Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'erik seidel'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 21 results

  1. When you first look down at your hole cards after the dealer pitches your cards, you immediately begin to formulate a plan on how to play that specific hand. In most cases, you’re simply waiting for your turn to fold, but in those instances where the poker gods have blessed you, you look down and see a great starting hand - a premium pair perhaps - and you instantly picture yourself raking in a huge pot at the conclusion of the hand after cleverly outplaying your opponent. Things don’t always follow the initial narrative you create though. Maria Konnikova spent the last three years learning exactly that, but not just via the hands she played live and online as she wrote her latest book The Biggest Bluff, which followed her journey from total poker newb to a Hendon Mob profile with over $300,000 in winnings and a marquee victory to her credit. It was 2016 and Konnikova, a New York Times bestselling author, had just launched her second book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time into the universe and was searching for her next project. Her first few ideas were met with polite resistance from her publisher and she folded to wait for something better. That’s when her idea to take a year learning the game of poker - really learning it - before playing in the World Series of Poker Main Event came to her like a premium hand on the button. Konnikova envisioned tracking down a top-flight poker pro to be her coach and guide through the journey. She knew nothing about the game, including the rules, and put together a well-thought-out pitch that detailed how the 12-month journey was going to play out. “Proposals take a lot of time and a lot of research. You don't just bang out a book proposal. It took me about six months to do my book proposal,” Konnikova says. “I had to do a bunch of research so that I could make the proposal really meaty and have some sort of idea about what was going to happen.” As she dug into the research part of the pitch, Konnikova zoned in on one player to be her coach, Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. She tracked down Seidel and did her best sales job on convincing the eight-time WSOP bracelet winner to take her on as a student. “When I reached out to Erik, the first time I met him, the book hadn't been sold and I was very open about that. I said, ‘Look I have this idea, but we don't know what's actually going to happen’,” Konnikova remembers. Seidel agreed to be part of the project but Konnikova had one more thing she had to do. She played a little bit online and then headed to Las Vegas to get her first taste of the poker world. “I just wanted to make sure that I wasn't going to hate poker,” Konnikova admits. After getting enough of a taste of the online and live scene to know she was going to enjoy the process, Konnikova signed a book deal with her publisher to spend a year in the poker world before using the 2017 WSOP Main Event as the exclamation point on her journey. That’s not how the hand played itself out though. Premium pairs be damned. “I had no idea how the journey was going to go. I didn't know what was going to happen and I really did envision it as being like one year and as ending with the World Series of Poker. That's just kind of the grand hurrah,” Konnikova says. “And none of that was the case and the outline, the proposal that I gave is totally different from what ended up happening.” The book, which hit bookshelves Tuesday, features Seidel extensively. When Konnikova first met with him she didn’t have an alternate choice as her coach in case Seidel declined but admits now that the student-sensei relationship with Seidel helped frame her poker journey and the book. “My experience with poker would have been totally different. I think with some players even, players who are considered great, I mean I'm not naming any names or anything like that, I would have just hated the game and not been able to get good at it because their attitude is so different from mine and we really would not have I think meshed on a personal level,” Konnikova says. “I think sometimes things just work out and this was one of those things where I just had no idea how good my first choice was. No idea. I could never have predicted it.” Learning that cash games and tournaments were totally different pursuits was a revelation for her and the more she learned about each one, the clearer the necessary path became. “Erik kind of told me, ‘Look, you have to focus. You have to pick one if you are going to do this quickly because it is a different animal. Eventually, you can play both but at the beginning, you have to focus on one game and one style because you are going to learn to play very differently if I'm teaching you to play cash versus tournaments’,” Konnikova says. Konnikova evaluated both options and elected to focus her poker education solely on tournaments. She saw them serving as a great vehicle to talk about decision making in a way that made sense for how people live their lives on a daily basis. “I was looking for something that was going to provide me with a good way into life. Tournaments are much more dynamic. They have a beginning, middle, and an end. They have an ark. They have a story. They have changing priorities at different depths of the game and to me that is much more reminiscent of how life is,” Konnikova says. “Life is not a cash game. It's not something where you can constantly add-on and re-buy and walk away from the table whenever you want and leave when you are up or when you are down.” So Konnikova was off and running with her poker journey but the calendar intervened and like a check-raise on the turn from the tightest player at the table, forced Konnikova to re-evaluate her options. “My year timeline got completely screwed from the very beginning. I met Erik in the summer and kind of conceived it as ‘oh, this is going to be like a year thing’,” Konnikova recalls. “But by the time that I was ready to play my first hand online, it was already fall. And by the time I played my first live tournament, it was already winter. And so, that timeline had gotten completely shifted.” Konnikova plowed onward. The next few months included playing online and multiple trips to Las Vegas to play small buy-in tournaments before finding some tougher events with bigger buy-ins on the East Coast of the United States. The 2017 WSOP Main Event was fast approaching and Seidel wasn’t sure she was ready for it. Playing that event was a key component of the book pitch and there was suddenly a real possibility she wouldn’t even be ready to play it. Skipping it to wait for a better spot seemed like a bad play at the time to Konnikova. “I was like, ‘No, this is my proposal. This is what I sold. This is the book I sold. I am going to play the damn thing’,” Konnikova says. She played the Main Event that year and looking back now admits it wasn’t her best decision. “It was a lot of money for me. So that was something I probably shouldn't have done. Hindsight tells me that and I should have known it in the moment and I didn't really want to know it. I think it tells us a lot about how the human mind works. When we really don't want to acknowledge something we often don't. We find excuses.” When she busted early on Day 2, Konnikova knew that was meant to be when she was supposed to begin writing the book. Reviewing everything up to that point, she quickly realized that she had to keep going if she wanted to write the book she had envisioned, even if it was not the one she had pitched. “I didn't have a book at that point. I did not have enough. I hadn't spent enough time in the poker world,” Konnikova says. “I hadn't met enough people. I hadn't. I mean sure, I could have written some book, but it would have been a different book and I think it would have been a much worse book.” Her first phone call was to her editor, Scott Moyers at Penguin Press. She explained to him that she needed to keep going and found him to be very supportive of the sudden shift. Not long after that, the book’s trajectory - and deadline - changed again. [caption id="attachment_631383" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Maria Konnikova and her poker coach/mentor Erik Seidel after Konnikova shipped the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure National Championship (PokerStars photo)[/caption] At the 2018 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, Konnikova beat out 279 other entries in the $1,650 PCA National Championship to win $84,600. While that victory could have served as the final chapter of a successful journey through poker, Konnikova wanted to do more research and continue to play. Her editor was receptive and supportive. “I told him, ‘Look, I need you to just leave me alone and give me time and when I'm ready I'm going to write the book’ and he said, ‘Yeah, sure. Go for it. No one is going to scoop you. This is your life story’,” Konnikova says. Like a premium hand and the narrative built in your head on how to maximize the value on each street, Konnikova turned that one-year plan into a 3.5-year-long education not only on how to play poker but how to handle the potential derailments along the way.
  2. Any conversation about who the best high roller poker player in the world that doesn't include Stephen Chidwick is wasted energy. Chidwick proved it again this week by winning the inaugural Australian Poker Open Championship against some of the toughest fields in recent memory. On his way to the title, Chidwick cashed in three of the seven APO events, including a win, a runner-up finish and very important Main Event min-cash. All told, Chidwick earned won $949,000 (AUD). Mike Watson Opens Things With a Win The opening event of the APO, a $10,000 No Limit Hold'em event, drew 59 entries with Canadian pro Mike Watson beating all of them to win $177,000 and take the early lead in the Australian Poker Open Championship. "I'm thrilled to have won it," Watson said. "Especially in these series, it's great to get off to a good start and set the tone, get your confidence high, and try to make a run for that player of the series title. It's also the first live event I've won a little while, so that monkey's off my back." A pair of Australian's filled the other two spots on the podium. Michael O'Grady finished second for $118,000 and Benjamin Shannon came in third for $82,600. Other players who picked up a cash were Orpen Kisacikoglu, Ben Lamb, Luc Greenwood, Andras Nemeth, and Elio Fox. Event #1 Payouts Mike Watson - $177,000 Michael O'Grady - $118,000 Benjamin Shannon - $82,600 Orpen Kisacikoglu - $59,000 Jamie Lee - $47,200 Andras Nemeth - $35,400 Elio Fox - $29,500 Ben Lamb - $23,600 Luc Greenwood - $17,700 Former #1 PocketFiver Andras Nemeth Wins Event #2 After finishing sixth in the opening event, former #1-ranked PocketFiver Andras Nemeth beat out the 42 other entries in Event $2, $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha, but still couldn't ascend to the very top of the Australian Poker Open Championship standings. "It's nice to not only play one thing, so that keeps me motivated, but I also love to play poker and that keeps me motivated and my fiancée is my biggest motivation," Nemeth said. "She, and our families, are very supportive and she travels with me to big events and that makes a big difference for me." Nemeth beat Najeem Ajez heads-up to claim the $146,200 first place prize and 300 APO points while Ajez took home $93,600 and 210 points. Nemeth had 340 points. Unfortunately for Nemeth, Watson actually extended his Championship lead, finishing third for $64,500 and 150 points to bump his two-event total to 450. Others who managed to pick up a cash in this event were Sean Winter, Chino Rheem, and Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. Event #2 Payouts Andras Nemeth - $146,200 Najeem Ajez - $93,600 Mike Watson - $64,500 Joni Jouhkimainen - $43,000 Sean Winter - $34,400 Erik Seidel - $25,800 Chino Rheem - $21,500 Timothy Adams Beats Stephen Chidwick for Event #3 Title Chidwick's march towards the APO Championship began in earnest in Event #3, a $25,000 No Limit Hold'em event with 49 entries. Chidwick managed to outlast all of them except one. Canadian Timothy Adams beat Chidwick heads-up to earn $416,500 and 300 points. "This final table was really tough with all guys I'm used to playing against," Adams said." At the high stakes you play mainly against all the same players and those guys are all really great and I'm very happy that I won. To win a tournament a lot of things have to go your way and today that happened to me." Chidwick picked up a $269,500 score and his first 210 APO Championship points. Australian Andy Lee ended up with a $183,850 payday. Also cashing in this event was Steve O'Dwyer, Orpen Kisacikoglu, and for the second time in two events, Chino Rheem posted a seventh place finish. Event #3 Payouts Timothy Adams - $416,500 Stephen Chidwick - $269,500 Andy Lee - $183,750 Steve O'Dwyer - $122,500 Orpen Kisacikoglu - $98,000 Aaron Van Blarcum - $73,500 Chino Rheem - $61,250 Farid Jattin Stays Hot with $25K PLO Victory Farid Jattin has had himself an amazing start to 2020. Just one week after winning the Aussie Millions $25K Challenge and finishing runner-up in the Aussie Millions $25,000 Pot Limit Omaha event, Jattin topped the 29-player field in Event #4, a #25,000 PLO event. "I came from Melbourne with a nice win and today I came in with a big chip lead and I'm lucky that things worked out again," Jattin said. "Today was a special situation because all their stacks were very even, and I could apply a lot of pressure on them. This favored me a lot, but there's a lot of luck in PLO, but it felt like I played flawlessly and I'm happy with my performance." Runner-up Jouhkimainen ended up pocketing $188,500 while third place finisher George Wolff earned $116,000. The APO Championship lead changed hands after this event. Nemeth ended up in fourth place and added 120 points to his total to move past Watson by 30 points. Event #4 Payouts Farid Jattin - $290,000 Joni Jouhkimainen - $188,500 George Wolff - $116,000 Andras Nemeth - $72,500 Alex Foxen - $58,000 Stephen Chidwick Beats Erik Seidel for $25K NLHE Win Chidwick took the APO Championship lead in dramatic fashion after beating Seidel heads-up in Event #5, $25,000 NLHE. The $399,500 winner's share also added 300 APO Championship points to his total to move him past Nemeth. Following the win, Chidwick talked about the Open Championship format and how he always seems to do well in them. "I really like this format of playing a week of tournaments, one every day, and battling against some of the best players to see who can run the best," Chidwick said. "It also feels nice to be in contention for the Australian Poker Open title, it seems like I'm in contention in most of these series that I play." Seidel earned $258,500 while Seth Davies banked $176,250 for his bronze medal performance. Also cashing in this event were Michael Addamo, Jorryt van Hoof, Matthias Eibinger, and Jattin. Event #5 Payouts Stephen Chidwick - $399,500 Erik Seidel - $258,500 Seth Davies - $176,250 Michael Addamo - $117,500 Jorryt van Hoof - $94,000 Farid Jattin - $70,500 Matthias Eibinger - $58,750 Canadian Luc Greenwood Ships Event #6 It wouldn't be a high roller series if at least one of the Greenwood brothers didn't ship something. Luc Greenwood did the family proud by besting the 35-player field in Event #6, a $50,000 NLHE event. Greenwood earned $700,000 for the win. "I was having a really rough trip to Australia so far with only one min-cash so far," Green admitted after his win. "This was a tough field and a big battle, and even though it looked like I was gonna run away with it three-handed, I really had to fight for it and I'm glad that I won. I think I played quite well overall." Mikita Badziakouski finished in second for $455,000 while Nemeth added $280,000 in earnings and another 150 Championship points to his total to move past Chidwick for the lead. Nemeth had 630 points while Chidwick had 510. Rheem picked up a third APO cash by coming in fourth place while Addamo earned a min-cash of $140,00 for coming in fifth. Event #6 Payouts Luc Greenwood - $700,000 Mikita Badziakouski - $455,000 Andras Nemeth - $280,000 Chino Rheem - $175,000 Michael Addamo - $140,000 Michael Addamo Wins Main Event, Stephen Chidwick Earns Championship Michael Addamo did his native Australia proud in the $100,000 Main Event, topping the 28-player field to win $1,288,000. That win was overshadowed however by Chidwick's fourth place finish which propelled him to the Championship victory. Aaron Van Blarcum finished in second for $784,000 while two-time reigning GPI Player of the Year Alex Foxen finished in third for $448,000. Chidwick rounded out the in-the-money finishers, coming in fourth place for $280,000 and 140 Championship points - enough to push him past Nemeth at the last possible moment. “Hopefully these style of events continue because I think it’s a bit more of an achievable accolade to win a multiple of or, over time, determine who the best player is rather than looking at a single tournament," Chidwick said. "Obviously there’s a lot of luck involved in this too, but over the course of seven, eight, or ten events you’re going to see the better players win more often and it would be fun to see who can collect the most titles like this.” Chidwick adds the Australian Poker Open title to the US Poker Open Championships that he earned in 2018. “I would love to complete the collection, get the whole set,” Chidwick said. In 2019, Chidwick finished second to Sam Soverel in the British Poker Open. Australian Poker Open Main Event Payouts Michael Addamo - $1,288,000 Aaron Van Blarcum - $784,000 Alex Foxen - $448,000 Stephen Chidwick - $280,000 Australian Poker Open Championship Standings Stephen Chidwick - 650 Andras Nemeth - 630 Michael Addamo- 560 Mike Watson - 450 Luc Greenwood - 360 Farid Jattin - 360 Joni Jouhkimainen - 330 Aaron Van Blarcum - 305 Timothy Adams - 300 Erik Seidel - 270
  3. Vincent Wan has been a regular at the Crown Casino in Melbourne for nearly two decades. In that time he has come to become a frequent face in the high stakes cash games and has even managed to win the Royal Flush jackpot on two occasions. On Friday, he capped all of that by winning the 2020 Aussie Millions Main Event title after an epic 15-hour long final table that included a heads-up battle that lasted longer than The Irishman and had nothing other than the trophy at stake. [ptable zone=“Global Poker Article Ad”][ptable zone=“GG Poker”][ptable zone=“BetMGM NJ”] The seven players who returned to action on Friday played for over two hours before the first elimination. Nino Ullmann raised from the UTG+1 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"], Gareth Pepper called from the hijack with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kh"], and Nicolas Malo defended the big blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="8c"]. The [poker card="jc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"] flop gave Ullmann the nut straight. Malo and Ullmann both checked and Pepper bet 400,000. Malo moved all in for 790,000 and Ullmann came over the top for 1,325,000 all in. Pepper folded. The turn was the [poker card="3s"] and the [poker card="ks"] completed the board to eliminate Malo in seventh. A little over an hour later, another player was sent to the rail. Pepper raised to 220,000 from the hijack with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kc"] before Oliver Weis moved all in for 2,190,000. Pepper called. The board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="ac"] to give Pepper the pot and end Weis' run in sixth place. The five remaining players played for four hours and took a one-hour dinner break before the next player was sent to the rail. Wan raised to 325,000 from the cutoff with [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"] and Erik Seidel pushed all in for 2,875,000 from the button with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ts"]. Wan called. The [poker card="js"][poker card="th"][poker card="2c"] flop gave both players a pair. Seidel wasn't able to make trips throug the [poker card="2d"] turn or [poker card="4d"] river and the Poker Hall of Famer was eliminated in fifth. Another hour passed without an elimination before Ullmann got involved in another confrontation with a much different result. Ngoc Tai Hoang called from the small blind with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"] and Ullmann checked the big blind with [poker card="td"][poker card="7s"]. The [poker card="tc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5h"] flop gave Ullmann control. Hoang bet 300,000 and Ullmann called. Hoang then checked the [poker card="jd"] and Ullmann bet 800,000. Hoang moved all in and Ullmann called all in. The [poker card="5d"] river gave Hoang a better two pair and sent Ullmann to the rail with a fourth place finish. The final three players then entered into chop discussions which got a little contentious. After running the ICM numbers, Pepper wanted his payout bumped up to an even $1 million. Wan agreed but was insistent that he would get the trophy, despite trailing Hoang at the time. Crown Tournament Director Joel Williams informed them that they had to play for the trophy. Negotiations continued and Wan pitched new numbers that Hoang felt was unfair. "It is fair, because I'm definitely better than you. I've been a professional poker player for like 20 years and he's been playing for like 10 years as well," Wan said. "This is like your first cash. You have like a $5K cash a $2K cash, I saw. It's okay. I know." Hoang explained he's had other cashes not listed online while campaigning for a more favorable payout. "I can see the way you play. You don't," Wan said. The three finally came to terms on a deal that saw each of them secure a seven-figure payday. Wan and Hoang each earned $1,318,000 with Pepper taking home $1,000,000. With the deal in place, Pepper lasted just 20 more minutes before busting. Pepper moved all in for 5,010,000 from the small blind with [poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Wan called from the big blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="3s"]. The board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] to send Pepper packing and put the tournament into heads up play. That pot gave Wan the heads-up lead over Hoang. Wan had 13,665,000 to Hoang's 11,045,000 and despite Wan's insistence he was a superior player, the pair played heads-up for nearly 4.5 hours before Wan claimed victory. Hoang was left desperately short after losing with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] to [poker card="ad"][poker card="9c"] and [poker card="ah"][poker card="qc"] to [poker card="ac"][poker card="th"]. There was yet one more chance for him to get it in good with an unfortunate result. Hoang shoved his last 2,200,000 in the middle with [poker card="as"][poker card="3h"] and Wan called with [poker card="tc"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="9s"][poker card="6s"] flop gave Wan middle pair and Hoang couldn't catch up after the [poker card="jd"] turn or [poker card="td"] river and was eliminated in second place giving Wan the title as 2020 AUssie Millions Main Event champion. 2020 Aussie Millions Main Event Payouts Vincent Wan - A$1,318,000 ($907,196 US) Ngoc Tai Hoang - A$1,318,000 ($907,196 US) Gareth Pepper - A$1,000,000 ($688,31 US) Nino Ullmann - A$480,160 ($330,501 US) Erik Seidel - A$378,660 ($260,637 US) Oliver Weis - A$307,820 ($211,877 US) Nicolas Malo - A$240,080 ($165,250 US)
  4. Chino Rheem is about as polarizing of a figure as you’ll find in today’s world of poker, but for all of the issues he’s had over the years, there’s no denying his ability to perform on the game’s largest stages. Rheem has won three World Poker Tour titles, final tabled the WSOP Main Event, and amassed more than $10.5 million in live tournament earnings. Coming off a first-place score for more than $1.5 million in the 2019 PCA Main Event, Rheem recently became the 41st poker player in history to win more than $10 million from live poker tournaments. Here’s a look at the five biggest scores of Rheem’s poker career. 7th in 2008 WSOP Main Event ($1,772,650) Rheem had been around the poker world for a handful of years before the 2008 World Series of Poker, and he even had a second-place finish in a gold bracelet event in 2006 that earned him $327,981. He truly made waves in the 2008 WSOP Main Event, though, when he aggressively splashed his way through the 6,844-player field to reach the final table in what was the first-ever WSOP November Nine. Rheem entered the 2008 WSOP Main Event final table in sixth position on the leaderboard. His run ultimately ended in seventh place after he got the last of his money in with the [poker card="As"][poker card="Kc"] against Peter Eastgate’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"]. A queen hit the flop, and that was all she wrote for Rheem, who was sent to the rail with a $1.772 million prize. 1st in 2019 PCA Main Event ($1,567,100) The 2019 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event attracted 865 entries. With six players left, Rheem entered the final day with the chip lead. He busted all five of his opponents to win the 2019 PCA Main Event and capture its $1.567 million first-place prize. This result proved to be, at the time, the second largest of Rheem's career, just behind his WSOP Main Event seventh-place finish. It also moved him to more than $10.5 million in live tournament earnings and he became the 74th player to eclipse the $10 million earnings mark, per HendonMob. 1st in WPT Five Diamond ($1,538,730) Rheem was one of 497 entries in the World Poker Tour’s Five Diamond World Poker Classic event at Bellagio in 2008. The event was part of Season VII of the WPT and featured a buy-in of $15,400. The prize pool was $7.231 million, of which Rheem got the most of when he scored the $1.538 million top prize. It was the first of Rheem’s three World Poker Tour titles and came just a month after he finished seventh in the World Series of Poker Main Event. At this final table, Rheem had stiff competition in the form of Justin Young, Evan McNiff, Steve Sung, Amnon Filippi, and Hoyt Corkins. 1st in WPT World Championship ($1,150,297) To conclude Season XI of the World Poker Tour, Rheem won the $25,500 buy-in WPT World Championship. The event was held at Bellagio in Las Vegas in 2013 and attracted 146 entries to create a $3.54 million prize pool. In the end, it was Rheem against Erick Lindgren for the title, with Rheem coming out on top to win a $1.15 million payday and his second WPT title. 1st in Epic Poker League Event #1 ($1,000,000) Currently standing as the fifth largest score of Rheem’s poker career is a victory in the now defunct Epic Poker League. Rheem won the EPL’s first title, defeating a field of 137 entries in the $20,000 buy-in tournament to score the $1 million top prize. At the final table, Rheem out-battled runner-up Erik Seidel and third-place finisher Jason Mercier en route to the title and million dollar payday.
  5. As 2019 draws to a close, PocketFives takes a look back at the year that was in poker news, going month-by-month through the biggest and most important stories of the year. In May, the poker world was surprised when it was announced that Daniel Negreanu, the face of PokerStars, was no longer going to be an ambassador for the online site. Daniel Negreanu And PokerStars Part Ways One of the most stable relationships in the poker world ended in May as Daniel Negreanu and PokerStars announced that they would be going their separate ways. Right before the World Series of Poker and only days after his high-profile wedding to Amanda Leatherman, Negreanu took to Twitter and posted a short video that announced that he would no longer be patched up for the online poker giant. Negreanu began representing the PokerStars brand in 2007 and quickly became the face of the company, including taking on plenty of criticism during PokerStars' controversial termination of the SuperNova Elite program in late 2015. “Daniel has been one of the most influential faces of poker and indeed PokerStars for 12 years,” said Stars Group Public Relations associate director Rebecca McAdam. “It has been wonderful to have his passion, support, and insights throughout our relationship. We wish Daniel the very best for the future, as well as wedded bliss and tons of run good this summer.” Six months after the end of his deal with PokerStars, Negreanu announced he would now be representing upcoming online poker site GGPoker in a deal that is believed to be worth even more than his contract with PokerStars. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] PocketFives Counts Down Top 50 Ahead of the 50th Annual World Series of Poker, the PocketFives editorial staff released their list of the 50 Greatest Players in World Series of Poker History. From old-school legends to internet grinders, the list is a snapshot of not just the history of the WSOP, but also of poker itself. Take a look back at our top 10 list of the players who made their name on the World Series of Poker stage. 10. Jason Mercier 9. Michael Mizrachi 8. Chris Ferguson 7. Erik Seidel 6. Daniel Negreanu 5. Johnny Chan 4. Phil Ivey 3. Stu Ungar 2. Doyle Brunson 1. Phil Hellmuth Phil Hellmuth Is Not Satisfied, Never Will Be With the 2019 World Series of Poker right around the corner, 15-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth spoke with PocketFives about what it means for him to hold all the records and what the 1989 Main Event winner was hoping would happen at the series, 30 years after his career-defining victory. “It’s in my nature, it’s in my DNA,” Hellmuth said of his drive to be the best. “I'm super competitive, and I’m competing against the best players in the world, in this era, and past and future eras, for greatest poker player of all time.” partypoker Invades Sin City Summer in Las Vegas belongs to the World Series of Poker. But in 2019, partypoker decided to get in on the action and announced that their partypoker MILLIONS series would be headed to the ARIA Hotel & Casino, marking the first time they’ve held a tournament in America. “We’re looking forward to MILLIONS making its debut this summer at the record,” said ARIA Director of Poker Operations Sean McCormack. “Our team is excited to add an event of this magnitude to our extensive summer schedule.” The partypoker MILLIONS had a $10,300 buy-in and a $5 million guarantee. The tournament ended up crushing the guarantee with Thomas Marchese taking home the $1,000,000 first-place prize of the over $5.36 million prize pool. Alex ‘SploogeLuge’ Foxen Wins May PLB Live or online, when it comes to poker Alex ‘SploogeLuge’ Foxen has proved he can do it all. In May, he took down the PocketFives Leaderboard for the first time. The former GPI #1-ranked player spent plenty of time in Canada this year, grinding some of the biggest online poker tournaments which helped him reach a career-high ranking of #4 in the world and soar past $5 million in lifetime online earnings.
  6. Daniel Dvoress entered the final table of the Super High Roller Bowl Bahamas with a less-than-stellar heads-up record. The Canadian poker pro had just one career live win and five runner-up finishes before Monday. He managed to avoid repeating that history by beating Wai Leong Chan heads-up to win the SHRB Bahamas and the $4,000,000 first-place prize. It took just over two hours of play for the first elimination to happen and a failed bluff played a key role. From UTG, Justin Bonomo raised to 90,000 with [poker card="tc"][poker card="9c"], Erik Seidel called from the button with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7h"] and Seth Davies defended his big blind with [poker card="th"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="5d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3h"] flop got Davies to check before Bonomo bet 80,000. Seidel called and Davies folded. The turn was the [poker card="7c"] and Seidel called after Bonomo slid out a bet of 250,000. The river was the [poker card="8c"] and Bonomo bet 545,000 to leave himself a single 5,000 chip behind. Seidel raised and Bonomo folded. He was eliminated on the next hand when his [poker card="7d"][poker card="6c"] was unable to beat Chan's [poker card="ac"][poker card="4c"]. [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zgone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Just 30 minutes later, Jason Koon moved all-in for 540,000 from UTG with [poker card="3d"][poker card="3s"] and Kathy Lehne called from the cutoff with [poker card="ad"][poker card="ks"]. The [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"] flop was no help for Koon and the [poker card="5s"] turn gave Lehne a flush and left Koon drawing dead as the [poker card="jd"] completed the board. Another 45 minutes passed before the next player hit the rail. Steve O'Dwyer moved all in from the hijack for 655,000 with [poker card="as"][poker card="9d"] and Seidel called from the small blind wiht [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"]. The [poker card="5h"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3c"][poker card="kh"][poker card="7h"] runout offered no reprieve for O'Dwyer and he was eliminated in sixth place. On the next hand, action folded to Dvoress in the small blind and he completed with [poker card="qc"][poker card="3d"] before Davies checked behind with [poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"]. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"] and both players checked. The turn was the [poker card="8d"] and Davies called Dvoress' bet of 100,000. The river was the [poker card="2c"] and Dvoress fired out a bet of 900,000 and Davies called all-in and was eliminated in fifth place. Dvoress then doubled through Seidel after making a set of threes on a [poker card="qs"][poker card="7s"][poker card="3h"] flop against Seidel's [poker card="ks"][poker card="2s"]. The [poker card="kd"] and [poker card="7h"] completed the board and Seidel called Dvoress' shove to double into the chip lead. One hand later, Dvoress raised to 125,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="jh"] as the first to act and Seidel called off his last 105,000 from the big blind with [poker card="7h"][poker card="6c"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="9h"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="kh"] runout ended Seidel's tournament with a fourth-place result. Three-handed play lasted almost three hours before Lehne's run at history ended two places short of a title. Already the first woman to enter a Super High Roller Bowl event (2015), Lehne became the first woman to cash in a SHRB after Wai Kin Yong bubbled on Sunday and was working towards becoming the first female winner in SHRB history before Chan derailed all of that. Dvoress opened to 200,000 from the button the with [poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"]. Lehne called from the small blind with [poker card="ac"][poker card="ad"] before Chan moved all-in from the big blind for 2,800,000 with [poker card="6c"][poker card="6d"]. Dvoress folded and Lehne called instantly. The [poker card="ks"][poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] flop kept Lehne ahead, as did the [poker card="7d"] turn. The [poker card="6h"] river however gave Chan a full house and eliminated Lehne in third place. Heads-up play began with Dvoress holding 63% of the chips in play. Over the next 90 minutes, Dvoress secured the rest of the chips to win the Super High Roller Bowl Bahamas and pick up a career-best score in the process. Down to just 1,745,000, Chan moved all-in from the button with Jx7x and Dvoress called from the big blind with [poker card="ad"][poker card="9d"]. The flop gave Chan a pair of sevens, but Dvoress managed to pair his nine on the river to eliminate Chan in second-place. Super High Roller Bowl Bahamas Payouts Daniel Dvoress - $4,080,000 Wai Leong Chan - $2,677,500 Kathy Lehne - $1,785,000 Erik Seidel - $1,275,000 Seth Davies - $1,020,000 Steve O'Dwyer - $765,000 Jason Koon - $637,500 Justin Bonomo - $510,000
  7. A new addition to the Poker Masters schedule for 2019, the $10,000 Big Bet Mix featuring a rotation of No Limit Hold'em, Pot Limit Omaha and No Limit Deuce to Seven drew 52 runners and at the end of it all, Julien Martini had his first win of 2019 over a talented group of players.[ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] Playing No Limit Deuce to Seven with blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 ante), Pedro Bromfman moved all-in for 450,000 with [poker card="tc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"]. Kahle Burns re-raised to 770,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="2d"] and Jorryt van Hoof folded behind. Burns drew the [poker card="6s"] to make and 8-6 while Bromfan ended up with the [poker card="qs"] for Q-7 and was eliminated in sixth. Stephen Chidwick started the final table with a massive chip lead but after just an hour and 40 minutes of play, he was all in for his tournament life. From UTG, Chidwick moved all-in for 930,000 with [poker card="js"][poker card="9s"] and Sam Soverel called from the big blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="qd"]. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5h"] to eliminate Chidwick in fifth place. Unfortunately for Soverel, that pot wasn't able to propel him to victory. Down to under a million, Soverel moved all-in with [poker card="qc"][poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4c"] and Burns called with [poker card="jd"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"]. Soverel drew the [poker card="jc"] and Burns stood pat to eliminate Soverel in fourth place. Another Duece hand resulted in the next elimination. From the button, van Hoof, who was down to just six big blinds, moved all-in with [poker card="qc"][poker card="td"][poker card="7s"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4h"]. Martini moved all-in from the small blind with [poker card="kh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2c"] and Burns called from the big blind with [poker card="jc"][poker card="8s"][poker card="7h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3c"]. Martini drew the [poker card="4d"] to make an 8-7, Burns patted his J-8, and van Hoof drew the [poker card="7c"][poker card="4s"] to double pair and was eliminated in third place. Martini started heads up with a 2-1 chip lead over Burns and it took less than an hour for the Frenchman to acquire all of the chips and he did it in heroic fashion. Playing No Limit Hold'em and with stacks nearly even, Martini raised to 450,000 with [poker card="ah"][poker card="8d"] and Burns defended with [poker card="kd"][poker card="3c"]. The flop came [poker card="th"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4h"] and Burns check-called Martini's bet of 200,000. The turn was the [poker card="js"] and both players checked. The river was the [poker card="2s"] river and Burns moved all-in for 2,200,000. Martini took just over a minute before calling to eliminate Burns and pick up his first live win since he won his first World Series of Poker bracelet in June 2018. Final Table Payouts Julien Martini - $166,400 Kahle Burns - $109,200 Jorryt van Hoof - $72,800 Sam Soverel - $52,000 Stephen Chidwick - $41,600 Pedro Bromfman - $31,200 Yuri Dzivielevski - $26,000 Erik Seidel - $20,800 Purple Jacket Standings Chance Kornuth - 420 Isaac Baron - 300 Ryan Laplante - 300 Julien Martini - 300 Jared Bleznick - 300 Jonathan Depa - 300 Sam Soverel - 270 Jorryt van Hoof - 270 Alex Foxen - 270 Thai Ha - 210
  8. Just over two weeks after winning a €50,000 Short Deck event at King's Casino in Rozvadov, Jonathan Depa picked up another short deck title on Thursday after beating Alex Foxen heads-up in the Poker Masters $10,000 Short Deck event. The last four cashes on Depa's Hendon Mob profile are all in the game of Short Deck. "Heaters are always fun," Depa said. "I don't really play that many tournaments. To win two tournaments in two weeks is pretty awesome and it's always nice when you're just basically winning every all in." [ptable zone="Global Poker Article Ad"][ptable zone="888poker NJ"][ptable zone="GG Poker"] The final table included a Poker Hall of Famer, a former November Niner, the reigning GPI Player of the Year, the reigning High Roller of the Year and a three-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner. None of them were a match for Depa though. Jorryt van Hoof, who finished third in the 2014 WSOP Main Event, limped with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qc"] before Sam Soverel raised all in to 940,000 with [poker card="qs"][poker card="th"]. Action folded back to Van Hoof and he used a time extension before calling. The board ran out [poker card="ks"][poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="qh"][poker card="ac"] to give both players two pair and leave Soverel, who won the PokerCentral High Roller of the Year title in 2018, out in sixth place. On the next hand, Ben Yu moved all in with [poker card="jd"][poker card="ts"] and Depa called with [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9h"][poker card="7c"] to give Yu to pair and a straight draw. The [poker card="kd"] turn gave Depa the advantage back and after the [poker card="7s"] completed the board, Yu was eliminated. First to act, van Hoof moved all in for 1,330,000 with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and Foxen also moved all for 1,890,000 with [poker card="kc"][poker card="kd"] forcing Depa and Seidel to fold. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="8s"][poker card="6s"] flop gave Foxen a stranglehold on the pot and the [poker card="6c"] turn gave him a full house to eliminate van Hoof in fifth place as the meaningless [poker card="tc"] completed the board. Foxen continued to enjoy the role of executioner and his next victim was Poker Hall of Famer Erik Seidel. Seidel opened by moving all in for 1,230,000 with [poker card="kh"][poker card="9d"] and Foxen mvoed all in behind him with [poker card="ac"][poker card="qc"] and Depa folded. Foxen fell behind on the [poker card="9s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="8d"] flop, but the [poker card="7c"] turn gave Foxen straight and flush draws. The [poker card="6c"] river completed Foxen's flush and eliminated Seidel in third. Thanks in part to those two eliminations, Foxen began heads-up play with 72% of the chips in play. The pair played for more than 90 minutes before Depa completed the comeback. Foxen opened by moving all-in with [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"] and Depa called with [poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"]. Foxen was unable to double up on the [poker card="qd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="6s"][poker card="8s"][poker card="9s"] runout and was eliminated in second place giving Depa the title. Final Table Payouts Jonathan Depa - $133,200 Alex Foxen - $88,800 Erik Seidel - $59,200 Jorryt van Hoof - $37,000 Ben Yu - $29,600 Sam Soverel - $22,200
  9. On Thursday, Event #24 of the 2014 World Series of Poker, a $5,000 No Limit Hold'em Six-Max contest, will play down from 17 players to one bracelet winner. The field is rock solid, containing nine PocketFivers, one Main Event champion, one November Niner with a huge chip lead, and one player looking to become the second dual bracelet winner of 2014. Besides that, there's not a lot to talk about. --- PocketFives' WSOP coverage is brought to you by Real Gaming, a regulated online poker site in Nevada. Play Real Gaming, real money poker on any device. Play now for Final Table Freerolls. Skip straight to the final table and win cash daily. --- Let's start with the chip leader, 2010 WSOP November Niner and 2011 bracelet winner Matt Jarvis (pictured), who was the lone player to bag a seven-figure chip stack on Wednesday. Jarvis stands at 1.37 million in chips, with WSOP coverage explaining, "On one of the final hands of the night, Jarvis eliminated Andrea Dato in a big cooler. Both the Italian and the Canadian flopped trip aces, but Jarvis had his opponent out-kicked with a king to Dato's queen. The money went in on the river and Jarvis was shipped a massive pot." 2012 WSOP Main Event winner Greg Mersonis also in the hunt for the $5K bracelet and has the 11th largest stack at 379,000 in chips. Merson eliminated George Tokarczyk in 23rd place after snap-calling a 4bet all-in with queens. Tokarczyk rolled over jacks and neither player improved when the board ran out 9-3-A-K-4. Merson is in search of his fourth career WSOP final table. Griffin Flush_EntityBenger (pictured) is also still alive and is in 13th with 297,000. Benger, a former #1 playeron PocketFives, will make his fourth final day appearance in a WSOP event since 2012 and is in search of bracelet #1. WSOP coverage relayed, "Benger was crippled down to five big blinds during the penultimate level of the evening when Pratyush Buddiga cracked his A-Q with A-J, but he received a fortuitous triple-up with J-10 against pocket tens and then exacted revenge with a weak ace against Buddiga's A-K." Also in the mix is 2014 WSOP bracelet winner Kory s00tedj0kersKilpatrick, who won a $3,000 Shootout three days ago. Kilpatrick is looking to become the second dual bracelet winner of 2014, joining fellow PocketFiver Dominik bounatirouIMO Nitsche, who won a $1,000 No Limit Hold'em event on Tuesday as well as the WSOP National Championship. Here's how the $5K Six-Max field looks with 17 players remaining. The blinds stood at 4,000-8,000-1,000 when play paused for the night. The tournament resumes on Thursday at 1:00pm PT: 1. Matt Jarvis - 1,373,000 2. Jeremy Kottler - 815,000 3. Bryn BrynKenney Kenney - 612,000 4. David Borrat - 574,000 5. Andrew luckychewy Lichtenberger - 530,000 6. Byron Kaverman - 512,000 7. Pierre Neuville - 498,000 8. Kevin 1SickDisease Eyster - 477,000 9. Mark RenRad 01 Darner - 475,000 10. Fabrice Touil - 448,000 11. Greg gregy20723 Merson - 379,000 12. Mustapha lasagnaaammm Kanit - 360,000 13. Griffin Flush_Entity Benger - 297,000 14. Pratyush Buddiga - 242,000 15. Kory s00tedj0kers Kilpatrick - 216,000 16. Amanda manderbutt Musumeci - 185,000 17. Jay Dragland - 125,000 Also taking place on Thursday is the conclusion of Event #25: $2,500 Omaha/Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Split Eight or Better. Longtime PocketFiver Mike goleafsgoehLeah is second in chips to Erik Seidel(pictured) in this tournament, which restarts at 2:00pm PT. Seidel is going for his ninth WSOP bracelet, which would put him in a tie for fourth all-time. Wednesday's play featured a one-round celebration penalty for Mike Matusow, Matt Glantz running into a royal flush, and Humberto Brenes recording his sixth cash of this year's WSOP. There are 18 players left. Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, sponsored by Real Gaming. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  10. Exactly one year ago today, Maria Konnikova was basically a complete unknown in the poker world. Sure, some people knew that a New York Times bestselling author had enlisted the assistance of Erik Seidel to learn how to play poker so she could write a book about it all, but almost nobody would have been able to put a name to that person. Then, over the course of the next seven hours, Konnikova became a known commodity, winning the $1,650 National Championship at the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure. The win came with $84,600 and one of the very first $30,000 Platinum Passes to be awarded. Suddenly every poker media outlet and a few mainstream outlets picked up her story. She followed that up over the next few days by making a very deep run in the PCA Main Event, almost as a way of proving that it wasn't beginner's luck. That set the stage for a big year for Konnikova and changed the direction of what she had planned for her book and poker career. "PCA last year really changed the trajectory of my relationship with poker because it had been, in the past, basically for the book," Konnikova said. "I was really enjoying it and I was learning and had gotten much more into the game than I ever thought I would, but it was always still one of these things that I'm gonna do this for a year and be done. Konnikova, who had originally planned to use the 2018 WSOP Main Event as the end of her poker journey for the book's story arc, decided to take advantage of her good fortune and pushed the book deadline back indefinitely to play more and see where it took her. The answer was, well, everywhere. "I've been playing really full time this past year. I made a point of just hitting as much of the major stuff as I could," said Konnikova, who played European Poker Tour, World Poker and World Series of Poker events over the 12 months. "And it's still for the book in the sense that you never know what's gonna happen and what's going to be an important moment, an important thing. If you don't do it, it doesn't have a chance of happening, so it gives you more opportunities." Once the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure finishes, Konnikova is headed back home to New York City to focus on writing the first draft. Her editor has been very understanding of the shifting deadline, but has made Konnikova promise him one thing. "The only thing he told me is, 'just make this the best book you can'," said Konnikova. She's looking forward to finally sitting down and just writing, but she's also excited about getting a break from one of the toughest parts of the last year, the travel. "The hardest thing has been just being constantly on the road because I do like being home. I like stability. I like to see my family, and it can be rough to just spend three days a month in my apartment," said Konnikova. "I take my role as (PokerStars) ambassador really seriously because I want to share my excitement. I want to bring women to the game. I want to be a positive force and not ever be seen as someone who's like, 'Oh man, the constant travel's such a drag'. That's no good to anyone. Yeah, sure, the travel's tough, and that's the hardest part, but you have to put it in perspective and say, 'Shit, I get to travel to all these places to play a game. That's pretty cool'." Hopeful that the book will be on bookshelves by the end of 2019, Konnikova has no plans of walking away from the game entirely. She's come to enjoy it too much. "Once I'm done with the book, definitely playing full time until publication for sure. If I'm still playing well and if the book is doing well, I don't see why I'd stop, because I'll just start working on my next writing project," said Konnikova. "At this point, I see a very possible future and once again, life has a way of getting in the way so I have no idea, but one possible future I see is just playing and writing in tandem because you can write from anywhere in the world. That's the beauty of writing." Along the way, PokerStars added Konnikova to their group of Team Pros. That too has been an eye-opening experience for her. As she's become more of a known commodity in the poker world, players and fans have approached her at various events to share their story with her. "I've had so many people come up to me, and a lot of them women, be like, 'You've really inspired me. You're a model for what I want to do'," said Konnikova. "That's so wonderful and I'm happy to do any number of interviews and to just give as much of my time as needed because ultimately, that's the dream, right? To inspire people. It's what I hope my books do, so to be able to do it also through poker, it's great to know that you've reached people." Having lived the life of a poker pro over the past year, Konnikova has noticed she's also undergone personal growth that is directly related to her time at the table. "I've always been pretty low stress, but I've just had to become really low stress because it's something where if you let things get to you, you're just gonna be so miserable," said Konnikova. "So I've really gotten to the point where okay, let's just go day by day and see what happens and be okay not knowing what's going to be going on two weeks from now. I've just been much more sanguine about any given tournament. I busted the $25K on Day 1 on the last level. That wasn't fun. I was bummed in the moment, but then I was like, you know what? On to the next one."
  11. [caption width="640"] Daniel Weinman grabbed his second WPT title of 2017 at the Season XV Tournament of Champions (WPT Photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] Two months ago Daniel Weinman added his name to the World Poker Tour Champions Cup with a win at the Borgata Winter Poker Open in Atlantic City. Sunday night in Hollywood, Florida the 29-year-old capped off Season XV of the WPT by winning the Tournament of Champions. "I feel incredible, this was such a tough tournament and to come out on top it's super special," said Weinman, who had to pass up a trip to The Masters final round after making the final table. ""It's crazy, usually you play these tournaments with a thousand people and there may be 850 people that really don't have a chance at winning the tournament that you go deep. They're just not comfortable with all the spots they're going to encounter. Having 66 people that have already won this and have had some success in the poker world, coming out on top is incredible." After running kings into aces, Dylan Wilkerson wasn’t left with much of a stack to work with. Daniel Santoro raised to 40,000 from UTG and Wilkerson moved all in from the cut off for 179,000. Santoro called and showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] while Wilkerson had [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="kc"][poker card="7s"][poker card="6h"] flop put Santoro ahead and neither the [poker card="3d"] turn or [poker card="6d"] river were any help to Wilkerson and he was out in sixth. Just six hands later Santoro picked up another elimination. With blinds of 8,000/16,000, Seidel all in for 138,000 from UTG and Santoro called, this time showing [poker card="ks"][poker card="jd"] and again found himself up against an ace as Erik Seidel showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="5h"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"] flop put Santoro ahead with second pair and left Seidel hoping for one of the three remaining kings or running fives. The [poker card="2h"] turn was no help and neither was the [poker card="7h"] turn and the Hall of Famer Seidel was eliminated in fifth. The Daniel Santoro show kept on going. David Ormsby moved all in from the button for his last 286,000 and Santoro re-raised from the small blind, forcing big blind Michael Mizrachi to fold. Ormbsy tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"] but this time Santoro was ahead with [poker card="ad"][poker card="kh"]. The board ran out [poker card="ah"][poker card="8s"][poker card="3s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="td"] to eliminate Ormbsy in fourth place and leave Santoro as the chip leader with three players remaining. Unfortunately for Santoro, just over two and a half hours later, the show came to an abrupt halt. Mizrachi folded his button, Weinman moved all in from the small blind and Santoro called all in from the big blind. Weinman showed [poker card="ah"][poker card="4h"] while Santoro had [poker card="ks"][poker card="qh"]. The [poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"][poker card="2s"] flop put Santoro ahead and he dodged the [poker card="7c"] turn, but the [poker card="ac"] gave Weinman a better pair and eliminated Santoro. When heads-up play began, Weinman had Mizrachi outchipped 4.5-1 and it took him just 18 hands to end things. Mizrachi moved all in for 890,000 and Weinman called and showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="8h"] while Mizrachi showed [poker card="5c"][poker card="5h"]. The [poker card="qd"][poker card="jc"][poker card="3c"] flop kept Mizrachi ahead, but the [poker card="8s"] turn gave Weinman third pair. The [poker card="7c"] river card was no good for Mizrachi and he was eliminated in second place, improving his TOC finish from last year by one spot and leaving Weinman as the Season XV TOC winner. Along with the $381,500 first place prize money, Weiman also won a 2018 Audi S5 Coupe, a pair of rose gold wireless Monster Headphones, a custom poker table, a seat in Tiger’s Poker Night and a one-week stay with Wyndham Extra holidays. Final Table Payouts Daniel Weinman - $381,500 Michael Mizrachi - $218,000 Daniel Santoro - $133,525 David Ormsby - $95,375 Erik Seidel - $73,575 Dylan Wilkerson - $57,225
  12. [caption width="640"] Bryn Kenney took home another six-figure score by winning Poker Masters Event #3 on Saturday (Poker Central photo)[/caption] While the storyline from the first two Poker Masters final tables has been the success of the Germans in the field, one of the questions heading into the final table of Event #3 was where are the Germans? There were no German players among the final seven players in Event #3 but the storyline ended up being Bryn Kenney's ability to bob and weave Erik Seidel's attacks to win the event and $960,000. Sergio Aido was one of three short stacks when the final table began and ended up being the first player sent packing. Jake Schindler made it 35,000 to go from the cutoff and Aido responded by moving all in for 341,000. Schindler called and showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="jc"] while Aido was hoping his [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"] would hold up. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="2s"] flop gave Schindler the nut flush draw and while the [poker card="ks"] turn was a blank, the [poker card="qc"] river completed his flush and eliminated Aido. It took over two more hours before another player was eliminated. Seidel raised to 100,000 from the button and Cary Katz defended his big blind. Katz moved all in afer the [poker card="8d"][poker card="6c"][poker card="3h"] flop and Seidel called. Katz showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="9s"] whil Seidel had [poker card="qs"][poker card="3s"]. Katz got no help from the [poker card="6d"] turn or [poker card="5d"] river and was out in sixth place. Before Katz could even leave the final table area, Doug Polk joined him on the way out the door. After every other player folded, Bryn Kenney moved all in from the small blind and Polk called all in and tabled [poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"]. Kenney showed [poker card="qc"][poker card="8d"]. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="7h"][poker card="7s"] to give Kenney top two pair. The [poker card="2c"] turn and [poker card="5c"] river were bricks for Polk and he was done in fifth. Kenney continued in his role as table captain when he sent yet another player out just 30 minutes later. From UTG, Dan Smith raised to 80,000 and Kenney made it 295,000 from the small blind. Smith moved all in for 1,420,000 and Kenney called. Smith showed [poker card="7c"][poker card="7s"] but got bad news when Kenney showed [poker card="jh"][poker card="js"]. The board ran out [poker card="ac"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2d"][poker card="5d"] to eliminate Smith. The final three players played for almost a full hour without an elimination before Seidel and Schindler clashed. Schindler called, Kenney folded and Seidel moved all in from the big blind. Schindler called quickly and tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="ks"] while Seidel showed [poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"]. Schindler could only watch as the [poker card="jh"][poker card="8c"][poker card="4d"] flop, [poker card="6d"] turn, and [poker card="3c"] river all missed his hand and eliminated him in third place. Heads-up play began with Kenney holding 3,255,000 to Seidel's 2,745,000. It took just under two hours for Kenney to overcome eight double-ups by Seidel to finally put the Poker Hall of Famer away to win $960,000. Final Table Payouts Bryn Kenney - $960,000 Erik Seidel - $576,000 Jake Schindler - $312,000 Dan Smith - $192,000 Doug Polk - $144,000 Cary Katz - $120,000 Sergio Aido - $96,000
  13. 2019 marks the 50th annual World Series of Poker. The most prestigious poker festival in history has played a pivotal role in creating many of the legends and superstars of the game. To commemorate the occasion, PocketFives editorial staff each ranked the top 50 players in WSOP history in an effort to define and rank the most important, influential, and greatest WSOP players of all time. Erik Seidel BRACELETS CASHES WINNINGS TOP 10s 8 107 $5,388,532 42 Before the 1998 WSOP Main Event, nobody in poker had heard of Erik Seidel. He was a regular at the Mayfair Club in New York City and was grinding out a living playing in those games. He was part of a larger group of New Yorkers who came to Las Vegas for the 1998 Series and he made a lasting impression. Seidel's first WSOP cash was his runner-up finish to Johnny Chan in the 1988 Main Event - a moment forever immortalized in Rounders. Rather than fade into WSOP history, that moment actually served as a launch pad for an all-time great. “I really didn’t know what to expect when I went out, and there wasn’t a great distance between my game and the people I was playing with, which was nice to see,” Seidel told the Las Vegas Review-Journal in 2015 about his first time out to Las Vegas for the WSOP. “For me, it was a big moment because it gave me a certain amount of confidence that I could do it, and that I could play. I hadn’t really felt that way about my game before that.” That confidence paid off in a big, big way. In 1992, Seidel won a $2,500 Limit Hold'em event, beating Phil Hellmuth heads up, for his first career bracelet. He returned to Binion's a year later and added his second bracelet, this time from a $2,500 Omaha Hi-Lo event. He continued his streak the very next year when he won the $5,000 Limit Hold'em event, making him just the fifth player in WSOP history to win a bracelet over three consecutive years joining Bill Boyd, Johnny Moss, Doyle Brunson, and Gary Bergland. Heading into the 2019 WSOP, Seidel sits sixth on the all-time bracelets list with 8 and fourth on the all-time cashes list with 108. He's one of just five players to have entered triple-digit territory for cashes. Of those in-the-money finishes, 42 of them (39%) were top 10 finishes. He's also one of the most game diverse players in WSOP history, having cashed in 15 different poker variants during his career. Seidel has two bracelets in No Limit Deuce to Seven, Limit Hold'em, No Limit Hold'em, and one in each Omaha Hi-Lo and Pot Limit Omaha. The fourth bracelet of Seidel's career came in 1998 when he beat a final table that included Doyle Brunson, David Grey, and eventual runner-up Wil Wilkinson in the $5,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven event. It took three years for Seidel to find the winner's circle again. In 2001, he got a modicum of revenge on Chan, beating him heads up to win a $3,000 No Limit Hold'em event for the fifth bracelet of his career. That win marked the beginning of a run that saw Seidel pick up a new bracelet every two years until 2007. In 2003, he won a $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha event. Two years later, it was a $2,000 No Limit Hold'em event that resulted in him hitting the biggest WSOP score of his career ($611,795) before winning the eighth bracelet of his career in 2007, another $5,000 No Limit Deuce to Seven event. That win made him just the fifth person to reach eight bracelets. While many casual poker fans might remember him most for that runner-up finish in 1988, Seidel has an impressive 8-3 record when he gets heads-up for a bracelet. His other two second-place finishes came in 1991 ($5,000 Limit Hold'em) and 2013 (€2,200 No Limit Hold'em). In 2010, Seidel was inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame. He's recorded 45 WSOP cashes since then.
  14. Some of the biggest names in poker are headed to Aria Hotel & Resort in a few weeks for the third annual Super High Roller Bowl. Daniel Negreanu, Fedor Holz, Jason Mercier, Erik Seidel and Dan Smith are just some of the 56 players in the field this year, and now 888poker wants to put you front and center for all of the action. Between now and May 15, poker fans from anywhere in the world can enter to win the Super High Roller Bowl VIP Backstage Pass, which includes travel for two, accommodation and the chance to meet some of the players at a VIP dinner. The package is valued at $5,000. The contest is free to enter and all it requires is some social media savvy and a little bit of creativity. Visit 888poker on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and post a picture, video or even just a comment explaining why you should get to the free to Las Vegas to rub elbows with some of the game’s greatest players. Make sure to tag 888poker in each post. The 888poker social media team will pick one winner on May 16. There are a couple of rules for entry. All participants must be at least 21 years old and must have a valid 888poker account. If you don’t have an 888poker account, you can sign-up here to get a free $10 on top of your first $10 deposit, PLUS a 100% bonus up to $700 on that same deposit.
  15. [caption width="640"] Daniel Negreanu was the biggest name in the field, but suffered an upset thanks to Jonathan Little.[/caption] When the field was announced for the WPT Champions Challenge, the bracket-style contest pitting former WPT champions against one another in a fan vote, it seemed like Daniel Negreanu was a lock to win it all. Negreanu has $6.4 million in WPT earnings, nine final tables and two titles. Couple that with his massive fanbase and Negreanu seemed to be in position to dominate the popularity contest. Locks are apparently just for doors. In what can only be described as a major upset, Negreanu, the number one seed in the Clubs region, was defeated by four seed Jonathan Little. Little did some social media campaigning to get his fans to vote for him. It paid off. Little now moves on to the Elite 8 and finds himself up against Doyle Brunson for a Final Four berth. Brunson, the 11 seed in the region, beat out two seed Hoyt Corkins to advance. Negreanu was actually the second top seed to fall. The Hearts region saw Carlos Mortensen eliminated in the second round by Erik Seidel. Only one of the four regions, the Spades region, had the top two seeds advance to the Elight 8. Top seed Gus Hansen beat out Alan Goehring to advance while second seed Antonio Esfandiari beat out good friend Phil Laak to move on. The other remaining top seed, Anthony Zinno, came out on top of Mohsin Charania to get through. He’ll now face Barry Greenstein. The three seed upset two seed JC Tran to move on. Despite being a number seven seed, Phil Ivey continues to survive and advance. Ivey made it past Michael Mizrachi. Seidel posted yet another upset, beating out Marvin Retteinmaier to earn a spot against Ivey. Clubs Region Matchup Key Stats #4. Jonathan Little: $3,695,510 - 2 titles - 4 final tables - 21 cashes #11. Doyle Brunson: $2,081,824 - 1 title - 3 final tables - 8 cashes Diamonds Region Matchup Key Stats #1. Anthony Zinno: $2,336,548 - 3 titles - 3 final tables - 15 cashes #3. Barry Greenstein: $2,427,428 - 2 titles - 5 final tables - 20 cashes Hearts Region Matchup Key Stats #7. Phil Ivey: $4,027,221 - 1 title - 10 final tables - 14 cashes #8. Erik Seidel: $2,332,000 - 1 title - 7 final tables - 22 cashes Spades Region Matchup Key Stats #1. Gus Hansen: $4,051,782 - 3 titles - 7 final tables - 9 cashes #2. Antonio Esfandiari: $2,956,243 - 2 titles - 8 final tables - 13 cashes The Elite 8 of the WPT Champions Challenge is open for voting until Tuesday at 5 pm ET. Vote here.
  16. Over the last 12 months, Jake Schindler has proven to be a legitimate threat in high roller tournaments around the world. He finished runner-up in the 2017 Super High Roller Bowl, runner-up in the Seminole Hard Rock Poker Open High Roller, third in a Poker Masters $50,000 event, runner-up in the US Poker Open Main Event. In March, he picked up two wins in Aria High Rollers, but on Wednesday in Barcelona he posted what could be considered a breakthrough win. Schindler beat Stephen Chidwick heads-up and overcame a final table that included Erik Seidel, Jason Koon and Bryn Kenney to win the partypoker MILLIONS Grand Final €100,000 Super High Roller for €1,750,000 ($2,163,174 US), the second biggest score of his career. The day began with 11 players still in contention for the €1.75 million first place prize but Koray Aldemir, Dominik Nitsche, Mikita Badziakouski, Steffen Sontheimer all failed to make the money, and once Keith Tilston went out in seventh, the remaining six players were all in the money. The first player to bust was Seidel. Down to less than five big blinds, Seidel three-bet all in over Kenney's UTG raise. Kenney called and showed [poker card="as"][poker card="tc"] which put him ahead of Seidel's tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="5c"]. The [poker card="7c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2h"] gave Seidel more outs but the [poker card="td"] turn and [poker card="ah"] river were no help and he was left with a sixth place finish. Despite picking up the first in-the-money elimination, things went south from that point on for Kenney. Kenney was on the button and raised to 350,000 and Schindler called from the big blind and then checked after the [poker card="th"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5d"] flop. Kenney bet 305,000 and Schindler raised to 1,200,000. Kenney moved all in for 4,410,000 total and Schindler called. Kenney showed [poker card="8c"][poker card="7s"] for an open-ended straight draw while Schindler showed [poker card="6d"][poker card="6h"] for middle set. The [poker card="ac"] turn was a blank and Schindler improved to quads with the [poker card="6s"] river to bust Kenney in fifth. A little over an hour later two more players were sent packing in quick succession by Chidwick. From the button, Chidwick raised to 400,000 and Koon moved all in from the small blind for 5,975,000. Chidwick called and turned up [poker card="6c"][poker card="6h"] while Koon showed [poker card="3d"][poker card="3h"]. The board ran out [poker card="kd"][poker card="jd"][poker card="th"][poker card="js"][poker card="7c"] to eliminate Koon. Left with just three big blinds, Jean-Noel Thorel moved all in for 600,000 from the button and Chidwick and Schindler called from the small and big blind respectively. The [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2h"] flop saw both remaining players check. The [poker card="5h"] turn got Chidwick to be enough for Schindler to fold. Chidwick showed [poker card="kh"][poker card="th"] for top pair with the second nut flush draw. Thorel needed help with the [poker card="qd"][poker card="8c"] but got none after the [poker card="9h"] river to go home in third. Heads up play began with Schindler holding just 54% of the chips in play. The two players traded the led back and forth for almost three hours before Schindler was able to finish Chidwick off. On the final hand, Schindler raised to 875,000 and Chidwick called. The flop came [poker card="ad"][poker card="4s"][poker card="2s"], Chidwick checked, Schindler bet 500,000 and Chidwick called. The turn was the [poker card="5c"] and Chidwick checked again, Schindler bet 1,800,000 but Chidwick raised to 5,100,000. Schindler called and both players saw the [poker card="7s"] river. Chidwick moved all in and Schindler called. Schindler showed [poker card="qs"][poker card="6h"] for a bluff while Schindler showed [poker card="as"][poker card="3h"] for a wheel and the final pot of the night. Final Table Payouts Jake Schindler - €1,750,000 Stephen Chidwick - €1,100,000 Jean-Noel Thorel - €726,000 Jason Koon - €500,000 Bryn Kenney - €340,000 Erik Seidel - €240,000
  17. It was another banner day for one of poker’s winningest players as Bryn Kenney found himself back in the winner’s circle again after taking down the 2019 HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event for $2,713.859. Kenney outlasted an all-star final table that included runner-up Daniel Tang, Peter Jetten, Nikita Badziakouski, Sam Greenwood, Erik Seidel, Matthias Eibinger, Jason Koon and Triton Poker Series founder Paul Phua. Kenney’s over $2.7 million score is the second largest of his career, right behind his over $3.06M haul that he took home for his runner-up finish in Triton’s HK$2M Super High Roller Series Jeju Main Event in March. It’s his second victory of the Montenegro series, the first coming in Event #2 (HK$500,000 No Limit Hold’em Six Handed) where he won the $1,431,376 first-place prize. Kenney’s 2019 has been nothing short of incredible. According to The Hendon Mob, the New York pro has eight results this year, four of which are for victories - including his official first-place finish in the 2019 Aussie Millions Main Event. In total, Kenney has over $9.1 million in total earnings this year alone, putting him at the top of the list for 2019 earners. He has also jumped up two spots on the All-Time Money List to fourth place sitting only behind Erik Seidel (3rd), Daniel Negreanu (2nd) and list leader Justin Bonomo. HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event Final Table Results 1. Bryn Kenney - $2,713,859 (HK$21,300,000) 2. Daniel Tang - $1,796,498 (HK$14,100,000) 3. Peter Jetten - $1,223,148 (HK$9,600,000) 4. Nikita Badziakouski - $925,005 (HK$7,260,000) 5. Sam Greenwood - $719,873 (HK$5,650,000) 6. Paul Phua - $560,609 (HK$4,400,000) 7. Erik Seidel - $440,842 (HK$3,460,000) 8. Matthias Eibinger - $341,462 (HK$2,680,000) 9. Jason Koon - $261,193 (HK$2,050,000) Kenney’s Path To Victory Although the player pool for the Main Event was limited, a total of 44 players (plus their 31 re-entries) pushed the prize pool to HK$70,500,000 ($8,982,494 USD). When the final nine returned to play to a winner, there were plenty of short stacks at the table. One of them was Triton ambassador Jason Koon. After losing a flip and doubling up Paul Phua, Koon was sitting on five big blinds. He moved in on the button with [ac][7d]. Nikita Badziakouski reshoved to isolate Koon, holding [8c][8s]. However, Matthias Ebinger also got involved from the big blind, calling with [ad][qh]. While a queen did hit the flop, an eight turned and both Koon and Eibinger hit the rail. Koon, the shorter stack, would take ninth place for $261,193 while Eibinger settled for eighth place and $341,462. Seidel finished in seventh place when his short stack re-shove with [qh][9h] from the small blind was called by Badziakouski’s [as][td]. The pro from Belarus turned the ten-high flush to send Seidel out the door in seventh for $440,842. The final six battled for the better part of three levels, during which time Kenney began to accumulate chips from the then chip leader Badziakouski. Six handed, Kenney picked up pocket queens on the button and limped, the small blind folded and Paul Phua checked his option holding [7s][4d]. The flop brought both a seven and a queen, giving Kenney a lock on the hand. Phua, however, moved all in with his pair of sevens, practically drawing dead. Phua finished in sixth for $560,609. Greenwood was sitting on a short stack and from the cutoff, he limped with the [ad][qd]. Danny Tang completed in the small blind with the [ks][5d] and Badziakouski checked his option with the [kc][9h]. The flop came [2c][kd][4s] with both blinds flopping a pair. Checked to Greenwood he put out a min-bet. Tang made the call and Badziakouski put in a raise. Greenwood tank-shoved which got Tang to fold. Badziakouski tanked, fearing Greenwood has limped aces pre-flop. Eventually, Badziakouski made the call. The board bricked out for Greenwood who finished in fifth place adding $719,813 to his earnings, which is now more than $17.445M lifetime. Kenney and Badziakouski then got the two biggest stacks in on a massive flip as Badziakouski’s [ac][js] faced off against Kenney’s [7c][7s]. Kenney’s pair held and Badziakouski, who had led for the majority of the final table, ended up in fourth place taking home $925,005. After that hand, Kenney was a massive chip leader over both Jetten and Tang. Kenney took out Jetten in third place when his [th][9s] clipped Jetten’s [ks][6h]. Jetten picked up the second largest cash of his career, taking home $1,223,148. Finally, Danny Tang faced off against Kenney with 12-1 chip deficit. There was no coming back in this one as Kenney closed it out, making Tang the runner-up for $1,796,498. It is the first seven-figure cash of Tang’s career. For Kenney, the heater continues as the $2,713,859 first-place prize of the HK$1,000,000 Triton Montenegro Main Event is his third million dollar score in a row. The 2019 Triton Super High Roller Series Montenegro continues through May 17.
  18. The Triton Million: A Helping Hand for Charity will be a record setter when action kicks off Thursday. The £1,050,000 buy-in tournament will make it the biggest buy-in in poker history, and the event comes with a unique format. It's a freezeout where recreational/businessmen players can enter via invite only. Those invited can then issue one invite of their own to a guest/professional players. As of Wednesday morning, 26 pairings had been named, but it's the 'what could have beens' that are equally as intriguing. Let's take a look at a handful of recreational-professional pairings that we would've liked to have seen compete in the Triton Million. Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth It's no secret that Chamath Palihapitiya and Phil Hellmuth have a close relationship. We've seen it on Hellmuth's social media accounts all too often. A former Facebook executive and now a successful investor, Palihapitiya fits the mold of the perfect recreational poker player to enter this field. He's played poker in the past, including the first-ever World Series of Poker Big One for One Drop that cost $1,000,000 to enter, and has three WSOP cashes and two World Poker Tour cashes. Being good friends with Hellmuth makes Hellmuth the perfect invitee for Palihapitiya, and getting the polarizing 15-time gold bracelet winner in the field would be very entertaining. Isai Scheinberg and Daniel Negreanu Now this, this is a pairing, and we'll call it 'getting the band back together.' The founder of PokerStars, Isai Scheinberg, paired with the company's former golden boy, Daniel Negreanu. It would be absolutely tremendous to see, and we all know both parties have enough money to afford the gigantic £1,050,000 buy-in. We all know how skillful and experienced of a poker player Negreanu is, but Scheinberg has conquered the felt before, too. He won the UKIPT Isle of Man High Roller in the same year that Negreanu finished second in the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. Tiger Woods and Antonio Esfandiari How can we not want to have Antonio Esfandiari, 'the magician,' the first-ever $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop winner, in the field? In order to make this happen, he needs a recreational player to invite him. Who bigger and better than Tiger Woods? You may be asking yourself, does Woods play poker and what's the connection here? Yes, Woods plays poker. He might not be entering the priciest tournaments in the world as some of these other recreational players are, but he’s the host of Tiger's Poker Night as part of Tiger Jam, held in partnership with the World Poker Tour each year, so he knows the game. On more than one occasion, Esfandiari has been one of the celebrity professionals to attend Tiger's Poker Night. Dan Fleyshman and Phil Ivey How do we get Phil Ivey in this field? We pair him with Dan Fleyshman, that’s how. Fleyshman doesn’t dabble in poker as he once did, but he’s still around the game enough that he could perform well in this tournament. One of his claims to fame is being the youngest founder of a publicly traded company and he's an active businessman and investor. Ivey is Ivey. His star power alone is worthy of entry into a £1,050,000 buy-in tournament, and we all know he has the chops to perform on the felt. He knows Fleyshman, so the pairing works, and we’d absolutely love to see Ivey in the field. David Einhorn and Erik Seidel Investor and hedge fund manager David Einhorn may not be a professional poker player, but he’s as avid a recreational player as they come. He's been known to compete in the highest buy-in poker tournaments the world has to offer, and he took third place for $4,352,000 in the first-ever $1,000,000 buy-in poker tournament the world has ever seen. With Einhorn being a New York guy, a perfect pairing would be Erik Seidel. Seidel is currently third on poker’s all-time money list with more than $35,000,000 in winnings, he’s an eight-time WSOP gold bracelet winner, and also a WPT champion. Although he’s of an older generation of players, Seidel continues to be a crusher on the high-stakes poker scene and has plenty of experience against the fellow professional players in the field. Haralabos Voulgaris and Daniel Colman Since Haralabos Voulgaris' new gig with the Dallas Mavericks, he hasn't been around the poker scene much. Not that the former professional sports bettor was grinding every tournament under the sun before he became the NBA team's Director of Quantitative Research and Development, but Voulgaris was known to get down in the high-stakes arena. Having played a couple million-dollar buy-ins before, this event is right in his wheelhouse. Voulgaris and Daniel Colman have a relationship that saw Voulgaris on Colman’s rail when Colman won the 2014 WSOP $1,000,000 Big One for One Drop. It would also be fitting to see Colman return to poker’s public stage in the largest buy-in event in the game’s history. Evan Mathis and Alex Foxen Maybe we’re reaching here, maybe we’re not, but these are dream scenarios so let’s keep rolling with it. Evan Mathis spent 12 years in the NFL and was one of the league’s top offensive lineman. He won a Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos and reached the Pro Bowl on two occasions. According to Spotrac, Mathis has estimated career earnings from football at more than $21,000,000. He recently grabbed headlines when he sold a 1952 Topps rookie card of Mickey Mantle for nearly $3 million. That’s enough to pay for his entry, his guest’s entry, and have plenty left over. Sticking with the football tie-in, Mathis’ guest could be Alex Foxen, a former football player for Boston College. These two would be quite the presence on and off the felt and both have the skills to compete. Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess Another fantasy Triton Million pairing is Richard Seymour and Ryan Riess. This would give us who is arguably poker’s strongest mainstream connection, Seymour, in the field and the three-time Super Bowl winner has plenty of experience on the felt. He just came off a 131st-place finish in the WSOP Main Event. A huge sports enthusiast and a player friendly with Seymour is Ryan Riess, winner of the 2013 WSOP Main Event and also a WPT champion. Steve Aoki and Brian Rast The last dream pairing we'll look at involves superstar DJ Steve Aoki and top poker player Brian Rast. The two know each other, so the connection works for the invite, and Aoki has been known to play a bit of poker in his spare time. With Aoki being billed as one of the richest DJs in the world, the cake-tossing music maker should have enough cash to enter. If not, Rast can certainly front or find the money to get Aoki in so that he can play in the event. How To Watch the Triton Million Fans from around the world can watch the Triton Million for free on PokerGO. Ali Nejad will call the action, with professional poker player Nick Schulman alongside to provide expert commentary. Action starts Thursday, August 1, at 8 am ET and PokerGO will have coverage for the entirety of the event. If you don't already have a subscription to PokerGO, sign up today using the promo code "POCKET5S" for $10 off the PokerGO annual plan.
  19. [caption width="640"] Erik Seidel recently broke through the million lifetime earnings mark (WPT photo/Joe Giron)[/caption] It is pretty easy to talk about Erik Seidel solely using hyperbole. Justified hyperbole, of course, but phrases like “the GOAT”, “the greatest”, or “Seiborg” all are merited to explain his poker career. Seidel recently crossed $30 million in career tournament earnings, putting him second on the all-time money list and reminding us all that though he can be soft-spoken, his results speak loudly and 2016 has been no exception. Since he isn’t one to brag, we decided to take a closer, specific look at his success and do it for him in this edition of Number Crunch. 5 – Number of non-poker show credits for Seidel on the Internet Movie Database (IMDb). One is as a poker consultant for the now-defunct ESPN show Tilt. Three others are cameos in poker-related movies. One is a brush with the President-elect on an episode of Celebrity Apprentice. Interestingly, Rounders, where Seidel’s heads-up battle with Johnny Chan in the 1988 WSOP Main Event, was not listed. Nor was Seidel’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-it stint as an extra on Curb Your Enthusiasm. 7 – Number of career World Poker Tour final tables for Seidel. He is sixth on the WPT all-time final tables list and fifth on the WPT all-time cash lists with 22. He also has one title, won at Foxwoods in 2008. 16 – Number of years since the New York card club the Mayfair closed its doors. Seidel is one of a number of backgammon and poker players who cut their teeth on the games at the Mayfair. Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s efforts to clean up NYC led to the club’s closure in 2000. 53 – Percentage of Seidel’s cashes this year which were in High Roller events. Of the nineteen 2016 cashes, ten are in high rollers. In 2015, 41% of the cashes were High Roller tournaments. In his standout 2011, that rate was 44%. Part of the uptick can be explained by the proliferation of High Roller tournaments, most notably the regular events running at the Aria in Las Vegas. It also indicates Seidel tends to skip most events that do not include a High Roller component somewhere in the tournament series. 60 – Number of six-figure cashes in Erik Seidel’s career. From 1988 to present, he earns a payday of at least $100,000 approximately twice a year. In reality, currently Seidel is making up for some early six-figure dry spells. In 2016 alone he notched ten six-figure cashes with the end-of-year high rollers still coming up on the schedule. 99 – Number of WSOP cashes for Seidel in his 18-year career playing the series. This puts him second on the cashing list behind Phil Hellmuth, who has 118. Eight percent of those cashes are victories, as Seidel is the owner of eight bracelets. 100 – Percent of the time Seidel has been in attendance for his daughter’s events growing up according to his daughters, Jamesin and Elian. During interviews for the Poker Central Pokerography series, his daughters said their fatherl never missed any of their important games or events as kids. He is often cited as an incredibly dedicated father both by his own family and by his poker peers. 76,000 – Approximate number of followers on Twitter of @Erik_Seidel. Ever since Seidel got on Twitter, he established a reputation for being one of those great follows who does not Tweet a lot, but when he does have something to say, it is usually quality. 1,990,476 – Dollars separating Daniel Negreanu and Seidel on the all-time money list. Negreanu took the top spot with his runner-up finish in the 2014 Big One for One Drop at the WSOP. Seidel had claimed the top spot during his historic run in 2011, but had fallen back a bit as Negreanu and Antonio Esfandiari passed him. Esfandiari is just a touch over $3 million in earnings behind Seidel on the all-time list. 6,530,153 – Dollars earned by Seidel during his most successful tournament year, 2011. During a week in 2001, Seidel won over $3 million. First he took third in the Aussie Millions $100,000 Challenge, then he went on to win the $250,000 Challenge. February brought a $750,000 victory in the NBC Heads-Up Championship. In May, he won a $100,000 buy-in event at Bellagio for another million-dollar payday. The WSOP was a slow one for Seidel, but he finished out the year with back-to-back Epic Poker final tables for one of the most memorable individual runs in recent memory.
  20. The final six of the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball Championship at the World Series of Poker are set. As has been a common theme this year, the final table is loaded with talent. Dan KingDan Smith (pictured) is your chip leader with a stack of 661,000, about 100,000 ahead of the next closest person. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- Smith will pass $1 million in career WSOP winnings in this event and cashed in a previous No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball tournament on this year's schedule. Second place with a stack of 554,000 in chips is Nick Schulman. According to coverage on WSOP.com, Schulman has been the talk of the town thus far: "Schulman, a two-time champion of this event, returned to Day 2 as the chip leader. He held that title for most of the day, only relenting his lead to Smith in during the last level of the night. Schulman, who won this event in 2009 and 2012, returns for Day 3 in second place with 554,000." Poker author and longtime PocketFiver Jon PearlJammer Turner (pictured) sits in third place with 439,000. Turner will cash for the 35th time in his career in a WSOP tournament and, like Smith, made the money in a previous No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball event on this year's schedule. Turner was ranked as high as #3 on PocketFives in 2008. Three high-stakes pros round out the leaderboard of the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball event. The first is Erik Seidel, who is in fourth place with 265,000. Seidel has eight WSOP bracelets dating back to 1992 and 90 WSOP cashes, six of which are in 2-7 Draw Lowball. Fifth place entering the six-handed finale is Phil Galfond, who is known in the online poker community as OMGClayAiken. Galfond has a stack of 255,000 and finished fourth in this year's $10,000 Limit 2-7 Triple Draw Lowball Championship. He has one bracelet and continues to challenge the nosebleed-stakes tables live and online. Rounding out the star-studded final six is Eli Elezra, who is the short stack at 160,000. Elezra has two WSOP bracelets, the most recent of which came in a Limit 2-7 Triple Draw Lowball tournament. The former Israeli army commando is a father of five and popped the money bubble on Sunday by sending Mike Gorodinsky to the rail. There were 77 entrants in the $10,000 No Limit 2-7 Draw Lowball event. The winner will take home $224,000, while the first person out on Monday pockets $31,000. Stay tuned to PocketFives for the latest WSOP coverage, brought to you by Tournament Poker Edge. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  21. [caption width="640"] Dan Colman defeated a loaded final table to win the Triton Super High Roller Series Six Max event. (PokerStars photo)[/caption] Dan Colman collected his third six-figure cash of 2017 by taking down the HKD$ 250,000 Triton Super High Roller Series Six Max Event on Saturday, beating a final table that included 2016 Super High Roller Bowl champion Rainer Kempe, Erik Seidel, Mustapha Kanit, and Timofey ‘Trueteller’ Kuznetsov. The first elimination of the final table was Italy’s Kanit. With less than 10 big blinds in front of him, Kanit shoved from the small blind with [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"] and Sergio Aido called on Kanit’s left with [poker card="qs"][poker card="8h"]. The [poker card="9c"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3d"] flop was safe for Kanit as was the [poker card="3c"] turn. The [poker card="qc"] river, however, gave Aido a pair and resulted in Kanit’s exit. Kuznetsov followed Kanit out the door over the course of two hands. Over two hours after Kanit’s bust out, Aido opened for a raise and got two callers in Kuznetsov and Seidel out of the blinds. The trio checked the [poker card="ac"][poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] the flop and Kuznetsov bet 38,000 on the [poker card="3h"] turn. Seidel raised to 83,000 and Aido folded. Kuznetsov found a call and the [poker card="js"] hit the river. Seidel moved all in for 92,000 and Kuznetsov called to see Seidel reveal [poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"] for a turned set. Down to his last nine big blinds, Kuznetsov shoved the next hand from the button with [poker card="kd"][poker card="2d"]. Kempe called with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"] out of the big blind and held to eliminated Kuznetsov. Sergio Aido exited in fourth place at the hands of Colman roughly an hour into four-handed play. Aido moved all in for 115,000 from the small blind with [poker card="7h"][poker card="6d"] and was looked up by Colman with [poker card="kd"][poker card="7d"]. The board ran true for Colman and Aido exited with another high roller score in 2017. With roughly 50 big blinds in play, there was little margin for error in three-handed play. Despite getting all of the chips in with the best out of it, Kempe couldn’t out run Colman and was the third place finisher. With blinds of 20,000/40,000, Kempe opened for 90,000 from the button and Colman jammed out of the small blind to put Kempe at risk. Kempe called for his last 350,000 with [poker card="qc"][poker card="qh"] and was in great shape to double up against the [poker card="ac"][poker card="6c"] of Colman. The [poker card="7d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Colman a pair along with a backdoor flush draw. The [poker card="6s"] turn put Colman firmly ahead and Kempe hit the rail after missing on the river. Heads up play went back and forth but Colman was able to finish Seidel off to claim victory. Seidel had a little under 1,000,000 in front of him and got all in with [poker card="ad"][poker card="6s"]. Colman had Seidel dominated with [poker card="as"][poker card="js"] and put the championship on ice with the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"][poker card="jc"] flop. Colman earned HKD$ 3,641,600 ($469,203 US) for his run and will be gunning for his second title of this week in the HK$ 1,000,000 Main Event which begins Sunday. Final Table Payouts Dan Colman - HKD$ 3,641,600 Erik Seidel - HKD$ 2,326,000 Rainer Kempe - HKD$ 1,466,000 Sergio Aido - HKD$ 1,011,000 Timofey Kuznetsov - HKD$ 708,000 Mustapha Kanit - HKD$ 556,000
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.