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Found 17 results

  1. Poker Central has acquired the brand and assets for High Stakes Poker, the company announced on Tuesday, and will begin streaming episodes of the show on the PokerGO platform in the coming months. Additionally, Poker Central is said to have future plans for the series, including new episodes. "High Stakes Poker was a remarkable poker program," said Sampson Simmons, president of Poker Central. "With star players, massive pots, and memorable moments, the show beautifully conveys the drama of cash game poker. Bringing the existing episodes of High Stakes Poker to our platform and producing more in the future will enable us to recapture the nostalgia and magic of the show for our PokerGO subscribers in the present-day poker climate." [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="GG Poker"][ptable zone="Party Poker NJ"] High Stakes Poker took place from 2006-2011 and included seven seasons of high-stakes, cash game action during the height of the poker boom. Over its many seasons, the show was hosted by Gabe Kaplan, AJ Benza, Kara Scott, and Norm Macdonald, with Kaplan and Benza hosting together through the show’s first five seasons. The show’s success was propelled by the astronomical stakes of poker that were being played by superstar poker players and celebrities, oftentimes sitting behind huge bricks of cash and mounds of large denomination chips that became staples of the show. Notable players to appear on High Stakes Poker were Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey, Daniel Negreanu, Gus Hansen, Antonio Esfandiari, Sammy Farha, Phil Galfond, and Barry Greenstein. Brunson, Negreanu, Esfandiari, and Greenstein appeared in all seven seasons of the show. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO and are interested in watching High Stakes Poker, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan. Minimum buy-ins for High Stakes Poker ranged from $100,000 to $500,000, depending on the season, and plenty of episodes featured millions of dollars at stake. During Season 4 of High Stakes Poker, poker pro David Benyamine went at it with celebrity businessman Guy Laliberte to create the largest pot in the show’s history, only it came with a plot twist. Largest Pot in High Stakes Poker History In a game with $300-$600 blinds and a $1,200 straddle, Farha started the action with a raise to $4,200 from under the gun with the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="3s"]. Benyamine made the call with the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8c"] and Laliberte called from the big blind with the [poker card="Kd"][poker card="5d"]. The flop was [poker card="Kc"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3d"]. Farha picked up bottom pair, but it was the top two pair for Laliberte and nut flush draw for Benyamine that really made this hand explode. On the flop, Laliberte checked, Farha bet $13,000, and Benyamine raised to $43,000. Laliberte reraised and made it $168,000 to go. Farha folded and Benyamine, behind bricks of cash, stood up, contemplated the decision, and then moved all in for $600,000. Laliberte turned his hand over and thought about the decision before making the call. Laliberte first said to run it once but then the two players went back and forth on what to do. Laliberte had said that the money doesn’t matter to him and would do what Benyamine wanted. Laliberte eventually offered to just take the pot before Benyamine’s all-in raise, which Benyamine agreed to. High Stakes Poker also helped young guns such as Tom Dwan get immense exposure. Of course, it also helps when you play $919,600 pots against one of the game’s greats on television. Although the hand between Laliberte and Benyamine created the largest pot in High Stakes Poker history, the hand ultimately finished with a much cheaper result. The hand Dwan played against Greenstein in Season 5 was played to the fullest for more than $900,000 and it had a single winner. Playing $500-$1,000 blinds, Peter Eastgate raised to $3,500 with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Kh"] and Greenstein reraised to $15,000 with the [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ac"] on the button. Dwan was next and made the call from the small blind with the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qs"]. Eastgate also called and the flop came down [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"]. Dwan fired $28,700, Eastgate folded, and Greenstein raised to $100,000. Dwan made it $244,600 to go and Greenstein moved all in for what was effectively $436,100 total. Dwan called and the pot ballooned to $919,600. Like the Laliberte and Benyamine hand, the question of how many times to run the board out came up. Greenstein said he wanted to run it once but asked if they wanted to take a couple hundred thousand back. Dwan declined and they were off to the races. The turn was the [poker card="Qc"] to vault Dwan into the lead with trip queens. The river completed the board with the [poker card="7d"] and Dwan was the winner of the biggest hand in High Stakes Poker history.
  2. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. In May, the poker world was surprised when it was announced that Daniel Negreanu, the face of PokerStars, was no longer going to be an ambassador for the online site. Daniel Negreanu And PokerStars Part Ways One of the most stable relationships in the poker world ended in May as Daniel Negreanu and PokerStars announced that they would be going their separate ways. Right before the World Series of Poker and only days after his high-profile wedding to Amanda Leatherman, Negreanu took to Twitter and posted a short video that announced that he would no longer be patched up for the online poker giant. Negreanu began representing the PokerStars brand in 2007 and quickly became the face of the company, including taking on plenty of criticism during PokerStars' controversial termination of the SuperNova Elite program in late 2015. “Daniel has been one of the most influential faces of poker and indeed PokerStars for 12 years,” said Stars Group Public Relations associate director Rebecca McAdam. “It has been wonderful to have his passion, support, and insights throughout our relationship. We wish Daniel the very best for the future, as well as wedded bliss and tons of run good this summer.” Six months after the end of his deal with PokerStars, Negreanu announced he would now be representing upcoming online poker site GGPoker in a deal that is believed to be worth even more than his contract with PokerStars. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] PocketFives Counts Down Top 50 Ahead of the 50th Annual World Series of Poker, the PocketFives editorial staff released their list of the 50 Greatest Players in World Series of Poker History. From old-school legends to internet grinders, the list is a snapshot of not just the history of the WSOP, but also of poker itself. Take a look back at our top 10 list of the players who made their name on the World Series of Poker stage. 10. Jason Mercier 9. Michael Mizrachi 8. Chris Ferguson 7. Erik Seidel 6. Daniel Negreanu 5. Johnny Chan 4. Phil Ivey 3. Stu Ungar 2. Doyle Brunson 1. Phil Hellmuth Phil Hellmuth Is Not Satisfied, Never Will Be With the 2019 World Series of Poker right around the corner, 15-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth spoke with PocketFives about what it means for him to hold all the records and what the 1989 Main Event winner was hoping would happen at the series, 30 years after his career-defining victory. “It’s in my nature, it’s in my DNA,” Hellmuth said of his drive to be the best. “I'm super competitive, and I’m competing against the best players in the world, in this era, and past and future eras, for greatest poker player of all time.” partypoker Invades Sin City Summer in Las Vegas belongs to the World Series of Poker. But in 2019, partypoker decided to get in on the action and announced that their partypoker MILLIONS series would be headed to the ARIA Hotel & Casino, marking the first time they’ve held a tournament in America. “We’re looking forward to MILLIONS making its debut this summer at the record,” said ARIA Director of Poker Operations Sean McCormack. “Our team is excited to add an event of this magnitude to our extensive summer schedule.” The partypoker MILLIONS had a $10,300 buy-in and a $5 million guarantee. The tournament ended up crushing the guarantee with Thomas Marchese taking home the $1,000,000 first-place prize of the over $5.36 million prize pool. Alex ‘SploogeLuge’ Foxen Wins May PLB Live or online, when it comes to poker Alex ‘SploogeLuge’ Foxen has proved he can do it all. In May, he took down the PocketFives Leaderboard for the first time. The former GPI #1-ranked player spent plenty of time in Canada this year, grinding some of the biggest online poker tournaments which helped him reach a career-high ranking of #4 in the world and soar past $5 million in lifetime online earnings.
  3. On Thursday, poker legend Doyle Brunson (pictured) Tweeted out some rather disappointing news about his health. From his Twitter handle, @texdolly, he notified the world, "Got my 3rd melanoma confirmed today. Early stages, should be simple operation. Fortunately, it's on my head and everybody knows I'm hardheaded." Always one to lighten the mood no matter what the circumstance, Brunson added, "Simple or not, this will be my 12th major operation. Gonna play poker now because I always heard you get lucky right before you die." Brunson's Tweets elicited plenty of response from poker pros all over the world, including Allen Kessler, who responded, "Best of luck with your surgery, Doyle." Another player wrote, "Wish you the best and a quick recovery to you. I hope to see you at the WSOP this year!" Here's Brunson's Tweet: According to CardPlayer, it's questionable how much we'll see Brunson at the WSOP in Las Vegas this year. The news site explained, "Even though he still plays cash games in Las Vegas, Brunson said last summer that he is likely done playing in any more WSOP Main Events. Brunson said that playing that many hours of poker in a row makes him feel 'like a truck ran over me.'" Brunson is tied with Phil Ivey and Johnny Chan for the second most number of WSOP bracelets won at 10 and took downthe Main Event in 1976 and 1977. In fact, his first six WSOP cashes were all for bracelets. His "Super/System" book series continues to inspire players around the world and he has remained very active in the industry despite his age and health issues. We wish Brunson the best in his surgery and will be hoping for a quick recovery. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  4. The completion of the full second week of the 2018 World Series of Poker was a non-stop poker extravaganza. The summer series has reached full throttle as some of the biggest events on the schedule awarded huge sums of life-changing money. Social media surrounding the series had a few moments of sincerity as poker legend, Doyle Brunson, announced his retirement from tournament play. That said, poker Twitter’s trademark snark was in full form as grinders jumped into event after event, trying to capture gold. So if you are watching from afar, enjoy the view as here’s a little taste of life at the Rio in week 2. Brazilian Million Some of Brazil’s best and brightest talent celebrated Roberly Felicio’s victory in Event #7: $565 Colossus. Felicio defeated the over 13,000 players to take home the first place guaranteed prize of $1,000,000. On to Week 3!
  5. Poker Summer Camp 2018 has come to a close. The 49th annual World Series of Poker is officially in the books and, as time passes, this year will be remembered for the wild one it was. Thousands of players flooded the halls of the Rio All Suites & Casino in search of their slice of the multi-million dollar prize pools, but also to have the time of their lives playing the game that they love. So, before too much time passes and players begin to look forward to their next great poker excursion let’s take a look at some of the most memorable moments from the summer that was WSOP 2018. The Bubble Bursts In a summer filled with hundreds of thousands of hands dealt, the hand that took the Main Event from ten players down to the official final table of nine may be one of the most extraordinary in Main Event history. The hand seemed so improbable. Three players all-in, two of them holding pocket kings and a third with pocket aces being broadcast to the world via ESPN. Nick Manion raised with his aces and, behind him, Antonie Labat opted to simply call his pocket kings. When short-stacked Yueqi Zhu peered down at his own pair of pocket kings, he moved all in. Having Zhu covered, but with fewer chips than Labat, Manion moved all-in as well. Then Labat had a big decision: call here with his under-represented kings for a shot at the chip lead or preserve his current stack, which was second in strength at the start of the hand. Labat called and the poker world witnessed a three-way all-in to determine who was going to be at the final table. Most likely, more than the players who held the hands, the hand itself will be remembered and celebrated for years to come as an example that when it comes to the WSOP Main Event, anything can happen. Doyle Tips His Hat, Says Goodbye Have we really seen the last of “The Godfather of Poker” Doyle Brunson at the World Series of Poker? “I’m planning on retiring after the summer,” Doyle said in an interview with Poker Central “My wife is not in very good health, and I will stay with her for the duration of either her life or mine. I’m going to stop playing completely, but while I might change my mind, I don’t think that I will. This will be the last time that my wife and I have to spend together, and right now, every day that I leave the house I feel guilty.” His wife’s health situation, as well as the grueling grind of the WSOP’s multi-day tournaments, had the poker world faced with the fact that, at age 84, this may be the last time to appreciate the on-the-felt endeavors of a poker legend. Doyle did not disappoint his fans either. For his last tournament he a deep run Event #23: $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Championship. For a brief moment, it seemed like the poker gods were going to bless Brunson with his 11th bracelet. It did not come to pass though, as Brunson ended up scooting to the rail in sixth place for just over $43,000, bringing a close to a WSOP career that started back in 1972. [caption id="attachment_619532" align="alignnone" width="1200"] Doyle Brunson bid farewell to the World Series of Poker on Tuesday. (Drew Amato photo/PokerCentral)[/caption] Once the moment of Brunson's final tournament passed, he later indicated that he may not be done with the game after all. Spectacle Hellmuth Love it or hate it, both players and fans of poker will remember Phil Hellmuth’s 2018 entrance into the World Series of Poker Main Event. Hellmuth, sitting astride a custom built chopper, came to the tournament dressed as the Marvel Comic’s Prince of Asgard, Thor. He strode into the halls of the Rio shouting "By Odin's Beard!" and hoisting a makeshift hammer high in the air. Surrounded by 14 models, all dressed as the DC comic’s staple heroine Wonder Woman, Hellmuth's grand entrance was captured and broadcast for all to see thanks to the ESPN cameras. Are the circus-like arrivals for the, now, 15-time bracelet winner "good for poker" because they are just good clean fun? Or are they simply a publicity stunt for the man in the middle of the spectacle itself? Either way, the entrance achieved the desired effect as, for the day, social media was abuzz with all things Hellmuth. Colossal Mistake Time and time again we see the pulse-pounding moments when players are on the verge of capturing their first WSOP bracelet. Flush with excitement, but reserved until the hardware is in their hands, it’s easy to be happy for those humble enough to win with grace. Sometimes though, the excitement of having your opponent crushed is too much to handle. When excitement becomes excessive celebration, the poker gods are happy to hand down a healthy dose of humility. Sang Liu couldn't contain his excitement when he discovered that he had Roberly Felicio all-in and dominated. The pair were heads-up for the million-dollar payday of the 2018 Colossus and victory for Liu was two cards away. Lui did just about everything you shouldn't do. He jumped in the air, he danced around the table, ripped off his jacket and, perhaps even, began spending his life-changing payday in his mind. That was not going to happen as with only three outs to the river, Felicio was granted his "one-time" and Liu’s dreams of being a WSOP champion were wiped away. Michael Dyer, ended that strange Day 5 with a massive chip lead, which he rode all the way to a third-place finish in the Main Event.
  6. In June, the poker world is consumed with results and stories coming out of the World Series of Poker. This year was no different with players, like Michael Mizrachi, accomplishing previously inconceivable feats and legends, like Doyle Brunson, hinting that their time playing the game may have finally come to an end. Here are some of the biggest stories that made headlines in the month of June. World Series of Poker Takeover If you follow poker, then it is impossible to get away from the World Series of Poker in June and here at PocketFives, we brought you wire-to-wire coverage of the biggest tournaments taking place at the Rio in Las Vegas. Some of the biggest names in the game were crushing the highest stakes and taking home new hardware to add to their poker legacy. Additionally, amateurs were making dreams come true by winning life-changing money and fulfilling their poker dreams. Relive some of the summer glory by checking out some of the most popular headlines from the WSOP. Read: Siever Takes Down $10K Limit, Nguyen Wins MONSTER Stack Read: WSOP Social Media Fun Ramps Up In Week One Read: Just How The **** Are You Supposed To Bead John Smith? Read: Matt Mendez ‘Goes From Cards’ And Chips To WSOP History Maker Doyle Brunson Hints At Retirement In the midst of the 2018 World Series of Poker, news came down that Doyle Brunson - who had given up WSOP tournaments in recent years - registered for the $10K No Limit Deuce To Seven event. It was “probably the last one I’ll ever play.” he tweeted. However, after comments he had made to Poker Central, it looked as if this was not only his last tournament but that he was planning on walking away from the game of poker at the end of the summer. “I’m planning on retiring after the summer,” Brunson said citing that he wished to spend more time with his wife Louise, who was in declining health. Brunson then went on a deep run in Event #23, eventually finishing in seventh place. He tipped his hat and left the Rio to a standing ovation. Brunson has not yet stepped away from the game, regularly appearing both in Bobby’s Room at the Bellagio as well as on camera playing the highest mixed games on PokerGO. He had recently commented that his wife has been feeling better. Read: Doyle Brunson Spent 30 Hours Taking the Poker World Back In Time Read: Doyle Brunson Announces Retirement, Goes Deep in $10K 2-7 Shaun Deeb Wins Third WSOP Bracelet “I think I have a great shot at Player of the Year right now so I think I’m gonna battle in every event I can and just enjoy myself.” - Shaun Deeb, Back in June, the writing was on the wall. Former #1-ranked PocketFives member Shaun Deeb was on a heater and on a collision course with the 2018 WSOP Player of the Year award. Deeb picked up his third WSOP bracelet this summer when he outlasted Ben Yu heads-up in the $25K PLO event during Event #42: $25,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed High Roller for a massive score of $1.4 million. Deeb went on to pick up his fourth bracelet of the summer during Event #74: $10,000 No Limit Hold’em 6-Handed Big Blind Ante for another $814K - essentially propelling him to his first WSOP Player of the Year title. Read: WSOP - Former #1 Shaun Deeb Wins $25K PLO For 3rd Bracelet ($1.4M) Michael ‘The Grinder’ Mizrachi Wins His Third $50K PPC Title The $50K Poker Players Championship is still one of the most coveted titles in poker. Which makes it all the more impressive that in June of 2018 Michael Mizrachi took down the event for an incredible third time, beating Poker Hall of Fame member John Hennigan heads-up for the title. “It’s quite an accomplishment,” Mizrachi said, reflecting on his win. “To win the first one was amazing. The second was great. The third one is unheard of.” His third PPC victory was the fourth bracelet win of his career and awarded him a $1.2 million payday. It was the sixth seven-figure cash of his storied career. Read: WSOP - Michael Mizrachi Wins Third $50K PPC Title ($1.23M) Read: 5 Things - The Poker Players Champions Deserves More Celebration Alex Foxen, Kristen Bicknell Chop Venetian $5K A tinge of controversy surrounded the $5,000 $1 Million Guaranteed Mid-Stakes Poker Tour Main Event at the Venetian when well-known poker power couple Kristen Bicknell and Alex Foxen ended up chopping the event heads-up. Foxen, the high-roller powerhouse, officially took home the win, the trophy and $239,000 for first. His better-half Bicknell, took home $200,000 as the runner-up. However, after the tournament, there were some accusations of soft-play on social media between the couple. When the play became three-handed, Kahle Burns declined a three-way deal. When he fell in third place for $120,000, there was some over-analysis of hands that were played on the live stream and discussion over how to handle a situation where an actual couple is competing at a final table. Read: Alex Foxen Tops Venetian $5K To Headline Non-WSOP Events ‘C Darwin2’ Takes Down June PLB It was yet another month at the top of the PocketFives Monthly PLB for the Swedish superstar ‘C Darwin2’ in June. He had held over the rankings for the better part of 2018 and his dominance continued into early summer. Despite pulling back on volume, ‘C Darwin2’ managed a few major scores in June. In the first week he took down the Winamax Mini Las Vegas High Roller for $46,404. He also managed a runner-up finish in the June 17 edition of the PokerStars $2,100 Bounty Builder High Roller for over $25,000. In total, he posted eight five-figure scores in the month. In the end, it wasn’t really a close race in June as ‘C Darwin2’ held a nearly 1000 PLB point lead over his closest competition, Denmark’s ‘x_zola25’.
  7. [caption width="640"] Only three of the four top seeds are moving on to the WPT Champions Challenge Sweet 16.[/caption] Even though they've had little trouble this year, number one seeds don’t always breeze through the NCAA tournament. Upsets happen. It seems that the World Poker Tour Champions Challenge is no different. Carlos Mortensen, top seed in the Hearts Region, was beaten by poker hall of famer and eight seed Erik Seidel in the Round of 32. The other three top seeds, Gus Hansen, Anthony Zinno and Daniel Negreanu, all advanced to the Sweet 16. The Champions Challenge is a bracket-style tournament pitting 64 former WPT champions against each other with each match-up decided by a fan vote on WPT.com. The field of 64, and the seeding, were determined by taking into account the WPT success of each player. In the Sweet 16, Hansen is matched up against Alan Goehring, while Zinno takes on Mohsin Charania and Negreanu has Jonathan Little as his opponent. There was only two other upsets in the second round, but poker fans might not call one of them that. Doyle Brunson, seeded 11th in the Clubs region, beat Darren Elias, a three seed, to advance to the third round. While Brunson’s popularity is unquestionable, his WPT resume isn’t quite as polished as Elias’. Brunson has one WPT title, three WPT final tables, eight WPT cashes and $2,081,824 in earnings, but Elias has two WPT wins, five final tables and 19 cashes and he only trails Brunson’s lifetime WPT earnings by $189,000. Still, Brunson earned enough fan votes to move on. The other upset came in the Spades region as 11 seed Phil Laak beat out 3 seed Freddy Deeb. Laak’s victory sets up a third round match-up that will probably end up as the most talked about of the round. Laak now faces his best friend, Antonio Esfandiari, in the Sweet 16. The pair have been good friends since long before their WPT success. Those two aren’t the only good friends facing off in the next round though. After upsetting Elias, Brunson now faces Hoyt Corkins for a chance at moving on to the Elite Eight. Like Elias, Corkins brings a better-than-Doyle WPT resume to the table, but his two WPT titles, six final tables, 19 cashes and $3.5 million in earnings might not be enough to overcome Brunson’s popularity. This round of voting is open until Friday at 5 pm ET. The WPT Champions Challenge Sweet 16 Clubs Region Daniel Negreanu vs. Jonathan Little Hoyt Corkins vs. Doyle Brunson Diamonds Region Anthony Zinno vs. Mohsin Charania JC Tran vs. Barry Greenstein Hearts Region Erik Seidel vs. Marvin Rettenmaier Phil Ivey vs. Michael Mizrachi Spades Region Gus Hansen vs. Alan Goehring Antonio Esfandiari vs. Phil Laak
  8. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. Doyle Brunson BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 10 37 $3,038,079 26 Doyle Brunson has always been the 'Godfather of Poker.' Now, he's the #2 greatest player in World Series of Poker history. Brunson has one of those seen-it-all, done-it-all types of careers that would put him at the top of any industry. He’s the proud owner of 10 WSOP gold bracelets, two WSOP Main Event titles, and a reputation so immense that it transcends the game. Although he comes in at #2 on this list, there would be shame shame if he ranked #1 on yours. Brunson came up in Texas and was quite the athlete in his younger years. In fact, he was likely going to become a member of the Minneapolis Lakers in the NBA until a knee injury ended those dreams. They say "what’s one man’s trash is another man’s treasure" and Brunson certainly became one of the poker community’s greatest treasures quickly after he took up the game full time following his injury. A career as a salesman just wasn’t cutting it for the competitive Texan. Brunson has been playing at the World Series of Poker since its start, and his first WSOP cash was in the 1972 WSOP Main Event where he placed third. There is a great story about this event and if you dig up the results, you would find that Brunson and second-place finisher Puggy Pearson each earned more money than the winner, Thomas 'Amarillo Slim' Preston. As the story goes, Brunson and Pearson didn’t want to win because they didn’t want to take on the spotlight. Preston accepted the honor and took the title, which he ran with and became an ambassador for poker players and gamblers alike. Brunson won his first gold bracelet in 1976. That year, he actually won two. He first won the $5,000 No-Limit 2-7 Draw and then he captured the WSOP Main Event title. The following year, Brunson sung the same tune, winning two gold bracelets including a successful title defense of his WSOP Main Event victory. Brunson’s streak of consecutive years winning WSOP gold continued in 1978 and 1979. In 1980, he was blanked on WSOP wins, but he came second in two events, with one being the WSOP Main Event. Incredibly so, Brunson took fourth in the 1982 Main Event and third in the 1983 Main Event. There was a gap in Brunson’s WSOP wins from 1979 to 1991, with him winning the $2,500 No-Limit Hold’em tournament in 1991 for $208,000. He then won his eighth bracelet in 1998, ninth in 2003, and 10th in 2005, and it’s the latter two that could be argued as just as impressive as any of the others. Poker was exploding in the early to mid 2000s. Chris Moneymaker won the WSOP Main Event in 2003 and helped ignite the poker boom, but even in 2003 the field sizes were getting bigger and tougher than ever before. That year, Brunson won the $2,000 H.O.R.S.E. event that had Scotty Nguyen and Chip Jett at the final table, plus Allen Cunningham, Carlos Mortensen, and Phil Hellmuth made the money. Brunson then won the $5,000 Short-Handed No-Limit Hold’em event in 2005, topping a field of 301 entries and winning $367,800. At 71 years old, clearly Brunson still had plenty of game left. That was the last time Brunson earned WSOP gold, in 2005, but it wasn’t the last time he cashed or reached a final table. He took eighth in the $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. in 2006, sixth in the $10,000 World Championship Pot-Limit Omaha in 2007, and seventh in the $10,000 World Championship Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo in 2009. Then later in 2009, although it wasn’t a final table appearance, Brunson finished 17th in the WSOP Europe £10,000 Main Event from a stack field of 334 entries. Notably, Brunson reached the final table of the $10,000 No-Limit 2-7 Draw in 2018 and finished in sixth place. He then announced he would be retiring from tournament poker and only sticking to cash games if he was going to play. Any way you slice it, Brunson is hands down, without argument, one of the greatest, most influential poker players in WSOP history. He’s meant an incredible amount to poker and without him, the game wouldn’t be what it is today.
  9. Clear your schedules for the next two nights as "Godfather Week" takes over Poker After Dark. Doyle Brunson will be joined by a handful of poker’s biggest names as they compete for astronomical stakes in a mixed game cash game on PokerGO. Along with Brunson, Gus Hansen, Daniel 'Jungleman' Cates, Scott Seiver, Brian Rast, and Billy O'Neill will be playing mixed games at limits of $1,500/$3,000. The minimum buy-in is $50,000 and they will be playing HORSE and Deuce to Seven Triple Draw. The action starts at 6 pm ET (3 pm PT) on PokerGO. The all-star team of Ali Nejad and Nick Schulman will be in the booth to provide commentary and analysis for both nights of action. Will Hansen Provide the Action? Hansen took a bit of time off from high-stakes poker in more recent years but appears to be back and ready to tackle some of the best at incredible limits. The 'Great Dane' has a career the includes more than $10.2 million in live tournament earnings, and he is also the owner of three WPT titles and one WSOP gold bracelet. Hansen has been known to bring a style all his own to the poker table, and it's often been one that drives a lot of the action in a game. Will we be getting the old Hansen driving play or will we be getting a newer, more tame version of this poker great? That's a question we can't wait to see answered come Tuesday. Cates, Seiver, and Rast Represent Today's Mixed Game Specialists Cates, Seiver, and Rast represent the best mixed game players in poker today. Cates is the youngest of the three at 28, Seiver is the middle child at 33, and then Rast is 36. Their ages may not seem old, but these guys have all played millions of hands of poker between online and live play and regularly lock horns in games of the highest stakes. Having the opportunity to watch the three of them play in such a high-caliber lineup at limits larger than most of the paychecks many of us see on a monthly basis will be nothing short of a treat. It will also provide a great learning experience because with hole cards shown, the audience will be able to pull back the curtain for insight into every street of every hand. Don’t Sleep On Billy O'Neill If there was a name you wouldn't recognize at this table, it'd be that of Billy O'Neill, but don't be surprised if he leaves the game as the biggest winner. If you follow poker closely, you've likely seen his name pop up here or there, or you may recognize his face from a photo or two. Even if you attempted to look up some of his results, you wouldn’t find much. HendonMob.com only has him winning just more than $195,000 and all of those results come from 2010 to 2012. O'Neill is a regular in Bobby's Room at Bellagio or the Ivey Room at ARIA, playing the highest stakes in all games. All of his peers know the level of skill he brings to the table and the stakes won't be foreign to him. The $1,500/$3,000 mixed game action for Godfather Week on Poker After Dark starts Tuesday, October 23, at 6 pm ET on PokerGO. Get your popcorn ready. If you don't already have a PokerGO subscription, sign up using the code "pocket5s" to receive $10 off an annual subscription.
  10. [caption width="640"] Doyle Brunson could have been the victim of an armed robbery this week - but the criminals got the wrong house[/caption] In a series of tweets on Friday afternoon, poker legend Doyle Brunson claimed that the Las Vegas Metro Police Department informed him of an armed robbery in his neighborhood and that he may have been the initial target of the robbers. Brunson, a ten-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner, is known to carry a handgun with him when travelling to and from poker games and confesses he’s always on the lookout when he gets back from a cash game session in Las Vegas even though he carries no cash with him. It appears the would-be thieves were either given the wrong address or went to the wrong home and Brunson was unharmed thought another man was robbed. This is not the first time that Brunson was targeted at his home by armed robbers. In 1998 two men wearing masked confronted Brunson in his driveway before handcuffing him to his wife Louise and pistol-whipped Brunson. The robbers left with $4,000 in cash and $80,000 in Binion’s Horseshoe casino, part of the prize money Brunson earned while winning his eighth career WSOP bracelet in a $1,500 Razz event.
  11. It wasn’t supposed to end like this. Nobody even expected him to play. Doyle Brunson’s appearance in the $10,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven event at the 2018 World Series of Poker came as a surprise to anybody who has followed poker over the last few years. Once the face of the franchise, Brunson first stopped playing the WSOP back in 2013, citing the long hours of play as the main reason. He much preferred the high stakes cash game action at the Bellagio where could come and go as he pleased. He teased coming back in 2017, but nobody, absolutely nobody, thought they’d see him at all this year. Then came the tweet heard ‘round the poker world. Word soon came that not only was this likely going to be the last WSOP tournament he was ever going to play, but he’d also be walking away from poker at the end of the summer. His wife, Louise, wasn’t doing all that great healthwise and he wanted to spend more time with her. He said he owed it to her. He owed the poker world nothing though. He’d been front and center long before the poker boom was a thing and wrote an in-depth strategy book at a time when every pro kept their secrets as close to their chest as possible. The Super System became the most important book in poker history. So there was a Christmas Morning-like excitement when Brunson late-regged for the event and took his seat alongside some of the best players in the world. Over the 30 hours that followed, Brunson took the poker world on a journey that will now serve as an almost unbelievable prologue on a Hall of Fame poker career that includes 10 WSOP bracelets, a World Poker Tour title, that best-selling strategy book and millions of dollars won in some of the biggest cash games the world has ever known. As the field dwindled down and eventually stopped with 11 players remaining on Monday night, many poker fans and players alike started to fantasize about an 11th bracelet for the Godfather of Poker, maybe even a heads-up battle with his son, Todd, who was also still in the tournament. If this was really going to be Brunson’s last WSOP event, it would be somewhat fitting if he went out on top. On Tuesday, the 11 players quickly became eight and action moved to the PokerGO livestream. Eight became seven. At no point did it look like Brunson was going to cruise to victory, but thanks to the swingy nature of No Limit Deuce, he was never out of it until he was out of it. And then seven became six. Brunson was finished. He tipped his trademark cowboy hat to the crowd that had gathered on this trip back in time and then exited the Rio to a standing ovation. The current generation of players that are dominating poker have little difficulty looking up to Brunson the poker player but that same group has, at times, struggled to relate to or even accept some of his political or social views. Over the last few years, Brunson has often found himself defending those views. He’s gotten in hot water for tweets that touch on political or social issues. In 2015, TMZ picked up a story about Brunson’s comments on Caitlyn Jenner after she transitioned from Bruce. He’s been an ardent supporter of Donald Trump and the NRA - two topics that often polarize the poker community. In the case of Jenner, and more recently John McCain, Brunson has talked about how people who were once his heroes have since let him down. A fair number of people who once looked up to Brunson will probably say they can relate as they struggle to reconcile the difference between Brunson the poker player and Brunson the person. Nobody was going to change their view of Brunson whether he won the bracelet or not on Monday. His place in poker history is as locked in as they come and, for better or worse, this is a time where one's political views just don’t change too quickly. For those 30 hours though, the politics didn’t matter. Only the cards did.
  12. Some of the biggest names in the game of poker along with prominent members of the poker industry gathered at the PokerGO Studios in Las Vegas on Friday night to celebrate the first ever Global Poker Awards presented by PokerStars. The ceremony acknowledged and celebrated the feats and achievements of members of the poker community in 2018 with 20 awards handed out in a wide range of subjects. PokerStars ambassador Lex Veldhuis, who was nominated in two categories, walked away with the Streamer of the Year Award for his popular Twitch Poker channel. He was joined by another popular digital content creator Andrew Neeme, who picked up his second award as Vlogger of the Year. Maria Ho made her way to the stage to pick up the award for Broadcaster of the Year as did PokerNews' Sarah Herring who took home the Journalist of the Year award. Almedin ‘Ali’ Imsirovic was in attendance and picked up the trophy for the Breakout Player of the Year after appearing on the high roller scene and taking down the title of Poker Central’s Poker Masters champion. Fellow high roller Justin Bonomo’s outstanding 2018 campaign brought him the award for Moment Of The Year by winning the Big One For One Drop at the World Series of Poker. Once again the World Series of Poker Main Event received the award for the Event of the Year. The tournament that is widely considered to be the best-structured tournament of the year also brought its 2018 winner, John Cynn the award for Tournament Performance of the Year. PocketFives Editor in Chief Lance Bradley, who was also nominated for two awards on the evening, received an award for Media Content of the Year for his book The Pursuit of Poker Success. Another PocketFiver, Chris Moorman, was chosen to be awarded the PocketFives Legacy Award, given to an online legend who has made significant contributions to the live poker arena. Speaking of contributions to the game of poker, the Godfather of Poker himself, Doyle Brunson was celebrated with the Lifetime Achievement in Poker award which was not awarded during the broadcast. Complete List of Global Poker Award Winners Vlogger of the Year - Andrew Neeme Podcast of the Year - The Chip Race Poker Podcast Broadcaster of the Year - Maria Ho Breakout Player of the Year - Ali Imsirovic Journalist of the Year - Sarah Herring Mid-Major Tour/Circuit of the Year - RUNGOOD Poker Series Streamer of the Year - Lex Veldhuis Charitable Initiative Award - Robbie Strazynski, Run Well Series Tournament Director of the Year - Paul Campbell, ARIA PocketFives Legacy Award Winner - Chris Moorman Tournament Performance of the Year - John Cynn, WSOP Main Event Poker Media Content of the Year - Lance Bradley, The Pursuit of Poker Success Tournament of the Year - World Series of Poker Main Event Tournament Industry Person of the Year - Angelica Hael Poker Moment of the Year - Justin Bonomo Wins Big One For One Drop Jury Prize - Drew Amato People’s Choice Award Winner - Brad Owen 2018 GPI Poker Player of the Year - Alex Foxen 2018 GPI Female Poker Player of the Year - Kristen Bicknell Lifetime Achievement in Poker - Doyle Brunson
  13. The 2019 World Series of Poker is almost here. It's the 50th annual WSOP and there's a lot of anticipation of what's to come this summer. One player who always looks forward to the summer is Phil Hellmuth. He's the poker player with the most WSOP gold bracelets (15) and most WSOP cashes (134), plus it's 30 years since he won the 1989 WSOP Main Event. "I love it!" Hellmuth told PocketFives when asked how it feels to have the WSOP right around the corner once again. "It's 30 years since my win in the WSOP Main Event." In 1989, a 24-year-old Hellmuth shocked the gambling world when he defeated two-time defending champion Johnny Chan to win the WSOP Main Event for $755,000. Hellmuth topped a field of 178 entries and launched himself into poker stardom. It was the first of his 15 gold bracelets, one of which was the WSOP Europe Main Event title in 2012, and 30 years later he's still hungry for more. "It would be nice to win a no-limit 2-7 tournament - I have two second-place finishes - as I've always seen myself winning one," Hellmuth said when asked what he's most looking forward to this summer, other than the Main Event. "It would be nice to win another razz tourney. That would solidify me as the best razz tourney player in the world, based on WSOP results. I would love to win a seven-card stud eight-or-better tourney or an eight-game mix or 10-game mix. Finally, winning a huge buy-in or field size no-limit hold’em tournament or heads-up tourney would be spectacular." In addition to those events, Hellmuth recently took to social media to proclaim, "I want to win a WSOP PLO bracelet in the next few years!" Of all the bracelets he's won, he has yet to earn one in the great game of pot-limit Omaha. His best WSOP performance in this exciting, four-card variant was a fourth-place finish at the 2000 WSOP. "I'm behind the curve in two tourney games: pot-limit Omaha and 2-7 triple draw," Hellmuth said. "I keep improving, which is wonderful, and who knows where that will lead. No one thought I would become the best razz tourney player in the world, and yet, I have shredded the WSOP razz tourneys since 2012 like no other. It's been a historic run, with two firsts, a second, a fifth, and a 13th. So, I need to improve at PLO tourneys. I need to learn something from Jason Mercier and Shaun Deeb." Speaking of Mercier and Deeb, Hellmuth included these two players, who hold five and four bracelets, respectively, when mentioning who might be able to catch him in the great bracelet race. "Daniel Negreanu says he will catch me in cashes," Hellmuth said. "A little known fact is that Negreanu has actually played more WSOP tourneys than I have. Others have said they will catch me in bracelets. Phil Ivey says his goal is to win 30. I was shooting for 24, until Ivey went public going for 30, then I changed my goal to 30. But 24 would still be amazing. Let me get there first. So, Ivey. Maybe Negreanu, Deeb, Mercier, John Monnette, or John Hennigan. In hold'em, of which I have 13 so far, maybe Joe Cada, Dominik Nitsche, or Adrian Mateos." Hellmuth is currently top of the charts in most WSOP gold bracelets and most WSOP cashes, two records that he holds by quite wide margins. In the bracelets category, the next closest are Ivey, Chan, and Doyle Brunson, who each have 10. For cashes, Hellmuth is first with 137 and then Chris Ferguson is second with 120. Negreanu currently sits third entering the 2019 WSOP with 108. "Let's not forget that I hold the record for most WSOP final tables," Hellmuth added. "It would be nice to own the money list title, but to me, it's all about the bracelets." Hellmuth's last gold bracelet win came last year when he won the $5,000 No-Limit Hold'em 30-Minute Levels tournament for $485,082. For final tables, the last time he didn't make one at the WSOP was in 2013. Having played the WSOP for so long and racked up so many accolades, it wouldn't be out of the question for Hellmuth to slow down and take it easy a bit, just as most athletes can get their titles and then take it a little easier. But every WSOP, whether in Las Vegas during the summer or elsewhere in the world some other time of the year, Hellmuth is grinding away and looking to add another few lines to the record books that are already littered with his name. "It's in my nature, it's in my DNA," Hellmuth said when asked what continues to drive him. "I'm super competitive, and I'm competing against the best players in the world, in this era, and last and future eras, for greatest poker player of all time. Right now, I have all of the records, but 15 WSOP bracelets is not enough to keep the record. So I stay focused, I stay determined, I pay attention, and keep abreast of new strategies. I stay away from drugs, away from drinking too much, and I take care of myself; watching my weight and sleeping in almost every single day. Long-term health is a factor in this race." With decades of experience at the WSOP, Hellmuth has undoubtedly seen a lot over the years. For that reason, there are few better to ask what the biggest differences are between then and now. "The numbers," Hellmuth said. "The WSOP was special back then, and a lot more like a convention for all of the best poker players in the world. But now, it's out of control with huge numbers, and I love it. Also, back in 1988 and 1989, we had a lot of one-day tournaments." While excited for what's to come poker-wise, Hellmuth has been quite busy as of late, but not necessarily in the poker realm. If you follow him on social media, then you're likely aware of some of the off-the-felt moves he's been making. "I'm doing a lot of business deals right now, both as an investor and as someone that's honored to be joining advisory boards (just joined LassoGear.com advisory board). In the last six months, I have invested in b spot (online slot machines), TravelSmarter.com (direct-to-consumer hotel room rates, airfare, and a lot more), End Game Talent Agency (esports talent agency), and STEAM Role (mentoring site). "I love business, but all of the founders understand that I will disappear into poker on May 25," Hellmuth said. "I really need to cut off all communication for a few months and focus on playing great poker. For the 2019 WSOP, I'm adding back mediation." Lastly, with the WSOP Main Event seeing a rise in attendance over the previous year in each of the last three years, Hellmuth needed to be asked to give a prediction for the 2019 WSOP Main Event. "I think we will crack 10,000 players!" Hellmuth said. "The ESPN coverage, thanks to PokerGO and Cary Katz, has been spectacular, with 14 days of coverage, and the economy is crushing!"
  14. Doyle Brunson was firmly in the spotlight today at the 2018 World Series of Poker, but in the end the ‘Godfather of Poker’ couldn’t take down his 11th bracelet in what we now know will be the legend’s last ever tournament. A very recognisable name would take down that bracelet though, while Tuesday also saw two new events kick off. Here’s all the info from June 12. Brian Rast Takes Down 4th Bracelet in $10K 2-7 Championship Another event is in the books, even if it didn’t quite produce the fairytale ending that many were hoping for. Brian Rast is now a four-time bracelet winner, after he defeated start-of-day chip leader Mike Wattel heads-up for the $259,670 winner’s prize and the WSOP gold. Italy’s Dario Sammartino came close to his first bracelet, ending in third, while the short stack coming into the final table, James Alexander, will surely be happy to ladder up to fourth. However, it was the sixth-place finisher who may capture most of the headlines. Doyle Brunson announced to the world on Monday that he was retiring from the game, meaning this event would be his last shot at an 11th WSOP bracelet. Texas Dolly put on a great showing, but couldn’t capture the gold to bookend his incredible, legendary career at the felt. Rast spoke highly of Brunson after his victory, saying: “In the last couple of years, I’ve started playing with Doyle a lot. So, in that respect, it was, you know, just another day playing with Doyle, but I could still take a step back and appreciate, like from the poker world’s poker world’s perspective … he has a history of back-to-back and the 10-deuce named after him because he won the back-to-back championships and he’s won a lot of bracelets … He’s a legend. “I could really appreciate from that perspective how special it was that Doyle came, he actually played a tournament this year and final tabled it,” Rast continued. “And you know everyone was pulling for Doyle and I can understand that. And you know, outside of me, I was pulling for Doyle too.” Rast held a 4:1 chip lead over Wattel when their duel began, and in the last hand Wattel shoved with a ten-low which Rast called with a nine-low. Both stood pat, and that meant Rast was the champ. As for his fourth bracelet, Rast said: “This element gives everyone who you normally play with something to talk about, something to share, something that bonds you a little bit, which as the years go by is nice.” Final Table Results: Brian Rast - $259,670 Mike Wattel - $160,489 Dario Sammartino - $114,023 James Alexander - $81,986 Shawn Sheikhan - $59,669 Doyle Brunson - $43,963 John Hennigan - $32,796 McKeehen, Loeser, Boatman Headline Final 17 in MILLIONAIRE MAKER There is a stacked line-up of seasoned pros heading into the fourth day of play in Event #21: $1,500 No-Limit Hold'em MILLIONAIRE MAKER. Day 3 saw the 155 players (out of 7,361 who entered) cut down to just 17, with all eyes now firmly on the $1,173,223 first-place prize. It’s Chad Hahn who leads the survivors, having bagged up 6,525,000 chips. He’s closely followed by Sean Marshall (6,160,000), and Manuel Ruivo (5,900,000). However, those guys will have a tough time tomorrow as they’ll be battling with the likes of 2015 Main Event winner Joe McKeehen (4,210,000), German high roller regular Manig Loeser (3,040,000), and British poker legend Barny Boatman (1,150,000). Tomorrow’s field could have been even more loaded, as they lost lots of big names deep into the money. Some of those who cashed include Joseph Cheong (23th, $40,898), Kyle Hatree (25th, $40,898), Robert Brown (36th, $32,927), JC Tran (42th, $26,713), Eddy Sabat (49th, $21,839), Steve Sung (59th, $17,995), James Calderaro (74th, 12,508), Elio Fox (92th, $8,976) and Greg Merson (94th, $8,976). The final 17 will return at 11am on Wednesday, with blinds starting at 50K/100K and all of them guaranteed a $51,188 payday. Here’s a look at the chip counts: Chad Hahn - 6,525,000 Sean Marshall - 6,160,000 Manuel Ruivo - 5,900,000 Ralph Massey - 4,435,000 Michael Souza - 4,400,000 Joe McKeehen - 4,210,000 Justin Liberto - 3,337,000 Manig Loeser - 3,040,000 Samad Razavi - 2,935,000 Michael Finstein - 2,450,000 Arne Kern - 2,440,000 Enio Bozzano - 2,255,000 Richard Dixon - 1,615,000 Kelly Wolfe - 1,515,000 Jared Narzem - 1,340,000 Aaron Messmer - 1,295,000 Barny Boatman - 1,150,000 THE MARATHON Jogs Along, Down to 246 Another slow stretch of Event #24: $2,620 THE MARATHON No-Limit Hold’em was chalked up today, bringing the 1,479 total field down to 246. Another six 100-minute levels were played on Tuesday’s Day 2, and when the chip bags were brought out it was Walter Fisher who held the chip lead with 641,500. He’s closely followed by Scott Einiger (636,000), while Faraz Jaka (491,500) is near the top of the counts too. Jaka is looking for back-to-back final tables in this one, having finished sixth last year. Just a few of the notables set to return tomorrow include Kristen Bicknell, Chris Moorman, Jesse Sylvia, Cate Hall, David Peters, and former main event champion Ryan Riess. This event has created a $3,485,124 prize pool so far. Play resumes at 1pm Wednesday, and you’ll find the top 10 stacks below: Walter Fisher - 641,500 Scott Einiger - 636,000 Daniel Colpoys - 598,500 Bart Lybaert - 569,500 Joseph Pietrafesa - 524,500 Yaniv Peretz - 496,500 Faraz Jaka - 491,500 Spencer Champlin - 486,000 Marcos Antunes - 480,000 Martin Kozlov - 465,000 Dobson, Greenstein, Elezra Advance in Event #20: $1,500 Stud-Hi Lo Day 2 of Event #20: $1,500 Stud-Hi Lo ended with just 23 players still in contention. The chip leader overnight is Ben ‘f3nix35’ Dobson, who tops the pack with 595,000. Dobson took the lead courtesy of a huge pot versus Mike Matusow which saw both make full houses. Barry Greenstein finished the night second in chips with 349,000, while Eli Elezra bagged the fourth biggest with 334,000. Bracelet winners Jesse Martin (335,000) and Georgios Sotiropoulos (231,000) will return, as will actor James Woods (210,000), who is seeking his second final table of the summer. Spare a thought for former PocketFives no.1 player Calvin ‘cal42688’ Anderson, who finished this one as the bubble boy. All 23 players have now locked up $4,899, but there’s $173,528 for the eventual champ. Play continues at 2pm Wednesday. You’ll find the top 10 stacks below: Benjamin Dobson - 595,000 Barry Greenstein - 349,000 Jesse Martin - 335,000 Eli Elezra - 334,000 Nicholas Kiley - 276,000 James Nelson - 249,000 Tim Finne - 246,000 Georgios Sotiropoulos - 231,000 Joel Tushnet - 212,000 James Woods - 210,000 $1K PLO Kicks Off One of the two Day 1s to get going on Tuesday was Event #26: $1,000 Pot-Limit Omaha. It attracted 986 runners, but after ten levels just 100 remain, all in the hunt for the $169,842 first-place prize. The bubble burst at 148 players, and some of those who cashed but failed to advance to Day 2 include Bryce Yockey (134th - $1,503), Martijn Gerrits (116th - $1,564), Sandeep Pulusani (111th - $1,564) and Justin Young (104th - $1,564). However, one player who will definitely be back tomorrow is overnight chip leader Ryan Goindoo. He’ll be joined tomorrow by the likes of Felipe Ramos, Christian Harder, Joe Cada, Martin Finger, Mikhail Semin and Shannon Shorr. They’re all guaranteed $1,564 when play resumes at 12pm Wednesday. Top 10 Chip Counts: Ryan Goindoo - 196,000 Ivaylo Sivinov - 192,900 Clinton Monfort - 173,900 Thayer Rasmussen - 142,000 Richard Tuhrim - 141,700 Filippos Stavrakis - 141,500 Arthur Morris - 133,000 Uri Reichenstein - 100,000 Roman Valerstein - 98,100 Sean Troha - 90,800 Former no.1 Shaun Deeb leads $10K H.O.R.S.E. It’s none other than former PocketFives no.1 Shaun Deeb who topped the Day 1 field in Event #27: $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Championship. The 157 entries were chopped down to 72 after ten levels, and as you’d expect, it’s a stellar line-up of mixed game beasts. Following two-time WSOP bracelet winner Deeb with 234,500 is Michael McKenna (215,500) and Robert Mizrachi (212,500), while other big stacks and notables include Brock Parker (199,500), Aditya Prasetyo (191,000), Randy Ohel (185,500), John Hennigan (175,000), David Benyamine (166,500), James Obst (164,500), Anthony Zinno (162,000), David "Bakes" Baker (159,000), Ian Johns (158,000), Cliff Josephy (142,500), John Monnette (142,000) and Jeff Lisandro (132,500). Daniel Negreanu had a good start to the day, but couldn’t maintain the momentum, ultimately finishing with one of the shortest stacks (25,500). Meanwhile, Jason Mercier bagged up 79,000. Registration is still open, and play resumes at 2pm Wednesday. Top 10 Chip Counts: Shaun Deeb - 234,500 Michael McKenna - 215,500 Robert Mizrachi - 212,500 Brock Parker - 199,500 Ryan Miller - 198,000 Iraj Parvizi - 192,000 Aditya Prasetyo - 191,000 Andrew Kelsall - 187,500 Randy Ohel - 185,500 John Hennigan - 175,000 Tomorrow’s Action (June 13) There are two shiny new tournaments set to kick off on Wednesday June 13, and both are sure to be popular. First, one for the NLHE heads. Event #28: $3,000 No-Limit Hold'em 6-Handed kicks off at 11am, which was won last year by the winnigest player in online history, former no.1 Chris ‘moorman1’ Moorman. Then at 3pm there’s one for the mixed gamers. Event #29: $1,500 Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw will get going, and Brian Brubaker was last year’s champ.
  15. Hosted by PocketFives President and Editor in Chief Lance Bradley and poker writer Matt Clark, The Fives runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. This week, Lance and Matt are all over the amazing run Doyle Brunson put on in his final World Series of Poker event. They also start to build a case for Brian Rast as the best player at the WSOP over the last case - helped largerly by his fourth bracelet win. Download this episode in ITUNES Listen to this episode on your Stitcher app GET THIS EPISODE ON GOOGLE PLAY
  16. After tabulating the votes of over 130 Nomination Panel members, the Global Poker Index, along with their partner PokerCentral, has unveiled the nominations in thirteen of the 20 categories of the first ever Global Poker Awards. The awards are set to take place on April 5 at the PokerGO Studios in Las Vegas where poker players and industry members from 10 different nations will be represented in a wide variety of categories that aims to celebrate all aspects of the poker community. PocketFives is well represented within the nominees. The Fives Podcast is one of five nominees for Podcast of the Year and PocketFives' President & Editor in Chief Lance Bradley's book, The Pursuit of Poker Success, Here are the nominees, presented in alphabetical order: Tournament Performance of the Year Justin Bonomo (Super High Roller Bowl IV) John Cynn (2018 World Series of Poker Main Event) Maria Lampropulos (2018 PCA Main Event) Dylan Linde (WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic) Breakout Player of the Year Almedin ‘Ali’ Imsirovic Maria Konnikova Ping Liu Christopher Michael Soyza Streamer of the Year Jeff Gross Jason Somerville Jaime Staples Lex Veldhuis Vlogger of the Year Marle Cordeiro Joe Ingram Andrew Neeme Daniel Negreanu Doug Polk Podcast LFG Podcast PokerCentral Podcast PokerNews Podcast The Chip Race The Fives Poker Podcast Broadcaster Maria Ho Lon McEachern Nick Schulman Lex Veldhuis Poker Journalist Drew Amato Sarah Herring Remko Rinkema Christian Zetzsche Media Content Drew Amato (photo: Brunson bids farewell to WSOP) Lance Bradley (book: The Pursuit of Poker Success) Haley Hintze (article: Vayo v. PokerStars) PokerCentral/PokerGO (Super High Roller Club: Schulman featuring Nejad) Industry Person Angelical Hael (World Poker Tour) Cary Katz (Poker Central) Matt Savage (WPT, TDA) Ty Stewart (World Series of Poker) Rob Yong (Dusk Till Dawn, partypoker) Tournament Director Tony Burns (Seminole Hard Rock) Paul Campbell (ARIA) Jack Effel (World Series of Poker) Kenny Hallaert (Unibet Open) Mid-Major Tour/Circuit 888poker LIVE RUNGOOD Poker Series Unibet Open WPTDeepStacks WSOP Circuit Event of the Year partypoker Caribbean Poker Party Main Event Super High Roller Bowl IV WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic WSOP Main Event Moment of the Year Jeremy Hilsercop received PSPC Platinum Pass via Christmas Day viral video Joe Cada wins The Closer after finishing 5th in WSOP Main Event Doyle Brunson plays his final WSOP event Justin Bonomo wins Big One for One Drop, completing Super High Roller Streak In addition to the above categories, there are seven other awards that will be given out during the ceremony. Due to their results in 2018, Alex Foxen and Kristen Bicknell will each be receiving awards for the 2018 GPI Player of the Year and the 2018 Female Player of the Year respectively. Along with trophies for Foxen and Bicknell the following categories will be determined by the Global Poker Awards Jury: - Lifetime Achievement in Poker Award - Charitable Initiative - Jury Prize As has been the case in previous GPI award shows, the “people” will have a voice and will vote to award the People’s Choice Award for Poker Personality of the Year. Also, PocketFives will be handing out the PocketFives Legacy Award acknowledging a player who has come from the world of online poker to make major contributions to poker’s live tournament scene. The Global Poker Awards can be watched live on PokerGO on April 5.
  17. The World Poker Tour will close out 2018 action with the prestigious WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic. The tournament, held at the iconic Bellagio Resort & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, will be the eighth WPT Main Tour stop of Season XVII. It’s an event that comes with a $10,400 buy-in and has been a part of the World Poker Tour schedule since the very first season. The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic $10,400 Main Event kicks off Tuesday, December 11, 2018, and runs through Saturday, December 15. The format calls for 40,000 in starting chips, big blind ante, registration until the start of the 12th level, and unlimited reentry until the close of registration. Levels will be 60 minutes long on Day 1 and 90 minutes long on Day 2, 3, and 4. The final table will be played with 60-minute levels until heads-up play. The full tournament festival begins Thursday, November 29. Rich Prizes, Storied History, and Legendary Champions The WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic was the very first event on the World Poker Tour, held all the way back in 2002 when the WPT got its start. In that inaugural event, 146 players ponied up the $10,000. The one and only Gus Hansen emerged victorious to claim the $556,460 top prize and his first of three WPT titles. In Season III, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic had a $15,300 buy-in and an incredible first-place prize of more than $1.77 million. Winner the event was none other than Daniel Negreanu after he defeated the popular Humberto Brenes in heads-up play. Season V of the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic attracted 583 entries and awarded a first prize of more than $2.2 million. Walking away with the title was Joe Hachem, who had just won the World Series of Poker Main Event one year prior. With the WPT Five Diamond victory, Hachem became the fourth player in poker history to own both WSOP Main Event and WPT titles, alongside Doyle Brunson, Scotty Nguyen, and Carlos Mortensen. More stars of the game captured WPT Five Diamond titles in Season VI, Season VII, and Season VIII of the World Poker Tour. First, it was Eugene Katchalov winning in Season VI for $2.482 million. In Season VII, Chino Rheem took the title and $1.538 million. For Rheem, it was his first of three WPT titles. In Season VIII, Daniel Alaei scored first place for $1.428 million. As if the likes of Hansen, Negreanu, Hachem, Katchalov, Rheem, and Alaei weren’t enough, Antonio Esfandiari earned his second WPT title when he won the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic in Season IX for $870,124. Esfandiari returned to the final table the following season and earned a sixth-place finish worth $119,418. Then in Season XI, Esfandiari was back at the final table, taking fourth for $329,339. To date, Esfandiari has cashed six times in the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Bellagio, earning more than $1.4 million in total from the event through its first 16 editions. Dan Smith earned the WPT Five Diamond title for $1.161 million in Season XII. Then in Season XIII and Season XIV, both Mohsin Charania and Kevin Eyster won WPT Five Diamond for their second World Poker Tour titles. Charania won for $1.177 million, and Eyster won for $1.587 million. Record-Breaking Turnouts and Tosoc’s Back-To-Back Success In Season XV, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic drew a mammoth field of 791 entries, setting a new record for the WPT Five Diamond tournament and tying the all-time record for a $10,000 buy-in event in WPT history. That tournament created an enormous prize pool of more than $7.67 million and saw the top two places walk away with seven-figures scores - first place earned $1.938 million and second place won $1.124 million. James Romero defeated Ryan Tosoc in heads-up play to win the event. The following season, an even larger field turned out for the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic, with 812 entries setting new records for the largest turnout in the WPT Five Diamond event and a $10,000 buy-in WPT event. Nearly $7.9 million was up for grabs, and once again the top two places earned seven figures - first place took home $1.958 million and second place earned $1.134 million. In a jaw-dropping back-to-back run, Tosoc, who placed second the year before for $1.124 million, won the event for $1.1958 million. From the two-season WPT Five Diamond run, Tosoc earned $3.082 million in total prize money. Big Buy-In Events Galore In addition to the $10,400 Main Event, the WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic schedule features several big buy-in tournaments. Included in the Season XVII schedule are seven other events with buy-ins of $10,000 or more. They are, as follows. - Wednesday, December 5, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 02 - Thursday, December 6, at 2 p.m.: $10,000 buy-in Bellagio 10K PLO 03 - Friday, December 7, at 2 p.m.: $15,000 buy-in Bellagio 15K 8-Game 01 - Saturday, December 8, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 01 - Monday, December 10, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 02 - Friday, December 14, at 2 p.m.: $25,000 buy-in Bellagio 25K 03 - Saturday, December 15, at 2 p.m.: $100,000 buy-in Bellagio 100K 01 There are also two $5,200 buy-in no-limit hold’em tournaments on the schedule. The first starts on Sunday, December 9, at 1 p.m., and the second starts on Thursday, December 13, at 1 p.m. *Photo courtesy of the World Poker Tour.
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