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Found 3 results

  1. There was a new face in the PokerGO studio for 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 ($25,000 Pot Limit Omaha) and that was California-based entrepreneur Miles Rampel. Rampel, who decided to made his Poker Masters debut in a $25K PLO event, walked away with what was, reportedly, his first-ever tournament cash of $365,500. As told to PokerGO, Rampel, who does play cash games, started playing PLO this year but had never bought into any tournament for more than $100. When his buddies brought him out to Las Vegas he thought “You know what, I’ll take a shot.” And what a shot it was, besting some of the game’s top high rollers and making his first Hendon Mob entry a victory at the Poker Masters. "It hasn't hit me yet, but I feel great, I feel great," Rampel told PokerGO after the win. Five-handed play lasted through the first break, nearly an hour forty-five minutes into the final table. At 20,000/40,000 (40,000 bb ante) Jeremy Ausmus, with 10 bigs, opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="as"][poker card="qs"][poker card="jd"][poker card="7s"]. In the big blind, Rampel looked down at [poker card="ad"][poker card="qh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="2d"]. Rampel, who had assumed the chip lead, quickly three-bet to 440,000. Ausmus took some time, and decided to call, leaving himself with just 15,000 behind. The flop came [poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"] giving Rampel bottom pair and missing Ausmus entirely. Rampel checked it over to Ausmus who checked back. The turn was the [poker card="4d"] giving Rample diamond flush outs. He led out enough to cover Ausmus’ final few chips. Ausmus took one more look at his hand before tossing them in. The [poker card="8s"] river was no help to Ausmus who tapped the table and went to collect his $86,000 for fifth place. It didn’t take long before another player hit the rail. Ten minutes later, Ben Lamb found himself with just 10 big blinds when he opened from the button to 140,000 holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="3c"]. From the small blind, Rampel made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2h"]. The [poker card="9s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"] flop gave Lamb a wrap and, once again, brought a pair of deuces for Rampel. Rampel checked it over to Lamb who moved the rest of his 290,000 stack all-in. It wasn’t enough to take Rampel off his hand, and the chip leader made the call. Although technically behind in the hand, with 17 outs twice Lamb was the statistical favorite to win. That changed when the [poker card="qh"] hit, nothing changed except Rampel’s chance of fading Lamb’s outs. He did just that on the [poker card="9d"] river, letting Rampel’s pair of twos hold and sending Lamb out in fourth place for $118,250. The final three players grinded for roughly another hour, passing chips back and forth. Lou Garza, who started the day with the chip lead, took it back, but Rampel stayed close. Sean Winter found his stack dwindling, unable to pick up the key hand that would allow him to get back in the thick of it. His time finally came at the 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante) level. After taking a number of hits to his already short stack, Winter was sitting on just over two big blinds. He raised to 120,000 from the button holding [poker card="qd"][poker card="ts"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8h"] and was called by Garza in the small blind with his [poker card="as"][poker card="kc"][poker card="qs"][poker card="8c"] and Rampel in the big blind holding [poker card="kh"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4c"]. The [poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"][poker card="4s"] gave Rampel trip fours, a pair and a flush draw for Winter, and a pair for Garza. It was checked to Winter on the button and he tossed in his final 20,000. Both Garza and Rampel called. The turn was the [poker card="5h"] improving Rampel to a full house and leaving both other players drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Winter walked with $161,250 for third place. The start of head-up play had Garza holding a slim lead over Rampel, both with more than 40 big blinds. It didn’t take long for Rampel to take the chip lead away from Garza once again, this time he didn’t give it back. He extended his lead to a roughly five-to-one advantage when the final hand went down. Blinds were up to 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) when Garza raised it up to 240,000 holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7s"]. Rampel made the call from the big blind with his [poker card="jc"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"][poker card="2h"]. The flop came [poker card="jh"][poker card="9d"][poker card="4h"] giving Garza the nut flush draw as well as a straight draw while Rampel hit top pair. Rampel checked it over to Garza who bet full pot, only to be shoved on by Rampel. Garza stuck the rest of his chips in the middle as a favorite. The [poker card="4d"] came on the turn and Rampel needed to once again fade a multitude of outs, this time to win the tournament. And again, he did that when the [poker card="qd"] completed the board. In his third straight final table, Garza again falls just short of his first Poker Masters victory, this time as the runner-up for $236,500. After Garza made his exit, Rampel was mobbed by a few friends on set as they celebrated his victory and $365,500 first-place payday. 2021 Poker Masters Event #9 Final Table Results Miles Rampel - $365,500 Lou Garza - $236,500 Sean Winter - $161,250 Ben Lamb - $118,250 Jeremy Ausmus - $86,000
  2. The 2021 Poker Masters schedule may be heavy on the No Limit Hold’em, but on Monday the schedule took a break from the standard fare to allow some of the high stakes mixed game players to enjoy some of the action. It was Maxx Coleman who enjoyed it the most, taking down Event #6 ($10,000 8-Game) to the tune of $120,000. In addition to No Limit Hold’em and Pot Limit Omaha, the two most popular poker variants, the 8-Game Mixed rotation included Limit Hold’em, Seven Card Stud, Seven Card Stud Eight or Better, 2-7 Triple Draw, Omaha Eight and Razz. The event drew 30 entries but only five who returned on Day 2 made the money. The first elimination took place during Pot Limit Omaha when Jeremy Ausmus, who had started the day as the short stack, found himself with just 35,000 in chips. With the blinds at 10,000/20,000 (20,000 bb ante), Ausmus stuck his stack in holding [poker card="as"][poker card="kh"][poker card="td"][poker card="9d"]. Coleman in the big blind committed the few chips necessary for a call with his [poker card="9h"][poker card="9c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="7s"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"] keeping Coleman’s pair of nines in the lead but leaving outs for Ausmus. The [poker card="2c"] turn changed nothing and when the [poker card="jh"] completed the board Ausmus was out in fifth for $21,000. Playing Omaha 8 with blinds at 25,000/50,000 a short-stacked Erik Sagstrom raised to 100,000 holding [poker card="kd"][poker card="6d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="3s"]. Stephen Chidwick, also very short but covering Sagstrom, made the call holding [poker card="ah"][poker card="qs"][poker card="ts"][poker card="5c"]. The flop came [poker card="qd"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2h"] giving Chidwick top pair on the high and a wheel draw for the low while Sagstrom had a wrap straight draw plus possible lows as well. Chidwick checked and Sagstrom bet. Chidwick raised and Sagstrom called. The [poker card="qh"] came on the turn, improving Chidwick’s high hand to trips and he bet again (100,000) and Sagstrom put the rest of his chips in the middle needing help on the river. It didn’t come as the [poker card="7s"] hit the river, allowing Chidwick to scoop the pot and ending Sagstrom’s run in fourth for $33,000. Even after the elimination, Chidwick was still short-stacked when No Limit Hold’em came around. With the blinds at 15,000/25,000 (25,000 ante) Chidwick moved all-in from the button holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="td"]. He ran into Coleman who made the call in the small blind with the [poker card="ac"][poker card="jd"]. The flop came [poker card="as"][poker card="jc"][poker card="5d"] leaving the 2018 U.S. Poker Open champion drawing thin. The [poker card="7c"] on the turn left Chidwick drawing dead to the [poker card="9c"] river. Chidwick collected his belongings and headed to the cage to collect his $48,000 third-place prize. Coleman and Chad Eveslage battle across the 8-Game landscape for the better part of an hour-and-a-half with Coleman eventually assuming a commanding chip lead. He sealed the tournament playing a hand of Razz. The game where the lowest hand wins determined the player who would take home the biggest payday. With the blinds at 80,000/160,000 (20,000 ante) Eveslage found himself all-in with one card to come holding [poker card="jh"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] while Coleman held the slightly better [poker card="qc"][poker card="9d"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2h"][poker card="ac"]. Eveslage’s needed some help but he didn’t get it when the [poker card="qs"] came on seventh street and Coleman’s final card - the [poker card="8h"] - was irrelevant. Eveslage said “I don’t want to go play No Limit now” as he finished in second place for $78,000. Maxx Coleman is the Poker Masters 8-Game champion and earned $120,000 Poker Masters Event #6 Final Table Results Maxx Coleman - $120,000 Chad Eveslage - $78,000 Stephen Chidwick - $48,000 Erik Sagstrom - $33,000 Jeremy Ausmus - $21,000
  3. Sean Perry was never really in any danger of elimination during the final table of the 2021 Poker Masters Event #2 ($10,000 No Limit Hold’em). He started the day with the chip lead, held on to it by taking out four of his final five opponents, and, in under three hours, walked out of the PokerGO studio with $206,400 for the win. The tournament was slightly larger than Event #1, as 86-entries created an $860,000 prize pool. For Perry, the victory, plus his eighth-place finish in the first event for $32,800, has made him the early points leader for the Purple Jacket something he said, “would mean the world to me.” Just six players returned to the PokerGO studio to battle for the Event #2 title, including John Riordan, fresh off his sixth-place finish in Event #1 for $49,200. Roughly 30 minutes into play, with the blinds at 30,000/60,000 (60,000 bb ante), Riordan found himself on the short stack with just eight big blinds. From the hijack, he moved all-in holding [poker card="ks"][poker card="qd"] and Jake Schindler, next to act, made the call with his [poker card="as"][poker card="js"]. The rest of the table got out of the way and the pair watched as the board ran out [poker card="9h"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="tc"][poker card="2s"] giving Schindler a straight and, for the second tournament in a row, ending Riordan’s day in sixth place for $51,600. With the blinds at 40,000/80,000 (80,000 bb ante) Sam Soverel clashed in a big pot against Daniel Negreanu. All-in before the flop, Negreanu held the [poker card="ah"][poker card="kh"], and Soverel, with the slightly larger stack, had the [poker card="ad"][poker card="qc"]. The flop came [poker card="ts"][poker card="6s"][poker card="2d"], keeping Negreanu in good shape. It got even better for "Kid Poker" when the [poker card="kd"] hit the turn leaving Soverel drawing dead to the [poker card="8d"] river. After the hand, Soverel was left with roughly two big blinds. Although he hung around for fifteen minutes, Soverel could build it back up when his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] eventually lost to Perry’s [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"] on the [poker card="th"][poker card="9c"][poker card="8c"][poker card="kd"][poker card="7c"] run out. Soverel, who won the Poker Masters Purple Jacket back in 2019, finished in fifth place for $68,800. Perry grabbed a commanding chip lead with four players left and began to apply the pressure. From the button, Perry made it 160,000 to go with the [poker card="kc"][poker card="4h"]. Negreanu bowed out in the small blind and then Schindler, with seven big blinds left, three-bet all-in holding [poker card="ad"][poker card="2s"]. Perry took some time to consider and ended up making the call. The [poker card="jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4c"] flop gave Perry bottom pair which held through the [poker card="5c"] turn and [poker card="2d"] river. Schindler fell in fourth place and picked up $86,000 on the day. The final three then went to break. On the first hand back, with blinds up to 50,000/100,000 (100,000 bb ante), there was only one big blind due to the prior elimination. First to act, Perry made it 225,000 holding [poker card="6d"][poker card="6c"] and Negreanu quickly moved all-in on the button for 1.425 million with his [poker card="kc"][poker card="tc"]. Jeremy Ausmus folded the single big blind and Perry wasted no time in calling. The flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"] keeping Perry’s sixes ahead, but not the favorite to Negreanu’s over cards, flush outs, and back door straight outs. The turn came the [poker card="9d"] giving Negreanu 16 outs one time. But that was simply too many outs, as Negreanu missed them all when the [poker card="ad"] completed the board. “He had half the deck and missed somehow,” Perry shouted as Negreanu collected his things and went to collect his $103,200 prize for third place. Unlike in Event #1, the heads-up match between Perry and Ausmus didn’t take very long. With a two-to-one chip lead, Perry kept control for the roughly 25-minute match. On the final hand, Ausmus raised to 200,000 holding the [poker card="qh"][poker card="jh"] and Perry raised it to 825,000 with his [poker card="kd"][poker card="jc"]. Ausmus called and the flop came [poker card="ac"][poker card="9h"][poker card="2c"] and Perry led for 400,000. In position, Ausmus opted for a call and the turn came the [poker card="kh"]. Perry checked it to Ausmus and Ausmus bet 800,000. After taking some time, Perry made the call. The [poker card="6d"] hit the river and Perry once again checked to Ausmus. Having missed all his outs, Ausmus moved all-in for just over 2 million. Perry went into the tank and eventually called the bluff with his pair of kings and ended the tournament. Ausmus was eliminated as the runner-up for $146,200 and Sean Perry took home the win and $206,400. Poker Masters Event #2 Final Table Results Sean Perry - $206,400 Jeremy Ausmus - $146,200 Daniel Negreanu - $103,200 Jake Schindler - $86,000 Sam Soverel - $68,800 John Riordan - $51,600
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