Jump to content
advertisement_alt

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'chad power'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 7 results

  1. Chad Power, who based on name alone would make a great poker-player superhero duo with 2006 World Series of Poker Main Event 11th place finisher Leif Force, was in a unique situation going into Day 7 of the 2015 WSOP Main Event. Of course, he is in the top 27 with his eyes on the November Nine and that is as unique a position as any, but he is also feeling the excitement of seeing his friend and roommate, Christoph Brand, still in the tournament as well. He ended up in 26th place for $262,000. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- On Day 6, Power told Bluff.com, "It's like I'm in the tournament twice. I really, as much as I wanna win, I've lived with Chris for probably two years now, and obviously we've become good friends and I just want him to do as well as I want to do. Almost." The two were introduced a few years ago by a mutual friend. That friend moved into Power's Maryland home, followed shortly thereafter by Brand. Power, Brand, and some other friends now fly out to Las Vegas each summer for the WSOP, mostly to play in cash games. Power stakes several of the housemates and actually put some of them, though not Chris, into the Main Event. Power didn't play in many tournaments before the Main Event – as mentioned, he was in Vegas mostly to play in the juicy cash games – but he did cash in the Colossus at the beginning of the 2015 WSOP, his only career WSOP cash before the Main Event. Power told Bluff that despite the exhausting, long days in the Main Event, he still has trouble getting to sleep at night because "I just have this adrenaline flowing." Whereas most players would try to get a good night's sleep, Power has only been sleeping four to five hours per night. It's working for him, it seems, as he entered Day 7 in 16th place with 5.3 million chips.
  2. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. The Fives is back with Lance Bradley and PocketFives' new Managing Editor, Donnie Peters sitting in the co-host chairs. Lance and Donnie recap the PokerStars World Championship of Online Poker and discuss how the 2018 Poker Masters might have been the breakout party for a young American pro. They also discuss the Chad Power vs. Cate Hall backing debate and talk about how William Kassouf's 15 minutes of fame might actually be up all over $100. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  3. Staking arrangements are commonplace in poker, and for the most part things tend to work out. That said, there are disagreements between parties that do occur, such as the recent dispute with Cate Hall and Chad Power involving a $60,000 makeup figure. The best way to resolve these issues may not be so commonly known, and it’s important to do your due diligence before you dive into a staking deal so you and your backer can avoid any headaches down the road. Here is what some players with extensive experience believe. “From a staker's point of view, you want to be confident that your horse is profitable in the events they are competing in and holds a record of integrity,” Jason Somerville said when asked what to look out for before entering a staking deal. “There is a ton of trust in staking, and as an investor, you need to be sure your horse will treat the investment professionally and as if it were their own money (or better). As a horse, you want to be sure your investor has sufficient funds to survive standard variance and will be easy to communicate with.” When it comes to makeup, it can be handled in different ways depending on the deal between the parties involved. Somerville, who has lots of experience with staking arrangements, said there are often a lot of questions to be answered regarding makeup, but that it’s important to agree upon these terms ahead of time. “Discussing what happens to makeup in different scenarios is important before you agree to terms of the deal,” Somerville said. “I've had horses quit poker and you can't really do anything about it, except that if they return to poker they return to makeup. It's usually up to the backer if they want to quit or not, and if they do then typically makeup vanishes at the end of the agreement. It's important to hammer out these issues beforehand — can makeup be transferred/sold? Can the horse potentially keep a small piece of their action, separate from the stake? Does makeup just expire at the end of a certain period? It's key to nail this before settling on a deal.” Another Jason, Jason Mercier, mentioned dealing with a makeup figure generally comes down to who wants out. If the player is the one who wants out, he or she should work out a deal to buy the makeup from the backer — known as a buyout. In cases where the player may simply want to play poker less, he or she should give the backer the option to still stake the person. If it’s the backer who calls off the deal, the player often assumes no makeup. Natasha Mercier, Jason’s wife and also a poker player, replied to a thread on Twitter involving a situation Cate Hall and Chad Power are in echoing her husband’s comments: “Jason had that happen with multiple [people]. They don’t owe, but when they play he gets to choose if he wants it on the stake.” Other pros we talked said similar things. Tristan Wade agreed, in that the common result simply comes down to who is the one deciding to end the backing arrangement. "Usually, if a backer wants to end an agreement with a horse, the backer can either try to sell the makeup or drop the horse and lose out on all the makeup,” Wade said. “If a horse wants to end the agreement, then a backer might let the horse pay [a percentage] of the makeup to get out of the deal.”
  4. Sunday at the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event saw 344 last-minute registrations put an exclamation point on the second-largest WSOP Main Event of all-time. The 8,569-player field means that sometime next week, one player will walk away with $10,000,000 and the title of World Champion. Day 2C saw the highly-anticipated arrival of Phil Hellmuth and the emergence of a fresh batch of names atop the end-of-day chip counts. Julien Milliard Inches Toward 1 Million Chips, Leads Day 2C Survivors Florida's Julien Milliard almost cracked the seven-figure stack code on Sunday. Milliard finished Day 2C with 947,900 to edge out Czech player Vlastimil Pustina, who ended up with 930,700. Andrew Brokos, co-host of the Thinking Poker podcast, rounded out the top three Day 2C stacks after ending the day with 895,400. The day started with 344 players taking advantage of the last chance to register to push the total Day 2C field to 4,008 players. Just 1,793 of those players made it through the five two-hour levels of play on Saturday. That group will combine on Monday with the 1,087 players who got through Day 2AB as the entire remaining field of 2,880 players will play on the same day for the first time. Eventual Champion Will Earn $10,000,000 Registration closed as the first card was dealt on Sunday and the final numbers show another year of growth for the Main Event and made this year's Main Event the second largest of all-time. A total of 8,569 players generated a total prize pool of $80,548,600. The eventual champion will win $10,000,000 and every player at the final table will earn at least $1,000,000. READ: 2019 WSOP Main Event Second Largest of All-Time, $10M to Champ Phil Hellmuth Arrives, Departs One of the 344 players who registered on Sunday morning was 15-time bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth. Just back from his vacation to Machu Picchu and the Galapagos Islands, Hellmuth didn't take his seat until well into the first level of play. He didn't sit long. Hellmuth was part of one of the secondary feature tables on the ESPN broadcast and gave fans at home and his tablemates a little taste of The Poker Brat before busting at the hands of Timothy Stanczak's pocket fives. Familiar Faces Stay Alive on Day 2C Three-time bracelet winner Adam Friedman bagged up 549,600 on Sunday to advance to Day 3 with a top 50 stack. Sam Greenwood snuck into that top 50 with 535,800. Mike McDonald continues to apply pressure to those who bet against him, finishing Day 2C with 516,700. Other notables still in include Dario Sammartino (522,700), Jeff Madsen (488,600), Bertrand Grospellier (428,200), David 'ODB' Baker (418,700), Joseph Cheong (354,500), Chino Rheem (286,500) and Nick Schulman (278,000). Defending champ John Cynn battled back from just 24,800 chips to finish with 248,900 at day's end. All-time online poker tournament earnings leader Peter Traply finished with 234,800. Holz, Antonius, Imsirovic Headline Big Names Busting Hellmuth wasn't the only big name who didn't make it through Day 2C. Former #1-ranked PocketFiver Fedor Holz, Patrik Antonius, James Obst, Ali Imsirovic, and Adrian Mateos were all sent to the rail on Sunday. They were joined by John Racener, Ismael Bojang, Matt Berkey, John Monette, John Juanda, Denis Strebkov, Ben Heath, Jonathan Little, Shawn Buchanan, Sam Soverel, Joe McKeehen, Niall Farrell, Maurice Hawkins, and Sam Trickett. Nate Silver was also one of the Day 2C casualties. A Half Dozen Former #1s March On Kevin Saul leads a group of talented poker players who once held onto the #1 ranking on PocketFives.com. The Illinois native finished Day 2C with 623,900. Saul has cashed three times in the WSOP Main Event, most recently in 2016 when he wound up 466th. Saul is joined by fraternity brothers Calvin Anderson (459,400), Cliff Josephy (402,000), Fabrizio Gonzalez (328,800), Chris Hunichen (307,500) and Tim West (130,400). 34 Keystone State Players Survive Day 2C Chad Power leads 34 Pennsylvania poker players who managed to find a bag at the end of Day 2C. Power finished with 401,300 for the 97th-best stack on Sunday. Ralph Wong finished with 344,300 for the second-best PA stack. Kenneth Smaron, Jason Loehrs, and David Vasil round out the top five. Top 10 Chip Counts Julian Milliard - 947,900 Vlastimil Pustina - 930,700 Andrew Brokos - 895,400 Aleksa Pavicevic - 867,700 Nai Hu - 798,300 Kainalu McCue-Unciano - 765,600 Dapeng Mu - 762,700 Hugo Torres - 720,400 Cody Brinn - 708,800 Tom Cannuli - 667,000
  5. The 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event went from 1,286 players down to 354 on Tuesday Those left are deep in the money and guaranteed $34,845, and it’s Dean Morrone holding the chip lead entering Day 5. Former NFL star Richard Seymour was one of the big stacks to advance. Morrone Leads the Way Morrone is a Canadian player and a qualifier from 888poker. He’s making his first career WSOP cash with his run in this year’s WSOP Main Event and it’s also his largest live tournament score to date as he entered the tournament with just $10,138 in live earnings. Morrone entered Day 4 with 365,000 before he went on to finish with 4.98 million and the lead. Other big stacks in the group behind Morrone on the leaderboard were Lars Bonding (4.04 million), Michael Messick (3.925 million), Warwick Mirzikinian (3.9 million), and Henrik Hecklen (3.862 million) to round out the top five. Morrone’s fellow 888poker qualifier Mihai Manole finished the day with a very healthy 3.781 million. Top 10 Chip Counts Dean Morrone - 4,980,000 Lars Bonding - 4,040,000 Michael Messick - 3,925,000 Warwick Mirzikinian - 3,900,000 Henrik Hecklen - 3,862,000 Mihai Manole - 3,781,000 Robert Heidorn - 3,700,000 Sean Mills - 3,692,000 Christopher Wynkoop - 3,563,000 Andrew Brokos - 3,518,000 Former NFL Star Richard Seymour On the Rush Former NFL star and three-time Super Bowl champion Richard Seymour was among those to advance to Day 5. He spoke with The Fives Poker Podcast at the end of Day 3 about his sixth time playing the WSOP Main Event being a charm and things only got sweeter on Tuesday. Seymour came into the day with 275,000 and quickly got his stack up to 400,000. It wasn’t long before he reached 1 million in chips and then the progression only continued after he was moved to one of the secondary features tables. Seymour bagged up 2.75 million in chips, but he wasn’t the only former NFL player to move on. Eric Stocz, who spent time in the NFL with the Detroit Lions, reached the money in the WSOP Main Event for the second time in his poker career. He’s already outperformed the 402nd-place finish he netted in 2011 that earned him $30,974 and will only be looking for more. Stocz bagged 350,000 for Day 5. Former PocketFives #1 Players Performing Well A handful of former PocketFives #1 players are performing well and have advanced to Day 4 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event. Fabrizio Gonzalez bagged 2.916 million, Chris Hunichen finished with 2.617 million, and Yuri Dzivielevski ended with 1.79 million. Hunichen bagged those chips despite losing one of the biggest pots of the tournament so far. He got involved in a big one with David Guay and Guay flopped a set of tens against Hunichen’s pocket kings. The hand resulted in a full double for Guay and took a dent of about 1.2 million out of Hunichen’s stack. Eight from Pennsylvania Still Alive Pennsylvania online poker has been legalized and the launch date is coming up soon. When sites do go live there will be a handful of players with some extra money to deposit thanks to deep runs in this WSOP Main Event. Eight players from Pennsylvania remain, with Thomas Parkes of Alburtis finishing Day 4 with the most chips at 3.172 million. Pittsburgh’s Chad Power is next with 2.78 million, and then it’s Matthew Sabia (1.81 million), Kenneth Smaron (1.806 million), Edward Pham (1.43 million), Jake Schindler (1.168 million), Donald Dombach (799,000), and Matt Glantz (690,000). Yoon, Esfandiari, Cheong Among Bracelet Winners Remaining In addition to all the names that have been mentioned, Brian Yoon (2.622 million), Antonio Esfandiari (2.583 million), Craig McCorkell (2.5 million), Chris Wallace (1.98 million), and Joseph Cheong (1.958 million) represent some of the WSOP gold bracelet winners still in the field. Yoon and Esfandiari are both three-time gold bracelet winners who have had some deep runs in the WSOP Main Event before. Yoon has finished in the top 60 on three separate occasions (2018, 2016, and 2011), and Esfandiari finished 24th in 2009. McCorkell took 13th in 2014, and Wallace finished 32nd in 2017. We also know very much about Cheong’s third-place finish behind Jonathan Duhamel and John Racener in 2010 that earned him $4.13 million. All Former Main Event Champs Gone Of course, not every player could advance. Three former WSOP Main Event champions began the day, with Johnny Chan, Chris Moneymaker, and Qui Nguyen still in the field, but all three of them busted out on Day 4. Moneymaker finished 687th for $20,200, Chan took 560th for $24,560, and Nguyen went out 455th for $30,780. Nguyen’s bust came when he got the last of his chips in with pocket fives only to lose out to an opponent’s two sixes. With no former WSOP Main Event champions in the field, we will see a brand new winner in 2019. Others to bust on Day 4 were Ricky Guan (362nd - $34,845), Scott Lazar (388th - $34,845), Jean-Robert Bellande (415th - $30,780), Bryan Campanello (435th - $30,780), Josh Arieh (485th - $27,390), Adam Owen (570th - $24,560), and Cliff Josephy (759th - $20,200). Day 5 of the 2019 WSOP Main Event starts at 12 pm PT on Wednesday, July 10 at the Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino.
  6. It might have been a day earlier than some were expecting, but the bubble of the World Series of Poker came and went on Monday, leaving 1,286 players in the money just as the day was coming to a close. Preben Stokkan Goes From 93,000 to 2,184,000 Norwegian poker pro Preben Stokkan is the only player with over 2,000,000 chips after bagging up 2,184,000 and the chip lead. Stokkan, who has never previously cashed the Main Event, started the day with 93,000 and trailed 75% of the field. Andrew Brokos had the opposite kind of day after starting third in chips and finishing second. The Baltimore native more than doubled his stack on Monday and ended up with 1,906,000. Ryan Dodge sits third with 1,800,000. The Bubble Burst for Ryan Pochedly The bubble is usually one of the most tension-filled moments of the Main Event. It can be chaotic for players and problematic for tournament staff. Not so much this year. Just as hand-for-hand play was about to start, Pennsylvania's Ryan Pochedly called all-in with ace-king on an [poker card="8d"] [poker card="7h"] [poker card="3s"] [poker card="kd"] [poker card="7c"] board only to be shown 7-6 by his opponent for trip sevens. Pochedly did not leave empty-handed though. He was awarded a seat to the 2020 WSOP Main Event. READ: Pochedly Leans On WSOP Experience, Excited for PA Online Poker Chris Hunichen Bags 6th Best Stack to Lead Former #1s All but two of the 10 former #1-ranked PocketFivers that started Day 3 made it to Day 4 and none made more noise than Chris Hunichen. After starting the day with 307,600, Hunichen finished with 1,618,000 and sits sixth in the chip counts. Two other players worked themselves into the top 50 on Monday. Fabrizio Gonzalez finished with 1,190,000 and Yuri Dzivielevski was right behind him with 1,083,000. The other four members of the #1 fraternity to advance to Day 4 include current #1 'lena900' (693,000), Kevin Saul (633,000), Cliff Josephy (435,000), Paul Volpe (380,000) and Taylor Paur (148,000). The only former #1s to not make it through the day were Calvin Anderson and Tim West. Jean-Robert Bellande One of Many Notables Still Surviving Jean-Robert Bellande leads the group of notable names moving on to Day 4. Bellande, who has twice finished in the top 100 of the Main Event, ended Day 3 with 1,126,000. Not far behind him is recent bracelet Joseph Cheong with 1,068,000. This is Cheong's first cash in the WSOP Main Event since 2012. He cashed in three straight years beginning in 2010 with his third-place result. Eric Baldwin (916,000), Antonio Esfandiari (740,000), Chance Kornuth (535,000), Brian Yoon (532,000), Kelly Minkin (456,000), and Gus Hansen (445,000) also advanced to Day 4. Former World Champions Chris Moneymaker, Qui Nguyen, and Johnny Chan each navigated Day 3 successfully and will be back for Day 4. No Chips, No Money, No More Main Event It wasn't all sunshine and rainbows for some of the game's top players. Igor Kurganov, Nick Schulman, Arseniii Karmatckii, legends TJ Cloutier and Scotty Nguyen, as well as Loni Harwood and 2019 $50K PPC champion Phillip Hui were all part of the 1,594 players who busted on Monday. 21 Pennsylvania Players Make it to Day 4 Just 21 Pennsylvania poker players remain heading into Day 4 with the biggest stack belonging to Matthew Sabia. The Bethlehem, PA resident finished with 1,060,000 and has the only seven-figure stack for Keystone State players. Chad Power (829,000), Matt Glantz (817,000), Jake Schindler (652,000), and Kenneth Smaron (632,000) round out the top five. Top 10 Chip Counts Preben Stokkan - 2,184,000 Andrew Brokos - 1,906,000 Ryan Dodge - 1,800,000 Galen Hall - 1,658,000 Cassio Pisapia - 1,640,000 Chris Hunichen - 1,618,000 Pavlo Veksler - 1,594,000 Duytue Duong - 1,576,000 Jacob Daniels - 1,560,000 John Patgorski - 1,524,000
  7. As the launch of Pennsylvania online poker approaches, PocketFives takes a look at how players from that state did at the 2019 World Series of Poker. Pennsylvania poker players accounted for 2,439 total entries at the 2019 WSOP, ranking the state 15th out of all states to have players participate in the series. Per official numbers sourced from the WSOP, US-player participation made up for 129,154 entries from live tournaments at the 2019 WSOP. With 2,439 of those entries coming from PA poker players, Pennsylvania accounted for nearly 2% of the US participation at the 2019 WSOP. Pennsylvania’s participation wasn’t that far off of what New Jersey’s was, another state with legalized online gambling and online poker. Players from NJ accounted for 3,501 total entries in live events at the 2019 WSOP, which was just more than 2.7% overall. US players accounted for 18,571 cashes at the 2019 WSOP, which was the most for any single country. Players from Pennsylvania accounted for 338 of those cashes, including some of the top performers below. Pennsylvania's Top Performers at the 2019 WSOP Of all the Pennsylvania poker players to compete at the 50th annual WSOP, Garry Gates was the highest earner with $3,006,881 won. The bulk of Gates’ winnings came via his fourth-place finish in the WSOP Main Event, a score worth $3,000,000 that landed Gates in the top 10 of the Pennsylvania all-time money list. Gates also cashed in the $1,500 Monster Stack and $1,000 Mini Main Event at the 2019 WSOP. Thomas Parkes of Alburtis, PA, finished 59th in the 2019 WSOP Main Event and took home $142,215. He was the second-highest finisher from the Keystone State. Chad Power (89th - $82,365) and Kenny Smaron (92nd - $69,636) also placed in the top 100. Jake Schindler, the PA poker all-time money list leader at time of writing, cashed three times at the 2019 WSOP. His first was a fifth-place finish in the $10,000 Heads-Up Championship worth $31,151, his second was in the WSOP.com $500 Turbo Deepstack for $1,113, and his third was a 67th-place result in the WSOP Main Event for $117,710. Joe McKeehen, winner of the 2015 WSOP Main Event and second on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list, cashed just once at the 2019 WSOP. He finished 65th in the $1,500 Millionaire Maker event. John Hennigan, who is originally from Philadelphia, only cashed one time at the 2019 World Series of Poker, but that cash was a victory in the $10,000 Seven Card Stud Championship to the tune of $245,451. Hennigan defeated Daniel Negreanu in heads-up play to win that tournament. Matt Glantz, the player who was fourth on the Pennsylvania poker all-time money list at time of writing, finished in the money of seven WSOP events in the summer of 2019. His best finish was a third-place result in the $10,000 Dealer’s Choice Championship for $139,126. He also had a deep run in the WSOP Main Event, finishing 205th for $50,855. PA Players in the WSOP Big 50 In the record-breaking WSOP Big 50, 345 entries came from Pennsylvania poker players. Of the 28,371 entries, PA poker players made up 1.22% of the total field. As it pertains to US participation in the Big 50, US players made up 23,972 entries in this tournament, meaning Pennsylvania players accounted for 1.44% of US participation in the Big 50. The highest finish in the Big 50 for a Pennsylvania player came from Fabio Garofalo. Garofalo, who hails from Mercer, PA, took 66th and turned a $500 entry into $14,958. Pennsylvania’s Gregory Fishberg (90th - $10,233) and James Gilbert (98th - $8,539) also placed in the top 100 of the 2019 WSOP Big 50. PA Online Poker Gives Potential for More WSOP Participation With the launch of PA online poker looming, exciting times are ahead. Legal, regulated online poker platforms in the Keystone State should help grow the game in the region and be a catalyst for increased participation by Pennsylvania players in the WSOP. Although it will take some time for the state to get up to speed with the likes of its neighbor, New Jersey, Pennsylvania's upside is quite large. New Jersey has a growing online poker market in the 11th most populated state in the country with nearly 9 million people to pull from. Pennsylvania will be drawing from the fifth largest population of nearly 13 million people when online poker goes live. The potential is there and it wouldn't be out of the question to see Pennsylvania's WSOP participation meet or surpass that of New Jersey's in 2020 or 2021.
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.