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  1. On Wednesday, while much of the poker world was fixated on the Stanley Cup Playoffs, Daniel Alaei (pictured) won his fifth World Series of Poker bracelet. The 30-year-old took down the $10,000 Omaha Eight or Better Championship for $391,000, the second time in his career he's won it. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- The tournament had 157 entrants and generated a prize pool that almost passed $1.5 million. After winning, Alaei became the second youngest player to win five bracelets. The youngest to do so: Allen Cunningham, who beat Alaei by a few months. This was Alaei's first tournament entered at the 2015 WSOP. Alaei said of his five pieces of hardware, "I think they are all pretty sweet. I did win this event in 2009, so it's nice to win it again. It was especially nice to win since I was so low-stacked when we were heads-up. So, it was really nice to come back and win it." Alaei was down 6:1 in chips at one point heads-up, making his victory even more impressive. Alaei is now tied for 15th all-time in terms of bracelets won with five. He's tied with the likes of Stu Ungar, John Juanda, and Scotty Nguyen. WSOP officials pointed out that Phil Hellmuth, who just won his 14th bracelet, was 31 years old when he won his fifth. So, Alaei is ahead of Hellmuth's pace thus far. On being among poker's elite, Alaei said, "I love coming to the World Series. I love playing the tournaments. I hope to win more and maybe one day be in that conversation. As for now, I just try to play my best and do what I do." Fourth place in the Omaha Eight or Better Championship went to PocketFiver Scott BigRiskkyClements (pictured), who has owned Omaha over the years. Clements has two bracelets and was the runner-up in the Omaha Eight or Better Championship in 2009. Sixth place belonged to reigning World Poker Tour Player of the Year Anthony Zinno. PocketFiver Kyle DEGENWLDBOYMiaso finished in second place for $241,000. There were four bracelet winners at the final table, including Mike Wattel, who won the Omaha Eight or Better Championship in 1999. Ninth place went to gold bracelet winner and 2012 November Niner Jeremy Ausmus. Here's how the final nine shook out: 1. Daniel Alaei - $391,097 2. Kyle DEGENWLDBOYMiaso - $241,691 3. Jeffrey Vaughn - $175,088 4. Scott BigRiskkyClements - $129,235 5. Ken Aldridge - $97,122 6. Anthony Zinno - $74,262 7. Mike Wattel - $57,748 8. Tobias Hausen - $45,661 9. Jeremy Ausmus - $36,688 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, brought to you by Tournament Poker Edge. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  2. The World Poker Tour will close out 2018 action with the prestigious WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic. The tournament, held at the iconic Bellagio Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, will be the eighth WPT Main Tour stop of Season XVII. It’s an event that comes with a $10,400 buy-in and has been a part of the World Poker Tour schedule since the very first season. The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic $10,400 Main Event kicks off Tuesday, December 11, 2018, and runs through Saturday, December 15. The format calls for 40,000 in starting chips, big blind ante, registration until the start of the 12th level, and unlimited reentry until the close of registration. Levels will be 60 minutes long on Day 1 and 90 minutes long on Day 2, 3, and 4. The final table will be played with 60-minute levels until heads-up play. The full tournament festival begins Thursday, November 29. Rich Prizes, Storied History, and Legendary Champions The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic was the very first event on the World Poker Tour, held all the way back in 2002 when the WPT got its start. In that inaugural event, 146 players ponied up the $10,000. The one and only Gus Hansen emerged victorious to claim the $556,460 top prize and his first of three WPT titles. In Season III, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic had a $15,300 buy-in and an incredible first-place prize of more than $1.77 million. Winner the event was none other than Daniel Negreanu after he defeated the popular Humberto Brenes in heads-up play. Season V of the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic attracted 583 entries and awarded a first prize of more than $2.2 million. Walking away with the title was Joe Hachem, who had just won the World Series of Poker Main Event one year prior. With the WPT Five Diamond victory, Hachem became the fourth player in poker history to own both WSOP Main Event and WPT titles, alongside Doyle Brunson, Scotty Nguyen, and Carlos Mortensen. More stars of the game captured WPT Five Diamond titles in Season VI, Season VII, and Season VIII of the World Poker Tour. First, it was Eugene Katchalov winning in Season VI for $2.482 million. In Season VII, Chino Rheem took the title and $1.538 million. For Rheem, it was his first of three WPT titles. In Season VIII, Daniel Alaei scored first place for $1.428 million. As if the likes of Hansen, Negreanu, Hachem, Katchalov, Rheem, and Alaei weren’t enough, Antonio Esfandiari earned his second WPT title when he won the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic in Season IX for $870,124. Esfandiari returned to the final table the following season and earned a sixth-place finish worth $119,418. Then in Season XI, Esfandiari was back at the final table, taking fourth for $329,339. To date, Esfandiari has cashed six times in the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Bellagio, earning more than $1.4 million in total from the event through its first 16 editions. Dan Smith earned the WPT Five Diamond title for $1.161 million in Season XII. Then in Season XIII and Season XIV, both Mohsin Charania and Kevin Eyster won WPT Five Diamond for their second World Poker Tour titles. Charania won for $1.177 million, and Eyster won for $1.587 million. Record-Breaking Turnouts and Tosoc’s Back-To-Back Success In Season XV, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic drew a mammoth field of 791 entries, setting a new record for the WPT Five Diamond tournament and tying the all-time record for a $10,000 buy-in event in WPT history. That tournament created an enormous prize pool of more than $7.67 million and saw the top two places walk away with seven-figures scores - first place earned $1.938 million and second place won $1.124 million. James Romero defeated Ryan Tosoc in heads-up play to win the event. The following season, an even larger field turned out for the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic, with 812 entries setting new records for the largest turnout in the WPT Five Diamond event and a $10,000 buy-in WPT event. Nearly $7.9 million was up for grabs, and once again the top two places earned seven figures - first place took home $1.958 million and second place earned $1.134 million. In a jaw-dropping back-to-back run, Tosoc, who placed second the year before for $1.124 million, won the event for $1.1958 million. From the two-season WPT Five Diamond run, Tosoc earned $3.082 million in total prize money. Big Buy-In Events Galore In addition to the $10,400 Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule features several big buy-in tournaments. Included in the Season XVII schedule are seven other events with buy-ins of $10,000 or more. They are, as follows. - Wednesday, December 5, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 02 - Thursday, December 6, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 03 - Friday, December 7, at 2 p.m.: $15,000 buy-in Bellagio 15K 8-Game 01 - Saturday, December 8, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 01 - Monday, December 10, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 02 - Friday, December 14, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 03 - Saturday, December 15, at 2 p.m.: $100,000 buy-in Bellagio 100K 01 There are also two $5,200 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on the schedule. The first starts on Sunday, December 9, at 1 p.m., and the second starts on Thursday, December 13, at 1 p.m. *Photo courtesy of the World Poker Tour.
  3. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. This list details the players who made spots #21 - #30 on our list. If you haven't yet caught up on the other names we've announced so far you can check out #41 - #50 here and #31 - #40 here. #30 - Barry Greenstein BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 102 $3,196,072 24 Barry Greenstein has one of the most recognizable faces in poker, plus plenty of accolades to go along with it. He has three WSOP gold bracelets with the first coming in 2004 when he won the $5,000 No-Limit 2-7 Single Draw event to the tune of $296,200. Greenstein went on to win his second gold bracelet in 2005 before landing his third in 2008. Interestingly, each of Greenstein's three bracelets has come in different variants. In addition to the No Limit 2-7 Single Draw bracelets he has, Greenstein won one in pot-limit Omaha and razz. When poker exploded in the early- to mid-2000s, Greenstein's face was one of those that was everywhere. He was a high-stakes cash game player who constantly found himself in the money in WSOP events. To date, Greenstein has racked up 102 cashes and 24 top 10 finishes in World Series of Poker events. At the WSOP in 2017 and 2018, Greenstein cashed 13 times each year. “Dubbed ‘The Robin Hood of Poker’, Barry Greenstein is one of the games all-time great grinders. His 101 summer series cashes is good for fifth on the all-time WSOP cashes list and his three bracelets have come in three different disciplines, proving that he’s a master of all the games. But Barry has brought more than results, being one of the most approachable of the poker boom superstars while in the halls of the Rio. Between his results, his philanthropy, and his ability to connect with his fans Greenstein is an all-time great.” - PocketFives Senior Writer Jeff Walsh #29 - Huck Seed BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 53 $3,579,604 28 Huck Seed is very much known for his 1996 WSOP Main Event victory that saw him win the $1 million top prize when he topped a field of 295 entries in the world championship tournament. What many don't know is that Seed had actually already won a WSOP gold bracelet. Seed earned his first bracelet in 2004 when he won the $2,500 Pot-Limit Omaha event for $167,000. That first win seemed inevitable for Seed, who prior to it had six WSOP cashes and all of them were top 10 finishes. Seed returned to the WSOP Main Event final table in 1999 and won bracelets three and four in 2000 and 2003, both of which came in razz. #28 - Berry Johnston BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 67 $2,112,340 30 In similar fashion to Huck Seed, many don't know that Berry Johnston had already won a WSOP gold bracelet before he won the WSOP Main Event. He first claimed gold in 1983 before going on to win the granddaddy of them all in 1986. Interestingly, Johnston's first-ever recorded cash came when he placed third in the WSOP Main Event in 1982. In 1985, he took third again in the event and then finally won it the following year. Further adding to Johnston's WSOP standing, he finished fifth in the WSOP Main Event in 1990 and has several other deep runs in the event. #27 - Shaun Deeb BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 4 66 $4,281,461 17 Shaun Deeb came up in poker as an online player, but he's transitioned to the live realm very well and has been quite the WSOP performer over the years. Since his first WSOP cash in 2007, Deeb has won four bracelets, finished in the top 10 17 times, and cashed 66 times. Deeb's first taste of WSOP gold came in 2015, when he won the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship for $318,857. He added his second bracelet in 2016, and then two more in 2018 en route to winning the 2018 WSOP Player of the Year title. His two bracelets in 2018, were worth $1.402 million and $814,000. Deeb cashed 16 times at the 2018 WSOP and then four more times at the 2018 WSOP Europe. "Not many players who came up in the world of online poker have been able to move to the live felt with as much success as Shaun Deeb. His talents make him one of the top poker players in the world and we're really starting to see him carve out his place in poker history over more recent years. Deeb appears to be as all in as possible when it comes to the WSOP. Deeb first hit the WSOP winner's circle in 2015 and won four gold bracelets and one Player of the Year title in the four-year span from 2015-2018. Plus, he had 10 additional cashes in the top 10 of events over that span. If the volume is there in any sort of way, Deeb is a threat to win WSOP Player of the Year and multiple bracelets every summer, and it wouldn't be a stretch to see him challenge Phil Hellmuth for most bracelets all time if he keeps playing these events at such a high frequency over the next decade or two." - PocketFives Managing Editor Donnie Peters In today's poker world, Deeb is considered to be as tough a competitor as any. He's a threat to win a WSOP bracelet, or two or three, every single year, and a strong contender for WSOP Player of the Year. #26 - Daniel Alaei BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 36 $4,427,139 8 Daniel Alaei may not make a lot of noise at the table, but the game he brings to the WSOP each and every year speaks volumes. Alaei has five WSOP gold bracelets, with the first coming in 2006 when he won the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw event. He later added bracelets two, three, four, and five in 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2015. Each time he won his way to the WSOP winner's circle, Alaei did it facing some of the toughest competition around. His first gold bracelet in the $5,000 NL 2-7 Single Draw tournament saw Alaei battle through a final table that included David Williams, Men Nguyen, Greg Raymer, and Allen Cunningham. His other four bracelets were all in Omaha tournaments and each of those events had a buy-in of $10,000. His wins in 2010 and 2013 were in the $10,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Championship, when he took home $780,599 and $852,692, respectively. "Daniel Alaei is an incredible poker talent, and his skills have led to WSOP success several times, especially when it comes to Omaha. Personally, I wish Alaei would play more WSOP events every summer because I don't feel his actual results are anywhere near the potential he has. If there was ever a player to be called a "silent killer" on the felt, it's Alaei. He doesn't say much, he's quiet when he does talk, and his demeanor is unassuming, but his poker prowess is as loud as they come. When it comes to Omaha, the WSOP's second most popular variant, Alaei is one of the best, if not the absolute best, in the world and his four bracelets in the game are clear evidence of that." - Donnie Peters #25 - Chris Moneymaker BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 1 4 $2,532,041 2 Chris Moneymaker is as important a player in WSOP history as anyone. His storybook win in the 2003 WSOP Main Event played a part in igniting the poker boom and the ambassadorship he's served in since rivals anyone in the game. But for as important a figure as Moneymaker is when it comes to WSOP history, his results since his moment of glory in 2003 have been minimal and it's the reason he's not higher on this list. Of his $2,532,041 in WSOP earnings, $2,500,000 of that is from his 2003 WSOP Main Event victory, and he only has three other cashes and one other top 10 finish. Moneymaker's last WSOP cash was more than a decade ago in 2007. “An argument can be made that the most famous accountant from Tennessee to ever play poker simply doesn’t have the numbers needed to be on this list. However, if Chris Moneymaker is not in the field in 2003, if he did not bluff Sammy Farha and he never took home the Main Event title - poker may not be where it is today. The man that sparked the poker boom influenced a generation of poker players who saw what he did on ESPN and thought to themselves ‘I can do that too.’ Moneymaker is the poker icon that the industry needed and his being where he was, when he was has helped the World Series of Poker become the series that it is today.” - Jeff Walsh #24 - David Chiu BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 5 71 $3,653,340 26 Another WSOP stalwart to find his way to PocketFives' Top 50 Greatest WSOP Players list is David Chiu, with 71 cashes, 26 top 10 finishes, and five gold bracelets. Chiu's first WSOP cash came in 1996, and it also turned out to be his first WSOP gold bracelet win when he took down the $2,000 Limit Hold'em tournament for $396,000. Future bracelets wins for Chiu came in 1998, 2000, 2005, and 2013. Chiu's skills have been on display at the WSOP ever since he started playing there, and he's a player well-versed in all games. His bracelets have come in hold'em, seven-card stud, and Omaha. Additionally, Chiu has four runner-up finishes in gold bracelet tournaments. "Many of his colleagues will make the argument that David Chiu could be the most underappreciated player of his generation. His WSOP record is impressive. He's one of just 25 players to have won five or more bracelets. He also has four runner-up finishes and two thirds. Had a hand or two (or six) gone differently during those events, we could be talking about him as pushing to join the double-digit bracelet club." - PocketFives Editor in Chief Lance Bradley. #23 - Barbara Enright BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 3 22 $463,499 4 Barbara Enright is a three-time WSOP gold bracelet winner best known for being the only woman to date to ever reach the WSOP Main Event final table. That came in 1995 when she placed fifth in the big one. In 1986 and 1994, Enright won the WSOP Women's Event, and then she took down the 1996 $2,500 Pot-Limit Hold'em tournament for $180,000. In a male-dominated industry, especially in the 1990s, Enright helped pave the way for female poker players around the world. #22 - Jeff Lisandro BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 71 $3,790,497 27 Not too many players can claim to have won three WSOP bracelets. Even fewer can claim to have won three in the same year. Jeff Lisandro has six WSOP gold bracelets in all, and three of those came in 2009 when he absolutely crushed seven-card stud at the WSOP, winning the $1,500 Seven-Card Stud, $2,500 Razz, and $10,000 Seven-Card Stud Hi-Low. He won his first bracelet back in 2007, also in seven-card stud, and won his other two in pot-limit Omaha. Further adding to the chapter Lisandro wrote in the WSOP history books, he won one of his bracelets at WSOP Europe and another at WSOP Asia-Pacific. "Half of Lisandro's six bracelet wins came in 2009 when he was clearly a dominant force on his way to winning WSOP Player of the Year. It would be a shame to let that performance overshadow the other things Lisandro has done in his career. He's won at least one bracelet in all three variants of Seven Card Stud and is part of an elite group of players who have won a bracelet on three different continents. You could easily make the argument that at #22, he gets the short end of the stick." - Lance Bradley #21 - Ted Forrest BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 6 38 $2,055,472 23 Ted Forrest also has six WSOP gold bracelets and he is also a player who can claim to have won three gold bracelets in a single year. Forrest achieved the feat in 1993, when he stormed onto the poker scene with three gold bracelet wins in three different games. First, he won the $5,000 Seven-Card Stud tournament. Then, he won the $1,500 Razz event. He followed that up with a victory in the $1,500 Omaha Hi-Low tournament. In 2004, Forrest was back winning multiple bracelets in the same summer, taking home two that year. He'd add his sixth in 2014. Forrest has always been a feared player at the table, and when he reaches the money he's playing to win, as evidenced by his 38 WSOP cashes resulting in 23 top 10s. In addition to his six gold bracelets, Forrest has reached the top three of a gold bracelet event on five other occasions.
  4. One of Brazil's top poker players went from online legend to World Series of Poker bracelet winner on Monday night while Korea's Ji young Kim became the first woman from her country to win a bracelet. Yuri Dzivielevski Ships $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Yuri Dzivielevski, who once held down the #1 spot on the PocketFives Rankings for five weeks, added another accomplishment to his resume on Sunday night, beating Michael Thompson heads-up to win the $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event for $213,750 and his first WSOP bracelet. Dzivielevski leaned on his years of experience playing tournaments to close out the final table. "I have a lot of experience in No Limit Hold'em tournaments, and I have a lot of experience with [statistical models], so I knew that the chips I could lose weren't worth the same as the chips when I win," Dzivielevski said. "That was my strategy – attack very specific spots, but play tight." Prior to Sunday, Dzivielevski's previous best WSOP performance came in 2016 when he narrowly missed out on the final table of the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship, finishing 11th for $44,911. Thompson took home $132,113 for finishing second. Dan Zack finished fifth for $43,950 but also picked up 370.2 WSOP Player of the Year points, which pushes him past Upeshka De Silvan and back into the lead through 51 events. Final Table Payouts Yuri Dzivielevski - $213,750 Michael Thompson - $132,113 Denis Strebkob - $89,744 Andrey Zaichenko - $62,176 Daniel Zack - $43,950 Philip Long - $31,710 Alex Livingston - $23,362 Daniel Ratigan - $17,584 Jason 'TheBigGift' Gooch Wins $1,000 Online NLHE Double Stack Two weeks ago, Jason Gooch was heads-up for a bracelet on WSOP.com only to finish second to Josh 'Loofa' Pollock. On Sunday night he erased the bad taste that result left in his mouth and did one better, beating Brian 'pure__reason' Wood heads-up to win the $1,000 Online NLHE Deepstack event for $241.492.94. Wood, the #19-ranked New Jersey online poker player, earned $148,542.85 as the runner-up. Gianluca Speranza, the two-time defending PokerStars SCOOP Main Event champ, finished seventh. The final table also included Italian poker players Dario Sammartino and Max Pescatori. Final Table Payouts Jason 'TheBigGift' Gooch - $241,492.94 Brian 'pure__reason' Wood - $148,542.85 Anthony 'scrotile' Augustino - $104,980.41 Dario 'Sirio87' Sammartino - $75,094.55 Tim 'Stucksoomuch' Wong - $54,543.05 Ran 'margarete' Koller - $40,143.29 Gianluca 'InMyHouse' Speranza- $29,885.86 Justin 'KingFortune' Liberto - $22,541.03 Max 'MaxSparrow' Pescatori - $17,348.99 Ji young Kim Wins Ladies Event Normally, you'll find Ji young Kim managing her coffee shop back in her hometown of Seoul, Korea. For the last four days, however, Kim was busy working her way through the 968-player field in the WSOP Ladies Event. On Sunday night, she wrapped up the victory by beating Nancy Matson heads-up. The win gives Kim her first WSOP bracelet and $167,308. Matson, from Santa Monica, CA, went home with $103,350 for her runner-up result. It's only her second WSOP cash. She previously finished 406th in the $800 NLHE Deepstack in the lead up to the Ladies Event. Lexy Gavin finished sixth for $27,643. Final Table Payouts Ji young Kim - $167,308 Nancy Matson - $103,350 Sandrine Phan - $72,821 Stephanie Dao - $52,007 Lyly Vo - $37,654 Lexy Gavin - $27,643 Raylene Celaya - $20,582 Stephanie Hubbard - $15,544 Barbara Blechinger - $11,911 Kainalu McCue-Unciano Leads Monster Stack After Day 2 Nearly 3,000 players crammed into 10-handed tables on Sunday for Day 2 of the $1,500 Monster Stack and by the time 10 levels were in the books, just 457 players remained. Kainalu McCue-Unciano leads the way with 2,187,000 and the only other player who put more than 2,000,000 in the bag was Andrew Moreno, with 2,034,000. Konstantin Puchkov, Pierre Neuville, Alex Lynskey, Ali Imsirovic, Ryan Hohner, Matt Salsberg, and Dan Sindelar all found a bag at the end of Day 2. The bubble burst mid-way through play Sunday with 447 players busting in the money. Some of the notables who picked up a cash on Day 2 include Taylor Paur, Jake Schwartz, PokerStars Players Championship winner Ramon Colillas, and Barry Greenstein. Action resumes at 11 AM PT and will play another 10 levels. Top 10 Chip Counts Kainalu McCue-Unciano - 2,187,000 Andrew Moreno - 2,034,000 Brady Bullard - 1,971,000 Justin Kindred - 1,900,000 Benjamin Ector - 1,869,000 Jeff Siegal - 1,840,000 Gergely Kulcsar - 1,839,000 Roman Korenev - 1,804,000 Duytue Duong - 1,800,000 Sean Yu - 1,682,000 Daniel Alaei Leads $10K Pot Limit Omaha Championship Daniel Alaei, recently named the 26th best player in WSOP history, spent Sunday building his case and his chip stack, in the $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha Championship event. The five-time bracelet winner finished Day 2 with 1,985,000. He'll have to work his way through a formidable group of challengers on Monday if he hopes to get anywhere close to bracelet #6. The next biggest stacks belong to players who registered at the start of Day 2. Luke Schwartz sits second with 1,700,000 while Shaun Deeb bagged the third biggest stack with 1,586,000. A total of 26 players took advantage of the Day 2 registration opportunity including Phil Ivey, Matthew Gonzales, Phil Kessel, and Stephen Chidwick. The 26 late-entries pushed the total field size to a record-setting 518 players. Just 50 of them survived to see Day 3 and will be in action beginning at 2 PM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Daniel Alaei - 1,985,000 Luke Schwartz - 1,700,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,586,000 Adam Hendrix - 1,219,000 Dash Dudley - 1,199,000 Joel Feldman - 1,196,000 Will Jaffe - 1,179,000 James Park - 1,173,000 Andjelko Andrejevic - 1,116,000 Patrick Mahoney - US 1,024,000 $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack The opening day of the $800 No Limit Hold'em Deepstack event drew 3,759 players and through 20 30-minute levels, just 440 made it through. Kenneth Johnson ended up on top of the Day 1 chip counts with 1,400,000. Every player in the top 10 turned their starting stack of 40,000 into at least 1,000,000. This includes Alex Foxen who finished with 1,104,000 and the seventh-best stack. Joseph Cheong, Dutch Boyd, Joao Simao, Greg Raymer, Phil Hellmuth, Matt Affleck, Daniel Strelitz, Chris Ferguson, and Tim West were just some of the more recognizable faces that advanced to Da y2. Comedians Brad Garrett and Norm MacDonald also finished Day 1 with chips. Day 2 begins at 1 PM PT and is scheduled to play to a champion. Top 10 Chip Counts Kenneth Johnson - 1,400,000 Shmuel Hada - 1,340,000 Amir Lehavot - 1,330,000 Jordan Meltzer - 1,188,000 John Rice - 1,138,000 Michael Dichiaro - 1,110,000 Alex Foxen - 1,104,000 Sharavan Chhabria - 980,000 Loc Nguyen - 976,000 Piet Pape - 956,000 Eric Rodawig Tops Day 1 of $1,500 Razz Day 1 of the $1,500 Razz event saw 363 players enter with bracelet-winner Eric Rodawig finish the day with the lead after being the only player to break through the 100,000 chip mark. Rodawig finished with 118,7000 while his closest competitor, Stephen Burns, ended with 92,700. Adam Owen, Scott Clements, Jennifer Tilly, Matt Waxman, Don Zewin, and Steve Billirakis were part of the 127 players who advanced to Day 2. Action resumes at 2 PM PT. Top 10 Chip Counts Eric Rodawig - 118,700 Stephen Burns - 92,700 Doug Lorgeree - 90,400 Charles Lorentz - 85,000 Jaime Lezama - 83,700 Shane Littlefield - 83,400 Adam Owen - 82,800 Peter Brownstein - 81,000 Christopher Kusha - 77,700 Michael Ross - 76,600
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