Jump to content
advertisement_alt

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'jcarver'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 5 results

  1. In a series of Tweets posted last week, it was revealed that Doug Polk (pictured), who is known in the high-stakes online poker world as WCGRider, had his Bank of America accounts frozen. The bank's actions came in advance of Polk wanting to head to Canada for the ongoing WCOOP on PokerStars. --- PocketFives' news coverage is brought to you by Betsafe, one of the leading suppliers of online gaming products worldwide and a major sponsor of Gumball 3000. Sign up now for great bonuses, €3,000,000 guaranteed monthly, and plenty of live events! --- According to HighStakesDB, "When Polk tried to change his more anonymous 'WCGRider' screen name to just 'Doug Polk', a security alarm of some kind in the Bank of America system must have been raised." Polk promptly took to Twitter to warn other poker players who may bank with BOA, saying: Members of the industry responded to Polk's comments by saying they've had similar experiences in the US and UK, with Polk remarking at one point, "Yeah, I'm tired of getting treated like a criminal." When asked why BOA shut his accounts down, Polk simply told the community, "They told me they do not reveal that information." The issue involving poker players and well-known banks doesn't seem to be isolated to BOA, either. For example, Jason JCarver Somerville (pictured) described his experience with Chase, saying, "Chase did basically the same thing to me a few years ago that BOA is doing to you. I'd be a little cautious w/ them too." WCGRider is 74th on the list of biggest winners tracked by HighStakesDB, which makes the news more high-profile. He is $1.23 million in the black in high-stakes games that the tracking site has logged since late 2009. According to the Hendon Mob, Polk has $3.6 million in career live tournament winnings, including a victory earlier this year in a $100,000 No Limit Hold'em Super High Roller event at the Bellagio in Las Vegas for $1.6 million. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  2. Earlier this year, Jason JCarverSomerville (pictured), now a PokerStarspro, began 70 straight days of live-streaming online poker on Twitch. We caught up with him on Day #60 of his campaign. You can catch him on Twitchseven hours a day live from Canada. However, now that he's just a week away from Day #70, what will happen next? And what does he see as the future of the game on Twitch? Read how Somerville has pioneered poker on Twitch. PocketFives: Thank you for joining us. How have you been enjoying playing poker on Twitch? Jason Somerville: It has been going great. I'm happy with how it has gone. Things have taken a different feel than I thought, but it's my first time doing a dedicated season. I haven't played this much poker against good players in years. I've basically been playing poker in Nevada until now, so this is a whole new world. I'm up $30,000 over the last 60 days. We've had two million unique viewers come through the show in the last 60 days. My goal is to break a quarter of a billion minutes consumed by the end of May. I'm at 160 million right now, so to do that would be insane. PocketFives: You mentioned the show has a different feel than you anticipated. What do you mean by that? Jason Somerville: When I was in Nevada, I was streaming four or five days a week. I was by myself. I was alone streaming on WSOP.com and testing things to see what would work. I didn't have a lot of time to plan or plot before the PokerStars deal came together. There had already been guys like PokerStaples streaming while I was negotiating, so I was eager to jump in. I thought I'd have more time to pivot and see what was going on, but I've had to get used to riding the flow every day and focusing on making each show the best it can be. I didn't think it would be exactly like this, but I'm proud of what I've done. PocketFives: You streaming regularly has seemed to cause other players like Daniel Negreanu(pictured) and Griffin Flush_EntityBenger to do the same. What do you think of those guys starting to stream? Jason Somerville: There are a lot of people who will watch Twitch and I think it's nothing but awesome to see my poker brethren embrace the platform. Twitch is a great base to interact with users. It's amazing for poker as both an entertainment and educational engine. It's awesome to see other people acknowledge that. It can only be good for me to have Daniel Tweet about his Twitch stream 15 times a day. Hopefully some of his fans can find me. PocketFives: What is the future of poker on Twitch? Jason Somerville: Poker is a much better fit for the internet than TV. Poker tournaments breathe in a longer space. It's hard to fit in a tournament into an hour TV broadcast, which is even shorter after commercials. Poker is a lot better fit on the internet. There is a recipe for successful gaming on Twitch and poker resonates well with a big segment of the Twitch audience. If you're a professional gamer, you're playing your heart out, grinding, and improving your skill. You'll maybe get a sponsorship deal. In poker, if you out-think your opponent, you're getting paid cash. Cash is how we keep score in poker and I think that has resonated well with the Twitch crowd. Poker has a vast appeal to people that has almost been forgotten. PocketFives: We have heard you talk several times about eventually ending up in New Jersey. Are you confident that will happen? Jason Somerville: I think I'm intentional and hopeful when I say I want to end up in New Jersey, but I don't know anything more than you guys do. Uncle Baazov doesn't give me the info, but there's no reason Stars can't be deployed in New Jersey. I have a lot of experience working with regulated online poker sites since I was with Ultimate Poker. I know the New Jersey market well too. I lived in New York all my life and New Jersey is one state over. I would love to be deployed to New Jersey. I'm a willing soldier. If Stars has a place there, I can bring the newfound enthusiasm and excitement to New Jersey. I think we'll drive thousands of players on Twitch to PokerStars. However, I still don't know anything more than you about when Stars will enter the state. PocketFives: Do you think you'll lose much momentum moving away from your daily scheduleon Twitch given you're headed to Las Vegas and elsewhere? Jason Somerville: I had to have a conversation with myself where I realize that if I left streaming to go the WSOP, I might lose momentum and let other people with streams close the gap. At heart, I am a poker player who streams, not a streamer who plays poker. I love the WSOP; I love the summer. My results have always come during the summer. There's a chance I might lose some of the momentum I've built, but I'm excited to go to the WSOP, to bring back stories and hand histories and hopefully another bracelet. I'm as interesting as I am because I've been immersed in the poker world for the last 10 years. I don't think I'd be a happy person if I streamed six days a week for the next year. I wanted to do this in seasons so people would know when I'm on and where to find me. I've sold something like 500 Run it Up hoodies. The Run it Up legion lives and I want to fight the battles with them in person. It's more than just an online thing. I want to make sure I'm doing the best I can to keep me happy and passionate and that, to me, is playing in the WSOP this year. Visit Jason Somerville's Twitch channel. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  3. WSOP bracelet winner Jason JCarverSomerville is on the forefront of poker players using the video streaming site Twitchto broadcast online sessions to fans in near-real-time. The 27-year-old Hold'em specialist believes the site offers an engaging experience that most mainstream poker shows can't match. Check out Somerville's Twitch stream. "It's hard to make poker content fit in hour-long blocks that are meant for an older audience that doesn't quite get it," Somerville told PokerListingsin an interview. "It's not a good fit for television. Twitch and live-streaming on the internet is the platform that poker needs to live." Twitch gives users the ability to create their own channels and stream their game play to a wide audience. During the action, streamers can interact with followers directly through a chat box while viewers talk amongst themselves. According to Somerville, the experience creates a sense of community, while at the same time, users become emotionally invested in the streamer. "You are engaged as a viewer on Twitch," he said. "You're not as engaged as a viewer on ESPN." Recently, while in the Bahamas for the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, Somerville continued to broadcast to his nearly 51,000 followers on the site. "I've been in the Bahamas for, I don't know, six days now, and I've streamed every single day," he continued. "My fans know what I've been up to every single day this trip because they talk to me every single day, you know. So they're invested and asking, 'Are you playing the $25K tomorrow? You doing this? You doing that?'" Twitch users are clearly interested in watching poker. Somerville has only been streaming since October and has racked up over three million views to his channel. Fans can watch for free or subscribe for $4.99 a month for an ad-free experience. The most popular streamers have built up such a large viewer base that they can make millions of dollars per year through such subscriptions. At the moment, Somerville isn't making much from the site and is focused on developing a loyal following. He is well on his way to achieving that goal; his channel receives around 300,000 views per week, with fans watching for an average of 45 minutes. "It's very hard to get someone to watch a video for even four minutes," said Somerville. "But because of the engagement on Twitch, where you can literally type and talk to me and we can engage and chat with you, people get invested." As one of the first online poker streamers, Somerville has had to work out the kinks of broadcasting real money play to an audience. One obvious issue was the fact that his opponents could simply watch his channel during a session and see his hole cards. Initially, he decided to cover his cards and reveal them at the conclusion of the hand. "It creates kind of a fun, I know what I have, the viewers don't know what I have dynamic," he said. "And the players at the table are often watching, so it's almost like I'm playing live poker with my cards face down." Eventually he found that uncovering his cards and running his stream on a four-minute delay was enough to thwart opponents from gaining an unfair advantage. Somerville believes many casual poker players are turned off by the way poker events are covered on television. "I've heard WSOP executives say, 'What's the point of a live stream, it only works for the hardcores; only hardcores care about live-streams.'" In Somerville's opinion, the exact opposite is true: "That's what happens when you run it like a CardRunners video," he said. "You can't put in the ingredients for a recipe and then get mad when you make the recipe." Through streaming, the 27-year-old connects with a market of casual poker players who simply want to "hang out" and have fun. "I wouldn't be surprised to see the majority of poker content be streamed through Twitch or living on Twitch to some degree by the end of the year." Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook. You can also subscribe to our RSS feed.
  4. According to Legal Sports Report, run by the same guys as Online Poker Report, Jason JCarverSomerville (pictured) has signed a "partnership deal" with DraftKings. He'll continue to be affiliated with the world's largest online poker room, PokerStars, as well. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- Legal Sports Report outlined the deal, which will see Somerville promote all of the brands he's associated with seemingly in harmony: "The deal will see Somerville promote DraftKings across Run It Up (RIU), the overarching brand for Somerville's universe of programming, live events, and community of fans, including Somerville's vertical-leading Twitch channel." The site added, "DraftKings will be hosting several online satellite events for American and Canadian players to a RIU live poker event scheduled for this October at the Peppermill Casino in Reno. PokerStars will be hosting similar satellites for the international market." Earlier this month, PocketFives reported that Somerville had inked a two-year agreement with the online streaming site Twitch, where he has nearly singlehandedly pioneered the growth of online poker on the platform. RIU streams returned to Twitch on August 16, just over a week after Somerville's announcement, and he has repeatedly streamed in the days since. Legal Sports Report explained that Somerville is a relative newcomer to daily fantasy sports, which can also be played on sites like FanDueland Victiv: "Somerville noted that he didn't even have a DraftKings account until a few months ago. Many of his viewers are likely in a similar position." Interestingly, the parent company of PokerStars, Amaya Gaming, recently acquired Victiv and will re-brand the site StarsDraft. As we said, Somerville is affiliated with PokerStars, but will be representing DraftKings, a StarsDraft competitor, instead. In March, Somerville kicked off a 70-day Twitch campaign for PokerStars, streaming day after day to his legion of fans. He was one of the first people to stream online poker on Twitch and has helped grow poker and Twitch alike with his charisma and accessibility. He apparently expects 500 fans to show up at Peppermill in two months, a testament to just how popular he has become. US players have been flocking in droves to daily fantasy sports after the industry received a carve-out from the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act. Visit DraftKings today. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  5. According to a post on Twitter, Jason JCarverSomerville (pictured) has signed a new two-year partnership with Twitch. Somerville wrote to his throng of followers, "Very excited to have signed a new 2-year partnership with @Twitch! Daily #runitup streams set to return August 16th!" Now we sit just eight days away from the return of Run it Up. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- Somerville's Tweet received 121 re-Tweets and had been Favorited 556 times when we checked it out. He even took time to respond to several comments in the feed, including one asking whether his schedule would be as rigid as it was before. To that, Somerville replied, "I'm still gonna try to be consistent, but maybe with less 'rules.'" Run it Up will take place, as Somerville alluded to, every day. When asked whether he'll be doing it every day for 730 days, or two years straight, however, Somerville responded, "Might be a LITTLE under 730 days. That would be ultra-tenacity tho for sure." Somerville has been largely silent on Twitch in the last couple of months with the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. He plays on his home site, PokerStars, which is not regulated in the US and so is not available to US players. His last Twitch broadcast came on July 1 when he was interviewed in the halls of the Rio in Las Vegas. In March, Somerville began 70 straight days of streaming on Twitch. He has served as a pioneer of poker on the media platform and was nominated for an American Poker Award for Poker Media Content of the Year in February. Somerville's Twitch stream has received an incredible 7.4 million views and has over 105,000 followers. In an interview in May, the PokerStars pro told us, "Twitch is a great base to interact with users. It's amazing for poker as both an entertainment and educational engine." Somerville's presence on Twitch has caused, either directly or indirectly, other staples of poker to stream, including Daniel Negreanuand Phil Hellmuth. Check out Somerville's Twitch stream. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.