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Found 13 results

  1. In 2013, David "Chino" Rheem (pictured) won the World Poker Tour Championship at the Bellagio in Las Vegas for $1.1 million, defeating a field of 146 entrants in the $25,000 buy-in tournament. This year, the WPT's season finale moved east to Borgata in Atlantic City, where, according to F5 Poker, Rheem had a free entry waiting for him. On Monday, Rheem Tweeted, "Wanna wish all my homies best of luck at Borgata @WPT Championship event! I won't be there to defend last year's title, so play well!" Day 1 of the WPT Championship was held on Monday and Rheem's Tweet sparked a response from Robert Mizrachi, who Tweeted back, "@ChinoRheem I think you have a free roll since u won last year. I would find out." Rheem's final comment on the matter was simply the two-word phrase "What freeroll?" The buy-in this year was dropped to $15,000 for the WPT Championship and the tournament's organizers guaranteed a prize pool of $5 million. First place will earn $1.3 million and a field of 328 players turned out, more than doubling last year's attendance. F5 confirmed with WPT President Adam Pliska that Rheem had been gifted a seat and the news site explained, "The World Poker Tour Championship event is one of the very few events, on any tour, where the previous year's champion gets a free seat the following year. Rheem had a seat just waiting for him… The seat is/was non-transferable or convertible." A PokerListings article insinuated that Rheem may have skipped the WPT Championship on purpose, even if he didn't know he had a free seat: "Rheem… decided to skip the tournament and was instead doing 'choice' (which we'll assume is Choice Leadership Program, of which Daniel Negreanu is a huge proponent)." Whatever the case may be, at the start of the day on Friday, 18 players remain in the WPT Championship, each guaranteed a payout of at least $41,000. Here are the chip counts along with the number of big blinds each player is stacked with, according to WPT's website: Eric Afriat - 2,029,000 (126 bb) Abe Korotki - 1,616,000 (101 bb) Anthony Gregg - 1,499,000 (93 bb) Ryan g0lfa D'Angelo - 1,369,000 (85 bb) Curt Kohlberg - 1,097,000 (68 bb) Justin Young - 993,000 (62 bb) Byron Kaverman - 974,000 (60 bb) Ray Qartomy - 955,000 (59 bb) Brock t soprano Parker - 918,000 (57 bb) Keven Stamdogg Stammen - 867,000 (54 bb) Tom Dobrilovic - 786,000 (49 bb) Chris O'Rourke - 670,000 (41 bb) Tony bond18 Dunst - 622,000 (38 bb) Corey Hochman - 598,000 (37 bb) Bobby Oboodi - 525,000 (32 bb) Glenn Lafaye - 395,000 (24 bb) Hans Winzeler - 320,000 (20 bb) David Grandieri - 209,000 (13 bb) The WPT Championship concludes on Saturday. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. [caption width="640"] Chino Rheem is now one of just four players to win three World Poker Tour titles. (WPT/Joe Giron photo)[/caption] When the final table of the $10,000 buy-in World Poker Tour Finale began, there were a couple of storylines in play. Spain’s Adrian Mateos was hoping to become the youngest player to win poker’s Triple Crown and Chino Rheem, with two previous WPT titles under his belt, was looking to become just the fourth player with three. Mateos saw his run ended early, but Rheem, with a rail of friends, family and supporters that kept growing as the final table wore on, came through in the end, beating Aditya Prasetyo heads-up to win the title and the accompanying $705,885. He also earned an automatic seat in the WPT Tournament of Champions that starts Friday at Seminole Hard Rock Casino. “This one feels real good. It’s been a couple of years since I got to see anything substantial in any kind of tournament,” said Rheem, 36. “When you have a shot, and you’re close and you’ve been there before and you already know the process of what you’ve got to do. It just feels good to zig and zag and get there.” Bryan Piccioli, the shortest stack at the start of the final table, was also the first player eliminated. Piccioli moved all in from under the gun, Richard Leger called from his left and Prasetyo called from the small blind. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4h"] and Leger and Prasetyo checked. The [poker card="qh"] turn got Prasetyo to check again, only to have Leger bet 600,000. Prasetyo folded. Leger tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"], which left Piccioli drawing dead after he showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. The [poker card="2s"] hit the river and Piccioli was out in sixth. It took another hour of play before another player hit the rail. William Benson moved all in for 695,000 from UTG and Leger called from the small blind. Benson flipped over [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"] and found himself racing against Leger’s [poker card="7h"][poker card="7s"]. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Leger top set, but left Benson with the nut flush draw. The [poker card="ks"] turn and [poker card="as"] river were both blanks, though, and Benson was out in fifth place. Mateos’s run at becoming the youngest winner of poker’s Triple Crown (EPT, WSOP and WPT title winner) was cut short. Prasetyo raised to 150,000 from UTG and Mateos defended his big blind. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="jh"][poker card="3h"] flop got checks from both players. The [poker card="ks"] turn got Mateos to bet 150,000 and Prasetyo called. Mateos moved all in after the [poker card="2d"] river and Prasetyo quickly called. Mateos showed [poker card="qd"][poker card="3d"] for a flopped two pair, but Prasetyo turned over [poker card="ad"][poker card="tc"] for a turned straight, eliminating Mateos in fourth place. The pace of play slowed with three players left as Rheem and Prasetyo each took turns with the lead while Leger continued to look for a spot to double up. Rheem opened to 215,000 from the button and Leger responded by moving all in for 1,785,000 - just under 18 big blinds. Rheem called and tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="ts"], much to the chagrin of Leger who held [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"] flop gave Leger some chop outs, but the [poker card="ks"] turn and [poker card="6s"] river completed an unneeded flush for Rheem and sent Leger packing in third place. Rheem started heads-up play with an 8-5 lead over Prasetyo. The two played 39 hands with Rheem never surrendering the lead. After increasing his lead to nearly 13-1, Rheem moved all in and Prasetyo called. Rheem held [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"] while Prasetyo was slightly ahead with [poker card="kc"][poker card="9h"]. The board ran out [poker card="jh"][poker card="th"][poker card="4s"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"] to give Rheem trip sevens and eliminate Prasetyo. With the win, Rheem joins Gus Hansen, Carlos Mortensen and Anthony Zinno as the only players to have won three WPT titles. “For the years that I’ve been playing, I have created an image that is priceless. The good thing is I can, for the most part, take advantage of that image,” said Rheem. Final Table Payouts Chino Rheem - $705,885 Aditya Prasetyo - $484,130 Richard Leger - $311,305 Adrian Mateos - $200,510 William Benson - $154,585 Bryan Piccioli - $127,905
  3. [caption width="640"] Sam Panzica is now a two-time WPT winner after taking down the Bay 101 Shooting Star event Friday (WPT photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] When the World Poker Tour Bay 101 Shooting Star final table kicked off Friday afternoon in San Jose, California, the focus was clearly on Chino Rheem. With three WPT titles already to his credit, and over 44% of the chips in play, Rheem seemed to be on the verge of becoming the first player in WPT history to win four titles. Sam Panzica wanted no part of that storyline though and went on to win his second WPT title of Season XV and $1,373,000 while Rheem had to settle for a third place finish. With all eyes on him at the start of the day, Rheem didn’t disappoint, picking up the first three eliminations. Just 37 hands in Rheem went to work at whittling the field. Rheem raised to 225,000 from the cutoff before Rainer Kempe moved all in for 2,190,000 from the small blind. Rheem snap-called and tabled [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"] while Kempe showed [poker card="as"][poker card="9c"]. The [poker card="7h"][poker card="6h"][poker card="3h"] flop was a great one for Rheem and when the [poker card="3d"] turn and [poker card="8s"] river failed to connect with Kempe, the German was eliminated in sixth place. Kempe was also the last remaining bounty, meaning Rheem picked up an additional $2,500 cash. Just over 90 minutes later, Rheem did it again. From the button Rheem made it 320,000 to go and Dennis Stevermer moved all in from the big blind for 1,425,000. Rheem called and tabled [poker card="ks"][poker card="9h"] but found himself behind Stevermer’s [poker card="ad"][poker card="8d"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"] flop flipped the odds in Rheem’s favor and he stayed in front through the [poker card="4h"] turn and [poker card="qh"] river to eliminate Stevermer in fifth. Things went slightly off track 20 minutes later when he clashed with Anthony Spinella in a pot that cost him the chip lead. With 2,775,000 already in the pot and a completed board of [poker card="kd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="ac"], Spinella check-called Rheem’s 1,500,000 bet and tabled [poker card="ad"][poker card="2d"] for a river pair of aces while Rheem showed and mucked [poker card="kc"][poker card="9s"] for second pair. Following that hand, Spinella had more than half of the chips in play. Five hands after that Rheem was hard at work rebuilding his stack. Rheem raised to 325,000 from UTG and Paul Volpe called from the big blind. The flop was [poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4s"] and Volpe checked, Rheem bet 375,000 and Volpe responded by moving all in fro 2,975,000. Rheem didn’t hesitate to call and tabled [poker card="kh"][poker card="kd"] while Volpe turned over [poker card="qs"][poker card="js"] for a flush draw. The [poker card="2c"] turn and [poker card="8c"] river were no help for the former #1-ranked online poker player in the world and Volpe was out in fourth place. Five hands later, Rheem re-took the chip lead from Spinella. The first 54 hands of three-handed play were all about Rheem and Spinella taking turns as chip leader but once Panzica took his turn with the top spot, he never relinquished it again. Rheem’s run at history took a major hit on the 98th hand of three-handed play. Panzica raised to 500,00 from the button and Rheem defended his big blind. Rheem check-called a 500,000 bet after the [poker card="as"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2c"] flop and then check-called again after the [poker card="ks"] river. The [poker card="qs"] river got Rheem to check a third time, Panzica bet 2,100,000 and after taking some time to think over his decision, Rheem called and mucked after Panzica showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="kd"] for top two pair. A few hands later Spinella doubled up through Rheem, leaving him with just two big blinds. On the very next hand Rheem moved all in for his last 475,000 and Spinella called from the big blind. Rheem was ahead with [poker card="qc"][poker card="th"] to Spinella’s [poker card="5h"][poker card="3h"] but the [poker card="kd"][poker card="ks"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2h"] runout spelled an end to Rheem’s run in third place. Three-handed action took over 3.5 hours but heads-up play took almost no time at all. Five hands after Rheem was shown the door, Panzica picked up his first elimination of the final table. Spinella raised to 650,000, Panzica moved all in Spinella called. Spinella tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"] but found himself behind the [poker card="ah"][poker card="ts"] of Panzica. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="5c"] board kept Panzica ahead for good and eliminated Spinella. Panzica, who already has a $15,000 seat in the upcoming WPT Tournament of Champions, was given the $15,000 seat from this event as cash. Final Table Payouts Sam Panzica - $1,373,000 Anthony Spinella - $786,610 Chino Rheem - $521,660 Paul Volpe - $349,610 Dennis Stevermer - $243,090 Rainer Kempe - $188,460
  4. The World Poker Tour will close out 2018 action with the prestigious WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic. The tournament, held at the iconic Bellagio Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, will be the eighth WPT Main Tour stop of Season XVII. It’s an event that comes with a $10,400 buy-in and has been a part of the World Poker Tour schedule since the very first season. The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic $10,400 Main Event kicks off Tuesday, December 11, 2018, and runs through Saturday, December 15. The format calls for 40,000 in starting chips, big blind ante, registration until the start of the 12th level, and unlimited reentry until the close of registration. Levels will be 60 minutes long on Day 1 and 90 minutes long on Day 2, 3, and 4. The final table will be played with 60-minute levels until heads-up play. The full tournament festival begins Thursday, November 29. Rich Prizes, Storied History, and Legendary Champions The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic was the very first event on the World Poker Tour, held all the way back in 2002 when the WPT got its start. In that inaugural event, 146 players ponied up the $10,000. The one and only Gus Hansen emerged victorious to claim the $556,460 top prize and his first of three WPT titles. In Season III, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic had a $15,300 buy-in and an incredible first-place prize of more than $1.77 million. Winner the event was none other than Daniel Negreanu after he defeated the popular Humberto Brenes in heads-up play. Season V of the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic attracted 583 entries and awarded a first prize of more than $2.2 million. Walking away with the title was Joe Hachem, who had just won the World Series of Poker Main Event one year prior. With the WPT Five Diamond victory, Hachem became the fourth player in poker history to own both WSOP Main Event and WPT titles, alongside Doyle Brunson, Scotty Nguyen, and Carlos Mortensen. More stars of the game captured WPT Five Diamond titles in Season VI, Season VII, and Season VIII of the World Poker Tour. First, it was Eugene Katchalov winning in Season VI for $2.482 million. In Season VII, Chino Rheem took the title and $1.538 million. For Rheem, it was his first of three WPT titles. In Season VIII, Daniel Alaei scored first place for $1.428 million. As if the likes of Hansen, Negreanu, Hachem, Katchalov, Rheem, and Alaei weren’t enough, Antonio Esfandiari earned his second WPT title when he won the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic in Season IX for $870,124. Esfandiari returned to the final table the following season and earned a sixth-place finish worth $119,418. Then in Season XI, Esfandiari was back at the final table, taking fourth for $329,339. To date, Esfandiari has cashed six times in the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Bellagio, earning more than $1.4 million in total from the event through its first 16 editions. Dan Smith earned the WPT Five Diamond title for $1.161 million in Season XII. Then in Season XIII and Season XIV, both Mohsin Charania and Kevin Eyster won WPT Five Diamond for their second World Poker Tour titles. Charania won for $1.177 million, and Eyster won for $1.587 million. Record-Breaking Turnouts and Tosoc’s Back-To-Back Success In Season XV, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic drew a mammoth field of 791 entries, setting a new record for the WPT Five Diamond tournament and tying the all-time record for a $10,000 buy-in event in WPT history. That tournament created an enormous prize pool of more than $7.67 million and saw the top two places walk away with seven-figures scores - first place earned $1.938 million and second place won $1.124 million. James Romero defeated Ryan Tosoc in heads-up play to win the event. The following season, an even larger field turned out for the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic, with 812 entries setting new records for the largest turnout in the WPT Five Diamond event and a $10,000 buy-in WPT event. Nearly $7.9 million was up for grabs, and once again the top two places earned seven figures - first place took home $1.958 million and second place earned $1.134 million. In a jaw-dropping back-to-back run, Tosoc, who placed second the year before for $1.124 million, won the event for $1.1958 million. From the two-season WPT Five Diamond run, Tosoc earned $3.082 million in total prize money. Big Buy-In Events Galore In addition to the $10,400 Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule features several big buy-in tournaments. Included in the Season XVII schedule are seven other events with buy-ins of $10,000 or more. They are, as follows. - Wednesday, December 5, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 02 - Thursday, December 6, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 03 - Friday, December 7, at 2 p.m.: $15,000 buy-in Bellagio 15K 8-Game 01 - Saturday, December 8, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 01 - Monday, December 10, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 02 - Friday, December 14, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 03 - Saturday, December 15, at 2 p.m.: $100,000 buy-in Bellagio 100K 01 There are also two $5,200 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on the schedule. The first starts on Sunday, December 9, at 1 p.m., and the second starts on Thursday, December 13, at 1 p.m. *Photo courtesy of the World Poker Tour.
  5. The 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure is in the books, with notable victories coming from Ramon Colillas in the PokerStars Players NL Hold'em Championship, David 'Chino' Rheem in the PCA Main Event, Sam Greenwood in the PCA $100,000 Super High Roller, and Martin Zamani in the PCA $25,000 High Roller. Each of those players earned mammoth payouts from their victories, but where do they stack up on the 2019 money leaderboard? Let’s take a look. The $25,000 buy-in PSPC was such an enormous tournament that the top three finishers from that event make up the top three spots on the 2019 PCA money list, with Colillas on top thanks to the huge $5.1 million score he earned. Runner-up in that event, Julien Martini, sits second on the list, and third-place finisher Marc Rivera is third on the list. Here are the top 25 money earners from the 2019 PCA festival. Top 25 2019 PCA Money List 1. Ramon Colillas - $5,102,100 2. Julien Martini - $2,974,000 3. Marc Rivera - $2,168,000 4. Sam Greenwood - $1,954,860 5. Scott Baumstein - $1,657,000 6. David 'Chino' Rheem - $1,576,200 7. Jason Koonce - $1,304,000 8. Henrik Hecklen - $1,284,260 9. Rainer Kempe - $1,202,760 10. Jesus Cortes - $1,153,440 11. Stephen Chidwick - $1,084,322 12. Marc Perrault - $1,040,520 13. Talal Shakerchi - $994,300 14. Daniel Strelitz - $964,020 15. Alex Foxen - $904,040 16. Martin Zamani - $895,110 17. Farid Jattin - $746,000 18. Igor Kurganov - $697,100 19. Sean Winter - $673,120 20. Scott Wellenbach - $671,240 21. Chris Hunichen - $627,340 22. Steffen Sontheimer - $623,220 23. Dominik Nitsche - $606,360 24. Pavel Veksler - $560,240 25. Justin Bonomo - $533,370 As you can see, Greenwood sits fourth after having won $1.954 million from the 2019 PCA series. Greenwood's big win was in the $100,000 Super High Roller when he scored a $1.775 million first-place prize, but he also added scores of $89,320, $69,100, and $20,980 to his bankroll. Greenwood was one of 21 players to cash at least four times at the 2019 PCA. Another player to cash four times was the player 18th on the 2019 PCA money leaderboard, Igor Kurganov. He banked scores of $378,760, $129,780, $121,040, and $67,450 for a total of $697,100. The largest of those four scores was a sixth-place finish in the $100,000 Super High Roller that Greenwood was victorious in. Other than Greenwood and Kurganov, no player cashed four times in the top 25. Several players in the top 25 cashed three times, though, in addition to Greenwood and Kurganov, of course. Those players were Rainer Kempe, Jesus Cortes, Stephen Chidwick, Daniel Strelitz, Alex Foxen, Sean Winter, and Steffan Sontheimer. Kempe won the most money of that bunch with more than $1.2 million in payouts. He placed fourth in a $25,000 no-limit hold’em event before he won a $50,000 no-limit hold’em event and a $10,200 no-limit hold’em knockout turbo. The $50,000 buy-in tournament that Kempe won earned him $908,000. Foxen doesn't appear that he's going to slow down after an epic 2018 saw him haul in more than $6.6 million in live tournament earnings. Foxen has already won more than $900,000 in 2019 thanks to his performances at the 2019 PCA. He placed 11th in a $25,000 buy-in event, second in the $50,000 event that Kempe won, and third in another $50,000 buy-in tournament. Foxen's three scores were for $45,020, $651,980, and $207,040 in those three events, respectively. Four players cashed five times each at the 2019 PCA, but none of them ranked higher than 75th on the 2019 PCA money list. Sitting in 75th overall with a total of $136,460 won was Ariel Celestino. Daniel Tang, Sean Legendre, and Fernand Dos Santos Ferreira were the others to cash five times during the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure tournament series. How did the 2019 PCA change the festival's all-time money list? With a little help from our friends at HendonMob.com, here’s a look at the new top 25 following the completion of the 2019 PCA. Top 25 PCA All-Time Money List 1. Bryn Kenney - $6,262,731 2. Ramon Colillas - $5,102,100 3. Steve O'Dwyer - $3,910,382 4. Tony Gregg - $3,183,095 5. Poorya Nazari - $3,000,000 6. Julien Martini - $2,974,000 7. Scott Seiver - $2,970,620 8. Sam Greenwood - $2,927,337 9. Galen Hall - $2,877,080 10. Vanessa Selbst - $2,824,640 11. Jason Koon - $2,645,595 12. Isaac Haxton - $2,583,616 13. Justin Bonomo - $2,524,742 14. Bertrand 'ElkY' Grospellier - $2,484,120 15. Daniel Negreanu - $2,348,097 16. Harrison Gimbel - $2,329,220 17. Dan Shak - $2,323,840 18. Byron Kaverman - $2,307,235 19. Cary Katz - $2,257,420 20. Marc Rivera - $2,168,000 21. Mustapha Kanit - $2,077,000 22. Dimitar Danchev - $1,985,000 23. John Dibella - $1,960,700 24. Daniel Dvoress - $1,946,102 25. Tyler Reiman - $1,937,770 As you can see, Bryn Kenney reigns supreme. He came into the 2019 PCA with a big lead on this list, thanks to $6.245 million in earnings from the PCA, and Kenney added a small cash by his standards of $17,620 to move up to $6.262 million. The most notable additions to the top 25 of the PCA all-time money list were three players we already talked about, Colillas, Martini, and Rivera. Those three finished first, second, and third in the 2019 PSPC. Colillas moved to second on PCA's all-time money list, Martini jumped to sixth, and Rivera went up to 20th. Another big jump was had by Greenwood, who entered the 2019 PCA with $972,477 in earnings from the series. After winning nearly $2 million this year, Greenwood shot up the all-time PCA leaderboard to eighth with nearly $3 million in earnings total from the event. Justin Bonomo also increased his standing, going from 17th to 13th on the all-time PCA list after winning $533,370 at the 2019 PCA. Notable departures from the top 5 PCA all-time money list were Christopher Oliver, Eugene Katchalov, Will Molson, and Nick Petrangelo.
  6. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. Is Chino Rheem a Poker Hall of Famer? Lance Bradley and Donnie Peters are back from the Bahamas to talk about all things poker, including whether or not the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event winner is worthy of getting into the Poker Hall of Fame when he's eligible in 2020. Other topics include the most recent news from the World Series of Poker including the addition of a Short Deck event, the use of Big Blind Ante in the Main Event and plans for the 50th WSOP. The guys also recap the WPT Gardens Championship, discuss PokerStars' decision to lower the Sunday Million buy-in to $109 and go over the first few events of the 2019 Aussie Millions. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  7. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Jeff Walsh, The Fives Poker Podcast is LIVE this week from the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure with daily episodes bringing in all of the guests and action from the PokerStars Players No Limit Championship and the PCA Main Event. The PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event is down to a final table of six with Chino Rheem leading the way. Lance and Jeff go into full preview mode giving everything you need to know to tune into the live stream on Wednesday. They're joined by Rheem and Scott Wellenbach. They also reminisce about Gavin Smith with Daniel Negreanu and Amanda Leatherman. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  8. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Jeff Walsh, The Fives Poker Podcast is LIVE this week from the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure with daily episodes bringing in all of the guests and action from the PokerStars Players No Limit Championship and the PCA Main Event. Lance and Jeff wrap up a busy Day 2 of the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure and are joined on the show by Chino Rheem and Kristen Bicknell. All of the chip leaders, all of the bustouts and all of the action recapped just in time to get you ready for Day 3. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  9. Even after the fanfare of the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $100K Super High Roller died down with Canadian Sam Greenwood earning his sixth career seven-figure score of $1.775M, the Imperial Ballroom at the Atlantis Resort & Casino was still buzzing. Day 1B of the 2019 PCA Main Event was in full swing and, in the afterglow of the PokerStars NL Hold'em Poker Championship, players were eager for one more chance at a huge score to start the year. Along with the Main Event, the superstars of the high roller scene continued to battle it out on the felt - this time in a $50K Single-Day tournament. Enjoy some photos from around the room on this action-packed day. $50K Single-Day [caption id="attachment_622269" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Mikita Badziakouski is a high fashioned high roller.[/caption]   Mikita Badziakouski is a stone-cold killer in high roller tournaments and he’s got the results to prove it. He has over $20.8m in live earnings and also finished 34th in the 2019 PSPC as a Platinum Pass winner for over $86,000. [caption id="attachment_622270" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Christoph Vogelsang's decision to cover up in this manner has sparked some debate.[/caption] Christoph Vogelsang is at the center of an ongoing debate/discussion on how to handle it when players use extreme measures to cover up any facial tells. At first, it was just a scarf, but Vogelsang has now moved to this current look. Say what you want about the Super High Roller Bowl winner - he has results and is currently Germany’s #2 leader in all-time cashes, right behind Fedor Holz. [caption id="attachment_622271" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Kurganov is consistently finding himself at high roller final tables. His last victory came in Dec. 2017.[/caption] Daniel Dvoress (left) pocket nines outrace Igor Kurganov’s AJ. When a nine hits the turn, the Jack on the river is nothing but a needle for the PokerStars ambassador Kurganov. Kurganov is coming off a sixth-place finish in the PCA $100K for over $378,000. [caption id="attachment_622272" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Dominik Nitsche has amassed over $17M in lifetime earnings.[/caption] Dominik Nitsche reflects on his time in front of a solver while contemplating a decision as Timothy Adams (left) looks on. Nitsche’s most recent high roller success was a fourth-place finish in the WPT Five Diamond $100K for $370,000 in December. PCA Main Event Day 2 Shots from around the room shortly after the dinner break. [caption id="attachment_622273" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Poker legend Barry Greenstein mixes it up in the PCA Main Event.[/caption] Beresford and The Bear. Along with Scott Stewart (right), we look over the shoulder of top-ranked UK online grinder Conor Beresford as he sits with the legend Barry Greenstein. [caption id="attachment_622274" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Ole Schemion (left) won the 2019 PCA National for over $148K.[/caption] Two of the final four in the 2019 PCA National are side-by-side once again in the Main Event. National champ Ole Schemion (right) chats with Alexandre Mantovani. READ: Alexandre Mantovani WCOOP Score Into Live Success [caption id="attachment_622276" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Julien Martini finished as the runner up in the historic $25K PSPC for $2.9M.[/caption] PSPC Runner-Up Julien Martini (right) is still feeling good after his multi-million score. Here he sits with Netherlands pro Martijn Gerrits in the PCA Main. [caption id="attachment_622277" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Chino Rheem bubbled the final table of the 2019 PCA National.[/caption] Chino Rheem doing what he does best. Building big stacks in large field tournaments. [caption id="attachment_622278" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Leo Margets has over $1.1 million in live tournament earnings.[/caption] Winamax pro Leo Margets already made a deep run during the 2019 PCA National. Here's she's putting together some chips to make a run in the Main Event. [caption id="attachment_622279" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Has the covering of faces gone too far or is it just no big deal?[/caption] What do you think of this look? Hate it? Love it? Does it bother you or is it fair game? We want to know what you think - tweet at us @PocketFives
  10. Chino Rheem is about as polarizing of a figure as you’ll find in today’s world of poker, but for all of the issues he’s had over the years, there’s no denying his ability to perform on the game’s largest stages. Rheem has won three World Poker Tour titles, final tabled the WSOP Main Event, and amassed more than $10.5 million in live tournament earnings. Coming off a first-place score for more than $1.5 million in the 2019 PCA Main Event, Rheem recently became the 41st poker player in history to win more than $10 million from live poker tournaments. Here’s a look at the five biggest scores of Rheem’s poker career. 7th in 2008 WSOP Main Event ($1,772,650) Rheem had been around the poker world for a handful of years before the 2008 World Series of Poker, and he even had a second-place finish in a gold bracelet event in 2006 that earned him $327,981. He truly made waves in the 2008 WSOP Main Event, though, when he aggressively splashed his way through the 6,844-player field to reach the final table in what was the first-ever WSOP November Nine. Rheem entered the 2008 WSOP Main Event final table in sixth position on the leaderboard. His run ultimately ended in seventh place after he got the last of his money in with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"] against Peter Eastgate’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"]. A queen hit the flop, and that was all she wrote for Rheem, who was sent to the rail with a $1.772 million prize. 1st in 2019 PCA Main Event ($1,567,100) The 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event attracted 865 entries. With six players left, Rheem entered the final day with the chip lead. He busted all five of his opponents to win the 2019 PCA Main Event and capture its $1.567 million first-place prize. This result proved to be, at the time, the second largest of Rheem's career, just behind his WSOP Main Event seventh-place finish. It also moved him to more than $10.5 million in live tournament earnings and he became the 74th player to eclipse the $10 million earnings mark, per HendonMob. 1st in WPT Five Diamond ($1,538,730) Rheem was one of 497 entries in the World Poker Tour’s Five Diamond World Poker Classic event at Bellagio in 2008. The event was part of Season VII of the WPT and featured a buy-in of $15,400. The prize pool was $7.231 million, of which Rheem got the most of when he scored the $1.538 million top prize. It was the first of Rheem’s three World Poker Tour titles and came just a month after he finished seventh in the World Series of Poker Main Event. At this final table, Rheem had stiff competition in the form of Justin Young, Evan McNiff, Steve Sung, Amnon Filippi, and Hoyt Corkins. 1st in WPT World Championship ($1,150,297) To conclude Season XI of the World Poker Tour, Rheem won the $25,500 buy-in WPT World Championship. The event was held at Bellagio in Las Vegas in 2013 and attracted 146 entries to create a $3.54 million prize pool. In the end, it was Rheem against Erick Lindgren for the title, with Rheem coming out on top to win a $1.15 million payday and his second WPT title. 1st in Epic Poker League Event #1 ($1,000,000) Currently standing as the fifth largest score of Rheem’s poker career is a victory in the now defunct Epic Poker League. Rheem won the EPL’s first title, defeating a field of 137 entries in the $20,000 buy-in tournament to score the $1 million top prize. At the final table, Rheem out-battled runner-up Erik Seidel and third-place finisher Jason Mercier en route to the title and million dollar payday.
  11. The PokerStars Caribbean Adventure $10K Main Event came to a conclusion on Wednesday night and it was veteran poker professional David 'Chino' Rheem who finished in first place taking home the $$1,567,100 first place prize. For Rheem, it seemed as if he was simply finishing what he started. On Day 4, Rheem ran hot and surged to take a chip lead that he would never surrender while at the final table. Throughout the day, Rheem continually put pressure on all of his opponents, opening liberally, flatting to take flops in position and staying active both with his play and his table talk. It was a dominating performance that saw Rheem eliminate every single one of the other final table participants. The entire final table took just under eight hours, including breaks, and at no point in time did it seem that Rheem was in trouble despite facing some very talented opposition. The final table was tense for a number of hours until, finally, the bustouts began. One-time WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open champion, Brian Altman, found himself trending downward and sitting on one of the smaller stacks. He was the first to clash with Rheem. Altman opened UTG with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] and it folded back around the Rheem in the big blind who looked down at pocket queens and piled in a big raise. Altman took a moment and put his remaining chips in the middle. Chino, still with his dominating table chip lead, snap-called. The [poker card="8h"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7c"] flop provided no help to Altman. The [poker card="3h"] turn kept the door open but the [poker card="ts"] river ended the run for Altman. Altman finishes the day in sixth place, picking up $297,020 to send his recorded career cashes to over $3 million lifetime. It took nearly two more levels for the next elimination to occur. Vincent Bosca, with roughly 14 big blinds, opened from the hijack with [poker card="ad"][poker card="jd"] prompting a big blind defend from Rheem with [poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"]. The flop came [poker card="3d"][poker card="td"][poker card="qc"] and Rheem checked. Bosca put in a roughly half pot bet and Rheem check-shoved on him with bottom pair. Bosca made the call with overcards, the flush draw and gutshot straight outs. The [poker card="ts"] turn only gave Bosca more outs and he needed one of 19 cards to hit the river. But the [poker card="5h"] was not one of them and the Spaniard fell in fifth place for $396,880. After a short break, the action picked up considerably. Roughly half an hour into the next level Ukranian by-way-of Israel Pavel Veksler also found himself facing the wrath of Rheem. Rheem, still having the table covered, open shoved [poker card="6s"][poker card="6c"] from the small blind into Veksler, who looked down at [poker card="as"][poker card="qc"]. Veksler made the call and the pair saw a [poker card="2d"][poker card="jh"][poker card="ts"] flop giving Veksler some additional outs. But as happened to Bosca before him, the [poker card="8h"] turn and [poker card="8s"] river provided no help and Veksler bowed out in fourth place for $503,440. With Rheem in firm control of the table, both he and the tournament went into overdrive. From the bu,tton Rheem opened with [poker card="ac"][poker card="td"] and Scott Wellenbach, the Buddist translator who has promised all of his winnings to charity, made his final stand by shoving [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"]. Rheem called and the flop came [poker card="8h"][poker card="7c"][poker card="kh"], putting Wellenback in the lead. The turn brought the [poker card="jd"] giving Rheem open-ended straight out to go along with his over card. The river was the [poker card="9s"], once again giving Rheem the cards he needed to win a big hand. Wellenback’s journey ended in 3rd place and he takes home $671,240, all of which is seemingly destined to be put to good use. Heads-up play between Rheem and Daniel Strelitz didn’t take very long with Rheem having a nearly 8:1 chip advantage. Rheem then wrapped up what he started from way back in Day 1 when he ended his opening flight with heaps of chips. From the button, Strelitz open shoved the [poker card="as"][poker card="2s"] and Rheem snap called with…pocket fives, [poker card="5s"][poker card="5d"]. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] keeping Rheem in the lead. The [poker card="3h"] turn was of no help to Strelitz and the [poker card="ts"] on the river sealed the deal for Rheem to win the 100th cash of his accomplished career. For his runner-up finish, Daniel Strelitz takes home $951,480. Chino Rheem is the 2019 PCA Main Event Champion and awarded the $1,567,100 first-place prize. PCA 2019 Main Event Final Table Payouts 1. Chino Rheem - $1,567,100 2. Daniel Strelitz - $951,480 3. Scott Wellenback - $671,240 4. Pavel Veksler - $503,440 5. Vicent Bosca - $396,880 6. Brian Altman - $297,920
  12. The 2019 Aussie Millions recently wrapped up, and it was another record-setting festival of events Down Under. In the heat of the Australian summer, while tennis fans from around the world enjoyed another edition of the famed Aussie Open, the Aussie Millions was packing the house at Crown Casino in beautiful Melbourne. The Aussie Millions Main Event generated its largest turnout ever with 822 entries, besting last year’s record attendance of 800 entries. Bryn Kenney captured the Aussie Millions Main Event title and A$1.272 million ($914,617) after a three-way deal, Cary Katz won the $100,000 Challenge for A$1.481 million ($1.074 million), and plenty of other big scores were had. Here's a look at the biggest winners from the 2019 Aussie Millions. Top 25 2019 Aussie Millions Money List 1. Toby Lewis - A$1,607,654 ($1,149,064) 2. Cary Katz - A$1,481,760 ($1,074,908) 3. Rainer Kempe - A$1,284,225 ($919,258) 4. Michael Del Vecchio - A$1,275,852 ($916,936) 5. Bryn Kenney - A$1,272,598 ($914,617) 6. Andrew Hinrichsen - A$1,102,408 ($792,305) 7. Manig Loeser - A$772,246 ($555,014) 8. Abraham Passet - A$617,400 ($447,878) 9. Jack Salter - A$541,660 ($390,523) 10. Anton Morgenstern - A$530,640 ($384,767) 11. Clinton Taylor - A$483,000 ($347,132) 12. Guillaume Nolet - A$451,069 ($322,640) 13. Tobias Ziegler - A$431,270 ($311,395) 14. David ‘Chino’ Rheem - A$416,760 ($296,137) 15. Thomas Mühlöcker - A$412,300 ($296,320) 16. Matthew Wakeman - A$380,300 ($273,322) 17. Farid Jattin - A$373,880 ($270,869) 18. Dominik Nitsche - A$350,385 ($251,999) 19. Gyeong Byeong Lee - A$311,985 ($224,207) 20. Kristen Bicknell - A$294,530 ($213,599) 21. Jason Pritchard - A$291,885 ($210,084) 22. Hamish Crawshaw - A$253,334 ($182,037) 23. Vincent Huang - A$251,865 ($180,431) 24. Gautam Dhingra - A$247,039 ($175,716) 25. Bjorn Li - A$235,600 ($169,326) Toby Lewis tops the list of winners, earning A$1.607 million ($1.149 million) thanks to four cashes in the series. Two of those four in-the-money finishes were for mega bucks, as Lewis placed second in the $25,000 Challenge for A$781,214 ($555,107) and first in the $50,000 Challenge for A$818,054 ($587,936). Lewis' performances moved him to more than $6.3 million in live tournament earnings and jumped him to sixth place on England's all-time money list, as ranked by The Hendon Mob. Katz, who was already mentioned as the winner of the Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge, was the second-biggest money earner from the 2019 edition of the event. Katz only cashed once, but he won the A$100,000 buy-in event for A$1.481 million ($1.074 million). It was the fifth-largest score of Katz’s poker career, as he moved to more than $18.4 million in live tournament earnings and up to 25th on poker’s all-time money list, also according to The Hendon Mob. Ranking third was Rainer Kempe, who earned a combined A$1.284 million ($919,258) thanks to two big results. Kempe won the $25,000 Challenge that Lewis came second in and took home A$831,465 ($590,814). He also placed fourth in the $100,000 Challenge that Katz won for A$452,760 ($328,444). Kempe's success carried over from the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, where he won more than $1.2 million from three cashes and was the ninth-biggest winner to come out of that series. Just from the PCA and Aussie Millions, Kempe has won more than $2.1 million in prize money in 2019. You’ll notice that Mike Del Vecchio notched Kenney by a couple thousand dollars on the list. The two were involved in a three-way deal at the end of the Aussie Millions Main Event and took home just about the same amount of money. Del Vecchio had another cash at the Aussie Millions that allowed him to finish higher than Kenney on this list. In ninth place with A$541,660 ($390,523) won at the 2019 Aussie Millions was Jack Salter, and he’s the player who cashed the most times within the top 25. Salter cashed five times during the festival, but that wasn’t the most times a player finished in the money at the 2019 Aussie Millions. Justin Liberto and Travis Endersby each cashed six times and were the ones to cash the most times. Liberto earned a combined A$181,609 ($131,133) and Endersby scored a total of A$105,488 ($75,571). If you read our 'Biggest Winners from the 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure' article, then you’ll notice there are a few more repeat names on the two lists, in addition to Kempe. Those players are David 'Chino' Rheem, Farid Jattin, and Dominik Nitsche. Rheem, who won the 2019 PCA Main Event for $1.567 million, finished third in the Aussie Millions $25,000 Challenge to win A$416,760 ($296,137). He was the 14th-biggest money earner from this year’s Aussie Millions as a result of that. Jattin notably finished seventh in the PokerStars Players NL Hold'em Championship for $746,000 in the Bahamas. In Melbourne, Jattin finished 31st in the Aussie Millions Main Event and then took second in the A$25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha tournament, winning a combined A$373,880 ($270,869). Nitsche won $606,240 at the 2019 PCA festival and then won another A$350,385 ($251,999) at the 2019 Aussie Millions festival, placing 23rd and 18th on each series' earnings leaderboard. Down Under, Nitsche took fourth in the $50,000 Challenge for A$323,950 ($232,823) and sixth in the A$5,000 Six-Max NL for A$26,435 ($19,176).
  13. The Season XVIII World Poker Tour Five Diamond World Poker Classic crowned its winner on Saturday, with Alex Foxen topping the record-breaking field of 1,035 entries to win the $1.694 million first-place prize. "It feels, I don't know… surreal," Foxen said in the moments following the win. "It’s kind of hard to put into words, but it feels amazing. The last time I got to this spot, I was a little bit disappointed in the way that I played heads up. It’s just incredible to get the opportunity again and be fortunate enough to pull out the win. I don’t have words." Back in Season XVI, Foxen found himself heads up with Ryan Tosoc in this very event. Tosoc had finished runner-up the year before and was back in heads-up play with a chance to better his previous result. Back then, Foxen couldn’t overcome Tosoc in what was a very lighthearted heads-up battle with plenty of fun had between the two and he had to settle for a second-place payout of $1.134 million. "I do feel like I was so excited about having that opportunity," Foxen said of the difference between his two WPT Five Diamond heads-up appearances. "I think that score I locked up was already five or six times my biggest score to date at that point, so there was an element of me feeling like I lost a little bit of focus and maybe didn’t take it as seriously as I should have because, regardless of the outcome of heads-up play, it was such an amazing result that in the moment I didn’t see the severity of that situation. I definitely didn’t make that same mistake twice." Much like Tosoc had redeemed his second-place finish with a victory the following season, Foxen came back two seasons after his runner-up finish to get the job done and capture the WPT Five Diamond throne. The victory gave Foxen his first WPT title. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Final Table Results 1st: Alex Foxen - $1,694,995 2nd: Toby Joyce - $1,120,040 3rd: Seth Davies - $827,285 4th: Peter Neff - $617,480 5th: Danny Park - $465,780 6th: Jonathan Jaffe - $355,125 Foxen came into Saturday’s final table in second position on the leaderboard with six players remaining. In fewer than 30 hands, Foxen had improved to the chip lead. Shortly after gaining the top spot, he knocked out WPT Champions Club member Jonathan Jaffe in sixth place. Although others did some damage of their own, such as Toby Joyce knocking out start-of-day chip leader Danny Park in fifth place and Seth Davies busting Peter Neff in fourth place, Foxen never gave up the lead once he had it. Three-handed play between Foxen, Joyce, and Davies lasted for quite some time. Even though both Joyce and Davies scored double ups during the battle, things never appeared to get away from Foxen as he stayed strong behind the wall of chips he built. Eventually, Davies’ stack shrunk and he got the last of his money in against Foxen in a dominated position. Foxen had the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] to Davies’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"]. Davies, a WPT Champions Club member, did flop some outs to a chop but he was ultimately done in thanks to the [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="3s"][poker card="As"][poker card="8d"] board. Entering heads-up play with Joyce, Foxen had the chip lead with 29.5 million to Joyce’s 11.9 million, and the match was never really close. Joyce narrowed the gap ever so slightly at the beginning of the duel, but Foxen’s dominance was too much and he quickly started to distance himself. On the final hand, Foxen had limped on the button with the blinds at 200,000/400,000 with a 400,000 big blind ante. Joyce checked and the dealer fanned the [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3d"] flop. Joyce checked, Foxen bet 400,000, and then Joyce check-raised to 1.1 million. Foxen put in a raise of his own and made it 2 million to go. Joyce called to see the [poker card="Kc"] land on fourth street. Joyce checked and Foxen shoved all in, for what was effectively 4.5 million because he had Joyce covered. Joyce tanked and used four 30-second time extensions to think things through. Joyce eventually made the call with the [poker card="Jh"][poker card="9c"] for a pair of jacks, but Foxen had him out-kicked with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Js"]. The river was the [poker card="4c"] to seal the deal for Foxen. For his runner-up finish, Joyce scored $1.12 million in prize money. Fourth Consecutive Record Turnout for Five Diamond It was the fourth consecutive record-setting turnout for WPT Five Diamond, and this season’s 1,035 entries topped last season’s 1,001. The seasons prior to that were 812 entries for Season XVI and 791 entries for Season XV. In this event, the top 130 finished reached the money. Included in those to cash were Eric Afriat (9th - $168,005), Darren Elias (14th - $107,840), Chino Rheem (22nd - $60,435), Cary Katz (44th - $37,670), Kitty Kuo (67th - $26,220), Cliff Josephy (74th - $23,830), and Maria Ho (116th - $19,345). Also running deep was Timo Kamphues, who placed seventh in the Season XVIII WPT Five Diamond for $273,695. He has had quite the week of poker in Las Vegas, as just a few days prior to his run at Bellagio, Kamphues won the Wynn Poker Winter Classic $1,100 NL $500,000 Guarantee tournament for $202,787. Foxen Takes Player of the Year Lead With the victory, Foxen moved to first place in the Hublot WPT Player of the Year standings. Both Foxen and Joyce have the same amount of points, 1,400, but Foxen holds the tiebreaker of most money won. Joyce earned his second cash of the season and is currently second in the race. 1st: Alex Foxen - 1,400 points 2nd: Toby Joyce - 1,400 points 3rd: Donald Maloney - 1,300 points 4th: Aaron Van Blarcum - 1,275 points 5th: Geoffrey Hum - 1,250 points 6th: Milen Stefanov - 1,200 points 7th: Kevin Albers - 1,200 points 8th: Simon Brandstrom - 1,200 points 9th: Peter Neff - 1,150 points 10th: Seth Davies - 1,100 points WPT Gardens Poker Championship Up Next Up next for the WPT Main Tour is the WPT Gardens Poker Championship at the Gardens Casino in Southern California. The $10,000 buy-in event kicks off January 9, 2020, and runs through January 13.
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