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Found 7 results

  1. Nick Petrangelo touched the final step of PokerGO’s inaugural 2022 Stairway to Millions, going back-to-back in the final two events of the series and winning the $100,000 buy-in NLHE finale for $1,026,000, the fourth seven-figure cash of his career. Petrangelo finished the series with four final tables, three of which came in the final three events. Just after his victory, Petrangelo talked with Maria Ho about the importance of momentum and confidence in his game. “I think when you’re running good and making hands and timing is working well it obviously breeds confidence,” Petrangelo said. “That’s important to play well because you gotta be able to make the right play when you know it’s correct and if you’re running bad and always running into it sometimes it’s hard to do that. Running good helps you be confident and helps you play better” Of the 19 entries in the last event, just three players made the money and returned to play out the final table. Petrangelo started the day with the chip lead, Sean Perry sat in second with nearly half of Petrangelo’s chips, and David Peters a distant third place holding just under 20 big blinds. Both Peters and Perry chipped away at Petrangelo’s lead in the early goings and roughly 40 minutes in, Perry even took over the chip lead. However just before the end of the first hour, Petrangelo took back the lead, and right after the break, Peters won a significant pot off Perry putting himself and Perry essentially even in chips. A pivotal hand took place in the 15,000/30,000 (30,000 ante) level when Petrangelo opened on the button to 60,000 holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"]. Peters, with roughly 25 big blind in his stack, three-bet to 400,000 with the [poker card="7h"][poker card="7d"]. Perry let go of the big blind and Petrangelo moved all-in for nearly 2 million total and Peters made the call for his remaining 300,000. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4c"] flop kept Peters hand in the lead, but with 15 outs twice Petrangelo was the favorite. The [poker card="kh"] turn was no help to Petrangelo and neither was the [poker card="2h"]. The pot was shipped to Peters and with the double, Peters assumed the chip lead for the first time all day. Petrangelo and Perry were both looking up at Peters when they went to battle. After Peters folded his button, Perry, with a slight chip lead over Petrangelo, put in a raised from the small blind with the [poker card="9d"][poker card="4c"]. Petrangelo made the call with the [poker card="qc"][poker card="td"] and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"]. Perry continued with a bet of 180,000 and Petrangelo made the call. The turn was the [poker card="8c"], giving Petrangelo and double gutter to go with his second pair. Perry fired again, putting 220,000 in with just 415,000 behind. Once again, Petrangelo called. The river brought the [poker card="ah"], and after a moment Perry moved all-in for his final 415,000 putting Petrangelo to the test. Petrangelo burnt his final time extension and eventually correctly clicked call to drag the 1.7 million chip pot and leave Perry on just 100,000. Perry was eliminated on the very next hand when he put it in with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="9c"] and Peters made the call from the big blind with [poker card="8d"][poker card="5h"] and the board came [poker card="7h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="ks"][poker card="3h"]. Perry picked up $304,000 for third place. The levels dropped to 10 minutes at heads-up and Peters has a 2.1 million to 1.7 million chip advantage over Petrangelo. Petrangelo almost immediately took back the lead and within 10 minutes the pair had all the chips in the middle. Peters, covered, held [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"] and Petrangelo, once again, was trying to take him out with a suited ace of clubs, the [poker card="ac"][poker card="tc"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="4s"], nearly the same set up as when Peters doubled earlier in the day. However, this time the clubs came in as the [poker card="qc"] hit the turn, leaving Peters drawing dead to the [poker card="5s"] river. As the runner-up, Peters added $570,000 to his more than $38 million in lifetime live earnings, and with that score climbed into 4th on the All-Time Money List surpassing Erik Seidel. With the win, Petrangelo picked up the $1,026,000 first-place prize and became the first Stairway To Millions “Main Event” champion. PokerGO Stairway to Millions $100K Final Table Nick Petrangelo - $1,026,000 David Peters - $570,000 Sean Perry - $304,000 The finale completed the inaugural eight-tournament series which offered players the chance win their way up the escalating buy-ins. Every time a player cashed in a Stairway to Millions tournament, they were given a ticket to the next event, along with their payout. As long as they continued to cash, they’d continue to play - of course, direct buy-ins were also available. Not unlike the tried-and-true online poker satellite tree where players start at a low buy-in but, as long as they continue to win, they earn a spot in the next event. The series started with a $1,100 event at the Aria that drew 190 entries and saw 28 players advance to Event #2. The next $2,150 buy-in event brought in 129 entries where three-time WSOP bracelet winner Chance Kornuth took down the title. In fact, Kornuth did it again in Event #3 ($4,000 NLHE), earning back-to-back titles (and three cashes in a row) for a series total of just over $136,000. As the buy-in increased, the fields began to narrow with 12 players from Event #3 advancing to Event #4. The $8,000 buy-in drew a total field of 56 entries from which Salim Admon earned his first PokerGO win for $138,880. Just eight players advanced from Event #4 to make up the 43-entry field of Event #5 ($15,800 NLHE). In the end, Michael Wang walked away with the $219,300 first-place prize. Jake Schindler, who is no stranger to winning in the Aria, scored the victory in Event #6 ($25,000 NLHE) where just seven of the 25 entries were from the previous tournament. The foursome of Schindler, Nick Petrangelo, Alex Foxen, and Sean Winter earned entry into Event #7 ($50,000 NLHE). Petrangelo topped the 21-entry field, coming back from a single big blind, and walked away with another $567,000 in his bankroll prior to his win in Event #8. Next up for PokerGO is the PokerGO Cup taking place from February 2-10.
  2. This year we’re doing something a little different and breaking down our annual Poker Year In Review into three different parts - the Flop (January-April), Turn (May-August), and River (September-December). We’ll be wrapping up 2021 by taking a look back at some of our biggest stories, winners, and surprises that unfolded in one of the most unique years in the history of the game. May One of the craziest stories of the year broke in May when it was revealed that high-stakes poker pro Chad Power had been victim to a home invasion robbery of nearly $1,000,000 in cash and casino chips. However, the Henderson Police Department arrested a suspect who was charged with multiple felonies including Burglary with a Deadly Weapon, Conspiracy Home Invasion, and Theft after the suspect went out and purchased a Dodge Hellcat Charger with a $30,000 cash down payment and also purchased a 2018 Maserati Levante SUV under his mother’s name with another $60K in cash. On the felt, Phil Hellmuth and Daniel Negreanu returned for Round 2 of High Stakes Duel II with Negreanu looking to get even, however, once again, Hellmuth pulled off the win. Negreanu promised that there would be a third match sooner than later leaving Hellmuth still feeling slighted despite his back-to-back wins. “I’ve given Daniel credit the whole way from start to finish and I haven’t said one negative word about him. He was pretty condescending in the first match. I felt it was super condescending, and this match he handled himself much better,” Hellmuth said. “But even still, he’s preaching down to me about ranges, and I’m thinking to myself, I’ve just won 24 out of 26 heads-up matches against pros and they have me rated as a fucking underdog every match. It just blows my mind, but I just never quite get that respect, and that’s ok with me. I just want to keep winning.” There were plenty of other winnings taking place in May with a trio of World Poker Tour events coming to a conclusion. The pandemic had forced the WPT to delay a number of its high-profile final tables for more than a year and in the middle of the month, they gathered in Las Vegas to crown three consecutive champions. First up was Veerab Zakarian who took down the WPT Borgata Winter Poker Open for $674,840. “Waiting this long, you didn’t know what to expect. You don’t know, you keep waiting for it,” Zakarian said after the tournament ended. “Most people, after the pandemic, they didn’t have anything to look forward to so I was glad to have something to look forward to.” [caption id="attachment_637581" align="alignright" width="250"] Brekstyn Schutten[/caption] The next day it was Balakrishna Patur’s turn in the spotlight as he won the delayed 2020 WPT L.A. Poker Classic for $1,015,000, defeating Matas Cimbolas in heads-up play. It was the second year in a row that Cimbolas finished as the LAPC runner-up. Finally, Brekstyn Schutten took down the largest event in the 19-year history of the WPT when he won the WPT Seminole Hard Rock Poker Showdown for $1,261,095. While all of that is nice, the most prestigious contest of the year came to a conclusion in May when Niklas Astedt was named, by the poker community and his peers, as the All-Time #1 Number One. For the better part of a month, PocketFives ran a social contest asking the poker community to vote, March Madness-style, to see which of the (then) 60 former worldwide #1-ranked online pros stood above the rest. The finals came down to Astedt and online great Chris Moorman with Astedt edging out Moorman with 54% of the vote. “The PocketFives rankings really motivated me over the years,” Astedt said after being crowned the winner. “I’m super happy and proud that so many people voted for me.” Speaking of Chris Moorman, he was one of three popular player profiles to be featured this month. Moorman reflected on his career and his recent winning of his first SCOOP title. READ: “Old Guy” Chris Moorman Happily Proves He’s Still Got It Sami Kelopuro had been on an amazing heater and talked with PocketFives in a rare interview on the secret to his recent success and how he planed on taking it easy after his intense grind. READ: After Winning $4.4M, Sami Kelopuro is Taking It Easy - For Now Finally, after winning the first-ever GGPoker Spring Festival Main Event, Mathias ‘KingKongJoel’ Joelsson talked about what it was like to win a seven-figure score. READ: Mathias Joelsson Has ‘King Kong’ Plans After $1.25M GGSF Score By the end of the month, another Brazilian earned themselves an Online Player of the Month title, as Dalton Hobold took the title in May. June It had already been announced that the World Series of Poker was going to be moved to the fall, but in the middle of June, the complete schedule (before the addition of online events) of the last WSOP at the Rio was announced. It was an 88 gold bracelet schedule that hoped to bring back a sense of normalcy after a year away. READ: 5 Things: The WSOP Schedule Gives Players a Comfortable Return Home While players had the WSOP to look forward to, the 2021 U.S. Poker Open was taking place in the PokerGO Studio with familiar faces winning large sums of money. Stephen Chidwick, Jake Schindler, Ali Imsirovic were all at the top of the earners list for the series but David Peters dominated them all, winning more than $2.6 million and taking home the Golden Eagle trophy. READ: David Peters, Old Guard, New Faces Shine Bright as U.S. Poker Open Hellmuth’s three-peat over Negreanu was completed earning him the $400,000 prize and bringing his series record to 6-0 and bringing High Stakes Duel II to an end with Hellmuth opting to cash out and start over in the coming months. Brian Altman also notched his third win, but for him, it was taking home his third World Poker Tour Main Tour title at WPT Tampa at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Tampa, Florida. The reigning WPT Player of the Year put himself in the race for WPT all-time title, just one behind Darren Elias’ four, and picked up $613,225 in the process. READ: WPT POY Brian Altman Writes His Own Script For Success In other WPT news, the 2021 WPT Online Series Main Event reached a conclusion as well with Christian Rudolph earning his first WPT title and $487,442. Plus, the WPT held its WPT Heads Up Poker Championship in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. An online tournament, it featured some of the biggest names in the game including Doug Polk, Tow Dwan, Sam Greenwood, Anthony Zinno, Brad Own, and eventual winner Phil Ivey who took down the invite-only event for $400,000. Another popular profile published in 2021 was on poker vlogger Jaman Burton and his recent move to Las Vegas. In it, he discusses how the social climate in St. Louis pushed him to make a move, the future of his vlog, and finding new inspiration in Sin City. READ: Jaman Burton and The Drawing Dead Find New Life In Las Vegas The string of Brazilian crushers taking down the Online Player of the Month continued in June as Geraldo Cesar Neto earned the honor for the first time in his career. July The poker world was shocked and saddened in July when six-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner, Layne ‘Back-to-Back’ Flack unexpectedly passed away at age 52. An outpouring of condolences for Flack’s family poured out from the poker community as a mainstay personality from the early days of the poker boom will be certainly be missed. Before that, Daniel Negreanu was back making headlines. After his loss to Doug Polk earlier in the year and then falling three times to Hellmuth on High Stakes Duel, Kid Poker’s ability to close in a big spot was being questioned by some in the poker world. He quickly responded with a victory during the PokerGO Cup series, not only winning the $50,000 NLHE event for $700,000 but, with a little thanks to Cary Katz in the final event of the series, taking the PokerGO leaderboard title and trophy for an additional $50,000 score. READ: The Anatomy- and End - of Daniel Negreanu’s Tournament Futility All month long, the World Series of Poker was running online bracelet events with some notable names adding to their poker resume including David Peters, Manig Loeser, and Chris Moorman who grabbed the victory in one of the final events of the series for his second career bracelet. But the big WSOP news was the rumor (which turned out to be true) that the World Series of Poker would be on the move in 2022, leaving its long-standing home of the Rio to set up shop on the Strip at Bally's and Paris. [caption id="attachment_637583" align="alignright" width="250"] Andrew Moreno[/caption] July also saw a pair of celebrated live wins as Andrew Moreno battled through the 1,325-entry field of the first-ever $10K Wynn Millions to walk away with a life-changing $1.460 million score. The final three agreed to chop the majority of the prize pool, creating two more millionaires as Clayton Maguire finished as the runner-up for $1.443 million and Toby Lewis grabbed the bronze for $1.235 million. Dapo Ajayi also earned a career-defining win after taking down WPT Choctaw for $558,610, making it the second time that Viet Vo would come up just one spot short in the same tournament, finishing in second place for $372,415. Brazil’s Dalton Hobold earned Online Player of the Month honors in May, in July he opened up about how he was almost scammed out his entire career by someone he trusted. READ: Rising Star Dalton Hobold Almost Had Poker Career Derailed by Scam Another month, another Brazilian at the top of the Online Player of the Month leaderboard, as Renan Carlos Bruschi took home the honors in July. August August was another massive month when it came to online poker as PokerStars announced the start of their biggest World Championship of Online Poker with $100 million guaranteed and the World Series of Poker Online kicked off on GGPoker. Both series featured poker superstars taking home titles including Christian Rudolph and Ivan Zufic taking down early WCOOP titles and Joao Simao and Samuel Vousden earning gold bracelets. It was also the month where Erik Seidel made history, taking down 2021 WSOP Online Event #11 ($10,000 Super MILLION$ High Roller) for $977,842 and his ninth career gold bracelet, tying Johnny Moss. Soon after, he talked with us about winning his ninth bracelet online made it special for him. “Winning any WSOP event is special,” Seidel said when asked where his online bracelet ranks. “This one was extra great for me because it was so unexpected. Getting through 600+ players and then the prize was close to one million, which I think is my biggest WSOP cash, felt really amazing. Might be my favorite.” READ: Erik Seidel’s Online WSOP Bracelet Victory Might Just Be His Favorite In addition to Seidel winning the WSOP edition of the Super MILLION$, a pair of perennial champions added to their MILLION$ resume. Niklas Astedt scored his third title and Michael Addamo kept the all-time wins record with his fourth. For Addamo, it was just a sign of things yet to come. READ: 50 Things To Look Forward To At The 2021 WSOP After Phil Hellmuth vanquished Fox Sports commentator Nick Smith in a bottle episode of High Stakes Duel, the re-match everyone was waiting for was booked. The Hellmuth vs. Tom Dwan hype train was rolling and the show did not disappoint. However, after seven wins in a row, Hellmuth was defeated as Dwan dethroned Hellmuth to become the new High Stakes Duel champion. READ: Three Takeaways From Tom Dwan's Victory Over Phil Hellmuth on High Stakes Duel III [caption id="attachment_637584" align="alignleft" width="250"] Brock Wilson[/caption] A pair of profiles proved to be popular this month as 26-year-old high-stakes tournament pro Brock Wilson talked about his major move from New York to Las Vegas to pursue the poker dream. Plus, Ryan Hagerty scored an online bracelet in July and sat down to talk with us about his roller coaster of a year grinding the tournament scene. A victory for Alex Theologis in the WSOP $25,000 Super High Roller Championship locked up the August Online Player of Month. Finally, after six years as the President and Editor-in-Chief of PocketFives Lance Bradley stepped away to pursue new opportunities and left by spotlighting some of his favorite stories he published over the years.
  3. A fantastic day of action in the World Series of Poker saw three bracelets won by first-time winners as well as the first day of action in the $100,000 NLHE High Roller. Leo Margets was the first female player to win an open bracelet in the 2021 World Series of Poker as she closed out The Closer, winning $376,000 and claiming a maiden bracelet. Margets Makes History in The Closer With just 63 players remaining in the hunt for the bracelet, Margets began the day in the chasing pack as Alex Kulev of Bosnia led the field. That lead would be maintained for much of the final day of the event, but with a little luck and a lot of skill, Margets made good on her attempt to become the first female open event winner late in the 2021 World Series. The final table was reached in record time as just nine players remained, with Kulev still king in waiting. At that point, Margets had managed to get third on the leaderboard, but Kulev’s lead was such that she had just over half of his stack. Canadian player Ben Underwood busted in ninth place for $35,131 when his short stack shove with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="6s"] couldn’t get there against Aleksandr Shevliakov’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"] as the board ran out with queens on flop and river but low cards elsewhere. There was quickly another elimination as Chris Moorman, online poker legend and short stack heading into the final, busted with ace-high against Margets. Moorman’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5h"] started the hand behind against Margets’ [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"] and the board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="7s"][poker card="As"][poker card="Tc"] saw Margets’ kicker play to send Moorman out with a cash worth $44,740. In seventh, Shevliakov was the victim as the post-dinner session that would find a winner began with his elimination for $57,525. Shevliakov called off Kulev’s shove and was in horrible shape, holding [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qh"] against Kulev’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ks"]. The seven-high board sent the Russian home at the Bosnian’s expense as the chip leader took yet more control. In sixth place, Cherish Andrews earned $74,680 when her [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3h"] couldn’t catch Stephen Song’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"] as the board, which initially looked great for Andrews on the flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3s"], was fine on the [poker card="3c"] turn but took a turn for the worse on the [poker card="Qc"] river. With five players left, it looked like everyone was playing for second behind Kulev as he continued to dominate, busting two more players in a single hand as his [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qc"] held against Arturo Segura’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"], condemning him to a fifth-place finish worth $97,865 and Marc Lange, whose [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] was overtaken on the board of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="Qd"] board. Another queen on the river and another player out, Lange earning $129,460, the first six-figure score of the event, for crashing out in fourth. Three-handed, Kulev’s stack of 38 million dwarfed both Song (6 million) and Margets (4 million), but no limit hold’em being what it is, no-one’s lead is ever safe for more than a couple of all-in hands. Margets had chipped up a little to 7 million by the time Song departed in third for $172,855, but Kulev, whose pocket nines beat Song’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8h"] shove, was up to 40 million and looking like it was a matter of time before he booked a first WSOP win. Heads-up began with the stroke of luck Margets needed. Miscounting her stack to 2.5 big blinds rather than 7.5, she shoved with [poker card="9c"][poker card="4d"] and when Kulev called with the dominating [poker card="As"][poker card="9s"], she looked doomed. But the board had other ideas, coming [poker card="Js"][poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="8c"] to double her up in fortuitous fashion and give her 15 bigs to play with. Suddenly, Margets had all the momentum, and 3:1 down in chips, she doubled again when her shove with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="4c"] held in spectacular style when Kulev’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="8h"] was shot down by quad fours after the board played out. Grinding to level up the chips, Margets had a slim lead by the time the pair saw a flop of [poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3s"] and all the chips went into the middle. Kulev held [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9d"] for top pair, top kicker, but Margets had the flush draw and bottom pair with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"]. The turn of [poker card="5c"] gave her trips and holding through the [poker card="Th"] river, her miraculous comeback was complete as Spanish pro Margets won her first-ever WSOP bracelet in the most dramatic of circumstances. WSOP 2021 Event #83 $1,500 The Closer Final Table Results: Leo Margets - $376,850 Alex Kulev - $232,920 Stephen Song - $172,855 Marc Lange - $129,460 Arturo Segura - $97,865 Cherish Andrews - $74,680 Aleksandr Shevliakov - $57,525 Chris Moorman - $44,740 Benjamin Underwood - $35,131 Badziakouski Wins Brilliant First Bracelet in High Roller In Event #85, the $50,000-entry High Roller, it was Belarussian poker crusher Mikita Badziakouski who reigned supreme and took the title and his first WSOP bracelet. Badziakouski had a huge task on his hands to do so, with one of the toughest final tables in this or any World Series to negotiate. However, from being one of the shortest stacks when the final table began, the Belarussian modern poker legend added another reminder to others of his poker prowess with an impressive performance. Ryan Leng was the first player to leave the nine-handed final table and it came as no surprise purely due to the 2021 WSOP powerhouse entering play with seven big blinds. Most of them went into the middle before the flop, with a little going in on the flop with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"], but Ren Lin had [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"] and the cowboys shot down Leng’s hopes on a board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ks"]. Leng cashed for $131,982. In eighth place, it was the turn of Joao Vieira to depart, earning $167,152 for his run to the final table. All-in pre-flop for just a couple of blinds, Vieira had [poker card="Ah"][poker card="4h"], but he was called by both Carlos Villamarin with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="5s"] and Jason Koon with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"]. The board of [poker card="5d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="2s"] saw a little more money go in, but it eventually went to showdown and Villamarin’s pocket fives - of course - won the day. Shortly after that hand, Villamarin himself was on the rail. All-in pre-flop with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"], he was in horrible shape against the [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] belonging to Stephen Chidwick and the Brit held with ease across the [poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="9s"] board to leap up the leaderboard and leave Villamarin on the rail with $214,496. With six players left, Chidwick held the lead, but not for long. Badziakouski took over and grabbed the chip lead. It was one he would not relinquish easily, as Ali Imsirovic busted in sixth place for $278,840 when Ren Lin’s [poker card="8s"][poker card="7c"] got there against Imsirovic’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qd"] on a board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="7s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Tc"], with Lin’s middle pair on the flop surviving two streets of outs including two overs and any diamond. At this stage, Mike Matusow was singing the praises of Daniel Negreanu’s late registration...well, kind of. https://twitter.com/themouthmatusow/status/1462634694315438082 Stephen Chidwick had been left super-short by the chip leader and departed in fifth place for $367,153. Chidwick’s [poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"] couldn’t catch against Koon’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5c"] with all the chips in pre-flop and a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="4h"][poker card="6d"] playing out. Koon was the next to bust, crashing out in fourth place for $489,585 when his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"] couldn’t find any help against Badziakouski’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qs"]. The eight-high board sent the GGPoker ambassador out before the podium places and while the Belarussian Badziakouski led, hopes were high for both Negreanu and Lin to make a comeback. Those hopes were to be ruthlessly dashed by the champion in waiting. Negreanu was eliminated by Badziakouski next as the Belarussian went about taking down his final three opponents in a brutal display of poker dominance. The Canadian shoved with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="5h"] and Badziakouski called with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"], the board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="3s"][poker card="Ad"] delivering Kid Poker from the competition for another great score of $661,041, but missing out on the bracelet once again. Heads-up could have been a non-event, Lin trailing Badziakouski as he did by almost four-to-one in chips. Despite that opening deficit, however, Lin chipped up to take the lead, and for a while, it looked like Badziakouski might struggle. But the partypoker pro is made of strong stuff and he railed to lead once again before the final hand. Li, short-stacked, shoved for just under seven big blinds with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="7s"] and Badziakouski called it off with [poker card="As"][poker card="5h"]. The board of [poker card="8h"][poker card="9d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9c"] saw the Belarussian emerge from one of the toughest final tables of the Autumn the winner and the proud owner of his first-ever WSOP bracelet, along with the $1.46 million top prize. Li, defeated, had to settle for the runner-up prize of $903,610. WSOP 2021 Event #85 $50,000 NLHE High Roller Final Table Results: Mikita Badziakouski - $1,462,043 Ren Lin - $903,610 Daniel Negreanu - $661,041 Jason Koon - $489,585 Stephen Chidwick - $367,153 Ali Imsirovic - $278,840 Carlos Villamarin - $214,496 Joao Vieira - $167,152 Ryan Leng - $131,982 [caption id="attachment_637303" align="alignright" width="700"] Mikita Badziakouski won his first WSOP bracelet too, claiming a terrific victory in the $50,000 NLHE High Roller[/caption] The final event of the night to conclude produced a winner inside 14 hours of play as Michael McCauley won his maiden bracelet in the $1,000-entry Event #86, the Super Turbo event. In an event where the great and good took to the felt, some stars busted out early, such as Phil Hellmuth, Shau Deeb and Barny Boatman, whose tale of disaster started with such positivity... https://twitter.com/barnyboatman/status/1462472736895242244 ...but ended in a cold as ice defeat. https://twitter.com/barnyboatman/status/1462529376059154433 Others were running hot and chief amongst them was the leader of the WSOP Player of the Year race, Josh Arieh. Having seen the Poker Brat bust earlier, Arieh dug in his spikes and stuck around all the way to 10th place, earning $10,604, but most importantly, more points to go next to his name on the POY leaderboard. Others to cash but miss out on the final table included Ryan Riess (152nd for $1,606), Landon Tice (130th for $1,606), and Michael Lech (124th for $1,757). Down to the final table, Dara O’Kearney was the first player to bust when his queen-jack couldn’t catch Andrew Wilson’s ace-four. After Marc Lomeo lost a coinflip with pocket fives against Luigi Curcio’s ace-king, Curcio himself busted when he and Filippo Ragone bothlost out to McCauley in a double elimination. With just five players left, only the Israel player Yuval Bronshtein had won a WSOP bracelet before, but he crashed out in fourth after Rajvir Dua had departed in fifth. Indian player Neel Joshi had led for a long time in the run-up to the final table but could last no longer and left in third place when his start-stack shove with king-deuce ran into McCauley’s pocket sixes. Wilson was only a little shorter than the chip leader, but he was on the rail when his shove for 15 big blinds with [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"] saw a call from McCauley with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"] and the board of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="8d"] gave the American player his first-ever WSOP bracelet. WSOP 2021 Event #86 $1,000 Super Turbo Final Table Results: Michael McCauley - $161,384 Andrew Wilson - $99,742 Neel Joshi - $72,031 Yuval Bronshtein - $52,679 Rajvir Dua - $39,022 Filippo Ragone - $29,282 Luigi Curcio - $22,263 Marc Lomeo - $17,153 Dara O'Kearney - $13,395 Holz Leads The $100K On Day 1 of the $100,000-entry High Roller, Fedor Holz showed once again why he is still one of the most dangerous high stakes players in the world as he topped the 28 players who survived from 53 entries. Holz’ stack of 3,415,000 was marginally ahead of David Peters’ 3,305,000 as a top-quality field produced some big stacks belonging to superstars with plenty of bracelets between them. Oddly, however, while there are 8 bracelets between the top 10 players, only three players of that number have won one, with Michael Addamo (3) coming into Day 2 sixth in chips with over 1.8 million, behind Holz (2) and Peters (also 3). With big names such as Sam Grafton (2,120,000), Sorel Mizzi (1,380,000), Sam Soverel (1,070,000), Dan Smith (665,000), and Ben Heath (610,000) all in the Top 20, the potential late registration of both Phil Hellmuth and Josh Arieh could yet decide the destiny of the WSOP Player of the Year title. Players such as Darren Elias, Stephen Chidwick, and Jason Koon all busted on Day 1 but will have the chance to rebuy before the first card hits the felt on Day 2. WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 NLHE High Roller Top 10 Chipcounts: Fedor Holz - 3,415,000 David Peters - 3,305,000 Orpen Kisacikoglu - 3,040,000 Sam Grafton - 2,120,000 Bill Klein - 1,885,000 Jonathan Little - 1,625,000 Seth Davies - 1,260,000 Laszlo Bujtas - 1,240,000 John Lilic - 1,190,000 Michael Addamo - 885,000 Finally, we stay with Koon as the GGPoker ambassador and first-time WSOP bracelet winner this series paid tribute to a great player given little credit apart from in the past few days. Sincerity rocks, people. https://twitter.com/JasonKoon/status/1462499757369139201  
  4. The 2021 World Series of Poker kicks into high gear in its third week with three Championship bracelet events, another tough $5K No Limit tournament, and a high roller that’s certain to be packed with some of the biggest names in the game. Here’s everything you can look forward to in Week Three of the WSOP. Spotlight Tournament Event #38 - $50,000 High Roller There are so many big events taking place in Week 3, but the $50,000 NLHE High Roller is the biggest. The promise of a massive payday for those who make it deep will attract an array of the poker world's top-tier pros plus a few wealthy shot takers. The $50K is the biggest buy-in of the series to date and is one of just six tournaments on the schedule that has a price tag of this amount (or higher). If the field of week one's Event #6 ($25,000 High Roller) is any indication, this $50K will see all the nosebleed names you enjoy watching battle lining up to register. This should include the likes of Daniel Negreanu, Michael Addamo, Jason Koon, David Peters, and many, many more. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see the field size dip below 100 (the first $50K of the 2019 series hit 110 runners), but one should expect around 70 runners to create a prize pool that will award first-place prize that ranks among the top three of the series thus far. Plus, you can watch all the action go down as the final table is broadcast on PokerGO on Thursday, October 21. Complete WSOP Week 3 Schedule [table id=267 /] Championship Events Event #36 - $10K Dealers Choice There’s no doubt about it, the $50,000 Poker Players Championship is one of the most prestigious events on the schedule. However, the $10,000 Dealers Choice Championship could be considered, by some, a baby version of the event. It’s the highest price point for an event where all the games are on the table. The big difference is, there are more games up for grabs. It's up to the players to decide what will be played and what will be left on the sidelines. With that being the case, you have to know how to play all the games in order to have the best shot at winning. In 2019, the event drew just over 120 runners and had a final table that included Nick Schulman, Matt Glantz, and Shaun Deeb. In the end, it was Adam Friedman who took home the gold and the $312,417 first-place prize. Which mixed-game master will it be this year? Event #40 - $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. What to know who will be playing the $10K H.O.R.S.E.? Just take a look at who busted early from the tournament above and everyone who battled in Event #2 ($25,000 H.O.R.S.E.). This means it’s going to be a who’s who of the mixed game community. The five-game rotation is a staple of the series and this year will likely see 100 of the game’s best battling for the six-figure score. Greg Mueller is likely to be on hand to defend his 2019 title which brought him $425,347. Plus, expect some of the players who ran deep in the $25K, including Chad Eveslage and Benny Glaser, to try and make it back to another H.O.R.S.E. final table. Spend your Saturday (October 23) tuning in to the $10 H.O.R.S.E. final table on PokerGO. Event #45 - $10K Pot Limit Omaha The third and final Championship Event of the week is the $10K Pot Limit Omaha. A favorite among action seekers, the $10K PLO promises to be one of the more unpredictable events of the week as well as having the largest field size of the three. The Championship for the "Great Game" will, like those $10K’s before it, also be attracting the big names and well as some specialists who might only make it out in these non NLHE events. Tune in next week, on Tuesday, October 26, to watch the action unfold at the final table. One More To Watch Event #47 - $5K NLHE Freezeout Last week, the $5K Six-Max, one of the toughest tournaments of the series, took place. This week there’s another $5K, but this time it’s an eight-handed freezeout. These $5Ks have some of the most shark-infested fields of any series. The NLHE wizards who aren’t yet rolled for $10K plus usually find a way to get themselves involved in a $5K making for a registration list filled with some of the game’s best-known talent mixed with a healthy dose of up-and-coming talent. Keep an eye on this one.
  5. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl kicks off in Las Vegas at the PokerGO Studio on Monday, September 27 with some of the biggest names in tournament poker vying for a piece that will be, undoubtedly, a hefty seven-figure prize pool with multiple millions of dollars being shipped to the winner. With the $300,000 buy-in bringing out poker's best and brightest you might be thinking about getting a sweat going while watching the action unfold online. So, whether you are drafting a team with a few friends or playing a little fantasy poker these are the names you should be targeting to make sure they are on your SHRB Squad. These guys are the first-round picks for the 2021 Super High Roller Bowl. #1. Michael Addamo The dominance of Michael Addamo cannot be denied. And when you run as good as he is running right now, you top the list of SHRB draft picks. His high-roller credentials have been more than checked out - in addition to going back-to-back at the end of the 2021 Poker Masters to claim the Purple Jacket (and $1.84 million in 48-hours), Addamo is also the all-time leader in victories of the GGPoker Super MILLION$ where he’s amassed more than $1 million in profit. Add to that, he's also a two-time WSOP bracelet winner and Aussie Poker Open Main Event champ (among other accolades.) While others on this list may have more past SHRB success, Addamo is a player you simply can’t pass up. #2. Stephen Chidwick But...if one were to pass up Addamo and his sun run, they’d be a fool to pass up UK crusher Stephen Chidwick. With more than $35 million in total live earnings, Chidwick - a former #1 GPI ranked player and 2019 European Player of the Year - is both the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion and 2020 Australian Poker Open winner. As an aside, he was voted, by his peers, at the Global Poker Awards as the Players Choice for Toughest Opponent. Like Addamo, he enters the SHRB with momentum, cashing in three events of the 2021 Poker Masters, including a victory in Event #7 for $183,600. Plus, he’s cashed in three previous Super High Roller Bowls, all in 2018, including the last one that took place in Las Vegas where he finished in third place for $1.5 million. #3. David Peters David Peters may not be a trendy pick at #3, but there may be no more reliable player in the field. Sitting fifth on the All-Time Money List, Peters simply knows how to win. He’s proven that yet again this year by taking home the Golden Eagle trophy in the 2021 U.S. Poker Open after winning three of the four events he cashed in. Plus, he’s had plenty of SHRB success, including a fifth-place finish in this year’s SHRB Europe for $820,000 and a final table finish in the inaugural event back in 2015. Simply put, Peters is the kind of player who can win it all on any given day. #4 Ali Imsirovic Critics might say that fourth is a little high for young Ali Imsirovic, after all, there are SHRB champions that are ranked underneath him. But there are only a few players who have spent as much time in the PokerGO Studio grinding high rollers in the past 24 months as Imsirovic. This gives him a huge home-field advantage. And you don’t have to look too hard to see how hard (and often) Imsirovic crushes high rollers. The 2018 Poker Masters champion currently only has one seven-figure cash on his ever-growing resume however that was a runner-up finish to Cary Katz in the 2019 Super High Roller Bowl London. Imsirovic just seems destined to add more million-dollar scores in the very near future. While he didn’t have a standout performance in this year’s Poker Masters, he should find a way to bounce back here in the Main Event. #5. Justin Bonomo No one loves the Super High Roller Bowl more than Justin Bonomo. According to PokerGO, no one has won more money from Super High Roller Bowl events than Bonomo, who has reaped $12,706,516 worth of cashes thanks to back-to-back SHRB title in 2018. Hell, even in the midst of COVID, Bonomo took down the Super High Roller Bowl $100K Online Event for $1.775 million. So, why is Bonomo only fifth? It’s not a comment on his talent against the field obviously, it’s simply a question of if he will actually be in the field? And if so, without a live result for the better part of two years, how will he perform? Even not knowing the answer to either question, you still gotta put respect on his name and include him in the top 5 picks. #6. Mikita Badziakouski Belarusian nosebleed crusher Mikita Badziakouski has proven himself time and time again to be one of the best tournament players on the planet. With more than $29 million in live earning, Badziakouski seems to have a way of always making a deep run in the most critical of events. Like Addamo, Badziakouski showed up a little early in Las Vegas to warm up before the SHRB. He promptly took down a Poker Masters event and made the final table of the Main Event. That was coming off of two third-place finishes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe. In 2018, Badziakouski took third in May’s SHRB event for $1.6 million, and then in 2020, he did the same in the event in the Bahamas for another $1.6 million. If it’s Badziakouski walking away with the win in 2021, there won’t be a single surprised person in the PokerGO Studio. #7. Jake Schindler You’d best not sleep on Jake Schindler in any event, especially one in the PokerGO Studio. Schindler rolls into the SHRB with three recent results from the 2021 Poker Masters, a pair of cashes in the prelims of the SHRB Europe, and a PokerGO cup event win. He’s generally considered one of the very best tournament players on the planet and that was on full display in 2017 when he finished second to Christoph Vogelsang in the SHRB for a career-high $3.6 million payday. Although he’s seventh on this list, any person betting on Schindler should feel confident that they have an absolute top-tier player on in their corner. #8. Jason Koon One of the nicest guys on the high-roller scene is also one of the most dangerous. Jason Koon, currently seventh on the All-Time Money List, has enjoyed plenty of success in the SHRB over the years, cashing in four SHRB live events. Because the 2018 heads-up between Bonomo and Daniel Negreanu was so memorable, it often gets forgotten that Koon had a shot at winning the title that year, but he fell in third place for $2.1 million score. However, history aside, Koon has been putting in work at the PokerGO Studio over the summer, including taking down a PokerGO cup event for $324,000. Like Schindler ahead of him on the list, Koon isn’t flashy at the table - he just produces results. If he gets close here in 2021, it wouldn't be a shocker to see him finally take one down. #9. Daniel Negreanu Daniel Negreanu’s infamous “second-place streak” has come to an end and "Kid Poker" is back to his winning ways. This includes locking up the overall leaderboard in the 2021 PokerGO Cup and a victory in the 2021 Poker Masters, where he was in the running for the Purple Jacket right up until the start of the final event. Negreanu is one of those “old school” players that polarizes fans when it comes to the biggest events in the world. However, where others of his era have been unable to compete with the young crop of crushers, Negreanu constantly provides receipts. It should be noted that one of those second-place finishes that people point to was his runner-up finish in the 2018 SHRB to Bonomo - good for a cool $3 million. In the interest of transparency, Daniel Negreanu is selling a piece of his 2021 Super High Roller Bowl action here on PocketFives. #10. Sam Soverel Another player that thrives in the PokerGO Studio is Sam Soverel. Soverel, the 2019 Poker Masters overall champion, currently sits in third place on PokerGO’s high-roller leaderboard by thoroughly dominating a string of $10K tournaments throughout 2021. There are a number of players who could be considered right here, but it’s Soverel’s undeniable success in this atmosphere plus incredible momentum that puts him as the final player in round one. The only downside of taking him here, as opposed to a player like two-time champion Tim Adams, fan-favorite Nick Petrangelo, or up-and-comer Chris Brewer, is his lack of previous SHRB results. But this may be the year that changes. The 2021 Super High Roller Bowl is available to stream from Sept. 27-29 on PokerGO. A recap of the final table will be available here on PocketFives.
  6. High-stakes online professional Wiktor ‘Limitless’ Malinowski captured a resume-topping live score after taking down the Super High Roller Bowl Europe $250,000 Main Event for his first SHRB ring and the $3,690,000 first-place prize. The quarter-million-dollar tournament attracted an elite field of 41 entries and created a prize pool of more than $10.2 million. Poker superstars including Phil Ivey, Michael Addamo, Bryn Kenney, and Ali Imsirovic all made their way to Merit Royal Hotel & Casino in Cyprus to take their shot at a seven-figure score but it was Poland’s Malinowski who topped them all. In the end, ‘Limitless’ was able to lean on his expertise in heads-up play in what turned out to be a lengthy heads-up match against Malaysian tournament specialist Ivan Leow in order to win his career-best cash. It didn’t take long for the first player to fall. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 ante) Viacheslav Buldygin, who started the day with just eight big blinds, was all the way down to fewer than two big blinds. Holding [poker card="ac"][poker card="2s"], he called the 50,000 big blind, leaving himself just 40,000. Right behind him, Leow also called holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"] and Ruan Zhuang checked his big blind option with [poker card="6d"][poker card="4s"]. The three players saw a flop of [poker card="qh"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"]. It checked through to Leow who put in a bet of 90,000. Zhuang quickly folded and Buldygin committed the rest of his chips. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] giving Buldygin some additional outs, however, the [poker card="6s"] river was not one of them and the Russian exited in sixth place for $512,500. It was an up and down day for David Peters who, early at the final table found a critical double up and then, not long after provided a double-up of his own to Leow when Leow’s [poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] flopped a set on Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"]. With just ten big blinds left, Peters moved all-in from under the gun holding [poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"]. Right behind him, Leow leveraged some of those chips he took off Peters and made the call with the [poker card="ah"][poker card="9h"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair saw a flop of [poker card="qh"][poker card="qs"][poker card="tc"], keeping Peters ahead. The [poker card="9d"] turn gave Leow a pair and left Peters looking for one of the final fours in the deck. The river came the [poker card="jc"] and Peters headed for the exit to collect his $820,000 fifth-place prize as Leow took over the chip lead. It was just ten minutes later when Malinowski picked up [poker card="ah"][poker card="as"] and put in a raise to 125,000. It folded to Timothy Adams who, in the big blind with [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"], moved all-in for his final 25 big blinds. Malinowski snap-called putting Adams at risk. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"] flop brought open-ended straight outs for Adams but kept Malinowski as a three-to-one favorite. The [poker card="3d"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="6h"] hit the river, Adams was eliminated in fourth place for $1,127,500. With three left, Malinowski and Leow were nearly even in chips with Zhuang looking up with just over 15 big blinds. After the first break, on the first hand of 30,000/60,000 (60,000 ante), Zhuang raised to 120,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="ac"]. Leow made the call, defending his big blind with [poker card="8c"][poker card="7s"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"] and when Leow checked it over to Zhuang put out a bet of 200,000, which Leow quickly called. The turn came the [poker card="9d"], keeping Zhuang ahead but offering Leow additional outs to a gutshot straight. Leow checked again, and with a little more than a pot-sized bet left, Zhuang moved all-in for 755,000. This time, Leow took his time and got a complete count. Deep in the tank, he used multiple time bank extensions before eventually making the call. With only nine outs in the deck, the river came the [poker card="tc"], giving Leow the straight and cracking the aces of Zhuang. Zhuang fell in third place and picked up a career-high score of $1,640,000. As heads-up play got underway, Leow held a 15 big blind chip lead over Malinowski. However, it only took one hand for Malinowski to bring the chip stacks to even. After that, the grind began. Malinowski and Leow embarked on a heads-up battle that lasted over five hours with grabbing and losing momentum and the chip lead being passed back and forth. The early hours of heads up belonged to Malinowski and eventually, Leow clawed his way back to the chip lead. As the blinds increased to 100,000/200,000 (200,000 ante) the stacks were within four big blinds of each other when the penultimate hand of the match had the biggest swing of the tournament. Malinowski raised to 400,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"] and, with the larger stack, Leow moved all-in with his [poker card="ad"][poker card="4h"]. Malinowski call, putting himself at risk. Both players stood and watched as the flop came [poker card="8c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] keeping Malinowski ahead but offering Leow some extra outs. The turn was the [poker card="8h"], bringing some additional chop outs. But the river was the [poker card="9s"] and Malinowski picked up the biggest pot of the tournament, leaving Leow’s stack crippled to just three big blinds. It was all over the next hand when Malinowski moved all-in holding [poker card="9s"][poker card="8d"] and Leow stuck it in as well with the [poker card="jc"][poker card="4c"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5d"], but it was the [poker card="8s"] turn that paired Malinowski and there was no help for Leow with the [poker card="4h"] river. After a hard-fought heads-up match, Leow took home $2,460,000 as the runner-up and Wiktor ‘Limitless’ Malinowski captured his first Super High Roller Bowl Main Event ring and the $3,690,000 first-place prize, far and away a career-high live score. Super High Roller Bowl Europe Main Event Final Table Results Wiktor Malinowski - $3,690,000 Ivan Leow - $2,460,000 Ruan Zhuang - $1,640,000 Timothy Adams - $1,127,500 David Peters - $820,000 Viacheslav Buldygin - $512,500
  7. The record books will reflect that there was an official winner in Event #1 of PokerGO’s 2021 Poker Masters ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em), but it was hardly a definitive one as Shannon Shorr and David Peters effectively “played to a tie” on Wednesday night. After a lengthy, see-saw heads-up battle that lasted nearly two hours, the duo agreed that, in order to play the next event (Event #2), that they would simply split up the remaining prize pool and flip for leaderboard points. In the end, all the chips ended on Shorr’s side of the table and he was crowned the winner of the tournament and given 1st place points. The 12-event Poker Masters kicked off with 82 entries of Event #1 pushing the prize pool to $820,000. After a full day of play, the final seven returned for Day 2 to crown a winner and try to award a $205,000 first-place prize. Coming into the final table with fewer than ten big blinds, Ben Yu wasn’t long for the final table busting in the day’s opening moments when he got all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] against Shorr’s [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"]. When the board ran out [poker card="kc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="qc"][poker card="4c"], Yu tapped the table and exited in seventh place for $41,000. With the blinds at 25,000/50,000 (50,000 bb ante), Shorr opened to 100,000 on the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="qh"]. In the small blind, Brock Wilson looked down at [poker card="jd"][poker card="td"] and made the call. Then from the big blind, John Riordan who started the day as the second shortest stack moved all-in for his final 10 big blinds with [poker card="as"][poker card="8h"]. With the action on Shorr, he four-bet shipped all-in having Wilson covered. Wilson quickly released and the cards were put on their backs. The flop came [poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5s"], giving Riordan top pair and putting him in a good spot to double up. However, the [poker card="qh"] turn quickly put Shorr back in charge as Riordan was left looking for one of just two outs. The [poker card="qc"] river ended Riordan’s day in sixth place, good for $49,200. The final five battled for nearly two hours until the next player made their exit. The blinds had climbed to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) and Jonathan Jaffe found himself on the short stack with roughly ten big blinds. When it folded to him in the cutoff with [poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"], Jaffe moved all-in. It folded through to Wilson in the big blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"] and he quickly made the call. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="6d"][poker card="3h"] flop gave Wilson top pair and a commanding lead in the hand. The turn came the [poker card="5d"] bringing some additional gutshot straight outs for Jaffe. But the [poker card="ad"][ spiked on the river and Jaffe moved his chips into the middle, collected his belonging, and headed to the cage to collect $65,500 for fifth place. After losing a big hand against Peters, one in which Wilson was all-in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3d"] against Peters’ [poker card="kd"][poker card="kc"], Wilson moved to the bottom of the chip counts. At the 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante) level, Wilson and Peters clashed again. Peters put in a raise on the button to 225,000 with his [poker card="ks"][poker card="qs"] and Wilson, in the big blind with just under 10 big blinds remaining, defended holding the [poker card="kh"][poker card="6h"]. The flop came [poker card="kc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="5s"], giving both players top pair but keeping kickers in play. Wilson checked it over to Peters who bet the minimum, 100,000. Wilson then check-raised all-in and Peters made the call. The turn was the [poker card="ac"], bringing Wilson some chop outs. But the [poker card="3s"] ended Wilson’s run in fourth place, adding $82,600 to his bankroll. READ: Empire State to Sin City: Brock Wilson Ready for Breakout Moment At three-handed, the chip stacks evened out until at 50,000/125,000 (125,000 bb ante) Shorr crept out to a small lead, while Peters and Dylan DeStefano remained neck and neck. On the button, Peters looked down at [poker card="js"][poker card="jh"] and put in a raise to 250,000. After Shorr folded his small blind, action was on DeStefano in the big blind with [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"] and just under 20 big blinds. He took a long look at Peters and then announced he was all-in and Peters, with the bigger stack, snap-called. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"] brought DeStefano a whole host of outs including potential flush, pair and backdoor straight outs. The turn was was the [poker card="ks"], leaving DeStefano with one more chance to his 10 outs. It didn’t come, the river was the [poker card="7c"] and DeStefano wrapped up in third place for $98,400. After taking out DeStefano, Peters started head-up play with a slight chip lead but Shorr was quick to even the stacks. Then the pair went to battle. Shorr built a considerable chip lead of roughly four-to-one and then Peters doubled. Shorr built it back up and Peters continued to hang around and then he took the lead. The pair bounced back and forth each taking turns trying to eliminate the other. All the while, registration for Event #2 was coming to a close and both players were eager to make sure they registered. Peters held a 7.6 million to 2.6 million chip lead over Shorr, at the 100,000/200,000 (200,000 bb ante) level, when he open shipped the big stack holding [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"]. Shorr made the call holding the [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"] and it looked like Peters might finally lock up the win. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="th"][poker card="3c"] flop gave Shorr a flush draw which came in on the [poker card="9c"] turn. Peters needed a nine on the river to take the hand, but instead the river came the [poker card="qh"] and the pair were back to even with a quarter of an ante difference between them. At that point, they agreed to a deal (that may have been agreed to earlier) and then flipped for leaderboard points. “We’re effectively calling this a draw,” said PokerGO commentator Jeff Platt. “We can do an adjusted chop,” Shorr said, indicating that what little difference there was would be split in the aftermath. They both shipped all-in blind with Shorr winning the hand and being declared the official winner, claiming first-place leaderboard points. Poker Masters Event #1 Final Table Results Shannon Shorr - $205,000 officially* David Peters - $147,600 officially* Dylan DeStefano - $98,400 Brock Wilson - $82,000 Jonathan Jaffe - $65,600 John Riordan - $49,200 Ben Yu - $41,000 * Specific details of the deal were not made public but were discussed in the broadcast.
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