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Found 6 results

  1. It was a familiar scene on the set of the 2021 World Series of Poker $50,000 High Roller. With four players left and over $1.1 million up top, Australian sensation Michael Addamo held a massive chip lead over his final three opponents and looked to be cruising to yet another seven-figure victory. But Erik Seidel had other plans. With 40 big blinds and pocket eights in the small blind, he completed, perhaps anticipating some aggression from Addamo in the big blind. “If you’re a balanced player like Seidel, then you will have some limps from the small blind with strong hands,” said Maria Ho, who was calling the action. Addamo indeed did put in a raise, a hefty one. And after a few moments, Seidel three-bet shipped his remaining 40 big blinds only to be snap-called by Addamo holding ace-king. Seidel was ahead. Winning this hand would put the nine-time WSOP bracelet winner in the chip lead and in a position to make a little history. But Addamo is not simply running hot. He’s on a high-stakes sun run few have enjoyed and overcoming that has proven to be a tall task. “Seidel has 55%, but if I were Seidel I would feel like I have 20% against the way Addamo’s been running,” Ho said with a laugh. Almost as soon as she finished talking the dealer put a king on the flop with little-to-no help for Seidel. Even behind his mask, Seidel looked visibly annoyed. With just two outs left and headed to the river, Seidel began sliding his stack into the middle, resigned that today wasn’t his day. Once again this year, it was Addamo’s day. As Seidel grabbed his jacket and walked away, perhaps somewhere in the back of his mind he remembered when those looks of annoyment were directed at him. When it was he who was the high-stakes sun runner, on a seemingly unstoppable rampage through some of the biggest tournaments on the circuit. It was January 2011 and Seidel made the trip to the Aussie Millions in Melbourne. It was just months before Black Friday, and the Aussie Millions was preparing to run some of the biggest nosebleed tournaments ever held. Seidel, coming off a fourth-place finish in the PokerStars PCA $25K High Roller, hit a string of results that took the poker world by storm. First, he finished in third place in the Aussie Million A$100,000 for a $618,139 payday. Less than a week later he defeated a 20-runner field and took down the A$250,000 Super High Roller for $2,472,555, a win that remains his career-high score. From there, Seidel took down the 2011 LAPC High Roller, the $25,000 NBC Heads-Up Championship for $750,000, and, in May, bested another $100,000 Super High Roller in Las Vegas for another seven-figure score. Already a Poker Hall of Fame member, Seidel’s high-stakes dominance during this time captivated the poker public, it was called “The Year of Seidel” by PokerNews and it earned him more than $6.5 million - second only to WSOP Main Event winner Pius Heinz that year. In fact, it was such a phenomenon that in April of that year, there was a music video made in ‘Seiborg’s honor. Many thought we’d never see a high-stakes heater like that again. But, of course, we did. And a decade-long passing of the sun run crown began. A young, 23-year old seemingly serious media-shy Daniel Colman came out from behind his online grind in 2014 to shock the poker world. First with a win in the PokerStars EPT Monte Carlo €100,000 High Roller for $2.1 million and months later defeated Daniel Negreanu heads-up at the final table of the WSOP’s $1,000,000 Big One For One Drop for another $15 million victory. That was just the start for Colman. In August of that year, he grabbed back-to-back seven-figure scores with a runner-up finish in the EPT Barcelona €50,000 High Roller and then a signature big-field win in the $5,300 SHRPO Main Event. At the time Colman appeared to be the king of the high rollers desperate to abdicate, conflicted about the complexities of playing a game that meant when you win, someone loses. But by the end of the year, Coleman cashed in for an astounding $22,389,481, which, at the time, pushed him into the top 10 on the All-Time Money List. While Colman continued to crush, proving himself to be one of the all-time best, another young grinder began to turn heads as well. At the end of 2015, 22-year old Fedor Holz announced the start of his sun-running reign with a victory in the World Poker Tour $100,000 Alpha8 at the Five Diamond Classic in Las Vegas. The $1.5 million score was the first seven-figure win of his career and from that launch point, Holz went on a seemingly unstoppable tear through the high stakes. Weeks later Holz won again, this time in the 2016 Triton Super High Roller Series for just over $3 million. He took second in that year’s Super High Roller Bowl, won three high rollers at the Aria, and then picked up a gold bracelet in the 2016 $111,111 High Roller For One Drop for another $4.9 million. The massive scores were seemingly neverending. Months later he won again at EPT Barcelona. Even when he didn’t win, Holz was making final tables at nearly every stop he attended, ending the year with astounding $16 million in earnings and an article about him in Forbes Magazine to go with it. The rise of the German contingency, led by Holz, felt like a new era in poker, one that perhaps couldn’t be stopped or topped. However, in 2018, Justin Bonomo, who has long been considered one of the game’s best, with his origins in the online streets, emerged from the lab on an entirely different level. Prior to that year, Bonomo had always been successful and even had one seven-figure win in his career, back in 2012 - a resume-topping win for him. But in 2018 everything changed as Bonomo earned four million-dollar scores, all in spectacular fashion. A runner-up finish in January at the PokerStars PCA $100,000 for $1 million was just the start. In March he took down the Super High Roller Bowl China for a massive $4.8 million, a new career-high at the time. Two months later he repeated the feat, winning the $300,000 Super High Roller Bowl in Las Vegas for $5 million - another new high. Even that was eclipsed by his win in the 2018 WSOP $1M buy-in Big One For One Drop for a massive $10 million score. Staggering results from an inconceivable run. But Bonomo’s heater wasn’t limited to million-dollar scores, he outright won 10 different events that year, all high rollers, all for six figures or more. Bonomo, virtually unrivaled, earned more than $25.4 million that year alone as he took over the All-Time Money List lead from Daniel Negreanu. Bonomo’s stoic table demeanor and spot-on decisions were in stark contrast to the flash brought about by Bryn Kenney. In 2019, Kenney picked up the high-stakes heater torch and ran wild. Always a tough contender, Kenney hit a string of results at the right time when the stakes were at their highest. Between March and May of that year, Kenney lit up the Triton Poker Series. He scored a fourth and second-place finish in a pair of tournaments in Jeju for more than $3.5 million total. Then in May, he went back-to-back in Montenegro for a total of more than $4.1 million. Of course, Kenney’s streak peaked in August of that year when he posted the €1,050,000 buy-in for the Triton Million for Charity in London and ended up winning it all for a record $20,563,324 payday, more than enough to lift him to the top of the All-Time Money List. Kenney ended that year with more than $30 million in tournament earnings, accepting his newfound GOAT status. — In 2019, Michael Addamo already racked up a number of impressive scores, including a WSOP bracelet win. It’s safe to say that he wasn’t yet on a recreational player’s radar, he was more like an up-and-coming elite player poised for a breakout. In early 2020, at the Australian Poker Open, Addamo took down a pair of high rollers for a total of $1.5 million. He also picked up a pair of Super High Roller Bowl Online wins and a runner-up finish in the $100K Main Event for $1.187 million. To go with it, Addamo was (and still is) regularly killing the GGPoker Super MILLION$ online where he became the first player to win it all twice, then three times, then four. Now it’s late 2021 and Addamo has ascended. The new recipient of the high roller hot streak. An amazing barrage of wins that started just days after arriving in Las Vegas to play in the Super High Roller Bowl. Addamo first won the Poker Masters $50K for $680,000 and the subsequent $100K for another $1.16 million. Two days, $1.8 million in earnings. While waiting for the Super High Roller Bowl, Addamo scored a runner-up finish in an Aria High Roller for $322K and then, remarkably, dominated this year’s Super High Roller Bowl IV and defeated three-time SHRB champ, Bonomo, for a career-best $3.4 million score. He’s earned more than $7.2 of his live career $15.5 million in cashes in roughly one month. Like Seidel before him, Bonomo knows what’s it like when talent, preparation, and a little good fortune shines on you. And like Seidel just an hour earlier, Bonomo found himself all-in against a player who seemingly can do no wrong. Bonomo moved all-in with ten-nine off suit, likely hoping for a fold. But Addamo called with his king-jack suited and a massive pot with all the chips in this bracelet event was in the middle. When the turn hit, Bonomo's hand improved to trips and he simply needed to fade six outs on the river. But this is Addamo and this is now. So when an ace ripped off on the river to give Addamo the straight, the win, his third gold bracelet, and another seven-figure score Bonomo could only sigh, nod his head and congratulate his opponent. Afterward, when asked by reporters how all this success is coming to him, Addamo replied “I guess mostly luck. Obviously, there is some skill involved but winning this much, you can only really attribute it to luck in the end. So I’m very fortunate.” And there’s no telling just when (or if) that incredible good fortune will subside. So for now, Addamo, like others before him, enjoys the ride and will see where his talents, hard work, and good luck will take him. But whether Addamo leaves it, or it leaves Addamo, history has proven that a sun run will shine upon another high stakes player out there - as yet known or unknown - and the poker world will again be amazed by the results.
  2. Less than one month ago, Michael Addamo and Justin Bonomo, two of the most respected nosebleed tournament players in the game today, faced off heads-up at the end of Super High Roller Bowl VI. On that day, Addamo walked away with the win and the $3.4 million prize. On Thursday at the 2021 World Series of Poker, the two heavyweights made it to the end of Event #38, the $50,000 High Roller, and faced off again for a high-stakes rematch - this time with a WSOP bracelet at stake. And once again, it was Addamo who came out on top, besting Bonomo and the 81 player field to walk away with another seven-figure score of $1,132,968. For the better part of two days, Addamo dominated the event. He held a healthy chip lead at the end of Day 1, aggressively extended it into Day 2, and started the final table with nearly 50% of the total chips in play at his disposal. Although Addamo did not go wire-to-wire at the final table, losing the chip lead to Bonomo for a brief period, he did ultimately eliminate all four of his final table opponents in order to take home the third gold bracelet of his career. Chris Hunichen started the final table as the short stack but managed to find a double against Justin Bonomo in the early goings and then again against Addamo. However, he was unable to keep the momentum when he squared off again against the chip-leading Addamo. With the blinds at 60,000/120,000 (120,000 bb ante). Addamo put in a raise to 200,000 on the button with [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"] and with roughly 12 big blinds Hunichen defended his big blind holding [poker card="qh"][poker card="9h"]. The flop came [poker card="js"][poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"] giving Addamo top pair and Hunichen an over and backdoor draws. Hunichen checked and Addamo continued for a small bet which Hunichen called. When the [poker card="8h"] fell on the turn, Hunichen open-shipped for his final 10 bigs and Addamo made the call. Hunichen was looking for a heart, a ten, or a queen to survive, however, the river was the [poker card="jd"] giving Addamo trips and sending ‘Big Huni’ out in fifth place for $266,031. A big clash between Addamo and 9-time WSOP gold bracelet winner Erik Seidel took place just 40 minutes later. The action folded to Seidel in the small blind who just completed holding [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"]. Addamo, in the big blind, made it 480,000 with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"]. Seidel then shipped his last 40 big blinds and Addamo made the call. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="js"][poker card="3s"] giving Addamo a huge lead in the hand. Seidel needed an eight and an eight only to survive. The turn came the [poker card="2h"] and before the [poker card="qs"] even completed the board Seidel was shipping his chips into the middle for Addamo. Seidel’s quest for bracelet #10 ended in fourth place for which he collected $358,655. Addamo held a massive chip lead but then something a little unexpected took place. Bonomo doubled through Addamo, and moments later Gal Yifrach did as well and for the first time in days, Addamo lost his chip lead as Bonomo became the big stack. However, that didn’t last long. Shortly after the three players returned from a break, with the blinds up to 80,000/160,000 (160,000 bb ante) Yifrach and Addmo played yet another big pot only this time, Addamo came out on top. After Bonomo folded his button, Yifrach limped in from the small blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="7c"]. Addamo, holding [poker card="8s"][poker card="8d"], put in a raise to 520,000 in the big blind. Just like Seidel did in his bustout hand, Yifrach three-bet shipped his final 23 bigs and Addamo made the call with his pocket pair. The flop came [poker card="6s"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3s"] keeping Addamo’s eights in the lead but giving Yifrach a gutshot straight draw to go along with his one overcard. The turn was the [poker card="ks"] and Yifrach was left looking for an ace. The river was an ace, but it was the [poker card="as"] bringing in a flush for Addamo and ending Yifrach’s run in third place for $495,305. This set up what many people were hoping for, a rematch of the Super High Roller Bowl heads-up finale between Addamo and Bonomo, this time with a bracelet on the line. Addamo’s elimination of Yifrach helped him take back the chip lead, however, the difference in chips between the two was just four big blinds. Heads-up play wasn’t nearly as extensive as it could have been with both players sitting with more than 70 big blinds each. Bonomo grabbed an early lead and Addamo closed the gap. Addamo took a small lead before the final hand took place. On the button, Bonomo raised to 450,000 holding the [poker card="td"][poker card="9s"] and Addamo three-bet to 1.8 million from the big blind with his [poker card="kh"][poker card="jh"]. Bonomo then three-bet shipped for more than 11 million and Addamo, after a brief time in the tank, Addamo called for it all. "This is a big hand," Bonomo said as an understatement. "It's for all the chips basically," Addamo replied with a smile on his face. "How many bracelets do you have?" Bonomo asked. "Two. You?" "Three." "Get it even? Three each?" Addamo said. "I don't know if I agree to those terms," Bonomo joked right before the dealer fanned the flop. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="th"] bringing Bonomo bottom pair and a straight draw and giving Addamo middle pair and a straight draw as well. The turn was the [poker card="ts"] giving Bonomo trips and a chance to cripple Addamo. However, the river was the [poker card="ac"] bringing in Broadway for Addamo and eliminating Bonomo as the runner-up for a $700,228 score. Addamo picked up a career-high WSOP score of $1,132,968 (the 4th largest of his career) and his second WSOP gold bracelet. WSOP $50K High Roller Final Table Payouts Michael Addamo - $1,132,968 Justin Bonomo - $700,228 Gal Yifrach - $495,305 Erik Seidel - $358,665 Chris Hunichen - $266,031
  3. This summer, a 16-year association between the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino and the World Series of Poker comes to a close. With poker’s biggest annual festival rumored to be heading to Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel and Casino Event Center starting in the summer of 2022, the curtain comes down on the Rio’s time as host of poker’s signature series of life-changing tournaments. The Rio has been what the WSOP has needed, exactly at the time it needed it. For some, the lasting images of the World Series of Poker come from yesteryear, with legends of the game such as Doyle Brunson, Phil Hellmuth, Stu Ungar, and Johnny Chan winning big at Binion’s. While Binion’s has a great history, the Rio is where poker’s boom led to the growth of the game and its cavernous corridors have provided us with some of the most memorable moments ever witnessed at the felt. Many dramatic moments have followed in the Thunderdome, from Daniel Negreanu’s collapse after near-bubbling the final table to Phil Hellmuth’s record-breaking WSOP bracelet win in 2007 to Mark Newhouse’s celebrated reverse-curse on himself in WSOP the subsequent WSOP Main Event to his career-high score. https://twitter.com/mark_hizzle/status/486037130632638465 Binion’s had the gloriously claustrophobic nature of a state-wide game only much bigger. They hosted the WSOP while it was predominantly an American-attended festival. Fans were four or five deep at the rail, so close to Johnny Chan during his victory against Erik Seidel that they could have reached out and helped him push his chips over the line. The Rio, however, ushered in a new age of poker. During a time when poker enjoyed its years of growth and became more appealing to the mainstream, the rail increased and had to be moved back. Seating was erected in the Thunderdome, and in other rooms, with fans being kept at a modest distance. Antonio Esfandiari’s victory in the $1 million-entry Big One for One Drop in 2012 remains a watershed moment in poker and it all took place in the Thunderdome. From Sam Trickett’s quad threes against Brian Rast to ‘The Magician’ winning the bracelet and being held aloft by his friends and family after he got the better of the Brit heads-up, the event lived in the glow of flashbulbs. When thinking of the World Series of Poker at the Rio what comes to mind to this reporter is one hand in particular. In 2010, Jonathan Duhamel took down the WSOP Main Event to win $8.9 million when he dominated the final table. But in truth, Duhamel took the biggest step to victory when he won possibly the best hand the Rio has ever seen against Matt Affleck. Affleck had pocket aces, Duhamel had pocket jacks and somehow, all the money went in on a turn that saw Affleck a 4:1 favorite. Duhamel needed his straight draw or a jack to come in on the river and when it did, Affleck’s subsequent reaction was heartbreaking and incredible in equal measure. To the legendary commentary of Norman Chad and Lon McEachern, two men whose partnership has itself flourished at the Rio, a “thunderstruck” Affleck burst out of the Thunderdome and threw his water bottle against the wall. A few minutes later, Affleck returned to shake the hand of everyone at the table, ending in Duhamel himself. If the moment started awkwardly, it ended by transcending poker and showing the humanity that exists between poker players. Sure the Rio has its flaws. Poker can be about stepping into a teeming mass of sweat and closeness, shoulder-to-shoulder with your best friend and your biggest enemy - who, in a poker tournament, can be exactly the same person. It can feel like a cauldron. The Rio is often the opposite - it's a ‘cooler’. It's famous for its ice-cold temperatures forcing players to wrap up warm once they walk out of the Vegas sunshine and into the building where the last 15 World Champions have been crowned. Players who don’t insulate or consume enough vitamins have complained of the ‘Rio Flu’ years before COVID came along. In recent years, though, the WSOP Player of the Year has captivated fans for entire summers. With dozens of flags depicting former winners adorning every side of the two main cardrooms, each race has gathered its own momentum inside its echo chambers populated by thousands of poker players. From queues for the restroom and registration desk that snake through the labyrinthine pathways that criss-cross the Rio hallways to the stands of phone battery sellers and massage machines, there is no place like it. The Rio will go down in poker history as the venue where poker grew up, where it became the beast that can now never be tamed. The World Series of Poker will move on in 2022, but the memories of poker's time at the Rio will echo forever. How many more become eternal this Autumn remains as poker should, in the hands of the players who make the game what it is.
  4. It was late in London. The early morning actually, and Erik Seidel, one of poker’s most iconic figures, was back on the grind. Already in the United Kingdom to celebrate his youngest daughter’s wedding, the poker legend decided to extend his stay in the UK’s capital to take care of some business. Specifically, the business of high-stakes poker. And at this moment, his deep run in GGPoker WSOP Online Event #11 ($10,000 Super MILLION$ High Roller) was taking him back to the beginning of his career. “I haven’t stayed up that late for poker since I was in my 20’s,” Seidel said, referring to the overnight hours of Day 1 of the gold bracelet event. “London isn’t ideal for me because I’m a morning person and Day One lasted ’til the next morning.” Even casual fans are familiar with Seidel’s impact on poker and his history that took him from the early days of Mayfair Club in New York to the Poker Hall of Fame in Las Vegas. His career has spanned 40 years and in that time he’s earned nearly $38 million in recorded live earnings. He’s a World Poker Tour champion and, prior to the online high roller he was playing in, had previously won eight WSOP bracelets, making him one of the most prolific players in WSOP history. Seidel didn’t know it at the time but after that sleepless night, he was just days away from adding to his legacy with WSOP bracelet #9. For a player who has experienced just about everything there is to experience in the game of poker, Seidel admits he still feels “out of [his] element online”, making his victory one of the most unique moments of his career. [caption id="attachment_636078" align="alignleft" width="300"] Seidel's online winning moment.[/caption] “I’m just never that comfortable online,” he said. “I like it, it’s nice to be able to play a tourney in bed, but I make mistakes. I had two misclicks at the final table. It’s easier for me to get distracted and there’s always that concern that I’ll lose connection.” In fact, he did lose connection at one point while playing in his hotel on spotty Wi-Fi. But, obviously, the man they call Seiborg recovered nicely. He navigated his way through the field of 624 entries, made the final table, and bested a final nine that included Rui Ferreira, Isaac Baron, Thomas Muehloecker, and eventual runner-up, Francisco Benitez. When it was all over, Seidel won more than $977,000 and made WSOP history. He earned that ninth bracelet and moved into a tie with poker legend Johnny Moss for fifth (third-most) in all-time WSOP bracelets. “Winning any WSOP event is special,” Seidel said when asked where his online bracelet ranks. “This one was extra great for me because it was so unexpected. Getting through 600+ players and then the prize was close to one million, which I think is my biggest WSOP cash, felt really amazing. Might be my favorite.” [caption id="attachment_636079" align="alignright" width="219"] 2007 WSOP victory in NL 2-7 Lowball for bracelet #8.[/caption] That said, as special as winning another bracelet is for him, 14 years after winning #8, Seidel hasn’t been consumed with the bracelet chase as, perhaps, some other pre-poker boom prominent players. “I can’t say I really get caught up in bracelet fever,” he said. “My focus has been much more on higher buy-in No Limit events. If you really want to rack up bracelets, you’ve got to play the high buy-in limit events at the WSOP, the No Limit fields are way too big. I play a limited amount of events at the WSOP, and I love playing them, but I’m not trying to maximize my chances by playing every event.” It would be tough for anyone to not want to push if given the chance to break into double-digit bracelets. It’s well-known that there are currently only four players with 10 or more. Phil Hellmuth is the all-time leader with 15. And then, tied for second, all with 10, are Doyle Brunson, Johnny Chan, and Phil Ivey - a club that’s hasn’t admitted a new member since 2014. Now, Seidel is knocking on the door. At 61, he says he has no intentions of slowing down and has set his sights on playing a healthy schedule at this year’s WSOP. “I love playing, I hope I can continue competing for a while. I expect to play 20-something events at the WSOP although I’m really disappointed in the WSOP schedule this year, the big NL events that I’d love to play in are all very close to Thanksgiving. I’ll have to see if I can play them.”
  5. Hosted by Lance Bradley and Jeff Walsh, The Fives Poker Podcast runs each week and covers the latest poker news, preview upcoming events, and debate the hottest topics in poker. This week on The FIVES, Lance and Jeff bring you all of the latest gold bracelet results from the World Series of Poker Online on GGPoker - including poker legend Erik Seidel's history-making ninth career bracelet win. Plus, the Pennsylvania WSOP Online series wrapped up with an interesting payout structure for its high roller, and it was a great week for poker content with the World Poker Tour's live streamed high-stakes home game. Also, following up with last week's podcast about WSOP Rule 115, there were multiple clarifications to the COVID-inspired rule leaving the guys with even more questions. Tune in! Subscribe to The FIVES and never miss an episode - available everywhere you enjoy your favorite podcasts. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts * Google Podcasts * Stitcher
  6. Poker Hall of Fame member Erik Seidel captured his ninth career World Series of Poker bracelet after winning GGPoker 2021 WSOP Online Event #11 ($10,000 Super MILLION$ High Roller) for $977,842. With the victory, Seidel moves into a tie for third all-time bracelets with the legendary Johnny Moss and sits just one bracelet win behind Doyle Brunson, Phil Ivey, and Johnny Chan. Seidel's last WSOP gold bracelet win took place in 2007 when he won the live $5,000 Duece To Seven Lowball Championship for $538,835 of his now more than $37 million in career live earnings. The final table was especially hard-fought as not only was the gold bracelet on the line, but the WSOP edition of the Super MILLION$ had nearly $1 million up top. Start of the day chip leader Francisco Benitez applied constant pressure while some of today's best online pros including Thomas Mueloecker, Isaac Baron, and Rui Ferreira fought over six-figure sums. It took just two hands before the first player fell. With the blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Thomas Muehloecker opened from under the gun to 336,000 holding [poker card="js"][poker card="jd"]. When it folded to Rui Ferreira in the hijack, he moved all in for roughly 15 big blinds with his [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Muehloecker took only a second to call, and Ferreira was flipping for his tournament life. The board ran out [poker card="td"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"][poker card="qc"] allowing Muehloecker’s pocket jacks to hold and ending Ferreira’s day before it got started in ninth place for $129,410. Despite the quick elimination of Ferreira, the action at the final table slowed down considerably. It took nearly an hour for the next player to hit the rail. The blinds were up to 125,000/250,000 (30,000 ante) when a short-stacked Isaac Baron opened from under the gun to 1.25 million with [poker card="qd"][poker card="js"], leaving himself with just over one big blind behind. In the cutoff, Chin-wei Chien flat called holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="ac"] and the rest of the table let go of their hands. The flop came [poker card="kh"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] and Baron moved all-in for his final big blind and Chien snap-called. The turn was the [poker card="2s"], giving Baron some flush outs but the river came the [poker card="tc"] and shipped the pot to Chien, as Baron, who started the day sixth in chips, exited in eighth place for $166,631. Five hands later, former Super MILLION$ champion Claas Segebrecht found himself on the short stack and looking for help. After Erik Seidel opened from UTG+1 to 500,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="ks"], it folded to Segebrecht in the big blind with [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"] and he moved all-in. Seidel made the quick call and the flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"] keeping Seidel’s pocket kings in great shape to hold. The [poker card="kd"] effectively ended the hand improving Seidel to a set and leaving Segebrecht drawing dead to the [poker card="9h"] river. It was a small river needle for Segebrecht who collected $214,557 for his seventh-place finish. Thirty minutes later, the blinds had climbed to 175,000/350,000 (45,000 ante) when Norway’s Joachim Haraldstad put in a raise to 1.575 million with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"], leaving himself with three big blinds behind. By this time, Fransicso Benitez had amassed a healthy chip lead over the field and moved all-in from the button with [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"]. Both the blinds released their hands and Haraldstad committed the rest of his stack. The flop came [poker card="qs"][poker card="7h"][poker card="3d"], keeping kickers in play. The turn was the [poker card="qc"], bringing some additional chop outs for Haraldstad. But the river came the [poker card="4c"], awarding the pot to Benitez and sending Haraldstad out in sixth place for a $276,268 payday. Moments later, Chien moved all-in for nearly 3.9 million from the cutoff with [poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] and when it folded to Muehloecker in the big blind with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="jh"] he made the call. The [poker card="ah"][poker card="ks"][poker card="6s"] flop put Muehloecker in the lead with top pair and left Chien looking for running spades or one of the last two fours in the deck. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] and the river was the [poker card="kh"], ending Chein’s run in fifth place for $355,728. A tense four-handed battle was waged for the better part of thirty minutes as Benitez held the chip lead, Muehloecker was not terribly far behind, and both Seidel and Shyngis Satubayev were within striking distance with around 20 big blinds. With the blinds at 250,000/500,000 (60,000 ante), Benitez put in a raise to 1 million on the button with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qd"] and Satubayev shoved all-in for more than 12 million holding [poker card="ts"][poker card="td"]. Seidel folded his [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"] and Benitez quickly called putting Satubayev’s tournament life at risk. The flop came [poker card="ah"][poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"], keeping the pocket queens in the lead. The turn fell the [poker card="ks"], reversing Satubayev’s outs from the final two tens to two queens to make a straight. But the river was [poker card="kc"] and the cooler sent Satubayev to the rail in fourth place for $458,043. Benitez held a roughly 2:1 chip lead over both Muehloecker and Seidel when, with the blinds at 300,000/600,000 (75,000 ante), he opened from the button to 1.2 million with the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qd"]. After Seidel folded his small blind, Muehloecker shipped his 26 big blind stack all-in holding [poker card="as"][poker card="th"]. Benitez made the call and Muehloecker saw that he was dominated. The flop came [poker card="7d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"], keeping Benitez ahead. The turn was the [poker card="kh"], and Muehloecker needed a ten to survive. However, the river fell the [poker card="jd"] and Muehloecker bid for a Super MILLION$ title ended in third place for $589,785. Benitez had both the chip lead and momentum when heads-up play against Seidel started. But only a few hands into heads-up play, Seidel found a double when he coolered Benitez holding [poker card="qs"][poker card="qd"] against the [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"] of Benitez. After than, Seidel built a chip lead of his own, taking a 2:1 advantage. On the last hand, with the blinds at 350,000/700,000 (85,000 ante) Seidel limped the button holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="8h"] and Benitez put in a raise to 2.8 million with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="kd"]. Seidel took a few seconds and then shipped all-in and Benitez snap-called creating a monster pot of more than 52 million. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="tc"][poker card="4h"], giving Seidel heart flush out while keeping Benitez with a small edge. The turn was the [poker card="ad"], but it was the [poker card="3h"] river that helped Seidel come from behind in the hand to win it all. Benitez settled for runner-up and its $759,418 payday for second place, while Erik Seidel claims World Series of Poker bracelet number 9 and the $977,842 first-place prize. WSOP Online Event #11 (Super MILLION$) Final Table Erik Seidel - $977,842 Francisco Benitez - $759,418 Thomas Muehloecker - $589,785 Shyngis Satubayev - $458,043 Chin-wei Chien - $355,728 Joachim Haraldstad - $276,268 Claas Segebrecht - $214,557 Isaac Baron - $166,631 Rui Ferreira - $129,410
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