Roller The third and final $25,000 high roller tournament on the WPT Five Diamond schedule drew 50 entries for a $1.25 million prize pool. The top eight places reached the money, and it was Seth Davies taking the title and $341,920 in first-place prize money. The win came just days after Davies took third in the previous $25,000 high roller event during the series of $256,672, as you can see above. Davies did a deal with Isaac Haxton in second place, who earned $320,580. The money was filled with notable high rollers, including Alex Foxen taking third for $175,000. Foxen has had himself quite a 2018 and is closing it strong both on the live felt and the virtual felt. In the online world, Foxen recently achieved a new all-time high in the top 100 of the PocketFives Online Poker Rankings. You'll also notice Soverel's name appearing in the in-the-money places once again, this time for fifth place, worth $100,000. Seth Davies - $341,920 Isaac Haxton - $320,580 Alex Foxen - $175,000 David Peters - $125,000 Sam Soverel - $100,000 Christoph Vogelsang - $75,000 Rainer Kempe - $62,500 Elio Fox: $50,000 Schindler Defeats Koon for $100,000 Super High Roller Victory The final big buy-in event from the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule this year was the $100,000 Super High Roller. The event drew 37 entries to Bellagio for a $3.7 million prize pool and the top six spots reached the money. Earning the $1.332 million first-place prize was Jake Schindler. Adding that score to the $168,000 he won earlier in the series for taking third place in one of the $25,000 high rollers, Schindler scored $1.5 million in prize money at Bellagio this December. Schindler beat out Jason Koon for the win, and Koon took home $888,000 for his second-place finish. Jake Schindler - $1,332,000 Jason Koon - $888,000 Chris Hunichen - $592,000 Dominik Nitsche - $370,000 Ben Tollerene - $296,000 Talal Shakerchi - $222,000
  8. As 2018 winds down, PocketFives is taking you a trip down memory lane with a month-by-month year in review. We get things started with January and a trip the Bahamas. Vanessa Selbst Calls It Quits Word actually broke in the closing hours of 2017, but the talk around Vanessa Selbst retiring from poker carried on into the early days of 2018. Selbst, the all-time leading female money winner, announced her decision to retire via a Facebook post. In that post, she explained that she had taken a job with a New York-based hedge fund and had already been working there for a few months. Selbst did indicate that she wasn't done entirely with the game though. "To me, the opportunity to work hard and learn something totally new and get to keep poker in my arsenal of fun go-to hobbies feels like the right approach,” Selbst wrote. Selbst lived up to her word, showing up to play the World Poker Tour Lucky Hearts Poker Open in late January. READ: Vanessa Selbst Retires From Poker Maria Lampropulos Wins PCA Main Event; Cary Katz Tops $100K High Roller The first major poker tournament of 2018 was the return of the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure. The PCA was brought back after PokerStars' failed rebranding of all of their live events as PokerStars Live Championships. The PCA Main Event brought out 582 players for a total prize pool of $5,645,400. The final table included Adrian Mateos, Koray Aldamir, Shawn Buchanan and Maria Lampropulos. The tournament came down to an epic heads-up battle between Buchanan and Lampropulos with the Argentinian pro taking it down for her second major title in a 10-month span. READ: PCA: Maria Lampropulos Wins Main Event, $1.08M, Platinum Pass At a final table that included the likes of Daniel Negreanu, Justin Bonomo, Isaac Haxton, Bryn Kenney and Sam Greenwood, PokerGO founder Cary Katz managed to outlast all of them to win the $100,000 buy-in Super High Roller for the first major title of his career. READ: PCA: Cary Katz Wins $100K Super High Roller Platinum Passes Galore in the Bahamas The PCA was also the launching for what would become PokerStars' year-long campaign to award nearly 300 Platinum Passes worth $30,000 each that give the pass holder entry into the 2019 PokerStars Players Championship. Lampropulos picked one up for her victory in the PCA Main Event, author Maria Konnikova also grabbed one for taking down the PCA National Championship and David Peters won his via a random draw. Pennsylvania-based grinder Thai Ha was the fortunate winner of a Platinum Pass on Day 2 of the Main Event, but he almost missed it after oversleeping. READ: Thai Ha Almost Misses Out on Platinum Pass Winning Moment While Lampropulos, Konnikova, and Peters are all established players who may have played the PSPC anyways, Steven-John Jost is the polar opposite. The Swiss amateur qualified for the 2018 PCA Main Event on PokerStars for $27 and ended up cashing for $17,500. By finishing in the money, Jost was also given a raffle ticket for a Platinum Pass and he ended up having his name drawn. “I was really shaking. Now I’m calm. I had to go for a drink and now I’m relaxed, just enjoying it,” Jost said after learning he'd won the $30,000 package. READ: Steven-John Jost’s ‘Dream Come True’ Topped Off with Platinum Pass Ole Schemion and Darryll Fish Pick Up WPT Titles The World Poker Tour added two well-known names to the WPT Champions Cup in January. Germany's Ole Schemion beat out 338 other players to win the €3,300 WPT European Championship at Spielbank Berlin. The win earned Schemion $260,858 and he finished 2018 within spitting distance of $15,000,000 in career earnings. READ: Ole Schemion Wins WPT European Championship Meanwhile, on the other side of the Atlantic, one of poker's most well-respected grinders finally picked up a major title. Darryll Fish topped the 911-player field to win the WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open for $511,604. It was a career-best cash for Fish at the time, only to be eclipsed a few months later when he finished second in the partypoker MILLIONS North America Main Event for $ 937,221. READ: Darryll Fish Wins Lucky Hearts Open for First WPT Title, $511K partypoker Adds Isaac Haxton as Ambassador To say that Isaac Haxton's departure from Team PokerStars was messy, might be an understatement. Haxton left PokerStars in the wake of the changes the online poker giant made to its player rewards system and took special joy in being a thorn in their side via social media ever since. That thorn got a little bit bigger when Haxton signed on as an ambassador with partypoker. Haxton noted that partypoker's growth, both online and live, was a big part of his decision to sign with them. “I’ve been very impressed with their growth over the last year or so. From expanding their online cash game and tournament offerings, to improving their software, and most of all rolling out their ambitions and innovative live events program, their commitment to growing the game and providing a great product for their players has been clear,” Haxton said. READ: Isaac Haxton Joins partypoker as Brand Ambassador Sweden's 'lena900' Tops January PLB Race Anybody who follows the PocketFives Rankings will know that the Swedish players have dominated them for years. So it's no surprise to learn that one of the most successful Swedish players started 2018 off with a bang. 'lena900' topped the January PLB thanks ‘lena900’ to eight five-figure scores and a win in the partypoker Powerfest Event #5 for $26,899 and 328.63 PLB points. READ: Swedish Crusher ‘lena900’ Wins January PLB Title
  9. It's getting to the point where Stephen Chidwick winning a U.S. Poker Open event isn't news. Tuesday night in Las Vegas the British poker pro picked up his fourth career USPO title, beating Cary Katz heads up to win Event #6, the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha event. It's his second USPO win in 2019 giving him two wins in each year the tournament series has existed. Chidwick, who won the USPO title last season, now leads the overall standings this year with just four events remaining. Chidwick started Tuesday's final table with the chip lead and, along with Anthony Zinno, was one of just two players with a seven-figure stack. While Chidwick continued to build early, Zinno was less fortunate. After a little more than an hour of play, Zinno was down to just 365,000 and found himself tangling with Katz. Chidwick raised to 90,000 and Katz called before Zinno moved all in from the button. Chidwick folded and Katz called, tabling [poker card="qc"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"][poker card="5c"]. Zinno was ahead with [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"][poker card="jh"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] flop was a relatively safe one for Zinno. The [poker card="2c"] turn gave Katz a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="7c"] river to eliminate Zinno in sixth place. Chidwick then put his big stack to work 20 minutes to send Sean Rafael to the rail. Chidwick opened to 90,000 before Rafael made it 290,000. Chidwick called and the two players saw a [poker card="9d"][poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"] flop. Rafael bet 155,000 all in and Chidwick called. Rafael tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"][poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"] but Chidwick showed [poker card="tc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"] for trips. Neither the [poker card="3h"] turn or [poker card="qh"] river were any help and Rafael was out in fifth. Katz then picked up another elimination just 30 minutes later. Katz limped his button, Ben Lamb completed from the small blind and Tom Marchese checked his option. The [poker card="as"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5c"] flop got Lamb bet pot. Marchese folded but Katz repotted and Lamb called all in. Katz turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"] while Lamb was drawing with [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"]. The [poker card="5h"] turn was no help for Lamb and after the [poker card="8h"] river failed to complete his draw, Lamb was eliminated in fourth place. Marchese actually started the day as the shortest stack but managed to outlast three other players before meeting his fate. Katz completed from the button and Marchese raised to 240,000 from the small blind. Chidwick folded and Katz called. After the [poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4c"] flop, Marchese bet 600,000 and Katz responded by repotting and Marchese called his last 240,000. Marchese tabled [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"][poker card="js"][poker card="5s"] while Katz was drawing wiht [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"]. The [sc] ended all the drama, completing Katz's flush draw. The meaningless river was the [poker card="6c"] and Marchese was out in third. Thanks to those last two eliminations, Katz began heads up play with 65% of the chips in play. Chidwick and Katz played heads-up for nearly two hours with the lead being traded back and forth before Chidwick finally put a cap on another USPO win. Down to just 3.5 big blinds, Katz moved all in for 410,000 after Chidwick had opened with a pot-size bet of 360,000. Chidwick called and turned up [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4h"] which put him behind Katz' [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"][poker card="js"][poker card="3d"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="6c"] gave Chidwick a wheel and eliminate Katz. Final Table Payouts Stephen Chidwick - $351,000 Cary Katz - $234,000 Tom Marchese - $156,000 Ben Lamb - $97,500 Sean Rafael - $78,000 Anthony Zinno - $58,500 Chidwick now has four USPO wins and nine final tables over 14 events stretching the last two years. He now sits atop the USPO leaderboard and is 100 points clear of his nearest competitor, Sean Winter. USPO Top 10 After Event #6 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Stephen Chidwick 4 $705,950 540 2. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 3. Cary Katz 3 $580,200 340 4. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 5. Ali Imsirovic 1 $442,500 200 6. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 7. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 8. Ben Lamb 2 $146,200 160 9. Dan Shak 2 $232,100 140 10. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140   The final table for Event #7: $25,000 No-Limit Hold’em takes place on Wednesday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  10. The 2019 Aussie Millions recently wrapped up, and it was another record-setting festival of events Down Under. In the heat of the Australian summer, while tennis fans from around the world enjoyed another edition of the famed Aussie Open, the Aussie Millions was packing the house at Crown Casino in beautiful Melbourne. The Aussie Millions Main Event generated its largest turnout ever with 822 entries, besting last year’s record attendance of 800 entries. Bryn Kenney captured the Aussie Millions Main Event title and A$1.272 million ($914,617) after a three-way deal, Cary Katz won the $100,000 Challenge for A$1.481 million ($1.074 million), and plenty of other big scores were had. Here's a look at the biggest winners from the 2019 Aussie Millions. Top 25 2019 Aussie Millions Money List 1. Toby Lewis - A$1,607,654 ($1,149,064) 2. Cary Katz - A$1,481,760 ($1,074,908) 3. Rainer Kempe - A$1,284,225 ($919,258) 4. Michael Del Vecchio - A$1,275,852 ($916,936) 5. Bryn Kenney - A$1,272,598 ($914,617) 6. Andrew Hinrichsen - A$1,102,408 ($792,305) 7. Manig Loeser - A$772,246 ($555,014) 8. Abraham Passet - A$617,400 ($447,878) 9. Jack Salter - A$541,660 ($390,523) 10. Anton Morgenstern - A$530,640 ($384,767) 11. Clinton Taylor - A$483,000 ($347,132) 12. Guillaume Nolet - A$451,069 ($322,640) 13. Tobias Ziegler - A$431,270 ($311,395) 14. David ‘Chino’ Rheem - A$416,760 ($296,137) 15. Thomas Mühlöcker - A$412,300 ($296,320) 16. Matthew Wakeman - A$380,300 ($273,322) 17. Farid Jattin - A$373,880 ($270,869) 18. Dominik Nitsche - A$350,385 ($251,999) 19. Gyeong Byeong Lee - A$311,985 ($224,207) 20. Kristen Bicknell - A$294,530 ($213,599) 21. Jason Pritchard - A$291,885 ($210,084) 22. Hamish Crawshaw - A$253,334 ($182,037) 23. Vincent Huang - A$251,865 ($180,431) 24. Gautam Dhingra - A$247,039 ($175,716) 25. Bjorn Li - A$235,600 ($169,326) Toby Lewis tops the list of winners, earning A$1.607 million ($1.149 million) thanks to four cashes in the series. Two of those four in-the-money finishes were for mega bucks, as Lewis placed second in the $25,000 Challenge for A$781,214 ($555,107) and first in the $50,000 Challenge for A$818,054 ($587,936). Lewis' performances moved him to more than $6.3 million in live tournament earnings and jumped him to sixth place on England's all-time money list, as ranked by The Hendon Mob. Katz, who was already mentioned as the winner of the Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge, was the second-biggest money earner from the 2019 edition of the event. Katz only cashed once, but he won the A$100,000 buy-in event for A$1.481 million ($1.074 million). It was the fifth-largest score of Katz’s poker career, as he moved to more than $18.4 million in live tournament earnings and up to 25th on poker’s all-time money list, also according to The Hendon Mob. Ranking third was Rainer Kempe, who earned a combined A$1.284 million ($919,258) thanks to two big results. Kempe won the $25,000 Challenge that Lewis came second in and took home A$831,465 ($590,814). He also placed fourth in the $100,000 Challenge that Katz won for A$452,760 ($328,444). Kempe's success carried over from the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, where he won more than $1.2 million from three cashes and was the ninth-biggest winner to come out of that series. Just from the PCA and Aussie Millions, Kempe has won more than $2.1 million in prize money in 2019. You’ll notice that Mike Del Vecchio notched Kenney by a couple thousand dollars on the list. The two were involved in a three-way deal at the end of the Aussie Millions Main Event and took home just about the same amount of money. Del Vecchio had another cash at the Aussie Millions that allowed him to finish higher than Kenney on this list. In ninth place with A$541,660 ($390,523) won at the 2019 Aussie Millions was Jack Salter, and he’s the player who cashed the most times within the top 25. Salter cashed five times during the festival, but that wasn’t the most times a player finished in the money at the 2019 Aussie Millions. Justin Liberto and Travis Endersby each cashed six times and were the ones to cash the most times. Liberto earned a combined A$181,609 ($131,133) and Endersby scored a total of A$105,488 ($75,571). If you read our 'Biggest Winners from the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure' article, then you’ll notice there are a few more repeat names on the two lists, in addition to Kempe. Those players are David 'Chino' Rheem, Farid Jattin, and Dominik Nitsche. Rheem, who won the 2019 PCA Main Event for $1.567 million, finished third in the Aussie Millions $25,000 Challenge to win A$416,760 ($296,137). He was the 14th-biggest money earner from this year’s Aussie Millions as a result of that. Jattin notably finished seventh in the PokerStars Players NL Hold'em Championship for $746,000 in the Bahamas. In Melbourne, Jattin finished 31st in the Aussie Millions Main Event and then took second in the A$25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha tournament, winning a combined A$373,880 ($270,869). Nitsche won $606,240 at the 2019 PCA festival and then won another A$350,385 ($251,999) at the 2019 Aussie Millions festival, placing 23rd and 18th on each series' earnings leaderboard. Down Under, Nitsche took fourth in the $50,000 Challenge for A$323,950 ($232,823) and sixth in the A$5,000 Six-Max NL for A$26,435 ($19,176).
  11. Back in September, Ali Imsirovic put on a bit of a show on his way to winning the 2018 Poker Masters Purple Jacket. On Monday night, the 24-year-old eliminated his final three opponents over a 20-minute span to win the $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em event at the 2019 US Poker Open. Final Table Payouts 1. Ali Imsirovic - $442,500 2. Cary Katz - $295,000 3. Dan Shak - $206,500 4. Nick Petrangelo - $147,500 5. Kristen Bicknell - $118,000 6. Joseph Cappello - $88,500 Joseph Cappello started the final table with three big blinds. An early double up was of little help though. Nick Petrangelo raised from under the gun to 60,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="jc"] before Cappello moved all in for 175,000 from the small blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="kh"]. Petrangelo called and then Cappello watched the [poker card="qh"][poker card="ts"][poker card="7h"][poker card="kc"][poker card="as"] runout give Petrangelo a straight to eliminate him in sixth place. With the short stack out of the way, five-handed play continued for an hour before the next elimination. Action folded to Kristen Bicknell on the button and she moved all in for 755,000 with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jc"] before Dan Shak moved all in over the top with the [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] and Imsirovic folded his big blind. The [poker card="6h"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3s"] flop kept Shak ahead and after the [poker card="kd"] turn and [poker card="td"] river, Bicknell was out in fifth. It was at this point that Imsirovic went to work. From the button, Imsirovic raised to 120,000 with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"], Cary Katz folded his small blind and Petrangelo moved all in for 1,160,000 with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="js"]. Imsirovic snap-called. The [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"][poker card="6d"] flop gave both players a set and the [poker card="3s"] turn and [poker card="2c"] river couldn't save Petrangelo from a fourth-place finish. Five minutes later, Imsirovic had another victim. From under the gun, Imsirovic raised to 125,000 with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="3d"] and Shak called from the small blind with the [poker card="9d"][poker card="8s"]. The flop came [poker card="9s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2s"] and Shak check-called a bet of 75,000 from Imsirovic. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and Shak bet 150,000. Imsirovic raised to 550,000 and Shak responded by moving all in for 192,000. The river was the [poker card="tc"] and Shak was out in third. As heads-up play began, Imsirovic had a 10-1 lead over Katz and it took less than 10 minutes for Imsirovic to end it. On the final hand, Imsirovic raised to 180,000 and Katz called. After the [poker card="qs"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2c"] flop, Katz check-raised all in for 1,107,000 and Imsirovic called. Katz turned over the [poker card="kc"][poker card="5c"] for a flush draw and Imsirovic showed the [poker card="9c"][poker card="6s"] for middle pair. The [poker card="5d"] turn paired Katz but the [poker card="8h"] river wasn't enough to save him from a runner-up finish and give Imsirovic the title. USPO Top 10 After Event #5 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Sean Winter 4 $419,400 440 2. Stephen Chidwick 3 $354,950 340 3. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 4. Ali Imsirovic 1 $442,500 200 5. Cary Katz 2 $346,200 200 6. Lauren Roberts 1 $218,400 200 7. Manig Loeser 2 $146,200 180 8. Dan Shak 2 $232,100 140 9. Koray Aldemir 1 $159,250 140 10. David Peters 1 $100,800 140   The final table for Event #5: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Monday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  12. The 2019 US Poker Open continued on Friday at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas with the conclusion of Event #2: $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha. American Jordan Cristos entered the final table with a commanding chip lead and proceeded to eliminate each of his final five opponents en route to claiming the $179,200 first-place prize and rocketing to the early lead in the USPO Championship standings. Final Table Results 1. Jordan Cristos - $179,200 2. Manig Loeser - $128,000 3. Martin Zamani - $83,200 4. Adam Hendrix - $64,000 5. Cary Katz - $51,200 6. Sean Winter - $38,400 From the original field of 64, the final six, which included Aussie Million $100,000 Challenge winner Cary Katz and USPO Event #1 runner-up Sean Winter, took their seats on the live-streamed final table to play down to a winner. It didn’t take long for the first elimination of the final table. Roughly 15 minutes into the day, Cristos put his chip lead to work. He opened on the button with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"] and Winter defended his big blind with the [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="td"][poker card="7h"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"][poker card="js"]. Winter bet out, prompting a raise from Cristos. Winter made the call with his tournament at risk. The [poker card="qc"] gave both players a straight, but Cristos had a redraw to the spade flush while Winter had a redraw to a full house. The [poker card="qs"] brought the flush in for Cristos and he eliminated Winter in sixth place for $38,400. Winter improved to a two-day USPO total of $195,900 and 180 points. Cristos claimed his second victim 45 minutes later. A short-stacked Katz raised from the button with the [poker card="as"][poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"] and was called by Cristos holding the [poker card="th"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3s"]. The flop came [poker card="5c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="kd"] and Cristos bet his flopped two pair enough to put Katz at risk. Katz called with his aces and the turn was the [poker card="6d"] to give Cristos a full house. Katz needed one of the last two aces in the deck to survive but the [poker card="2d"] hit the river instead. The Poker Central founder finished in fifth for $51,200. Minutes later, it was Adam Hendrix’s turn to battle Cristos. Hendrix raised his [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"][poker card="jd"][poker card="6s"] from the small blind only to be re-raised by Cristos from the big blind with the [poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="3c"]. Hendrix called with his tournament on the line and with the cards on their backs, the pair saw a flop of [poker card="3d"][poker card="9h"][poker card="kh"]. Cristos flopped a set which held through the [poker card="6h"] turn and the [poker card="ad"] river. Hendrix wrapped Event #2 in fourth place for $64,000. The rapid bustouts continued moments later when Cristos raised his [poker card="ts"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] from the small blind into Martin Zamani’s big blind. Zamani made the call with the [poker card="9s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2c"]and the flop fell [poker card="jc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"], again giving Cristos the best hand with trip sevens. The board was completed with the [poker card="jd"] and [poker card="6h"]. Zamani hit the rail in third place and added $83,200 to his more than $1.3 million in career tournament earnings. Cristos took a healthy chip lead into his heads-up play with Germany’s Manig Loeser. However, during the more than two-hour battle, Loeser wrestled the chip lead away. The pair passed the lead back and forth until Cristos finally managed to get the best of Loeser. The final hand saw Cristos raise holding the [poker card="9s"][poker card="6h"][poker card="kc"][poker card="5c"] and Loeser defended with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="4c"]. The flop fell [poker card="qc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="7c"] and Loeser checked to Cristos, who put in a bet. Loeser check-raised with his two pair and the pair got all the chips in the middle. The turn was the [poker card="ks"], giving Cristos a bigger two pair, and the [poker card="8s"] river completed the tournament. Loeser was eliminated as the runner-up, settling for second place and collecting $128,000 for his efforts. Cristos wins his first USPO event and the $179,200 first-place prize. This comes on the heels of his 11th-place finish in Event #1, where he earned $27,000. Together, his 2019 USPO earnings have helped propel him to over $2.5 million in career live earnings and the current leader in the quest for the 2019 USPO Championship. USPO Top 10 After Event #2 PLAYER CASHES PRIZE MONEY POINTS 1. Jordan Cristos 2 $206,200 240 2. Stephen Chidwick 1 $216,000 200 3. Sean Winter 2 $195,400 180 4. Manig Loeser 1 $128,000 140 5. Joseph Cheong 1 $112,500 100 6. Martin Zamani 1 $83,200 100 7. Joseph Cappello 1 $90,000 80 8. Adam Hendrix 1 $64,000 80 9. Lazaro Hernandez 1 $72,000 60 10. Cary Katz 1 $51,200 60   The final table for Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em will take place on Saturday. USPO Streaming Schedule On PokerGO DATE EVENT TIME (ET) 02/14/19 Event #1: #10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/15/19 Event #2: #10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/16/19 Event #3: $10,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/17/19 Event #4: $10,000 Short Deck 5 p.m. 02/18/19 Event #5: $25,000 No-Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/19/19 Event #6: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 5 p.m. 02/20/19 Event #7: $25,000 No Limit Hold'em 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #8: $25,000 8-Game 5 p.m. 02/21/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 8 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #9: $50,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. 02/22/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Early 7:30 p.m. 02/23/19 Event #10: $100,000 No-Limit Hold'em Final 5 p.m. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  13. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Back from a Super Bowl party, Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters jump right back into the world of poker and discuss the deal that Bryn Kenney struck that awarded him a seven-figure score and the Aussie Millions Main Event championship. They also debate whether or not Cary Katz is still a "recreational player" after his win in the Aussie Millions $100K Challenge. Also on the show this week, a look at the second week of the $109 buy-in PokerStars Sunday Million, how 888poker's RakeLESS weekend did, and talk about what the departures of Jaime Staples and Jeff Gross from Team PokerStars might actually be leading to. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  14. The prestigious Aussie Millions AU$100,000 Challenge wrapped up on Saturday with Cary Katz adding another high roller title to his resume. Katz, the founder of Poker Central, bested the 42-entrant field to take home the AU$1,481,760 ($1,074,658 USD) prize and ANTON Championship ring. Although Katz would eventually end up with all the chips, he was in need of some serious help earlier in the tournament after limp-shoving pocket kings against eventual runner-up Johannes Becker’s pocket aces. A king hit the board and Katz doubled through. He then used that bit of good fortune to stay alive and press on to win the fifth seven-figure score of his career. The final table of nine needed three eliminations before players found themselves in the money. Germany’s Manig Loeser fell in ninth place, followed by American Michael Soyza in eighth. Then Alex Foxen, who celebrated his birthday just one day prior, received the unkind gift of being the official bubble boy, busting in seventh place when his [poker card="as"][poker card="2h"] couldn’t spike against Becker’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="8h"]. With six players remaining, Kristen Bicknell shoved her 15 big blinds in from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2d"]. Rainer Kempe made the call from the small blind with the [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3s"] giving Kempe some backdoor outs plus two overs to bust Bicknell, who just needed to hold. The [poker card="kc"] turn left Bicknell in need of an ace however the [poker card="4h"] river was no help. Bicknell’s run ended in sixth place for AU$288,100. It wasn’t long before the next elimination. Katz opened from under the gun with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qs"] only to be shoved on by Jack Salter who held [poker card="8h"][poker card="8s"]. Katz went into the tank, but eventually made the call. The [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"][poker card="6c"] flop gave Katz a commanding lead and left Salter searching for one of the final eights in the deck. The turn was the [poker card="3h"] and the river [poker card="js"] sending the UK pro to the rail in fifth place for AU$329,280. Four-handed play took place for nearly an hour before Kempe and countryman Abraham Passet clashed in a big hand. Passet raised small from under the gun with [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"] and was called by both Katz and Becker. Kempe, in the big blind, pushed all in with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"]. Passet then reshoved, forcing both Katz and Becker out of the hand. The pair of Germans saw a board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="3d"][poker card="7c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="qh"] keeping it clean for Passet’s pocket kings. Kempe, the 2016 Super High Roller Bowl Champion, bowed out in fourth place for AU$452,760. The final three, eager to continue play, shortened their dinner break and pressed on with Passet in the chip lead and Katz sitting on the short stack. However, over the course of the next hour, Katz began chipping up and finally turned the tables. He found double through Passet holding pocket aces versus Passet’s pocket sixes, sending Katz into a chip lead he would not relinquish. Eventually, Passet’s tournament came to an end when Becker’s only called the small blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"] prompting a shove from Passet with [poker card="ad"][poker card="th"]. The flop fell [poker card="9s"][poker card="2c"][poker card="3c"] giving Passet some backdoor straight options along with his single overcard. The turn was the [poker card="9c"] and the river was the [poker card="ts"]. Passet took home AU$617.400 for his third-place finish. Once heads-up play began, Katz went on a run that had him eliminating Becker in just under an hour of play. After winning a series of hands, Becker was crippled and the final hand had the pair get all the chips in the middle with Katz holding [poker card="9h"][poker card="9d"] against Becker’s [poker card="kc"][poker card="2c"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="8s"] flop was clean for Katz. The [poker card="2h"] turn offered some extra outs for Becker but the [poker card="jc"] river sealed his fate and the German finished in second place for AU$946,680. Katz earned AU$1,481,760 for the victory, his first ever result at the Aussie Millions. It marks his second major $100K Super High Roller win having also taken down the 2018 PCA $100K for $1,492,340. Katz now sits at #25 on the All-Time Money List with over $18.3 million in earnings. Aussie Millions AU$100,000 Challenge Payouts Place Player Payout AUD Payout USD 1 Cary Katz $1,481,760 $1,066,867 2 Johannes Becker $946,680 $681,610 3 Abraham Passet $617,400 $444,528 4 Rainer Kempe $452,760 $325,987 5 Jack Salter $329,280 $237,082 6 Kristen Bicknell $288,120 $207,446
  15. In breaking news Tuesday, the World Series of Poker added a new bracelet event as part of the 2019 WSOP schedule. Starting Monday, July 8, the 'Final Fifty' has a $50,000 buy-in and makes for the 90th gold bracelet event of the summer. WSOP officials confirmed the addition of the event shortly after it hit the website and began making the rounds on social media. As it is an open gold bracelet tournament, the Final Fifty will count towards WSOP Player of the Year rankings. "I don't think it has a huge effect [on WSOP Player of the Year] because it was added in enough time," Daniel Negreanu said. "It’s not like it was added three days before. It gives people plenty of time and it’s around the $100K. Overall, I wish they wouldn’t do that, because it complicates things, but I think it should count for WSOP Player of the Year." The event is now the second $50,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournament on this summer’s schedule. WSOP officials informed PocketFives that the event was added after player feedback. It seems several players voiced a desire to have an additional $50,000 no-limit hold’em event later in the summer after missing the first one that took place May 31-June 3. "It’s abnormal an event gets added late in the year, but we got some feedback from players who thought [the first one] was too early in the Series and they weren’t around for it," Seth Palansky, WSOP Vice President of Corporate Communications, told PocketFives. Palansky pointed out that there is no $25,000 buy-in no-limit hold’em event on this summer’s schedule, so in a way this event takes the place of that but with a larger buy-in. "We decided to make it a $50K instead of $25K to properly close out the 50 theme of the WSOP this year," Palansky said. "The event is well positioned right before the $100K." The $50,000 Final Fifty starts Monday, June 8, and is scheduled to be a three-day event. Players start with 300,000 in tournament chips, levels are 40 minutes in length, and registration is open until the start of Day 2 with unlimited re-entry allowed. Day 2 starts June 9 at 4 p.m. PT and the tournament will use a play clock. "I have no idea why it was added," Negreanu said with a laugh. "I’m guessing because Cary Katz wanted to play a tournament." Following the newly added Final Fifty is the $100,000 High Roller, scheduled to start on Thursday, July 11. One wrench thrown into the system for players such as Negreanu is how the addition affects the $25K Fantasy league. Should the added event count or not? As things stand right now, it’s likely going to take some time to iron out a decision one way or another. "It’s a little bit of annoyance for the $25K Fantasy because we never foresaw something like this happening and there aren’t any rules that discuss what to do if events are added, although all of our rules say that every open bracelet event counts and this is an open bracelet event," Negreanu said. "My thought, as the commissioner, is that if we had a consensus to not count it then we would, but a straight vote doesn’t work because people are going to vote in their own interest. If you have a team full of no-limit guys, you’re thinking, ‘Yeah, it should count!’ If you have all mixed-game guys, you’re like, ‘No!’ We might have to take it to arbitration." Looking forward to the 2020 WSOP, Palansky mentioned the series will likely go back to having a $25,000 buy-in event in place of one of the $50,000 ones.
  16. There’s a reason that summer in Las Vegas is often called ‘poker player summer camp’ and it’s not just because the World Series of Poker is going on. During the summer bracelet chasing takes center stage in Sin City but over the past decade, many other Las Vegas poker rooms have battled with the WSOP for the hearts and minds of the poker playing public by consistently scheduling competing summer series that offer players excellent value through great structures and big guarantees. Here's a quick look around the city at some of those non-WSOP tournaments keeping poker players in action. ARIA Poker Classic and High Roller Series There are basically two tournament series happening at the same time inside the ARIA. The first is for the everyday player. It's filled with buy-ins right around the $400 and $240 buy-in level, The ARIA Poker Classic. The second is home to the high rollers - small fields, high buy-in, and elite competition - The ARIA Summer High Roller Series. Even though the Rio has offered some big buy-in tournaments early in the WSOP schedule, many of the biggest names in the game have been spending more time in the ARIA this summer simply because it’s where the biggest games are. Before he was embroiled in controversy for folding out of order at the WSOP, Sam Soverel bested the 23 player field in Aria High Roller 11 on May 30 for a $235,880 payday. He was joined in the money by David Peters (runner-up, $189.620), Jake Schindler (3rd, $92,000) and Poker Central founder Cary Katz (4th, $57,500). Australia’s Michael Addamo won the $10,000 buy-in ARIA High Roller 12 on June 4 for $136,000, defeating Germany’s Manig Loeser heads up. Loeser finished in second place taking home $88,400 for his efforts while fellow countryman Rainer Kempe finished in third for $54,400. Spain’s Juan Dominguez is having a nice start to his summer as he went back-to-back at the ARIA. First, he topped the 45 player field of the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 13 for $153,000 and the very next day he won the $10,000 ARIA High Roller 14 for another $126,682. Ben Yu was the official runner-up, taking home $125,318 while the familiar faces of Jake Schindler (3rd, $67,500), Manig Loeser (4th, $45,000) and Ali Imsirovic (5th, $36,000) also made final table appearances. The 2019 Wynn Poker Classic One of the nicer properties on the Las Vegas strip, the Wynn/Encore hosts the Wynn Poker Classic and through the first week and a half, players have been turning up en masse to play in their daily offerings. The Wynn has been offering multiple $1K+ buy-in tournaments and some well-known names have been showing up for them. On June 3, 484 runners showed up for the $1,100 in which the UK’s Louis Salter took home the $98.452 first-place prize and defeated a final table that included Connor Drinan (runner-up, $64,295) and Lily Kiletto (7th, $13,907). The next day 432 players jumped into the $1,600 buy-in which saw Florida’s Evan Teitelbaum hold off one-time WSOP Main Event champion Joe McKeehen to take down the $138,209 first place prize. McKeehen settled for $89,018 as the runner-up. Other notable final table players included Mark Radoja (5th, $31,068) as well as Entourage and Ballers music supervisor Scott Vener (9th, $12,468). Keven Stammen bested the 618 runners of the $550 daily on June 6 for a $50,940 payday while Justin Liberto defeated Germany’s Bart Lybaert on June 8 to win a $1,100 tournament for $94,659. Lybaert’s $61,412 runner-up prize helped push him to over $3M in career earnings. The DeepStack Championship Poker Series at The Venetian The Venetian continues to provide large field tournaments for players looking for action outside the Rio. They have a partnership with the Mid-States Poker Tour for some of their larger events but also provide daily tournaments for players looking for buy-ins under $1,600. Although the Deepstack Series starts in the middle of May, the $1,100 ‘Summer Kickoff ‘ Event from May 27-29 brought out 518 runners where World Poker Tour Champion Brian Altman took home the $90,905 first-place prize. He defeated Robert Kuhn who ended up with $84,390 as the runner-up. The final table included popular Twitch Poker streamer Ricky ‘RatedGTO’ Guan who finished in fourth for $36,364, a top-3 score for his young career. Pot Limit Omaha cash game grinder Sasha Liu outlasted the 144 runners in the $800 Pot Limit Omaha 8-Max Bounty to take down the $20,161 first-place prize. Canadian Kevin Barton fell in second place for a $11,995 payday.
  17. What could possibly overshadow the conclusion of the largest poker tournament of all time where one player walked away with $1 million at the 2019 World Series of Poker? The unexpected and unannounced return of Phil Ivey. While the Big 50 was playing down to a winner on the ESPN main stage Friday afternoon, the 10-time bracelet winner casually entered the Rio through a back entrance and was one of the last players to register for the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship event. Femi Fashakin Wins Largest Tournament Ever, Turns $500 in $1.15M Femi Fashakin started the Big 50 final table with the chip lead on Friday afternoon and when all was said and done he was posing for pictures with the bracelet as poker's newest millionaire. Fashakin topped the record-setting 28,371-player field to win $1,159,620. He eliminated Nicholas Chow in fourth, Rafi Elharar in third, and then bested Canadian Paul Cullen heads-up to win the prize. The 37-year-old Florida resident and father of two came to the United States from Nigeria in 2001 to study computer science at Bethune-Cookman University. He started playing poker in 2010. "When I found poker, I couldn't believe it. I was like, 'This is a game I can analyze and use my mind on.'," Fashakin said. "So I got a little more interested in the game and started watching WSOPs and WPTs." He started playing bar poker near his home in Orlando before graduating into smaller buy-in events in local casinos. Prior to this win, Fashakin's live earnings totalled just a hair over $59,000 and his single biggest score was $11,250 in the WPT Seminole Rock n Roll Poker Open last November. Final Table Payouts Femi Fashakin - $1,147,449 Paul Cullen - $709,183 Rafi Elharar - $534,574 Nicholas Chow - $405,132 Walter Atwood - $308,701 Danny Ghobrial - $237,609 Adrian Curry - $182,192 Morten Christensen - $141,126 David Rasmussen - $109,922 Jason Stockfish and Murilo Souza Make Event #14 a Two-Horse Race In the wee hours of Saturday morning, Jason Stockfish and Murilo Souza bagged up chips in the $1,500 HORSE event as the only two players remaining. There were 28 players still in contention at the start of the day but through over 13 hours of play, just two remain. Stockfish and Souza attempted to finish things on Friday night but agreed to come back Saturday to play down to a winner. Earlier in the day, Andre Akkari busted in 26th, WSOP Circuit crusher Valentin Vornicu finished 19th, and 2018 WSOP bracelet winner Rich Zhu went home in 15th place. The final table included Chris Klodnicki going out in fifth and Phillip Hui following him to the rail in fourth. Chip Counts Jason Stockfish - 4,095,000 Murilo Souza - 3,425,000 Isaac Baron Heads Up for First WSOP Bracelet Isaac Baron reached as high as #2 in the PocketFives Rankings in his online poker career. He's hoping for anything but second best on Saturday when he and Ong Dingxiang return to finish off the $1,500 Six-Handed No Limit Hold'em event. The pair bagged up early Saturday morning after outlasting 19 other players on Day 3. With 53.8% of the chips in play, Baron has a slight lead over Dingxiang. Both players are looking for their first career WSOP bracelet. Baron's previous best finish came in 2014 when he finished fourth in the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship event. Dingxiang meanwhile has never cashed in a WSOP event. Romain Nussmann, who started the day in the chip lead, busted in ninth Chip Counts Isaac Baron-24,475,000 Ong Dingxiang - 21,025,000 $1,500 Shootout Down to Final Table Cary Katz is one of the regulars on the High Roller and Super High Roller circuit. He's one of 10 players who has managed to navigate their way through two tables to advance to the final table of the $1,500 Shootout event. Despite having $19.5 million in lifetime earnings, mostly from those big buy-in events he frequents, Katz has never won a WSOP bracelet. He has two runner-up finishes, first 2013 in a $5,000 Pot Limit Hold'em event and then in 2017 when he finished one spot behind Mohsin Charania in a $1,500 No Limit Hold'em event. The final table also marks the return of Kenna James. He last made a WSOP final table in 2009 when he finished 6th in a $2,500 Razz event. He has 36 WSOP cashes but has yet to secure a bracelet. Brett Apter starts the final table with a slight chip lead. Some of the players who made Day 2 but were unable to advance included Joe Cada, Erik Seidel, Daniel Ott, Dillon Ott, Jonathan Proudfoot, Qui Nguyen, Felipe Ramos, Kelly Minkin, Loni Harwood, and Maurice Hawkins. Final table action begins at Noon PT and Final Table Chip Counts Brett Apter - 2,258,000 Anatolii Zyrin - 2,306,000 Marko Maher - 2,240,000 Shintaro Baba - 2,237,000 Adrian Scarpa - 2,286,000 Michael O'Grady - 2,298,000 Kenna James - 2,203,000 Cary Katz - 2,266,000 Manuel Ruivo - 2,245,000 Tommy Nguyen - 2,213,000 Phil Ivey Return Highlights $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Day 1 The $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship usually brings out a cross-section of the best poker players in the world and players who specialize in this variant. Day 2 of the $10,000 Omaha Hi-Lo Championship certainly lived up to that reputation and even brought about the return of Phil Ivey. Ivey was one of a handful of players who took advantage of the late registration extending into Day 2 and his return to the WSOP for the first time this year set the poker world abuzz. Unfortunately for poker fans, Ivey wasn't one of the 23 players who were able to bag up chips at the end of the day. Ken Aldridge leads the final 23 players with 1,178,000, but Owais Ahmed is hot on his heels with 1,078,000. Robert Mizrachi sits third with 703,000. Shaun Deeb picked up his third cash of the 2019 WSOP and will begin Day 3 with 652,000 in chips. Other notables still chasing the bracelet and $443,641 first place prize money include David Benyamine, Jake Schwartz, Mike Wattel, Mike Matusow, and David 'Bakes' Baker. Action resumes at 2 PM PT and will play down to six players. Top 10 Chip Counts Ken Aldridge - 1,178,000 Owais Ahmed - 1,074,000 Robert Mizrachi - 703,000 Frankie O'Dell - 692,000 Andrew Yeh - 677,000 Nick Guagenti - 667,000 Shaun Deeb - 652,000 Yarron Bendor - 647,000 David Benyamine - 605,000 Richard Ashby - 587,500 Millionaire Maker Opening Flight Draws Nearly 4,000 Players Amidst all of the hype for the Big 50, other smaller buy-in gimmick tournaments could have suffered. That doesn't appear to be the case for the $1,500 Millionaire Maker though. Day 1A drew 3,930 players, a 29% increase over 2018 Day 1A. Topping the 968 who managed to bag up chips at the end of the day was Garrett Greer with 570,600. Two former #1-ranked players also bagged top 10 stacks. Calvin Anderson finished with the second-best stack of the day, right behind Greer, with 563,600. Chris Hunichen rounded out the top 10 with 366,800. Chance Kornuth, Jack Sinclair, Daniel Strelitz, Joe McKeehen, David Pham, Asher Conniff, Scott Clements, and Jared Jaffee were just some of the notable players who managed to put chips in a bag at the end of Day 1A. Day 1B begins at 10 AM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Garrett Greer - 570,600 Calvin Anderson - 563,600 Eder Murata - 506,000 Orson Young - 417,300 Soheb Porbandarwala - 406,000 Keith Lehr - 383,000 Susannah Altman - 381,200 Luis Pinho - 373,800 Jacob Naumann - 372,500 Chris Hunichen - 366,800 Daniel Negreanu Among Leaders $1,500 Seven Card Stud Day 1 of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud event drew 285 players and Daniel Negreanu, Julien Martini, Andre Akkari, Scott Seiver, and Joao Simao were a handful of the notables who moved on to Day 2. Negreanu built his 10,000 starting stack into 56,900 for the sixth best moving on to Day 2. Martini is right behind him with 56,100. Action resumes at 2 PM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Constantine Moustakis - 76,600 David Singer - 69,000 Joshua Mountain - 60,500 Joachim Sanejstra - 57,500 Pawel Andrzejewski - 57,500 Daniel Negreanu - 56,900 Julien Martini - 56,100 Perry Friedman - 54,400 Kyle Hinnerichs - 52,500 Jose Paz-Gutierrez - 52,100
  18. Shaun Deeb and Brandon Adams both bagged up chip leads in "post-lim" events in the shadows of the Main Event at the 2019 World Series of Poker on Tuesday. Those two were the headliners in two of the five events outside of the Main Event on the calendar but Dan Zack also put on a show in his pursuit of WSOP Player of the Year honors. Brandon Adams Leads $50,000 Final Fifty Final Table Brandon Adams has already won one WSOP bracelet this summer and on Tuesday he took a gigantic step towards winning a second one. Adams finished Day 2 of the $50,000 Final Fifty event with the chip lead and just six players standing between himself and that second victory. Adams bagged up 11,970,000 and sits well ahead of the rest of the field. 2013 WSOP Europe Main Event champion Adrian Mateos has the second biggest stack with 7,375,000. Michael Addamo sits third with 5,765,000. Daniel Tang, Sam Soverel, Ali Imsirovic, and Keith Tilston round out the final table. There were 14 players who registered on Day 2, including Cary Katz. This presented the PokerGO owner with a challenge. He started the day with a healthy chip stack in the Main Event and was forced to actually multi-table between the two events. Katz managed to survive past the bubble of the Final Fifty before busting in 12th for $112,357. Final Table Chip Counts Brandon Adams - 11,970,000 Adrian Mateos - 7,375,000 Michael Addamo - 5,765,000 Daniel Tang - 4,550,000 Sam Soverel - 3,600,000 Ali Imsirovic - 2,190,000 Keith Tilston - 1,500,000 Shaun Deeb Tops Little One for One Drop After Day 2 Shaun Deeb continues to chase down Player of the Year points and a fifth career bracelet. The former #1-ranked PocketFiver soared to the top of the chip counts after the $1,111 Little One for One Drop after Day 2 with 412 players still remaining. Deeb ended the day with 2,892,000 and holds a 526,000 chip lead over the next biggest stack belonging to Matt Souza. This is Deeb's 14th cash this summer and he sits just over 620 points behind WSOP Player of the Year leader Robert Campbell. There's a number of notables still in contention including Loni Harwood (1,121,000), Mike Sexton - (1,030,000), Ryan Laplante (747,000), and Day 4 Main Event casualty Cliff Josephy (676,000). An additional 787 players joined the field on Day 2 to push the final number of entries to 6,248 and the prize pool to $5,623,200. The eventual champion will earn $690,686. Top 10 Chip Counts Shaun Deeb - 2,892,000 Matt Souza - 2,366,000 Jeremy Dresch - 2,300,000 Naor Slobodskoy - 2,109,000 Jaime Lewin - 1,980,000 Ian Simpson - 1,961,000 Dustin Goff - 1,751,000 Keith Carter - 1,700,000 Alan Schein - 1,637,000 Nick Shkolnik - 1,620,000 Tu Dao On Top of $3,000 Six Max Limit Hold'em Final Table Tu Dao finished fourth in the Ladies Championship event in late June, but now she's in position to improve on that after finishing Day 2 of the $3,000 Six Max Limit Hold'em event with 954,000 and the lead. Right behind Dao is Alain Alinat with 805,000. The two middle-of-the-pack stacks, Oleg Chebotarev and Jan Suchanek have 672,000 and 599,000 respectively. Chade Eveslage sits fifth 431,000 and Ian O'Hara rounds out the final six with 410,000. Among those who cashed on Tuesday include Patrick Leonard (15th - $6,748), Greg Mueller (23rd - $5,484), Joao Vieira (27th - $4,571) and Daniel Zack (28th - $4,571). Zach also picked up 46.1 POY points to move just 112.46 points behind current POY leader Robert Campbell. The day started with 57 players and needed just 11 hours to get down to a final table. The players will now take Wednesday off before returning to action on Thursday to play down to a winner. Final Table Chip Counts Tu Dao - 954,000 Alain Alinat - 805,000 Oleg Chebotarev - 672,000 Jan Suchanek - 599,000 Chad Eveslage - 431,000 Ian O'Hara - 410,000 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Bounty Event Draws 1,130 Runners A year after 833 players entered the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Bounty event, 1,130 players gave the event a decent-sized boost in entries and prize pool and so far nobody can be happier about that than Tobias Schwecht. The Austrian finished Day 1 with 419,200 and the chip lead. Richard Kellett is right on his heels though. The Brit finished with 414,600 and is just 4,600 behind Schwecht. China's Yingui Li and Kazuhiko Yotsushika wound up third and fourth respectively. The top American, Jason Young, bagged up the fifth biggest stack with 356,300. READ: A FIGHT FOR FATHERHOOD: THE BIGGEST WIN OF JASON YOUNG’S LIFE Some of the familiar faces that made it to Day 2 include Jesse Sylvia (205,800), Christian Harder (147,300), Connor Drinan (124,300), JC Tran (95,800), Gordon Vayo (90,600), Daniel Negreanu (64,800), Robin Ylitalo (62,800), and Daniel Zack (51,300). Just 247 players made it to Day 2 and the bubble will burst on Wednesday after 77 more players are sent to the rail. Top 10 Chip Counts Tobias Schwecht - 419,200 Richard Kellett - 414,600 Yingui Li - 379,400 Kazuhiko Yotsushika - 359,600 Jason Young - 356,300 Jan-Peter Jachtmann - 354,100 Bradley Butcher - 341,200 Denis Strebkov - 331,700 Senovio Ramirez III - 302,400 Jonathan Depa - 300,400 Vlad Darie Edges out Andras Nemeth for $3K NLHE Lead Vlad Darie finished Day 1 of the $3,000 No Limit Hold'em event with the chip lead, just ahead of former #1-ranked PocketFiver Andras Nemeth. Darie wound up with 284,000 while Nemeth accumulated 264,500. Darie and Nemeth are just two of the 148 players who advanced to Day 2. Other notables who bagged and tagged include Kristen Bicknell (192,000), Justin Bonomo (170,500), Patrick Leonard (103,500), Asher Conniff (92,500), Rainer Kempe (80,500), and Paul Volpe (46,500). Remarkably, Dan Zack managed to finish with chips in this event as well. Daniel Zack will have a busy day on Wednesday as he plays his stack in the $1,500 PLO Bounty event adn this one. Top 10 Chip Counts Vlad Darie - 284,000 Andras Nemeth - 264,500 David Margi - 263,500 Guillaume Nolet - 230,000 Peter Walsworth - 222,000 Athanasios Polychronopoulos - 221,000 Jay Sharon - 218,000 Dennis Brand - 216,500 Ronald Paolucci - 210,500 Michael Tureniec - 209,000  
  19. The schedule is out for the 2020 Aussie Millions Poker Championship at Crown Casino in Melbourne, Australia. The series spans 21 days of consecutive poker action from Saturday, January 4, through Friday, January 24, and features 23 championship poker tournaments. The 2020 Aussie Millions A$10,600 Main Event starts Friday, January 17, and has three starting flights, one each across Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The final table will be played on Friday, January 24. The winner is said to walk away with an estimated A$1.8 million and champion's bracelet valued at more than A$25,000. The 2019 Aussie Millions Millions Main Event attracted a record-breaking field of 822 entries and was won by one of poker's biggest names, Bryn Kenney. The 2020 Aussie Millions festival opens with the A$1,150 Opening Event on Saturday, January 4. This event has five starting flights and a A$1 million prize pool guarantee. The 2019 Aussie Millions Opening event became the largest-ever tournament at Crown Casino with a,1752 entries. Also returning for 2020 are the A$25,000 Pot Limit Omaha, A$25,000 Challenge, A$50,000 Challenge, and A$100,000 Challenge. 2020 Aussie Millions Schedule DATE TIME EVENT BUY-IN Jan. 4 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1A A$1,150 Jan. 5 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1B A$1,150 12:15 pm H.O.R.S.E. A$2,500 Jan. 6 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1C A$1,150 6:10 pm Opening Event Day 1D A$1,150 Jan. 7 12:10 pm Opening Event Day 1E A$1,150 Jan. 9 12:15 pm Pot Limit Omaha A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em - Mix Max A$1,150 Jan. 10 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em - Six Max A$1,150 Jan. 11 12:10 pm Pot Limit Omaha A$2,500 2:10 pm No Limit Hold'em 'Deep Freeze' A$1,500 Jan. 12 12:10 pm Shot Clock No Limit Hold'em Six Max A$2,500 Jan. 13 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1A A$1,150 12:15 pm 8 Game Mixed A$2,500 2:10 pm 25K Pot Limit Omaha A$25,000 Jan. 14 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1B A$1,150 Jan. 15 12:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Accumulator Day 1C A$1,150 2:10 pm $25,000 Challenge A$25,000 Jan. 16 2:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Bounty A$2,000 Jan. 17 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1A A$10,600 2:10 pm $50,000 Challenge A$50,000 2:30 pm No Limit Hold'em Terminator A$1,150 Jan. 18 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1B A$10,600 2:30 pm Hyper Turbo No Limit Hold'em A$1,150 Jan. 19 12:30 pm Main Event Day 1C A$10,600 Jan. 20 2:10 pm Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em A$2,500 Jan. 21 2:10 pm Aussie Millions Tournament of Champions A$1,150 6:10 pm No Limit Hold'em Six Max A$5,000 Jan. 22 12:10 pm Turbo No Limit Hold'em - Shot Clock A$1,150 2:10 pm $100,000 Challenge A$100,000 "The 2019 Aussie Millions saw records smashed right across the board," said Joel Williams, Crown Melbourne Tournament Director. "We watched the 'Main Event' scale heights previously unseen; we re-established ourselves as an integral stop on the High Roller circuit; total prize pools exceeded A$30 million and overall participation broke through 8,600 - all served to produce arguably the most memorable series in Australian poker history. January 2020 allows us the opportunity to continue to stamp ourselves as an elite poker destination for players right across the globe - and we are more than ready to accept that challenge and remain committed to providing the best experience possible." On Wednesday, January 8, there is a 10-seat guarantee satellite to the Aussie Millions Main Event on the schedule, starting at 2:10 pm local time with a buy-in of A$550. Although Kenney won the 2019 Aussie Millions Main Event, he wasn't the biggest winner from the series. That title belonged to Toby Lewis, who walked away from the 2019 Aussie Millions with A$1,607,654 ($1,149,064) in prize earnings. Cary Katz and Rainer Kempe also had impressive performances.
  20. The Triton Super High Roller Poker Series is about to make history. On Thursday, August 1 the Triton Million: A Helping Hand For Charity tournament will begin and it’s £1,050,000 buy-in will make the three-day event the biggest buy-in in poker history. Some of the biggest names in the game of poker will make their way to the UK to participate in this historic event that blends nosebleed stakes with an effort to raise money for a host of charitable causes. From every buy-in, £50,000 will be raised to benefit charities that include REG, the Caring For Children Foundation, Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Invitations Please It’s not just the super-sized buy-in that makes playing in this tournament unique. The Triton Million was searching for a way to make sure the event wasn’t simply packed with pieced-out pros. They wanted to give recreational players and business professionals a reason to participate, so that made the event invitation only - with a twist. A Triton Poker Series committee handed out invitations only to non-professional players and then allowed them to invite one player each, which could be a pro player. The result is a field consisting of one half ‘recreationals’ and the other half, super high roller poker pros. For the first six hours, each half will be separated. The pros will only play against other pros and the recs will battle the recs. Then, there will be a redraw and the tournament will proceed as usual. With only 23 business professionals signed up, pro players needed to find themselves an invite from a like-minded counterpart. Here are those pro players that made a connection or two and will be taking a seat at the Triton Million. Bryn Kenney [caption id="attachment_625864" align="alignnone" width="903"] Bryn Kenney (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Bryn Kenney is in the midst of a career year. The regular super high roller and former #1-ranked GPI player has spent the better part of 2019 destroying the biggest buy-ins in the world, claiming three seven-figure scores this year alone. In addition to taking down the 2019 Aussie Million Main Event for over $914,000, Kenney has posted some of the biggest results of his career in previous Triton Poker Super High Roller Series. In March, he finished as the runner-up in the Triton Jeju Main Event for a career-high cash of $3,062,513. He followed that up with back-to-back victories during Triton Montenegro bringing him scores of $1.4 million and $2.7 million in a three-day span. His incredible run has vaulted him to the rarified air of the top 5 on the All-Time Money List, where he currently sits at #4. He is also currently resting as the #2 player on the 2019 Money List, second only to the winner of the World Series of Poker Main Event, Hossein Ensan. Kenney was invited to the Triton Million by Poker Central founder Cary Katz. Tom Dwan [caption id="attachment_625865" align="alignnone" width="903"] Tom Dwan (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Tom Dwan is arguably one of the most popular poker players in the history of the game. When his exciting, aggressive style of play was featured in the pre-Black Friday televised cash games heyday, the young man known as ‘Durrrr’ became iconic as the representative of the young crop of online grinders who helped push the game of poker to the next level. Nowadays, a Tom Dwan sighting is rare. Especially in a tournament. It’s generally understood that Dwan spends his time grinding the largest cash games in the world in Macau, only buying into tournaments when the stakes are at their highest, like the Triton Million. In fact, Dwan only has five recorded tournament results since 2011, two of which were invitational events. His last tournament cash was from June 2018 where he had a final table finish during the Triton Jeju Short Deck event for $252,320. In April 2019, Dwan was named an official Triton Poker ambassador. Dwan was invited to the Triton Million by the founder of the Triton Series himself, Paul Phua. Justin Bonomo [caption id="attachment_625867" align="alignnone" width="903"] Justin Bonomo (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] It wouldn’t be a Super High Roller event without the current king of the All-Time Money List, Justin Bonomo. For roughly a two year stretch between 2017-2018, it seemed like there wasn’t a nosebleed tournament where Bonomo didn't end up with all the chips. With just over $45 million in career earnings, Bonomo has a trophy case filled with super high roller scores including the 2018 Super High Roller Bowl China for $4.8 million, the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl title in Las Vegas for $5 million and the 2018 $1M The Big One For One Drop at the World Series of Poker for $10 million. Bonomo’s last outright victory took place this past March when he conquered the field in the first Short Deck event of the 2019 Triton Juju SHR Series taking home just over $586,000. Bonomo was invited to the Triton Million by Ferdinand Putra. Fedor Holz [caption id="attachment_625869" align="alignnone" width="903"] Fedor Holz (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Despite having ‘retired’ from poker, German poker savant Fedor Holz is still very much categorized as a pro. Hailing from a country packed with some of the greatest minds in the game, Holz sits at #1 on Germany’s All-Time Money List (#6 in the world) thanks to his over $32M in career earnings. Like many players who will be attending Triton Million, Holz found the majority of his success in the high rollers, where he absolutely dominated the scene in 2016. At the time Holz went on his outstanding tournament tear, the poker world had not seen anything like it. Holz took down the 2016 Triton Philippines Main Event title for over $3 million as well as the WSOP’s $111,111 High Roller for One Drop for nearly $5 million in a campaign that brought his over $16 million for the year. Nowadays, Holz spends much of his time working in business endeavors off the felt, including his midset app, Primed Mind. However, it was just last year that Holz finished as the runner-up to Justin Bonomo in the $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop, taking home $6 million for his efforts. Holz was invited to the Triton Mliion by Antanas ‘Tony G’ Guoga. Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates [caption id="attachment_625872" align="alignnone" width="903"] Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] One of the most unique and entertaining players on the SHR circuit is Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates. A regular in the nosebleed cash games in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Cates is known as a fearless player willing to take on anyone, anywhere, and at any stakes. When Cates isn’t busy producing steamy poker themed music videos, he has found plenty of success on the Triton tour. In 2016 he took home the Triton SHR Series Sanctity Cup title, just days before finishing third in the same series Main Event for over $1 million. He also took home another Triton trophy in May 2019 taking down the NLHE/Short Deck Mix event for just over $500,000. Cates was invited to the Triton Million by Malaysian businessman Richard Yong. Plenty of other pro players were able to find an invite into the tournaments and they are listed below, with their businessman/recreational counterpart in parentheses. David Peters (Stanley Choi) Rui Cao (Wai Kin Yong) Jason Koon (Bobby Baldwin) Mikita Badziakouski (Liang Yu) Timofey Kuznetsov (Ivan Leow) Stephen Chidwick (Alfred DeCarolis) Wai Leong Chan (Chin Wei Lim) Christoph Vogelsang (Chow Hing Yaung) Nick Petrangelo (Pat Madden) Sam Greenwood (Sosia Jiang) Elton Tsang (Qiang Wang) Tan Xuan (Zang Shu Nu) Martin Kabrhel (Leon Tsoukernik) Matthias Eibinger (Open Kisacikoglu) Igor Kurganov (Talal Shakerchi) Sam Trickett (Rob Yong) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Andrew Robl (Andrew Pantling) Vivek Rajkumar (Rick Solomon) Danny Tang (Winfred Yu) Michael Soyza (Ben Wu) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don’t have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code “POCKET5S” for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  21. Orpen Kisacikoglu will have you believe that he's a businessman who plays poker recreationally. That might be true, but on Tuesday the Turkish-born high roller showed he has the chops to hang with some of the best poker players in the world by beating the 32-entry field in the Triton Super High Roller Series €100,000 event at partypoker MILLIONS Europe for a seven-figure score. Day 2 began with 18 players still in the field and registration open for the first level of play. Four players, including a re-entry from Phil Ivey, decided to take advantage of the late registration period to push the total field size to 32 players. Leading the way into Day 2 was Igor Kurganov. Unfortunately, things didn't go smoothly for Kurganov however and he was eliminated on the bubble in seventh place. Once play hit the money, it took almost 90 minutes for the first player to bust. Down to just 15 big blinds, Kristen Bicknell shoved from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="3h"] and Kisacikoglu called instantly from the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"]. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"] flop gave Bicknell a flush draw, but neither the [poker card="tc"] turn or [poker card="td"] river completed it and she was eliminated in sixth place for €213,000. Just 20 minutes later, Cary Katz joined her on the sidelines. From the hijack, Katz called with [poker card="8d"][poker card="7c"] and Vladimir Troyanovskiy checked his big blind with [poker card="qd"][poker card="6d"]. The [poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"] flop got a check from Troyanovskiy and a shove of 230,000 - less than four big blinds - from Katz. Troyanovskiy called and then watched the [poker card="ts"] miss both players while the [poker card="4s"] river gave Troyanovskiy a straight to bust Katz in fifth place for €273,000. Wai Kin Yong has been on massive heater over the last week. He won the Triton SHR NLHE Main Event in London for $3,154,064 and then finished runner-up in the Short Deck Main Event two days later for $2,232,740. He nearly added another top-two finish to his resume, but ultimately had to settle for fourth place thanks to Ben Heath. Yong shoved his last three big blinds holding [poker card="qs"][poker card="9d"] on the button only to have Heath look him up from the big blind with [poker card="qd"][poker card="tc"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6s"] runout kept Heath ahead and eliminated Wong in fourth for €349,000. Three-handed play lasted over an hour before Kisacikoglu began his push to the title. Kisacikoglu moved all-in for 1,710,000 from the button with [poker card="2d"][poker card="2s"] and Heath called from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="ts"][poker card="2h"] flop gave Kisacikoglu bottom set but left Heath drawing thin. The [poker card="qs"] turn gave the 2019 WSOP bracelet winner four outs to Broadway, but the [poker card="6d"] river wasn't one of them and he was out in third for €455,000. Troyanovskiy and Kisacikoglu battled heads-up for just over an hour. On the final hand of the tournament, Troyanovskiy raised to 250,000 with [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"] and Kisacikoglu called with [poker card="th"][poker card="8d"]. The flop came [poker card="8s"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"] and Kisacikoglu check-shoved after Troyanovskiy bet 300,000. The Russian pro called off his last 2,800,000 and couldn't improve on the [poker card="jd"] turn or [poker card="ks"] river and was eliminated in second place for €710,000. Payouts Orpen Kisacikoglu - €1,040,000 Vladimir Troyanovskiy - €710,000 Ben Heath - €455,000 Wai Kin Yong - €349,000 Cary Katz - €273,000 Kristen Bicknell - €213,000
  22. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series London kicks off this week with the biggest buy-in in tournament poker history as the highlight. Deemed the Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity, the event has a gargantuan £1,050,000 buy-in, of which £1,000,000 goes to the prize pool and £50,000 goes towards charitable causes. The Triton Million takes place at London Hilton on Park Lane and is sponsored by partypoker LIVE. It is scheduled as a three-day event from August 1-3. Charitable causes to benefit include Caring For Children Foundation, R.E.G., Healthy Hong Kong, Credit One World Charity, and One Drop. Triton Million Provides Unique Twist The Triton Million has a freezeout format with a rather unique twist to it. It’s invite-only. Invited players were issued invitations from a committee, and these players are of the recreational or businessman or woman variety. Those fortunate enough to receive invitations can then issue one invitation of their own to a guest player. The guest player can be a professional poker player. This allows for the field to be at least a 50% businessmen. For the first six hours of tournament play, the two player pools will be separated, such that the recreational/businessmen and women compete against one another and the guests/professionals play against one another. Furthermore, players will be asked to dress in formal attire for the final table. The Triton Million field has 25 businessmen signed up. Let’s take a look at them. Paul Phua [caption id="attachment_625843" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Paul Phua (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Paul Phua has been around the ultra high-stakes poker scene for nearly a decade now, amassing more than $11,400,000 in live tournament earnings and cashing in some of the richest poker events in the world. He has two victories on record, first in the Aspers £100,000 High Roller in 2012 for £1,000,000 ($1,621,297) and second in the Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €100,000 High Roller for €752,700 ($825,619). As for his business exploits that have earned him a fortune, Phua has been a well-known junket operator for some of the world’s richest and he’s been in the news as the "world's biggest bookie," having his Caesars Palace villa raided in July 2014 for running an illegal gambling operation. The raid came just about a month after Phua was arrested in Macau under similar charges. Phua's guest player for the Triton Million is Tom Dwan. Cary Katz [caption id="attachment_625842" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Cary Katz (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Cary Katz is the man atop the Poker Central organizational chart, having founded the company in 2015. Prior to that, he was founder and CEO of one of the largest student loan companies in the United States. On the felt, Katz has nearly $20,000,000 in live tournament earnings, including a career-best score of €1,750,000 ($1,929,203) when he finished fifth in the 2016 Monte-Carlo One Drop Extravaganza €1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. In January 2018, Katz won the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100,000 Super High Roller to the tune of $1,492,340, and he placed eighth in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop for $1,306,667. Katz's guest player for the Triton Million is Bryn Kenney. Rob Yong [caption id="attachment_625844" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Rob Yong (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Rob Yong is the owner of Dusk Till Dawn Poker & Casino in Nottingham, UK. Under Yong’s watchful eye, Dusk Till Dawn was built into what is considered to be one of the best card rooms in the world, with top-tier brands such as the World Series of Poker, World Poker Tour, partypoker, and UK & Ireland Poker Tour holding events there. Yong is now heavily involved with partypoker and partypoker LIVE, helping to grow these two brands in the online and live realms, respectively. Although his live tournament results amount to only a little more than $330,000, Yong has been a regular at some of the highest stakes in the world, specifically when it comes to cash games. At the table, he’s an entertaining competitor who doesn’t shy away from risk and will liven up any game. Yong's guest player for the Triton Million is Sam Trickett. Talal Shakerchi [caption id="attachment_625845" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Talal Shakerchi (photo: World Poker Tour)[/caption] Talal Shakerchi is a player from the recreational/businessmen category that could likely fit into the professional poker player category. He doesn’t have the most live tournament earnings, with more than $7,300,000 won in his career, but make no mistake about it, Shakerchi is a grinder. For quite some time, Shakerchi kept his online poker name a secret so others in the high-stakes community wouldn’t realize his ability or the amount of volume he was putting in. On the business side, Shakerchi is an investment manager, running Meditor Capital Management Limited, which he founded. Shakerchi's guest player for the Triton Million is Igor Kurganov. Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga [caption id="attachment_625841" align="aligncenter" width="903"] Antanas 'Tony G' Guoga (photo: Triton Poker)[/caption] Antanas Guoga, who is best known as 'Tony G' in the poker world, is another player listed in the recreational/businessmen category that could very well be considered a professional poker player. At least that’s what he used to be. Now a politician and Lithuanian Member of the European Parliament, Guoga is rarely seen on the poker scene these days. He is the founder of PokerNews.com and TonyBet. Guoga boasts more than $6,000,000 in live tournament earnings and became famous for his brash table talk. His biggest cash came at the European Poker Tour Grand Final €25,500 High Roller in 2009, when he took third for €420,000 ($552,239). He won the 2005 European Poker Championships Main Event for £260,000 ($456,822) and placed second in the World Poker Tour €10,000 Grand Prix de Paris for €339,930 ($414,478) in 2004. Guoga's guest player for the Triton Million is Fedor Holz. Additional Triton Million players from the recreational/businessmen category are listed below, with their guest players in parentheses. Richard Yong (Dan Cates) Stanley Choi (David Peters) Wai Kin Yong (Rui Cao) Bobby Baldwin (Jason Koon) Liang Yu (Mikita Badziakouski) Ivan Leow (Timofey Kuznetsov) Alfred DeCarolis (Stephen Chidwick) Chin Wei Lim (Wai Leong Chan) Chow Hing Yaung (Christoph Vogelsang) Pat Madden (Nick Petrangelo) Sosia Jiang (Sam Greenwood) Qiang Wang (Elton Tsang) Zang Shu Nu (Tan Xuan) Leon Tsoukernik (Martin Kabrhel) Orpen Kisacikoglu (Matthias Eibinger) Ferdinand Putra (Justin Bonomo) Rick Salomon (Vivek Rajkumar) Bill Perkins (Dan Smith) Winfred Yu (Danny Tang) Andrew Pantling (Andrew Robl) Ben Wu (Michael Soyza) How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. 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  23. James Chen returned to the final table of the World Series of Poker Europe €250K Super High Roller with the shortest stack among the seven remaining players on Friday while Dominik Nitsche stood alone atop the chip counts. Over 6.5 hours of play, Chen overcame his short stack to go on to win his first career bracelet and a €2.8 million score while Nitsche suffered through an almost unimaginable turn of events. Nitsche, who won the €111,111 High Roller for One Drop event at WSOP Europe 2017, couldn't have had more go wrong for him just after cards were in the air. Christoph Vogelsang and Chen each doubled through the German poker pro in the opening hands of play and then an hour later, Nitsche became the first player to hit the rail. Down to just under 15 big blinds, Nitsche moved all in from middle position with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"] and Chin Wei Lim looked down at [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] on the button moved all in over the top. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2d"] flop left Nitsche drawing to one of four jacks for Broadway. The [poker card="2h"] turn gave Lim a full house and Nitsche was out one spot before the bubble. The river was the [poker card="6d"]. Tony G considers poker his hobby, but for a brief time on Friday, he was the Table Captain of this event and he seemed to enjoy throwing Ryan Riess overboard on the bubble. Riess moved all in from the cutoff with [poker card="ah"][poker card="jc"] and G moved all in behind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"]. The board ran out [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9h"][poker card="th"] and despite picking up a sweat along the way, Riess was eliminated in sixth place leaving the remaining five players all in the money. G continued to run things and 45 minutes after busting Riess, he found another victim. From the hijack, G raised to 3,500,000 and Cary Katz called from the big blind. After the [poker card="js"][poker card="jd"][poker card="9h"] flop, Katz moved all in for 5,300,000 and G called. Katz showed [poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"] for top pair with a straight draw which put him ahead of Katz's [poker card="jh"][poker card="6h"]. Neither the [poker card="7c"] turn or [poker card="2c"] river improved either player's hand and Katz was eliminated in fifth place. G's time as the Table Captain was relatively short-lived though. Just 40 minutes after busting Katz, G tangled with Chen and ended up walking the plank. Chen raised to 3,200,000 from the cutoff and G called from the big blind. After the [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"] flop, G checked and allowed Chen to bet 3,000,000. G check-raised all in for 27,900,000 before Chen called. G showed [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"] for an open-ended straight draw while Chen showed [poker card="as"][poker card="td"] for top two pair. The [poker card="8h"] turn was no help for G and neither was the [poker card="kc"] river, sending him home in fourth place. Three-handed play lasted just 45 minutes before Lim sent another player to the rail. Lim raised to 6,000,000 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"] and Vogelsang called all in with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7h"] flop moved Lim ahead and Vogelsang was unable to find help on the [poker card="8h"] turn or [poker card="8c"] river and was out in third place. Heads-up play began with Chen holding 63% of the chips in play and over the course of two hours, Lim only briefly held the chip lead before Chen was able to close the deal on his first career WSOP bracelet. Chen moved all in from the button with [poker card="ad"][poker card="4d"] and Lim called all for his last eight big blinds with [poker card="ah"][poker card="5c"]. The [poker card="ac"][poker card="jh"][poker card="9s"] flop gave Lim hope of winning the pot outright. The [poker card="3d"] turn was a safe one for Lim but the [poker card="4c"] river gave Chen two pair and eliminated Lim in second place to give Chen a bracelet and a €2,844,215 score. Final Table Payouts James Chen - €2,844,215 Chin Wei Lim - €1,757,857 Christoph Vogelsang - €1,185,161 Tony G - €799,045 Cary Katz - €538,722
  24. Jared Bleznick has had a few close calls in live tournament play over the years, most notably at the World Series of Poker where he had a runner-up finish in 2013 and three third places finishes, one in 2017 and two this past summer. On Friday night in Las Vegas, Bleznick beat a talented group of players at the final table to win the Poker Masters $10,000 8-Game Mix event for the first live win of his career. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] It didn't take long to lose a player. The first elimination coming during a hand of Deuce to Seven Triple Draw just four minutes in. Brandon Adams raised to 100,000 with [poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2s"], George Wolff re-raised to 150,000 with [poker card="9h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"], Nick Schulman called from the big blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2c"] and Adams called to close the betting. Schulman picked up the [poker card="6d"], Adams drew the [poker card="8h"], and Wolff stood pat. Adams checked, Wolff bet 50,000, Schulman and Adams both called. Schulman drew the [poker card="qc"], Adams picked up the [poker card="7s"] and Wolff stayed pat. Action checked to Wolff and he bet his last 60,000. Schulman and Adams both called again. Schulman picked up the [poker card="8d"], Adams drew the [poker card="7c"] and Wolff stood pat a final time. Schulman bet and Adams folded, and Wolff was eliminated when his 9-6 was bested by Schulman's 8-5. Ten minutes later, Adams ended up on the outside as well. With Adams down to just 65,000 and paying 50,000 for the big blind, action folded to Schulman and he raised to 100,000 with [poker card="tc"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2s"] and Adams called with [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4h"]. Schulman drew the [poker card="5d"] and Adams drew the [poker card="9s"] and the [poker card="6s"]. Schulman stood pat over the next two draws and Adams was unable to improve to a hand better than Schulman's 8-7 and was eliminated in sixth. Triple Draw was the game in play for another bustout just eight minutes after Adams left. Action folded to Jake Abdalla in the small blind and he raised all-in to 80,000 with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] and Mike Gorodinsky called from the big blind with [poker card="qd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6c"]. Through the three draws, Gorodinsky improved to a 7-6 and Abdalla was unable to avoid a paired hand and was eliminated in fifth. Bleznick picked up his first victim of the final table in a hand of No Limit Hold'em. Gorodisnky moved all-in for 415,000 with [poker card="9c"][poker card="7c"] and Bleznick took some time to think through his options before calling with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9s"]. The board ran out [poker card="tc"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="3h"] to leave Bleznick in front and eliminate Gorodinsky in fourth place. The game had rotated to Seven Card Stud Eight or Better when Schulman attempted to make a stand. Schulman got the last of his 370,000 chips in the middle with [poker card="kc"][poker card="ks"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4d"] against Bleznick's [poker card="8s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"]. Bleznick improved to two pair to beat Schulman's pair of kings and eliminate him in third. Bleznick and Cary Katz played heads-up for 20 minutes before they clashed in a hand of Pot Limit Omaha. With the board showing [poker card="ts"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="ad"], Bleznick checked and Katz bet 450,000. Bleznick re-raised to put Katz all-in, Katz called and showed [poker card="th"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"] which put him behind Bleznick's [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="td"][poker card="2d"]. The river was the [poker card="qs"] to eliminate Katz and give Bleznick the first live tournament win of his career. Final Table Payouts Jared Bleznick - $153,000 Cary Katz - $99,000 Nick Schulman- $67,500 Mike Gorodinsky - $45,000 Jake Abdalla - $36,000 Brandon Adams - $27,000 George Wolff - $22,500 Purple Jacket Standings Chance Kornuth - 420 Isaac Baron - 300 Ryan Laplante - 300 Jared Bleznick - 300 Jonathan Depa - 300 Alex Foxen - 270 Thai Ha - 210 Cary Katz - 210 Ralph Wong - 150 Sam Soverel - 150
  25. The Season XVIII World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic crowned its winner on Saturday, with Alex Foxen topping the record-breaking field of 1,035 entries to win the $1.694 million first-place prize. "It feels, I don't know… surreal," Foxen said in the moments following the win. "It’s kind of hard to put into words, but it feels amazing. The last time I got to this spot, I was a little bit disappointed in the way that I played heads up. It’s just incredible to get the opportunity again and be fortunate enough to pull out the win. I don’t have words." Back in Season XVI, Foxen found himself heads up with Ryan Tosoc in this very event. Tosoc had finished runner-up the year before and was back in heads-up play with a chance to better his previous result. Back then, Foxen couldn’t overcome Tosoc in what was a very lighthearted heads-up battle with plenty of fun had between the two and he had to settle for a second-place payout of $1.134 million. "I do feel like I was so excited about having that opportunity," Foxen said of the difference between his two WPT Five Diamond heads-up appearances. "I think that score I locked up was already five or six times my biggest score to date at that point, so there was an element of me feeling like I lost a little bit of focus and maybe didn’t take it as seriously as I should have because, regardless of the outcome of heads-up play, it was such an amazing result that in the moment I didn’t see the severity of that situation. I definitely didn’t make that same mistake twice." Much like Tosoc had redeemed his second-place finish with a victory the following season, Foxen came back two seasons after his runner-up finish to get the job done and capture the WPT Five Diamond throne. The victory gave Foxen his first WPT title. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Final Table Results 1st: Alex Foxen - $1,694,995 2nd: Toby Joyce - $1,120,040 3rd: Seth Davies - $827,285 4th: Peter Neff - $617,480 5th: Danny Park - $465,780 6th: Jonathan Jaffe - $355,125 Foxen came into Saturday’s final table in second position on the leaderboard with six players remaining. In fewer than 30 hands, Foxen had improved to the chip lead. Shortly after gaining the top spot, he knocked out WPT Champions Club member Jonathan Jaffe in sixth place. Although others did some damage of their own, such as Toby Joyce knocking out start-of-day chip leader Danny Park in fifth place and Seth Davies busting Peter Neff in fourth place, Foxen never gave up the lead once he had it. Three-handed play between Foxen, Joyce, and Davies lasted for quite some time. Even though both Joyce and Davies scored double ups during the battle, things never appeared to get away from Foxen as he stayed strong behind the wall of chips he built. Eventually, Davies’ stack shrunk and he got the last of his money in against Foxen in a dominated position. Foxen had the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] to Davies’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Davies, a WPT Champions Club member, did flop some outs to a chop but he was ultimately done in thanks to the [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="3s"][poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] board. Entering heads-up play with Joyce, Foxen had the chip lead with 29.5 million to Joyce’s 11.9 million, and the match was never really close. Joyce narrowed the gap ever so slightly at the beginning of the duel, but Foxen’s dominance was too much and he quickly started to distance himself. On the final hand, Foxen had limped on the button with the blinds at 200,000/400,000 with a 400,000 big blind ante. Joyce checked and the dealer fanned the [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop. Joyce checked, Foxen bet 400,000, and then Joyce check-raised to 1.1 million. Foxen put in a raise of his own and made it 2 million to go. Joyce called to see the [poker card="Kc"] land on fourth street. Joyce checked and Foxen shoved all in, for what was effectively 4.5 million because he had Joyce covered. Joyce tanked and used four 30-second time extensions to think things through. Joyce eventually made the call with the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"] for a pair of jacks, but Foxen had him out-kicked with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Js"]. The river was the [poker card="4c"] to seal the deal for Foxen. For his runner-up finish, Joyce scored $1.12 million in prize money. Fourth Consecutive Record Turnout for Five Diamond It was the fourth consecutive record-setting turnout for WPT Five Diamond, and this season’s 1,035 entries topped last season’s 1,001. The seasons prior to that were 812 entries for Season XVI and 791 entries for Season XV. In this event, the top 130 finished reached the money. Included in those to cash were Eric Afriat (9th - $168,005), Darren Elias (14th - $107,840), Chino Rheem (22nd - $60,435), Cary Katz (44th - $37,670), Kitty Kuo (67th - $26,220), Cliff Josephy (74th - $23,830), and Maria Ho (116th - $19,345). Also running deep was Timo Kamphues, who placed seventh in the Season XVIII WPT Five Diamond for $273,695. He has had quite the week of poker in Las Vegas, as just a few days prior to his run at Bellagio, Kamphues won the Wynn Poker Winter Classic $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee tournament for $202,787. Foxen Takes Player of the Year Lead With the victory, Foxen moved to first place in the Hublot WPT Player of the Year standings. Both Foxen and Joyce have the same amount of points, 1,400, but Foxen holds the tiebreaker of most money won. Joyce earned his second cash of the season and is currently second in the race. 1st: Alex Foxen - 1,400 points 2nd: Toby Joyce - 1,400 points 3rd: Donald Maloney - 1,300 points 4th: Aaron Van Blarcum - 1,275 points 5th: Geoffrey Hum - 1,250 points 6th: Milen Stefanov - 1,200 points 7th: Kevin Albers - 1,200 points 8th: Simon Brandstrom - 1,200 points 9th: Peter Neff - 1,150 points 10th: Seth Davies - 1,100 points WPT Gardens Poker Championship Up Next Up next for the WPT Main Tour is the WPT Gardens Poker Championship at the Gardens Casino in Southern California. The $10,000 buy-in event kicks off January 9, 2020, and runs through January 13.
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