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Found 193 results

  1. The 10 finalists for this year's Poker Hall of Fame class have been announced. One name stands out on the list as a potential early favorite for this year's class, Daniel Negreanu (pictured). This author is once again on the voting panel for the Poker Hall of Fame and will likely be casting the majority of his votes to "Kid Poker." --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsson Poker, a leading global online gaming provider. Betsson Poker is available on Mobile and offers regular promotions to live events around the world along with great bonuses and competitions. Play nowfor a chance to win the a Dream Holiday with the Grand Poker Adventures throughout 2014! --- This year's 10 finalists, in alphabetical order, are: Chris Bjorin Humberto Brenes Bruno Fitoussi Ted Forrest Jen Harman Bob Hooks Mike Matusow Jack McClelland Daniel Negreanu Huck Seed Ballots will be sent to the 21 living members of the Poker Hall of Fame along with 20 members of the media. Bjorin, Brenes, Harman, Matusow, and Seed all appeared on the ballot in 2013, but were not inducted. Fitoussi, Forrest, Hooks, McClelland, and Negreanu are new this year. This is what the media panel and living Poker Hall of Fame members will be voting based on: - A player must have played poker against acknowledged top competition - Be a minimum of 40 years old at time of nomination - Played for high stakes - Played consistently well, gaining the respect of peers - Stood the test of time - Or, for non-players, contributed to the overall growth and success of the game of poker, with indelible positive and lasting results. Induction ceremonies will take place during the WSOP November Nine weekend in Las Vegas. In the past, each voter has gotten 10 votes to cast for up to three people they think deserve entry. This author is tempted to flush all 10 votes to Negreanu, who has been one of the primary faces of the poker industry in the modern era. Negreanu is #1 on the all-time money listaccording to the Hendon Mob, has played for the highest stakes around, and is #3 on GPI. He is the main face of the world's largest online poker site, PokerStars. More importantly, Negreanu's character and willingness to promote the game can't go overlooked. He has appeared on a variety of non-poker programming, including shows like "Millionaire Matchmaker," and has always been very media-friendly. Any time this author has asked Negreanu for a comment or information in general, he has typically gotten a prompt response. He regularly takes pictures with fans and interacts with the general public on a level not seen by more than a handful of members of the poker community. Who do you think should be inducted, and I'll consider your comments when casting my ballot? Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. Coverage of the World Series of Poker's Big One for One Drop continued on Tuesday night on ESPN. Two one-hour episodes began with 16 players left and Tom Hall was perched atop the chip counts. The One Drop dished out a $15 million top prize. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsafe, one of the leading suppliers of online gaming products worldwide and a major sponsor of Gumball 3000. Sign up now for great bonuses, €3,000,000 guaranteed monthly, and plenty of live events! --- Daniel Negreanu (pictured) got off to a hot start on Tuesday, doubling to 70 big blinds after his aces held against Dan Colman. This prompted ESPN poker commentator Norman Chad to joke, "Betting against Daniel Negreanu in the 2014 WSOP is like betting against Christopher Columbus in 1492." Oh Norman. Colman did rip off a little revenge courtesy of Phil Galfond (pictured), who dropped a pot worth 8.3 million in chips to Colman after the latter hit a runner-runner flush. Upon seeing what Colman had, Galfond remarked, "I was going to feel dumb if he had queens, but I don't feel dumb about that." The next hand, Galfond called an all-in of a player who had A-K while Galfond had A-Q on a flop of A-7-7. Galfond didn't improve and he was quickly down to nine big blinds. The first one-hour episode ended with Phil Ivey check-raising all-in versus Cary Katz with two hearts on a flop of Q-5h-Qh. Katz had A-Q, which was unbeatable when the turn paired the board, and Ivey was eliminated in 14th. Katz delivered the beat of a lifetime last week. Following Ivey out the door was Galfond, who started the second episode off by getting it all-in with Qc-10 on a flop of 7-2-4, all clubs. Reigning One Drop champAntonio Esfandiari curiously called with A-Q (no clubs), while Negreanu shoved all-in over-the-top with K-J of clubs for the second best flush. Esfandiari got out of the way and Galfond was drawing dead and out. The hand pushed Negreanu to 12 million in chips and he told his tablemates, "I told you what I play for: straights, flushes, all-in." Former "Welcome Back Kotter" star and "High Stakes Poker" host Gabe Kaplan went out at the hands of former "sex tape purveyor" Rick Salomon (pictured), as Chad dubbed him. Google it. Following Kaplan's elimination, Salomon, who was wearing a white "Painman" t-shirt, stacked 16% of the chips in play with 11 people remaining. ESPN then touched on the subject of Colman "refusing to speak to the media during the Big One." Chad perhaps sarcastically explained, "He says he's conflicted about the game and doesn't care to promote poker. So, I guess one of the best ways not to promote poker is to play in a million-dollar buy-in event on national TV?" Tuesday's coverage ended with a blow-up from Esfandiari, who first called an all-in with A-9 of diamonds and lost and then 3bet all-in pre-flop with A-5 only to run into Tobias Reinkemeier's A-J. Esfandiari did not improve and was sent to the rail in 10th place, making no money. Esfandiari was seen on the rail saying, "It's amazing. When the cards turn against you, they just turn against you." The conclusion of the Big One for One Drop will air nextTuesday at 8pm ET on ESPN. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  3. With the 2014 World Series of Poker nearly upon us, pros like Daniel Negreanu (pictured) and Phil Ivey have been busy drumming up their annual high-stakes side action. This year, Negreanu made a simple proposal open to anyone: an even-money bet that either he or Ivey will win a bracelet in one of the WSOP Las Vegas events. Negreanu posted the offer on his Twitter account: "Min bet is $5k against me and Ivey winning a bracelet this summer and the odds are even money. One of us wins, you lose. Simple," he said. The max bet? A million dollars. Negreanu has a stellar record in WSOP tournaments, winning six bracelets and banking over $6 million in earnings. His first WSOP win came in 1998 when he took down a $2,000 Pot Limit Hold'em event for $169,460. Since then, he has topped the field in three more Las Vegas events, while taking first in two No Limit Hold'em events at WSOP APAC and WSOP Europe in 2013. Ivey (pictured) has an equally impressive record at the WSOP, taking home nine bracelets along with $5.9 million in total event winnings. The 38-year-old won his first bracelet in a $2,500 Pot Limit Omaha event in 2000 for $195,000 and went on to win seven more in the Vegas series while scoring his latest at WSOP APAC in 2013. That means that at least one of them has claimed a Vegas WSOP bracelet in eight of the last 15 years, leaving seven dry years between them. Willyoman on TwoPlusTwo pointed out the fact that the skill level of the competition has undoubtedly increased in the last few years. "From 2010 to 2013, over four World Series, when the games have been toughest, only one of them won one," he said. "Don't recall if Ivey sat out one of those years, but either way, I don't think it's even money." For gamblers like Ivey and Negreanu, prop bets and the WSOP go hand-in-hand. When Ivey was close to winning his first Main Event title in 2009, it was rumored that the high-stakes pro would have made up to $6 million in side action alone had he taken first place. With his confidence sky-high after securing two bracelets that year, Ivey was reportedly taking as much action as he could right up until the final table kicked off. In the end, he took seventh for $1.4 million. So far, a Las Vegas Main Event win has eluded the pair. While Ivey is once again busy taking action, some believe that, due to his recent legal problems with Borgatain Atlantic City (pictured) and an ongoing issue with Crockfords in London, the pro might not even be allowed to participate in this year's Series. "What I'm hearing [is that] Caesars/WSOP staff as of right now are saying Ivey can play, but there are ongoing discussions between higher-ups… that are seriously considering not allowing Ivey to play or step foot on Caesars Entertainment properties until this Borgata mess is cleared up," said poster trotter. However, Caesars' Seth Palansky told PocketFives in an exclusive statement that any talk of Ivey being barred from this year's WSOP was purely fictional: "IveyPoker has a booth this year at WSOP and we look forward to Mr. Ivey’s quest to join the double-digit bracelet holders list." Some wondered if Ivey was simply a "fantasy partner" in the bet, but Negreanu later said on a Bluff podcast that Ivey would be taking the lion's share of the action, while he would take a very small portion. If you think the pair can't make it happen this year, you can e-mail pattylandis@hotmail.com and make your own bet. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  4. On Tuesday, Dan Colman won the Big One for One Dropat the World Series of Poker for $15.3 million. While Colman might have won the battle, Daniel Negreanu (pictured) won the war, becoming tournament poker's all-time money leader according to the Hendon Mob. Negreanu passed Antonio Esfandiari, who won the 2012 One Drop. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsafe, one of the leading suppliers of online gaming products worldwide and a major sponsor of Gumball 3000. Sign up now for great bonuses, €3,000,000 guaranteed monthly, and plenty of live events! --- "Kid Poker" has a staggering $29.7 million in career tournament winnings after picking up $8.2 million for finishing second in the One Drop on Tuesday. Last September, he took second in the EPT Barcelona High Roller for $352,000 and followed that up with a win in the WSOP Europe High Roller for $979,000, a final table in the Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge for $492,000, and a fourth place finish in the Aussie Millions $250,000 Challenge for $1.1 million. He has amassed $10.2 million in tournament winnings this year alone. Negreanu told WSOP staff after finishing second in the One Drop on Tuesday, "The $8 million is [a good consolation prize], but… it's really important to reinforce [that] $4.6 million was raised for charity. Otherwise, it's a bunch of rich people with too much money gambling for stakes that are obscene." He posted on Twitter when the $1 million buy-in One Drop had finished, "Thanks for all your support everyone and congrats to those who bought a piece of my action! I'm happy with how I played and proud too… Had a blast battling Daniel Coleman! Actually joyful and amazing experience. What a great player and great kid. Congrats to him." Negreanu is second to Carlos Mortensen (pictured) on the World Poker Tour's all-time money list at $5.7 million and has failed to pass $1 million in tournament winnings in a year just three times since 2004, according to the Hendon Mob. Negreanu has six bracelets, tied for ninth all-time, and has 78 WSOP in the money finishes, good for fifth all-time. Here are the top 10 players on the tournament poker all-time money list, according to the Hendon Mob. You'll notice that Colman, this year's One Drop winner, is already in sixth place: 1. Daniel Negreanu - $29,796,381 2. Antonio Esfandiari - $26,244,377 3. Phil Ivey - $21,431,318 4. Erik Seidel - $20,445,359 5. Sam Trickett - $20,065,545 6. Daniel Colman - $18,200,842 7. Phil Hellmuth - $18,146,522 8. John Juanda - $16,052,904 9. Michael Mizrachi - $14,579,583 10. Scott Seiver - $12,607,348 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest poker news. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  5. On Tuesday night, the world watched as Dan Colman (pictured) won the World Series of Poker's Big One for One Drop on ESPN. Colman was largely stoic after the final cards were dealt and for the most part looked stunned. He quickly declined interviews and exited the Rio while second place finisher Daniel Negreanu cordially stuck around, spoke to the press, and took pictures. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsson Poker, a leading global online gaming provider. Betsson Poker is available on Mobile and offers regular promotions to live events around the world along with great bonuses and competitions. Play nowfor a chance to win the a Dream Holiday with the Grand Poker Adventures throughout 2014! --- On TwoPlusTwo after the fact, Colman called poker a "very dark game" and added, "I don't owe poker a single thing. I've been fortunate enough to benefit financially from this game, but I have played it long enough to see the ugly side of this world. It is not a game where the pros are always happy and living a fulfilling life." On Tuesday, Colman spoke up again, this time on Twitter, saying, "While I appreciate @lonmceachern's and @RealKidPoker's attempts to hypothesize at me being a 24-year-old who doesn't know who he is yet, I am actually 100% certain who I am." Colman then spouted off, "I find it to be a much greater accomplishment (and necessary) if thru solidarity, we can get everyone at the bottom to all move up a couple rungs on the ladder. This can be done once we stop idolizing those who were able to make it to the top." The One Drop champ, who added $15 million to his coffers for the win, cleared up earlier comments by saying the following in two successive Tweets: After calling poker a "distraction," several people asked a logical follow-up question: "If it's such a distraction, why do you play then?" Another person commented, "By not speaking, you have made more noise, which was probably the opposite of your goal." Another person on Twitter gave Colman a straightforward exit plan: "Lost all respect for you man... Give all the money to charity and bounce the F out of poker if you don't like it." Shortly after Colman's original comments about poker came out in July, Negreanu offered the following words of wisdom to Colman about perhaps pursuing another career choice in a blog on Full Contact Poker: "If you are genuinely having an issue with the morality of playing poker for a living, make a choice. Don't compromise your own moral code for money. If you truly believe in your heart that what you are doing hurts people, and you don't want to hurt people, you need to make a choice." What do you think? Leave a comment here and let us know. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  6. There are 16 players left in Event #40 of the 2014 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, a $10,000 No Limit Hold'em Heads-Up tournament. The winner of the Heads-Up event, who will be determined on Saturday, will make $335,000. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- On Friday, the tournament will continue until the Final Four or championship match and the tournament restarts at 1:00pm Pacific Time. Here are the match-ups: Erik Seidel vs. Scott Baumstein Max Silver vs. Sam KingKobeMVP Stein Jason JAKoon1985 Koon vs. Dee Tiller Alberto Gomez vs. Scott Davies Tommy Chen vs. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Colman vs. Taylor taypaur Paur (pictured above) Davide Suriano vs. Serkan Kurnaz John Smith vs. Ankush pistons87 Mandavia It took three, or in some cases four, wins to get to the Sweet 16 after 136 players entered. Taylor taypaurPaur's road included wins over Idris Ambraisse, Sergey Rybachenko, and Michael Pickett. Paur, who won his first WSOP bracelet last year in a $1,000 No Limit Hold'em event, will break $1 million in career WSOP cashes with this score and will record his fifth in the money finish this year. He wrote on Twitter following his match with Pickett, "Marathon match. Lasted almost 3 hrs, but I won. Itm and round of 16 tomorrow." Daniel Negreanu (pictured), who is still trying to capitalize on a well-publicized bracelet bet, beat Max Steinberg, Brice Lin, and 2013 November Niner Sylvain Loosli en route to the round of 16. Negreanu is the holder of six WSOP bracelets and finished second in a $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament earlier this month to give his bettors a sweat. Negreanu Tweeted, "Winner! My 5th cash, tough opponent, but I played really well. Back tomorrow for final 16! Exciting stuff woot." Jason JAKoon1985Koon navigated rough seas on Thursday, beating Brian Roberts, John Juanda, and Sam Trickett heads-up to set up a date with Dee Tiller in the Sweet 16. This is the former sprinter's deepest run in the 2014 WSOP and will mark his third in the money finish this year. Meanwhile, Ankush pistons87Mandavia also had a tough draw and squared off against Vanessa Selbst, Faraz The-Toilet Jaka, and Chris Whitcomb. Elsewhere at the Rio, George Danzer became the second player to win two WSOP bracelets this year, joining fellow German pro Dominik bounatirouIMONitsche. Danzer took down the $10,000 buy-in Seven-Card Stud High-Low Championship and, as for whether you'll see him be crowned the Player of the Year, Danzer said, "I'm already busy enough playing in the events I schedule for myself. So, I'm not going to overload myself too much. I'm going to grind that way I intended, just as I did before." Danzer started the final day of play as the chip leader and busted Calvin cal42688Anderson (pictured) in third place. Anderson, a former #1 player here on PocketFives, won a gold bracelet five days ago and has three final tables at this year's WSOP. He Tweeted to his 5,700 followers, "I got 3rd… Thanks for the support!" Here's how the final table paid out: 1st Place: George Danzer - $352,696 2nd Place: John $JMONEY$ Racener - $217,935 3rd Place: Calvin cal42688Anderson - $98,828 4th Place: Brian Stinger885 Hastings - $77,238 5th Place: Jeffrey Lisandro - $61,594 6th Place: Chris George - $50,018 7th Place: David Singer - $41,277 8th Place: Richard Sklar - $34,550 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP news, sponsored by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  7. Longtime PocketFiver and former #1 ranked player Paul paulgees81Volpe (pictured) claimed the fifth World Series of Poker bracelet for PocketFivers in Las Vegas this year. The event was a $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament that brought out a star-laced field, including Daniel Negreanu, whom Volpe beat heads-up. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- You'll recall that Negreanu posted a prop bet prior to the WSOP in which Phil Ivey and he would offer up 1:1 odds on the pair winning a bracelet in Nevada. While many thought the odds heavily favored those punters betting against Ivey and Negreanu, the latter almost won a bracelet just 13 events into the 65-tournament series. Volpe told WSOP staff following the tournament, "I knew what this meant to Daniel because he has so many bets. So, I tried keeping the pressure on him and it worked… It feels amazing to get my first bracelet, especially in the $10K Deuce-to-Seven [event], which is one of the toughest events of the summer. I was confident I was going to win. I felt like I was going to win. It was a super tough table. It was unbelievable getting heads-up against Daniel. If I have to pick one person to beat for my bracelet, it would be him." Volpe entered the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament's final table with the chip lead and Negreanu(pictured), the reigning WSOP Player of the Year, was third. The tournament marked Volpe's first WSOP final table, while Negreanu recorded his 70th WSOP in the money finish. Online, Volpe has been a stud, amassing almost $5 million in tracked scores, including almost $3 million on PokerStarsalone. He was tops in the PocketFives Rankings until two days before Black Friday and currently stands at #181 worldwide. Volpe won the PokerStars Sunday Million in 2011 for a quarter of a million dollars officially and finished fourth in an FTOPS Two-Day Event the same year for another $108,000. The seven members of the 2-7 final table had a combined 14 bracelets. Here's how the group cashed out: 1st Place: Paul paulgees81Volpe - $253,524 2nd Place: Daniel Negreanu - $156,674 3rd Place: Jason treysfull21 Mercier- $99,313 4th Place: Brian tsarrast Rast - $67,264 5th Place: Larry Wright - $47,792 6th Place: John Monnette - $35,549 7th Place: Abe Mosseri - $27,633 We'll stick with 2-7 for the rest of this article too, as another longtime PocketFiver, Mike goleafsgoehLeah (pictured), leads the way with 54 players left in Event #16, $1,500 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw Lowball. Leah has a stack of 91,800 in chips entering the tournament's play-down day, about 2,000 ahead of the next closest player. Interestingly enough, Mercier, who finished third in the $10,000 2-7 event, is seventh in chips after Day 1 of the $1,500 2-7 event. He Tweeted after he busted from the $10,000 event, "Hopped in the $1,500 2-7 Triple Draw. Already ran up my stack 3x. Hoping to make another deep run in a Draw event. Still hunting." Mercier has three WSOP cashes already this year; two are in Draw events. First place pays $124,000. Here's how the top 10 in chips look right now: 1. Mike goleafsgoehLeah - 91,800 2. Brian Tate - 90,000 3. Tom Franklin - 70,000 4. Dan Smith - 55,400 5. Todd Bui - 54,500 6. Jaet Shetty - 51,900 7. Jason treysfull21Mercier - 46,400 8. Ben Yu - 40,300 9. MattDVD Schultz - 36,900 10. Stephen stevie444 Chidwick - 35,700 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP news, powered by Real Gaming. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  8. Daniel Negreanu (pictured) recently made his opinions about Borgata's lawsuit against Phil Ivey abundantly clear, going on several 140-character-fueled tirades defending his friend on Twitter. The Atlantic City casino is suing the poker legend for $9.6 million, claiming he won the cash using a technique it considers to be illegal. Negreanu, never afraid to speak his mind, started out by questioning the judgment of the casino staff, who allowed Ivey to allegedly run his "edge-sorting" scheme in the first place: "Been reading up on poker news lately and the people running the Borgata high-limit pit have to be incredibly stupid overall." In the Tweet, Negreanu is likely referring to the fact that casino management agreed to allow Ivey to raise his betting limit from $50,000 to $100,000 per hand after he had already won millions of dollars playing baccarat and then continued to allow him to play even though he had been accused of using "edge-sorting" at a London casino. He had praise for Ivey and reiterated the sentiment of many gamblers, saying, "My hat's off to any man who can get an edge on a big-time casino. It's just straight baller and I have zero empathy for the big fish." Going back to the mistakes made by management, Negreanu Tweeted, "Big fish sets all the rules, okays all the rules, they need to eat it when they get beat and not be whiny biatches about it." The "rules" to which he refers are the conditions for the high-limit session of baccarat set by Ivey (pictured) and approved by the casino. The seemingly strange requests included a dealer who spoke Mandarin Chinese and shuffled using an automatic shuffler, a private pit, the ability to have a guest at the table, and, most importantly, a deck of purple Gemaco playing cards. "It's appalling to free-roll customers," Negreanu continued. "Take their money if they lose but don't pay when they win? Are you for real Borgata? That's dirty." Negreanu continued the mini-tirade and called into question how Borgata's image could suffer with gamblers after the incident. "Suing customers who crushed your souls is a bad look. You got bent over. Might as well smile and enjoy it," he ranted. "No one in the world has empathy for Borgata in this. Stop playing victim because your hustle wasn't as good as Ivey's." The consummate gambler even admitted to having been played in the past, but always settled his debts. "I've been hustled before, but the idea of not paying was never even a consideration! Borgata - you got hustled bad. Get over it already," Negreanu said. In one of his final Tweets on the matter, Negreanu summed up how many gamblers view the whole situation. "Borgata, you thought Ivey was stupid and you tried to bury him. He hustled you, smoked you, and left you feeling silly. Stand responsible!" Borgata is suing Ivey, along with his alleged partner in the scheme Cheng Yin Sun and card manufacturer Gemacofor lack of quality control. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  9. Despite calling poker a "distraction" and a "very dark game" as well as refusing media interviews, Dan Colman (pictured) has certainly demonstrated that he's a force to be reckoned with. On Wednesday, Colman won the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event, which had a $2.5 million overlay and a $10 million guarantee, to take home $1.4 million. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsson Poker, a leading global online gaming provider. Betsson Poker is available on Mobile and offers regular promotions to live events around the world along with great bonuses and competitions. Play nowfor a chance to win the a Dream Holiday with the Grand Poker Adventures throughout 2014! --- Yes, this is the same Colman who won the Big One for One Drop at the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas for $15.3 million this year. The same Colman who said most recreational players were losing money they couldn't afford to lose. The same Colman who said advertising gambling on television was playing off "people's impulses" and "targeting their weaknesses in order for them to make irrational decisions." Despite all of the negative press surrounding Colman, he has certainly excelled this year. In fact, he is now up to #3 on tournament poker's all-time money list, trailing only Daniel Negreanu and Antonio Esfandiari. Mike timex McDonald perhaps put it best in a Tweet that had been re-Tweeted over 50 times when we checked it out: Colman battled PocketFiver Mike goleafsgoeh Leah heads-up in the Florida poker tournament and entered with a slight chip lead. In the final hand, Colman, a heads-up specialist, 3bet pre-flop with A-K, according to CardPlayer, and Leah 4bet all-in with Q-J of clubs. Colman called and was ahead the entire way to book the win in the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event. Here's how the final table cashed out: 1. Daniel Colman - $1,446,710 2. Mike goleafsgoehLeah - $1,047,638 3. Shawn flexicom Cunix - $748,313 4. John JRD312 Dolan - $548,763 5. Joe daPHUNNIEman Kuether - $424,044 6. Martin Hanowski - $324,269 7. Blake Bohn - $249,438 8. Brian SN8WMAN Hawkins - $199,550 9. Roman Valerstein - $149,663 The win is the latest in a string of impressive performances from Colman. Here's a look at a few of the highlights over the last year, with data provided by the Hendon Mob: April 2014 €100,000 NLHE Super High Roller, EPT Grand Final 1st place for $2,127,398 June 2014 $1 Million WSOP Big One for One Drop 1st place for $15,306,668 August 2014 €50,000 NLHE Super High Roller, EPT Barcelona 2nd place for $1,118,479 September 2014 $5,300 Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open Main Event 1st place for $1,446,710 Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  10. Last week, the Big One for One Drop played out at the World Series of Poker. Its winner, Dan Colman, exited stage right shortly after his $15 million win and refused media interviews despite the fact that ESPN is devoting three weeks of coverage to the event. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsafe, one of the leading suppliers of online gaming products worldwide and a major sponsor of Gumball 3000. Sign up now for great bonuses, €3,000,000 guaranteed monthly, and plenty of live events! --- On TwoPlusTwo after the fact, Colman called poker a "very dark game" and added, "I don't owe poker a single thing. I've been fortunate enough to benefit financially from this game, but I have played it long enough to see the ugly side of this world. It is not a game where the pros are always happy and living a fulfilling life." Contrastingly, his heads-up opponent, Daniel Negreanu (pictured), who became poker's all-time money leader after an $8 million haul, was affable following the tournament and then took to his own blog on FullContactPoker to talk about his sentiments. Again, this is after Negreanu lost a heads-up match for $7 million in real money. Negreanu agreed with Colman in part, writing, "Truth is, most of you reading this will be lifetime losers at poker. You are unlikely to become successful professional poker players. It is available to all of you, and some of you will find success at the tables, but the truth is clear: most of you will fail. Sucks huh? It's the truth and he is right about that." Negreanu reminded readers that the One Drop event, which donated $111,111 of each player's buy-in to charity, raised over $4 million. He added, "Colman is a successful player and makes millions because he is an exceptional talent, an accomplishment I would hope he is proud of when he looks back on his life and the opportunities poker has now given him to be financially free and make a difference in the world however he chooses to." To contrast Colman's less-than-rosy picture of poker, Negreanu emphasized the game's strong suits, including "playing games and using your mind on a regular basis is excellent exercise for the elderly" and "people with gambling addictions are drawn to more instant gratification games like slot machines rather than a game of wits like poker." "[Be]thankful that you found a game you both love to play and are also good enough so that you can make a life for yourself," Negreanu, 39 years of age, advised Colman (pictured), 15 years his younger. "You don't owe poker anything, sure, but poker has given you a lot." Negreanu closed by suggesting that Colman, if he truly believes poker is a "dark game," should perhaps consider a career change: "If you are genuinely having an issue with the morality of playing poker for a living, make a choice. Don't compromise your own moral code for money. If you truly believe in your heart that what you are doing hurts people, and you don't want to hurt people, you need to make a choice." We've heard that most of the ESPN coverage of the One Drop will be focused on Negreanu, who became poker's all-time money leader in the event and is one of the most visible and gracious ambassadors poker has to offer. The event will begin airing on July 29 on ESPN. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  11. A $15.3 million payday was forked over to 23-year-old Dan Colman (pictured), who won the Big One for One Drop, a $1 million buy-in tournament, at the World Series of Poker on Tuesday. Colman defeated Daniel Negreanu heads-up. According to WSOP.com, Colman is a heads-up sit and go specialist who plays online under the handle mrgr33n13. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- Colman is now sixth on tournament poker's all-time money list, according to the Hendon Mob, while Negreanu is now in first placeafter scoring an $8.2 million hit. Colman has been on a rampage over the last eight months, finishing third in the PartyPoker Premier League VII for $194,000, winning the EPT Monte Carlo Super High Roller for $2.1 million, and now taking down the Big One for One Drop for a spectacular $15.3 million. The tournament raised $4.6 million for the One Drop charity, which focuses on water conservation, and its total prize pool swelled to $37.3 million. The Big One for One Drop drew 42 entrants this time around and on its final hand, Negreanu moved all-in before the flop after Colman had limped and Colman made the call. Negreanu showed A-4 and was in front of Colman's K-Q, even finding aces-up on an A-4-J flop. However, the turn was a 10, leaving Colman one card away from a win with Broadway, and a blank hit on the river. Colman held a slight chip lead over Negreanu(pictured with fans) when heads-up play began. "Kid Poker" quickly wrangled that edge away, but a 60-million chip pot proved to be the difference-maker. On a board of 4-8-J-A-4, Negreanu, who had check-called on the flop and turn, checked once more and Colman bet 18 million. WSOP.com relayed, "'Kid Poker' went into the tank. He made his contingent giggle a few times, stretching and swirling in his chair, and then reached for chips. He was shaking his head, talking to a non-responsive Colman, then called." Colman flipped over A-4 for a boat and his rail went wild when Negreanu mucked. The One Drop featured a blockbuster field no matter how you slice it. There were 30 professional players and 12 amateurs; 18 were returning players from 2012 when it last ran. Fifteen of the 42 entrants were bracelet winners, while one (Erik Seidel) was a Poker Hall of Fame member. Greg Merson was the One Drop's lone former Main Event champion. Here were the eight in the money finishers in the 2014 WSOP Big One for One Drop: 1st Place: Daniel Colman - $15,306,668 2nd Place: Daniel Negreanu - $8,288,001 3rd Place: Christoph Vogelsang - $4,480,000 4th Place: Rick Salomon - $2,800,000 5th Place: Tobias Reinkemeier - $2,053,334 6th Place: Scott Seiver - $1,680,000 7th Place: Paul Newey - $1,418,667 8th Place: Cary Katz - $1,306,667 Also at the Rio, Mike babyshark33Kachan (pictured) won the final $1,000 No Limit Hold'em tournament on the WSOP schedule. It was Kachan's second career WSOP final table and first WSOP cash since 2011. He told WSOP staff, "It feels great. It was a tough ride, but it was well worth it. I am really thankful for all of the people I have behind me." Former #1 ranked PocketFiver Steve gboro780 Gross, the only member of the final table with a bracelet, took seventh place: 1st Place: Mike babyshark33Kachan - $403,483 2nd Place: Jeff Blenkarn - $250,815 3rd Place: Eric Shanks - $177,527 4th Place: Andrew Egan - $128,032 5th Place: Viktor Skoldstedt - $93,490 6th Place: Neo Hoang - $69,084 7th Place: Steve gboro780Gross - $51,676 8th Place: Richard Milne - $39,109 9th Place: Raymond Henson - $29,951 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, sponsored by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  12. On Friday, Phil Ivey (pictured) became the fourth player to reach ten World Series of Poker bracelets after taking down a $1,500 Eight-Game event. As a result, those who bet against Ivey and Daniel Negreanu capturing a WSOP bracelet this year were sorely disappointed, not to mention a little poorer. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- The reserved Ivey told WSOP officials following his win, "It's number ten. That's a good number. Me and Daniel [Negreanu] made these bets. That's what I'm talking about. I said either me or him were going to win [a gold bracelet] and we took even money. Me and him were both very deep in this tournament. This was a great opportunity. The tournaments are dying down. There's not too many left. I knew I had to get this one or else it was going to be pretty tough from here." Ivey entered the final day of the Eight-Game event, when 14 players remained, in third place. Making life even more uncomfortable for bettors was the presence of Negreanu, who started Friday in ninth place in the same tournament and ended up finishing in ninth as well. Ivey, Johnny Chan, and Doyle Brunson, all of whom have ten bracelets, are three away from tying Phil Hellmuth for the all-time record of 13. On reaching that mark, Ivey said, "Do I think I can catch Phil Hellmuth? Sure, I think I can catch him. It's possible. We just have to see how it goes. I just have to keep playing at this pace. I got to keep playing a lot of them because [Hellmuth] plays a lot of them, so it's a lot of work." Ivey and Bruce Yamron were in a dead heat in chips entering heads-up play, but Ivey quickly took a 3:1 lead and extended it to better than 6:1 before Yamron doubled in a hand of Stud. The tournament ended shortly after heads-up play began during Omaha Eight or Better with Ivey making aces and kings against Yamron's aces and sevens. Ivey's last bracelet came in 2013 in a $2,200 Mixed Event at WSOP Asia-Pacific. He has $6.5 million in career WSOP earnings and was the youngest person to reach nine gold bracelets. We should also mention that PocketFivers Aaron ndgrinder59Steury and Stephen stevie444 Chidwick (pictured) made the final table of this event, finishing in fourth and fifth, respectively. Steury, who won a HORSE bracelet in 2011, cashed for the seventh time at this year's WSOP. Chidwick, who is from the UK, is up to $1.2 million in WSOP cashes for his career. Here's how the final table cashed out: 1. Phil Ivey - $167,332 2. Bruce Yamron - $103,375 3. Dan Heimiller - $66,246 4. Aaron ndgrinder59Steury - $44,286 5. Stephen stevie444Chidwick - $30,488 6. Yuebin Guo - $21,692 7. Christoph Haller - $15,720 Check out all of our WSOP coverage, brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  13. Before the World Series of Poker started, Daniel Negreanu and Phil Ivey (pictured) offered a 1:1 bet up to $1 million. The concept was simple: if Ivey or Negreanu won a bracelet in Las Vegas this year, they win. If neither won a bracelet, you win. The odds: a seemingly generous 1:1. Many laughed at the concept of Ivey or Negreanu navigating three- and four-digit player fields en route to victory, while others pointed to the fact that they're two of the top poker minds in the world. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- What has ensued, however, is sweat after sweat for those who took the pair up. Negreanu has cashed seven times already at this year's WSOP, including four top-ten finishes and a runner-up performance in a $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament for $156,000. Meanwhile, Ivey has been relatively quiet, cashing twice for $11,000 total, but he's still considered the best player in the world by many. The pair owns a combined 15 WSOP bracelets. If you bet against Ivey and Negreanu, prepare for your ultimate worst-case scenario, which will play out on Friday from the Rio in Las Vegas. What happened? Ivey and Negreanu both made the final 14 of a $1,500 Eight-Game Mix, meaning there's a one in seven chance the bet pays off today if you consider every player has an equal chance to win. Ivey has the third largest stack at 220,000, while Negreanu (pictured posing with fans this week) is in ninth with 132,500. Negreanu Tweeted on Thursday night, "End Day 2 of $1,500 8 Game, 14 players left, I'm one of them and so is Phil Ivey. I have 132,500, avg is 155K. Ivey has more." Second place belongs to PocketFiver Aaron ndgrinder59 Steury, who has $809,000 in live tournament cashes, according to the Hendon Mob, including a bracelet in a HORSE event in 2011. Steury has been a member of PocketFives since 2006 and has $572,000 in online winnings. He is nearly tied for the Eight-Game tournament's chip lead. The field trails two-time bracelet winner Dan Heimiller, who won this year's Seniors Event for $627,000 and captured WSOP Circuit rings the last two years: 1. Dan Heimiller - 227,000 2. Aaron ndgrinder59Steury - 226,000 3. Phil Ivey - 220,500 4. Yuebin Guo - 211,500 5. Christoph Haller - 210,500 6. Bruce Yamron - 206,500 7. Devin looneyde Looney - 205,000 8. Stephen stevie444 Chidwick - 174,000 9. Daniel Negreanu - 132,500 10. Amnon Filippi - 117,500 11. Yehuda Buchalter - 94,500 12. Alex Rocha - 70,000 13. Abdel Hamid - 69,000 14. Christian crisper Pereira - 19,000 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP news, brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  14. We're down to two players in Event #15 of the World Series of Poker, a $3,000 No Limit Hold'em Six-Max tournament. What started as a field of 810 is now down to two PocketFivers, Gordon stlouis6Vayo and Davidi legrouzin Kitai (pictured). The two are about equal in chips. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- First place in the tournament will pocket $508,000, while the runner-up will get $314,000. The two had the option to play even more on Saturday night at the Rio in Las Vegas, but according to WSOP coverage, "When Level 30 ended at almost 2:10am on Sunday morning, the players were given the option to play one more level or pause the tournament and return to their seats once they had managed to get some sleep. They agreed to do the latter." Kitai, a two-time WSOP bracelet winner, delivered the death blow to Tony Ruberto, who started Saturday's play as the short stack, to trim the field to two. Ruberto 4bet all-in with A-6, but Kitai had him beat with A-K. Kitai ducked a flush draw to hold on and Ruberto exited in third place. As a scouting report, Vayo has $1 million in tracked online MTT scores in his PocketFives profile. He plays on PokerStarsas Holla@yoboy and his largest cash came in 2009 in a SCOOP $2,100 PLO tournament for $83,000 after a third place finish. Belgium's Kitai, a Winamax pro, won bracelets in 2013 and 2008; both of them came in Pot Limit Hold'em events. All eyes in the tournament were fixated on Phil Hellmuth (pictured), who was in pursuit of his 14th WSOP bracelet, but came up short and ended the day in eighth place after starting in sixth. After raising under the gun, Hellmuth called all-in with A-2, but could not survive against Vayo's A-7. He recorded his 102nd career WSOP cash, 20 more than the next closest player in that department (Erik Seidel, 82). Here are the chip stacks entering the finale of Event #15: 1. Gordon stlouis6Vayo - 3,750,000 2. Davidi legrouzinKitai - 3,545,000 Also on Sunday, Event #18, the first ever $10,000 Seven Card Razz tournament, will fire back up with a dozen players out of a starting field of 112. Daniel Negreanu (pictured), who along with Phil Ivey extended a 1:1 bracelet bet, is in third place entering Sunday's scheduled conclusion. After accepting action on his bet, Negreanu has already finished second in a $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament for $156,000. We smell another sweat on Sunday for those who picked against Negreanu and Ivey. Here's how the field looks in Event #18: 1. David Bach - 565,000 2. Brandon Shack-Harris - 369,000 3. Daniel Negreanu - 340,000 4. Dan Irisheyes64 O'Brien - 337,000 5. Todd Dakake - 317,000 6. George Danzer - 286,000 7. Todd Barlow - 261,000 8. Yuval yuvee04 Bronshtein - 221,000 9. Brian Stinger885 Hastings - 194,000 10. Naoya Kihara - 179,000 11. Thomas Butzhammer - 171,000 12. Roland Israelashvili - 121,000 Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, sponsored by Real Gaming. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  15. In an interview that appeared on iGaming.orgas part of a series, Daniel Negreanu (pictured), now the front man for PokerStars, the largest online poker site in the world, revealed that he had an offer to sell his old for-money room, FullContactPoker, for $170 million. However, the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA), passed in 2006, thwarted the deal. Negreanu told iGaming, "In the beginning, there were a lot of sites popping up out of nowhere. I saw this as a great opportunity to invest some money and create something, my own poker site." Negreanu said he was a one-man marketing machine for FullContactPoker, noting, "Over time, I had built a lot of good relationships with people that I could reach out to for some extra exposure. It reached a point where I would do up to 50 radio interviews in one day all across the United States and Canada." It took all of six months for Negreanu to receive an offer of around $170 million to unload his site and, as he recalled, "The offer was so big we called it 'game over money.' We were all very excited about it and about a week later this little thing called the UIGEA came into play." The UIGEA prohibited payments from US financial institutions to "unlawful internet gambling" sites, but failed to define what the critical three-word term meant. Nearly immediately after it was signed into law, sites like PartyPoker, then the largest room in the world, withdrew from the US market. Negreanu's FullContactPoker ceased being a real money poker site in 2007 and is now used as the Canadian's personal blog and sounding board. As iGaming narrated, "Most of [FullContactPoker's] members were based in the United States. The passing of the UIGEA made things a lot more complicated and in June of 2007, Negreanu signed with PokerStars." FullContactPoker was an Ongame Network site until around the time of the UIGEA. In November 2006, it migrated to the Digital Gaming Network. Whether the $170 million offer would have gone through and what its exact composition was remains to be seen, but the story illustrates the impact the UIGEA had on many when it was passed into law in late 2006. You might recall that in October 2005, one year before the passage of the UIGEA, Gus Hansen (pictured) sold his poker site, PokerChamps, to Betfair for a reported $15 million. Negreanu has $21.4 million in career live tournament earnings, according to the Hendon Mob, and is the reigning World Series of Poker Player of the Year. He is #8 on the 2014 money list, was #13 last year, and is #2 on the World Poker Tour's all-time earnings leaderboard at $5.7 million. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  16. Daniel Negreanu's recent blog post on Full Contact Poker lauding Choice Centerhas once again brought his association with the self-help organization into light, prompting a debate over whether the institution's primary focus is exploiting its members for financial gain. Read the post. Choice Center describes itself as a "leadership university" for successful people, offering a 100-day course "designed to take you to your next level of performance and in the fastest time possible." Negreanu (pictured) had positive comments about the program, which he outlined in his post. In one session on "emotional intelligence," he explained the result of having defined three specific goals for himself in a three-month period. "One of those goals was poker-related, getting back in the top 15 of the GPI, and quickly after completing the course, I jumped to #1 and held that spot for about 19 weeks," he said. According to the 39-year-old, the program also teaches students "the value of making a difference in the world via a legacy project." In his own project, Negreanu and his team were able to raise $280,000 for St. Jude's Children's Hospital in just one week. Other poker pros have taken Choice Center courses as well, including Nick Binger and Antonio Esfandiari (pictured). Binger described his experience in a TwoPlusTwo post: "Going into it, I knew that there was a broad spectrum of LGAT-type trainings that range from the craziest cults imaginable to really boring mainstream business development courses… From the beginning, I was on the lookout for violations of integrity that would signal time for me to go, but I never saw anything that would qualify." In the end, he summed up the course as "very interesting, fun, and generally a catalyst for positive life changes." Esfandiari seems to have found working with Choice Center to be even more impactful. After going on to take first and $18 million in the inaugural WSOP Big One for One Drop, the Iranian-born pro credited two people for his success: his father and his life coach Robyn Williams, the Founder and CEO of Choice Center. But not everyone is a fan of the organization's methods or what they say is an aggressive recruiting campaign to sign up new students. Brian tsarrast Rast is another poker pro who was convinced to take classes at the urging of a friend, but after a few sessions decided not to go back. In an interview with Bluff, Rast called the $2,700 program "interesting," but believed that Negreanu and Esfandiari were assigning too much credit to Choice Center for their success and too little to themselves. "It's basically a crash course in psychology and group therapy," he said, recalling his experience. "I think anyone can benefit, whether it's at Choice or not, or going and doing meditation with Buddhist monks for three days. Choice was valuable… but I don't think it's special in that it's the only way you could help yourself." He was also concerned that the program's methods of "tearing students down" before "building them back up" could lead to people being dependent on the Center for their happiness. "The whole point of Choice is great… but I'm not going to replace my family with Choice Center," he said. Furthermore, since Choice Center is for-profit, students are "basically turned into recruits," he said. "You could make an analogy that it's like a self-replicating virus or bacteria if you want to put it in a negative spin." Negreanu was quick to respond to Rast (pictured) in his own video and reiterated that out of 100 of his friends who had taken classes, only four had decided to quit early, while the others had a great experience. He said that since Rast had only finished a small portion of the class, it would be hard for him to be critical of it. Whatever you think of Choice Center or its methods, Negreanu's recent results in the poker world speak for themselves. Since 2013, the Canadian pro has earned nearly $5 million in tournaments worldwide. This year, he is banking on the fact that Phil Ivey or he will win a bracelet in this year's WSOP, offering a $5,000 minimum wager on the proposition. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  17. In August, Daniel Negreanu took to Twitter to offer his commentary on the play during the 2014 World Series of Poker and, in particular, the "online" players he faced. Negreanu was less than complimentary of the attacking style employed by many online players and fell back on his success in live cash games to demonstrate his knowledge. This led to some in the Twitterverse deriding him, stating he couldn't even beat a $5/$10 cash game online. Not one to back down from a challenge, Negreanu issued a challenge. In response to a person who questioned whether he could beat the $25/$50 six-handed PokerStarscash games, Negreanu responded, "It would take two weeks of work and I'd be a winner." He added, "I couldn't be any more serious. Two weeks, five hours playing, four hours studying numbers daily… (I) would bet a million (that I would be a winner)." Naturally, this boisterous proposition by Negreanu raised the ire of some of the regular online cash game pros. One of those was 2014 WSOP bracelet winner Doug WCGRiderPolk (pictured above), who responded to Negreanu's claims in an interview with CardPlayer. Polk said once Negreanu was called out, "Kid Poker" introduced several caveats to what he stated on Twitter. "This whole thing started with Negreanu posting that with two weeks of study, he could beat $25-$50," Polk answered in the interview with CardPlayer's Julio Rodriguez. "So, I took that to mean that if given two weeks of study, he could beat $25-$50. Apparently, what Negreanu meant was that he'd be given two weeks of study and then get a whole year to beat $25-$50, along with another year of play if needed with some consequences or something." "The question is, am I willing to bet against Negreanu beating $25-$50 over the course of two years while cherry-picking his spots and getting coaching?" Polk asked. "No, of course not. But that's not what he originally said. The terms that I think are reasonable for the bet, he would never agree to." Polk moved on to say that he and others in the online cash game world were "insulted" by Negreanu's insinuations that he could beat their game so easily. "I think Negreanu is a fantastic live tournament player. He has great results and is a great ambassador for the game of poker, but he is not a good high-stakes online cash game player. He's just not. There are guys who spent a lot of time and energy making their way to that level and winning and he's basically dismissing their effort by saying he could just jump in and beat them. Most of the older, more recognizable live pros just don't have the skill set to win online." Polk seems to be one of those who has made the online-to-live jump quite successfully. Although he dismisses reports of his online performance, his last eight months of live action have been impressive. In addition to winning a WSOP bracelet, Polk finished fourth in the Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge in February for a big six-figure score and, in July, took down the Bellagio $100,000 Super High Roller Event for $1.6 million. In his live tournament career of only three years, Polk has racked up over $3.6 million in earnings, according to the Hendon Mob. Although it makes for excellent fodder for poker gossip, the battle between Negreanu and Polk would be fascinating to see come to fruition. Do you think that "Kid Poker"' may have bitten off more than he could chew? Or could he actually, with two weeks of training, become one of those top online cash game pros? Leave a comment here and let us know! Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  18. Last week, a judge ruled against Phil Iveyin his high-stakes lawsuit against Crockfords casino in London, concluding that the poker pro had cheated by using edge-sorting to win $12.5 million at the baccarat tables. Daniel Negreanu (pictured), a six-time bracelet winner and friend of Ivey's, was stunned by the verdict and had some harsh words for the casino and the presiding judge in a recent interview. "I think it's ludicrous, I think it's absurd, completely unfair, and absolutely wrong," he told PokerListings. "Casinos, by nature, are designed to take advantage of people by manipulating and deceiving them into thinking they can win," he said. "A player gets the best of them, in the sense that he finds flaws in what they're offering, and they should go, 'Oops, we screwed up.' They should pay it like honorable people and then move on and address their issues." Crockfords, of course, had a very different opinion of the matter and was quick to withhold Ivey's massive win after deciding he and his partner, Cheng Yin Sun, used edge-sorting to gain an advantage with the prohibited technique. In his recent interview on "60 Minutes Sports", Ivey (pictured) made no attempt to hide the fact that he used the controversial strategy to win the cash. "The casino is my opponent and it's my job to exploit weaknesses in the house and give myself the best opportunity to win," he said. Not only does Negreanu believe the dismissal of Ivey's case to be unfair, he also believes the incident could have a negative effect on Crockfords' bottom line by scaring away high rollers. "It sets a bad precedent for gamblers who are going to gamble high," he said. "You could win a bunch of money and then all of a sudden – without doing anything that's considered cheating – be told you're not getting your money." While Crockfords acted quick enough to freeze Ivey's winnings, Borgata (pictured below) in Atlantic City wasn't so lucky. In 2012, Ivey and Sun used the same strategy there to add another $9.6 million to their baccarat profits. The casino paid out the cash before the 38-year-old's London exploits came to light. They are now suing Ivey, Sun, and Gemaco to try and recoup the losses. Negreanu spoke out in his friend's favor in that case in a series of Tweets in April: "It's appalling to free-roll customers. Take their money if they lose but don't pay when they win? Are you for real Borgata? That's dirty… My hat's off to any man who can get an edge on a big-time casino… I have zero empathy for the big fish." About the recent Crockfords decision, his anger was clear: "In every logical human being's mind, it's an open and shut case, but the judge ****ed him in the ass," he said. Due to his involvement with the Crockfords trial, Ivey has missed most of WSOP APAC this year, but Negreanu isn't worried for him. "He'll be fine," he assured. "But I've talked to him and he's not happy about it. He felt good about the case. I think if there is an option to appeal, he will appeal." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  19. For the uninitiated, multi-entry tournaments are exactly what they sound like: tournaments players can enter more than once. Typically, live tourneys that use a multi-entry format allow players who bust out of one starting flight to try again in a subsequent starting flight. So, get knocked out on Day 1A and you can try again on Day 1B, 1C, etc., for the price of another buy-in. Once in a while, at the Bellagio, for instance, you see unlimited re-entries allowed in the same day up until some deadline, often the end of the late registration period. Re-entry tournaments have been a source of controversy in the poker world, as many players of limited bankrolls don't like the idea that deep-pocketed players have an unnecessary, and perhaps unfair, advantage. In an unlimited re-entry tournament in particular, the richest players can just gamble it up, hoping to hit a huge hand without really worrying about busting out. For his part, despite his ability to buy the finest silks and furs, Daniel Negreanu (pictured) commented in a recent blog postthat he does not prefer multi-entry tournaments, saying, "I would rather play 'good poker' from the outset rather than gamble recklessly to increase my chances of winning the tournament." Negreanu specifically focused on the WPT. He said, though, that if multi-entry were allowed, he'd take full advantage of it in order to give himself the best chance to win. To him, winning is more important than making money at this point in his career. He sees the increase in multi-entry tournaments as simply a business decision by casinos and tournament organizers. The casinos need the tournament to make financial sense, so allowing people to re-enter and therefore pay another fee to the house increases the casino's revenue. On the WPT's end, it needs to convince a casino to host a tournament, so being okay with multi-entry might be the way to cement a deal. Negreanu, being an anti-multi-entry guy, totally understands why many players dislike these kinds of events. "A lot of players express concern that unlimited re-entry tournaments are bad for the game, discourage amateur players, and bleed player bankroll," he said in his blog. At the same time, he sees them as a potential positive for someone who travels from far away because it gives them the opportunity to play more poker if they bust out quickly. It is certainly no fun to travel for a full day, get knocked out within an hour, and then go home. Negreanu saw what the European Poker Tour does as a solution to make everyone happy, while at the same time getting rid of multi-entry tournaments. As he explained, "They create a festival after the Main Event begins. For ages, tournaments in the US would run two to four weeks of prelims, then have a week long Main Event. Bust the Main Event, and there is nothing left to play. You could play cash games, but as mentioned, that isn't happening. Negreanu concluded, "That setup makes it good for the players, as they will get to enjoy regular freezeout tourneys plus have more opportunities to play if they bust out, good for the venue, as it keeps people shelling out money to play, and good for the organizers, as it makes it easier to market the tour to potential casino hosts." Negreanu added that while many of his readers may hate multi-entry tournaments, they should look at the bright side and think of them as an opportunity to take some chips off of someone donking it up in a tournament with an inflated prize pool. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  20. After previously making a decision that brought the ire of the poker community, officials at Caesars Entertainment and the World Series of Poker have removed the $10 million guarantee for first place in this year's Main Event. "The dream of life-changing money is core to the DNA of the WSOP Main Event and we also want to make it easier to experience playing in poker's Big Show," said WSOP Executive Director Ty Stewart. "Our players understand numbers and 2015 now presents the best odds ever to leave the Main Event a winner." With the removal of the $10 million guarantee for this year's World Champion, WSOP officials have instead decided to pay out the top 1,000 finishers. The flattened payout structure, using the numbers from last year's Main Event, would guarantee that the entire final table would receive a $1 million payday, with first place earning $8 million. The entire final table being paid at least $1 million is something that hasn't occurred since 2009, when ninth place finisher James Akenhead earned $1,263,602. Although it would be unthinkable to believe that it could happen, WSOP officials put a minimum player number on the prospective 2015 Main Event field before they will pay out 1,000 players. If the tournament does not crack the 5,000-player mark, something that hasn't happened since 2004, then the 1,000-player payout guarantee will be removed. The minimum payday in the 2014 Main Event from the 693 players who earned a cash was $18,406 (three players split the 693rd place money). If the same number of players participate in the 2015 tournament, the 694th through 1,000th place players would receive $15,000. The change reflects some softening of the stance of WSOP officials. Traditionally, poker tournaments only pay the top 10% of the finishers, and rarely do tournament officials deviate from that mark. By expanding the payouts to almost 15% of the field for the 2015 WSOP Main Event, WSOP officials hope that the move will encourage more participation from new playersand, as a result, increase the overall prize pool. The reason for the change goes a bit further than that, however. After announcing in December that the $10 million guarantee would return this year, debate immediately began over the decision. Many in the poker community felt that the WSOP would be better benefitted by paying more players rather than a massive prize up top for the eventual champion. That charge was led by none other than one of poker's loudest voices, Daniel Negreanu (pictured). Read Negreanu's thoughts. Soon after the WSOP proposed the $10 million guarantee for the 2015 Main Event, Negreanu was quick to shoot it down. Negreanu opined that the world's greatest poker tournament would benefit more from having more players paid out than having a guaranteed first place prize. "When the bubble is smaller, players won't stall as much and bring the game to a halt," Negreanu explained. "More people come out of the tournament a winnerand it keeps the money flowing to a wider group of players so they can continue to play the next series of events." What impact the players' comments or Negreanu's outreach had on the change by WSOP officials is unknown, but it is interesting that the removal of the $10 million guarantee and the payout of 1,000 players is basically in line with what Negreanu was suggesting for the 2015 Main Event. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  21. About a week ago, word broke that Vicky Coren, a longtime PokerStarspro, had left the site over its decision to introduce sports betting and casino games. The news rippled through the poker community and many sympathized with Coren for her decision. Enter Daniel Negreanu (pictured), PokerStars' front man and a member of the 2014 Poker Hall of Fame class. In a post on FullContactPoker, Negreanu espoused his views on poker and gambling, saying in part, "I would personally feel like a hypocrite if I justified that it's OK for me to take money from problem gamblers, but it's not OK for the casino to do the same. If it's wrong, it's wrong, no matter who profits. As much as we'd like to separate poker from gambling, poker played for money is gambling. There will be some winners and a vast majority of losers." Negreanu argued that while poker, the stock market, and sports betting are beatable, casino games are not. As he put it, "The math is quite simple: the more you play, the more you are going to lose. You 'could' win, and you will win occasionally, but the game is obviously rigged in such a way to ensure the house always wins in the end." Casino games aren't all doom-and-gloom, however, especially for recreational players, according to Negreanu. He pointed out that a recreational player might actually have a higher ROI at a blackjack or craps table than at a poker table full of sharks. "Kid Poker" concluded, "I don't see how I could rationalize being against casinos profiting from disadvantaged players, but all for taking those same types of players' money for myself." Despite Coren (pictured) calling out PokerStars, Negreanu paid respects, saying, "I both respect and admire Vicky Coren's personal stance on online casino gaming. I assume she asked herself a lot of tough questions, and, in the end, drew a line in the sand that she wasn't willing to cross. I suppose everyone has their own line in the sand, and they aren't all going to be in the same place, and that's neither right nor wrong. What matters most is that when you draw that line, you also follow it up with doing what you feel is right, and Vicky deserves all the kudos in the world for doing that." Last month, PokerStars announced that it will roll out blackjack and roulette to about half of its customer base by the end of the year, with sports betting and other casino games to follow in 2015. It also plans to launch a fully-featured casino in 2015 that will appear on the Web and on a mobile platform. These changes come following Amaya Gaming's purchase of PokerStars and Full Tilt in June. What do you think of Negreanu's comments? Leave a comment of your own here and let us know. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  22. While poker superstars like Phil Hellmuth, Doyle Brunson, Johnny Chan, and Phil Ivey top the list of WSOP bracelet winners, only one player can boast earning $1 million in tournaments for five years in a row. The player in question is Erick Lindgren (pictured), who pulled off the accomplishment from 2004 to 2008. During that time, the California native pocketed $6,369,076, for a total of $10,005,543 in lifetime tournament earnings, according to the Global Poker Index. The team at PokerNewswas the first to report on the feat after overhearing it mentioned by Erik Seidel at the tables. While Lindgren might be the only member of the five years, $5 million club, several players are poised to join him. Daniel Negreanu is one of them and is on track to bank over a million dollars for the fifth consecutive year. In 2011, the Canadian grinder posted $1,534,367 in winnings and has seen his yearly scores increase ever since. With his second place finish in the 2014 Big One for One Drop, last year's take of $10,284,118 will be tough to beat, though. So far this year, Negreanu has added another $109,680 to his tournament bankroll and has more than enough time pick up the $900,000 he'll need to join the club. Also on deck are David Doc SandsSands (pictured), who has $6,657,264 in winnings over the past four years, Brian tsarrastRast with $6,947,556, and Philipp philbort Gruissem with $9,424,437. Some players have come close, but were sent back to the drawing board after a year of banking less than the seven-figures required. Tournament pro Jason treysfull21 Mercier has had a stellar career at the tables over the last eight years. From 2008 to 2015, Mercier won a total of $13,734,780, posting earnings of less than $1 million only in 2012, when he finished the year $523,587 in the black. This year, Mercier has pocketed $113,860; a one million-dollar 2015 would give the pro three years of consecutive seven-figure cashes. Sam Trickett, the second place finisher in the 2012 Big One for One Drop, also racked up four years of million-dollar cashes, but fell short of the fifth in 2014, when he took only $665,911. In eight years of recorded cashes, Trickett has banked over $20 million. Several others have started on the five-year accomplishment, getting two or three years toward the achievement. Germany's Ole Schemion already has three million-dollar years under his belt, with $27,700 in winnings in 2015. Grinder Joseph subiime Cheong is also knocking on the door, posting seven-figure scores every year since 2012. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  23. One of the passions of Daniel Negreanu (pictured) – besides playing poker, of course – is the national sport of his native Canada, hockey. Recently on his blog at Full Contact Poker, Negreanu offered his thoughts on the game and, in particular, the drive to bring the first professional sports team to his second home, Las Vegas. "I'm personally quite excited about the prospects of a National Hockey League team in Las Vegas and I believe strongly that not only will we get a team, but that hockey will work in this sports-starved city," Negreanu wrote on his blog over last weekend. "In a few hours, I'm meeting with the ownership group looking to bring a team here and to say I'm excited would be an understatement." Negreanu's belief that the NHL is looking to expand to Las Vegas is based on several angles. "Since (the NHL realignment in 2013), we have 16 teams in the Eastern Conference, but only 14 teams in the Western Conference," Negreanu noted. "This offers an unfair advantage to the West, as 57% of the teams will make the playoffs, while only 50% of Eastern Conference teams qualify. If you're an owner, this translates into dollars and cents. If you're a fan, then your team isn't getting an equal chance to make the postseason. It's not sustainable long-term and I'm quite certain NHL executives know this and are working towards a solution." "Many may wonder how it makes sense to play ice hockey in the desert, but I am sure the same was said years ago when expansion hit sunny California," Negreanu wrote. "That experiment has worked out quite well with thriving franchises in Los Angeles, Anaheim, and San Jose." Negreanu also pointed out that an NHL team in Las Vegas would be the "only game in town," something that has worked out for the San Jose team in the NHL. Negreanu ticked off that the Las Vegas metro area encompasses 2.2 million people, more than enough to support a professional sports franchise. Tourism, with people from around the world coming to Las Vegas, would provide more potential fans to come to a Las Vegas NHL team's games. Negreanu also posed the idea that the casino industry would probably support such a franchise through luxury boxes that would guarantee a "corporate infrastructure." Not one to shy away from the naysayers, Negreanu responded to several aspects of Las Vegas that have long caused professional sports teams to stay away. In reply to the factor that "Vegas isn't a hockey town," Negreanu conceded this could be problematic. "There's no evidence from the Wranglers (the minor league East Coast Hockey League franchise currently located in Las Vegas) to show there's enough interest, but the same could be said for San Jose and Nashville. We'll have a better idea what kind of interest exists here once a season ticket drive happens." "The old fears of game fixing come from the days when Las Vegas was a mob town," Negreanu stated. "Today, gambling is happening across the globe, both on the outcome of games as well as daily fantasy sports. I would argue that game fixing (would be) far less likely in Las Vegas because more eyeballs will be on those games. (The players) make more than enough money nowadays that the temptation to risk that livelihood (by throwing games) is minimized. This is a non-issue as far as I'm concerned." Following the writing of that blog, Negreanu took to his Twitter account to inform his fans about the meeting. "Great meeting tonight with the Maloofs, Bill Foley, and the other founding members. NHL is coming to Vegas." Negreanu passed along that a season ticket drive to demonstrate fan support for the team will begin on February 9 and that a 10% deposit is necessary to lock up seats. No major league sports organization has ever located a team in Las Vegas, but minor league sports have had success. Besides the Wranglers, the Las Vegas 51s, the minor league affiliate of Major League Baseball's New York Mets, and an Arena Football League team have passionate fan bases. With his passion for hockey and perhaps his hopes to be involved in the team's ownership, you can say for sure that Negreanu will be working feverishly to bring an NHL team to Sin City. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  24. Facing several years of declining World Series of Poker Main Event participation, the tournament's organizers sought a new marketing strategy that would create a splash and attract new faces. Their solution, implemented last year, was to bump the first place prize up to a massive $10 million and entice new players with the promise of an eight-figure payday. The approach seemed to work and after all was said and done, the 2014 Main Event saw its first increase in numbers in years. But not everyone is a fan of the new top-heavy structure; six-time bracelet winner Daniel Negreanu has argued that the improving economy, not the extra cash, contributed more to the success of last year's event. Read Negreanu's thoughts. WSOP organizers seem to have taken note and have requested that players give their opinion on the prestigious tournament in a short survey. "We always value the feedback of the players and thought it prudent to survey them on this issue as a result of recent chatter," WSOP VP Seth Palansky told PokerNews. "We will analyze the data and determine the best course of action moving forward in part based on that input." In the survey, the WSOP revealed that it is considering paying more places in the 2015 Main Event and asked that players consider the following scenario: "Last year, the WSOP Main Event paid 693 places, with 693rd receiving $18,406, 100th place getting $52,141, and 10th getting $565,193. If we pay 1,000 places using 6,683 entrants as the benchmark, 1,000th would possibly receive $15,000, 693rd would then get $16,750, 100th spot would hypothetically receive $50,000, and 10th would get $525,000. Are these pay adjustments an acceptable compromise to increase the percentage of the field paid out from a standard 10% to more along the lines of 15%?" The survey also questioned how much the min-cash should be, from $11,000 to $20,000, and what percentage of players should be paid in total, starting at 7.5% and going up to 20%. The questions seem specifically written in response to Negreanu's blog post. In it, he urged the WSOP to pay more places by lowering the minimum prize. He believed that the smaller minimum payout would have few psychological repercussions for most players. "When Billy Bob goes back to his wife and says, 'Honey, I'm in the money,' the fact that he is guaranteed $15,000 rather than $22,000 is an afterthought. The celebration is in the win, no matter how small," he said. Phil Hellmuth backed the idea on Twitter: "Agree 100%: Flatter payouts [are] more important than $10 million guarantee for 1st," he said. Negreanu even suggested a few new slogans for the Main Event: "The richest tournament in poker history is about to create nine new millionaires. Could you be one of the nine? Only one way to find out." "The Main Event payouts are being discussed again prior to pre-registration opening and this data will be one of several factors we consider," said WSOP Executive Director Ty Stewart (pictured). "We're interested in getting a broad swath of feedback, which ideally includes and segments both returning customer and potential customers. So, we hope players and fans will help us get the word out quickly about our interest to hear from them." It remains to be seen what changes, if any, will be made as a result of the survey. "If there is a way to make the WSOP better, the playing experience better, that's what we are here to do," said Palansky." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  25. In a recent blog post, six-time bracelet winner Daniel Negreanu (pictured) argued against the top-heavy $10 million guaranteed first place payout in the WSOP Main Event this year. "I think it's in poker's best interest long-term to have flatter payout structures that pay more spots, while also making that min-cash worth no more than 1.5 times the buy-in," he wrote. To back up that reasoning, Negreanu cited a study involving a rat which sometimes received a piece of cheese for choosing a specific tube, but other times was given an electrical jolt. "They alternated between cheese and electric shock before ultimately providing the rat only electric shocks," he said. "The rat continued down the second tube repeatedly until it died." In Negreanu's opinion, a player who enters 10 tournaments with top-heavy payout structures and doesn't cash is far less likely to continue playing than someone who occasionally cashes for the minimum. Furthermore, Negreanu believes that reducing the min-cash award would not have any negative effect on a player's perception of the accomplishment. "When Billy Bob goes back to his wife and says, 'Honey, I'm in the money,' the fact that he is guaranteed $15,000 rather than $22,000 is an afterthought. The celebration is in the win, no matter how small." After several years of decline, the 2014 WSOP Main Event saw an increase in participants. But Negreanu attributed that rise to the improving economy, not the "sexy" lure of an eight-figure payday. "If you look at the numbers when it comes to the economy in the last years, coupled with the refund checks from FTP arriving, things are looking up," he said. The Toronto native further illustrated his argument by imagining a winner-take-all Main Event. With such a structure, Negreanu estimated that roughly 150 players would buy in, with that number decreasing each year "as one guy gets rich and sucks money out of the poker economy, while 149 others end up losers." Negreanu realized that companies like the WSOP are a business and don't exist to simply provide free tournaments. With that in mind, he advised poker players to think of their profession as a small business and tournament organizers as their partners. The companies hosting these events are, after all, doing so in order to make money. If those interests aren't appeased, there would be no tournament at all. Seeing an increase in entrants in 2014, the WSOP is not likely keen on doing away with the top-heavy structure. However, organizers have made a number of changes for this year's series, including offering a tournament dubbed "The Colossus." The $565 buy-in event will be the lowest that the WSOP has offered in 35 years and guarantees $5 million in prize money. Organizers expect a huge turnout of some 13,000 entries. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
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