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  1. The Rio hosted one 2016 World Series of Poker final table – the last Stud event on the schedule and the vaunted $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event brings six players to final table Friday. Registration closed on Day 2 in the $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller, the Tag Team event has nine remaining and two budget-priced, big bet games kicked off for the arriving Main Event crowd. David Prociak Outduels Brandon Shack-Harris and John Monnette for First Bracelet [caption width="640"] David Prociak faced off against two of the best Limit players today and came out on top.[/caption]David Prociak was the short stack at the final table of the $1,500 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo event with nine players remaining and had two of the game’s best Mixed Game tournament players and a couple guys with 20 WSOP cashes in Calvin Anderson and Jameson Painter ahead of him. Prociak played beyond his experience and battled his way all the way back to his first bracelet and $156,546. “I can’t put it into worlds, there’s nothing I can say,” Prociak said moments after besting Shack-Harris heads-up. “I’m still in shock. I came in to the day with a lead but lost it pretty quick to him (Shack-Harris) in five straight pots.” “I was able to put it all behind me and kept him from putting it on me,” he added. “I’ve been locked in all week – waking up when I’m supposed to and eating healthy." Prociak's win is just his third WSOP cash in his first year at the WSOP. He previously cashed in Colossus II and finished 30th in the $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Mixed Event. Shack-Harris won his second career bracelet a week ago in the Pot Limit Omaha Championship and recorded his third final table of the summer. He also played the entire final table wearing a hooded polar bear jacket. Monnette’s Series improved to eight cashes with five final tables. He’s made $319,906 for his efforts of a runner-up and third place finishes. Bryan Devonshire finished 10th and Al Barbieri 12th. Final Table Payouts David Prociak - $156,546 Brandon Shack-Harris - $96,750 John Monnette - $66,601 Alex Livingston - $46,652 Louis Russo - $33,263 Gaurav Kalro - $24,148 Jameson Painter - $17,855 Calvin Anderson - $13,452 Yue Due Holds Half the Chips in Play with Six Remaining in $5,000 No Limit Event The penultimate day of the $5,000 No Limit Hold’em event returned with 47 players and the pace of elimination was a bit brisker than planned, so the field played down to six players before stopping. Yue Du holds half the chips in play with 11.73 million in the bag. German standout and three-time bracelet winner Dominik Nitsche is second in chips with 3.66 million and Jason Mercier’s better half, Natasha Barbour, sits in the middle with 2.45 million. Austrian Ismael Bojang, Michael Gentili and Marius Gierse round out the table. Matt O’Donnell (7th), Sertac Turker (8th) and Arne Coulier (9th) made the final table but didn’t survive the day. Kane Kalas bubbled the final table in 10th place as Andy Hwang, Byron Kaverman and Isaac Baron all made deep runs. Final Table Chip Counts Yue Du – 11,730,000 Dominik Nitsche – 3,665,000 Natasha Barbour – 2,455,000 Ismael Bojang – 1,785,000 Michael Gentili – 1,415,000 Marius Gierse – 730,000 Nine Tag Teams Advance, Polk/Fee Lead by Wide Margin Day 2 began with 130 returning teams and ten levels of action has the field trimmed to a final table headlined by Doug Polk and Ryan Fee. They have 1.2 million in the bag and John Gale and TJ Shulman sit second with 606,000. Top pros Mohsin Charania and Marvin Rettenmaier sit third, Jonathan Little has a team with his parents, James Dempsey and Chris Godfrey formed a team and Bart Lybaert, Adam Owen, Benny Glaser and Owais Ahmed formed a four-man squad that returns. Leo Wolpert and Ryan Laplante finished 22nd, Michael, Robert, Eric and Daniel Mizrachi finished in 26th place and Jeff Gross, Brian Rast and Antonio Esfandiari finished in 28th place. Final Table Chip Counts (by Last Player Sitting) Doug Polk – 1,243,000 John Gale – 606,000 Mohsin Charania – 505,000 Michael Padula – 475,000 James Dempsey – 447,000 Niel Mittelman – 425,000 Adam Owen – 293,000 Reuben Peters – 209,000 Larry Little – 113,000 Elite Field of 20 Return in $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller Day 2 returned 95 survivors with chips and 21 player waited until the start of action to get in the event. Ten levels of action trimmed the field down to 20 players with Ludovic Geilich on top with 3,025,000 in the bag. Michael and Robert Mizrachi sit second and third in chips one day after Michael finished fourth in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship and the same day they cashed in 26th place with brothers Eric and Daniel in the Tag Team event. Ryan D’Angelo, Sean Winter and Paul Volpe finished in the top ten with Dan Smith, Cary Katz and Yevgeniy Timoshenko in the second half of the counts. Day 2’s additional entrants that skipped Day 1 pushed the prize pool to $4.37 million. The top 28 players made the money with Sam Stein, Taylor Paur, Rep Porter and Isaac Baron earning a payout before busting. Top Ten Chip Counts Ludovic Geilich – 3,025,000 Michael Mizrachi – 2,435,000 Robert Mizrachi – 2,245,000 Ryan D’Angelo – 1,640,000 Sean Winter – 1,560,000 Paul Volpe – 1,430,000 Chris Lee – 1,245,000 Veselin Karakitukov – 1,215,000 Tommy Le – 1,200,000 Jens Kyllonen – 1,165,000 Event 63: $1,000 No Limit Hold’em The budget No Limit event at 11 am drew a huge crowd of 2,452 entrants and after a long day at the felt 268 players remain. Daniel Weinman missed out on the overall led by a few chips but is one of 15 to bag up six-figure stacks. Matt Jarvis, Hiren Patel, Nick Guagenti, Tony Dunst and Mark Radoja all bagged up above average stacks. The field combined for a $2,206,800 prize pool for the top 368 finishers. All returning players have $1,750 guaranteed but the big money up top nabs all the attention – the top four players earn six-figures with the winner walking with $339,254. Top Ten Chip Counts Frederick Goff – 144,300 Daniel Weinman – 140,400 Raffaele Castro – 130,000 Patricia Kananda – 127,600 Michael Wang – 127,300 Paolo Cusinato – 117,600 Sean Gibson- 117,500 Massoud Eskandari – 114,900 Sergio Cabrera – 114,800 James Salters – 104,900 Event 64: $3,000 Pot Limit Omaha HiLo The afternoon event picked up 478 entrants and ten levels of play reduced the field down to 156 players. Jon Turner built the largest stack but Allan Le, Kyle Bowker and Leif Force all bagged up in the top five spots. 2005 Main Event Champ Joe Hachem landed in the top ten with Ashton Griffin, Ari Engel and Ben Yu with stacks way above average. Richard Ashby, Scott Clements, Ylon Schwartz and David Paredes also return. The field built a $1,291,290 prize pool for a little less than half of the returning field – 71 players. First place earns $294,960 and top three spots earn six-figures. Top Ten Chip Counts Jon Turner – 116,900 Allan Le – 112,700 Tark Abboud – 111,500 Kyle Bowker – 110,700 Leif Force – 110,500 Sirous Jamshidi – 109,800 Anil Gurnaney – 101,300 Terrance Bott – 97,000 Joe Hachem – 95,200 Timothy Vukson – 94,800 Expensive Chairs in the Amazon Room or Playing for a Bracelet in Underwear The $111,111 High Roller for One Drop returns Friday for one of the most expensive buy-ins this side of the Atlantic. The event drew X in 2014 when Tony Gregg earned $x for his first bracelet. For those that prefer much less media attention the online bracelet with unlimited re-entries starts at 1 pm and plays down to the final six for a live final table in the Amazon Room. The Ladies Championship returns with a 90% discount of the $10,000 buy-in for female players. Technically, men can enter but their +EV argument takes a huge hit.
  2. Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and interview players and industry leaders. DOWNLOAD THIS EPISODE IN ITUNES The guest for Episode 3 is none other than World Poker Tour Tournament of Champions winner Daniel Weinman. He talks about his two WPT titles, rooming with Sam Panzica, and what's in store for him now that he's got a signature win (or two) on his resume. The guys also recap the action from the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown and Finale, try to trademark "podcast run good" and talk Salomon Ponte, the AbsolutePoker refund process, the recent win by Carnegie Mellon's AI poker program and the greatness of Maurice Hawkins and Ari Engel. Remember to subscribe to The Fives on iTunes and give us a five-star rating!
  3. [caption width="640"] Daniel Weinman grabbed his second WPT title of 2017 at the Season XV Tournament of Champions (WPT Photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] Two months ago Daniel Weinman added his name to the World Poker Tour Champions Cup with a win at the Borgata Winter Poker Open in Atlantic City. Sunday night in Hollywood, Florida the 29-year-old capped off Season XV of the WPT by winning the Tournament of Champions. "I feel incredible, this was such a tough tournament and to come out on top it's super special," said Weinman, who had to pass up a trip to The Masters final round after making the final table. ""It's crazy, usually you play these tournaments with a thousand people and there may be 850 people that really don't have a chance at winning the tournament that you go deep. They're just not comfortable with all the spots they're going to encounter. Having 66 people that have already won this and have had some success in the poker world, coming out on top is incredible." After running kings into aces, Dylan Wilkerson wasn’t left with much of a stack to work with. Daniel Santoro raised to 40,000 from UTG and Wilkerson moved all in from the cut off for 179,000. Santoro called and showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] while Wilkerson had [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6h"] flop put Santoro ahead and neither the [poker card="3d"] turn or [poker card="6d"] river were any help to Wilkerson and he was out in sixth. Just six hands later Santoro picked up another elimination. With blinds of 8,000/16,000, Seidel all in for 138,000 from UTG and Santoro called, this time showing [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"] and again found himself up against an ace as Erik Seidel showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="5h"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] flop put Santoro ahead with second pair and left Seidel hoping for one of the three remaining kings or running fives. The [poker card="2h"] turn was no help and neither was the [poker card="7h"] turn and the Hall of Famer Seidel was eliminated in fifth. The Daniel Santoro show kept on going. David Ormsby moved all in from the button for his last 286,000 and Santoro re-raised from the small blind, forcing big blind Michael Mizrachi to fold. Ormbsy tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"] but this time Santoro was ahead with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"]. The board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="td"] to eliminate Ormbsy in fourth place and leave Santoro as the chip leader with three players remaining. Unfortunately for Santoro, just over two and a half hours later, the show came to an abrupt halt. Mizrachi folded his button, Weinman moved all in from the small blind and Santoro called all in from the big blind. Weinman showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="4h"] while Santoro had [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2s"] flop put Santoro ahead and he dodged the [poker card="7c"] turn, but the [poker card="ac"] gave Weinman a better pair and eliminated Santoro. When heads-up play began, Weinman had Mizrachi outchipped 4.5-1 and it took him just 18 hands to end things. Mizrachi moved all in for 890,000 and Weinman called and showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"] while Mizrachi showed [poker card="5c"][poker card="5h"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="3c"] flop kept Mizrachi ahead, but the [poker card="8s"] turn gave Weinman third pair. The [poker card="7c"] river card was no good for Mizrachi and he was eliminated in second place, improving his TOC finish from last year by one spot and leaving Weinman as the Season XV TOC winner. Along with the $381,500 first place prize money, Weiman also won a 2018 Audi S5 Coupe, a pair of rose gold wireless Monster Headphones, a custom poker table, a seat in Tiger’s Poker Night and a one-week stay with Wyndham Extra holidays. Final Table Payouts Daniel Weinman - $381,500 Michael Mizrachi - $218,000 Daniel Santoro - $133,525 David Ormsby - $95,375 Erik Seidel - $73,575 Dylan Wilkerson - $57,225
  4. [caption width="640"] Even a World Poker Tour Champion like Daniel Weinman is capable of forgetting what game it is (WPT photo)[/caption] I F*cked Up is a PocketFives series where the game's best tell stories of where they got it wrong. Mistakes happen every day in poker and let these players be the first to tell you it happens to everyone. Two-time World Poker Tour Champions Club member Daniel Weinman rarely made any mistakes during his run to WPT glory in 2017. Outside of his No Limit tournament success, Weinman is an avid mixed games player and participant in the Atlanta home game scene. In this, the premiere edition of I Fucked Up, Weinman tells us about a Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo hand that he could have played better...had he known what game it was. The Hand Weinman moved to Washington, D.C. earlier this year but found himself back in Atlanta in early October. The stakes for the mixed game were $50/$100 with a $400/$800 spread limit. The game was shifting from a Seven Card Stud game to Omaha and Weinman thought it was Pot Limit Omaha instead of the Hi-Lo variant. Had he known what game it was, Weinman is likely not involved in this hand and we are left without a story. A few limps opened the hand before the cutoff raised to $200. Weinman called on the button with 10-8-8-6, a hand with plenty of possibilities post flop in PLO, but a limited one in PLO8. The A-9-7 flop gave Weinman a wrap and the action blew up from there. According to Weinman, all players were about $10,000 deep when the action reached the cutoff and he bet $1,200. Weinman raised to $5,000 and the big blind moved all in for $10,000. The cutoff moved in as well, for about $15,000- $20,000. Weinman said he shared a lot of history with this player, and decided to call all-in for his stack. When he saw that both of his opponents had a set, Weinman said, “the look on my face wasn’t great.” The trio decided to run the board twice and after bricking the first turn and river, Weinman found a low on the second runout to get a quarter of the overall pot. While fortunate to get a rebate on the hand, Weinman admitted, “A big mistake like this can cost you tons.” Taking it in Stride After the hand, Weinman texted some friends of his to explain the situation. Among those players was high stakes professional and former PocketFives #1, Shaun Deeb. Weinman says Deeb knew the exact mistake Weinman made as he was explaining the story. According to Weinman, mistakes like the one he made are common in games where PLO and PLO8 are both in the mix. Other Mistakes In Mixed Games In his career of playing mixed games, Weinman says he has made similar mistakes in 2-7 draw games where he has made it to the final draw before realizing the game wasn’t what he the format he had thought. That has resulted in Weinman making it to the third draw with zero equity in a hand. There is also an incident where, as Weinman puts it, “Not at those stakes but I’ve made a decent mistake in 2-7 hand. Going into the last draw I had 77532 with four of the same suit, pitched the wrong 7 and ended up getting a four of the suit in my hand." Maybe PLO8 Isn’t His Game At the same home game where his error took place, Weinman holds the record for the largest ever straddle; a number that is written on a whiteboard for all to see. Weinman was into the game for somewhere between $10,000-$15,000, as he recalls. Upon being felted again, Weinman bought in for $20,000 more. That money went in as a button straddle and Weinman ended up losing that pot as well. The Lesson Weinman preaches that it is always important to keep your eye on the plaques in a mixed game to know what the new game is. There is also another item to point out. For as successful as Weinman has been in 2017, even he, a former SuperNova elite on PokerStars, is capable of making a basic mistake. An expensive one. If something similar happens while you’re playing, take solace in knowing it can happen to the best. Remember when Phil Ivey mucked the winning hand?
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