Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'josh arieh'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Poker Forums
    • Poker Community
    • Poker Advice
    • Poker Legislation
    • Poker Sites
    • Live Poker
  • Other Forums
    • Off Topic
    • Bad Beats
    • Daily Fantasy Sports Community
    • Staking Marketplace
    • PTP Expats - Shooting Off

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Real name


Your gender


About Yourself


Your favorite poker sites


Favorite poker hand


Your profession


Favorite place to play


Your hobbies


Favorite Cash Game and Limit


Favorite Tournament Game and Limit


Twitter Follow Name:


Game Types


Stakes


Method(s)


Favorite Site(s)


Table Size(s)


Structure(s)


Hourly Rate

Found 16 results

  1. The 2021 World Series of Poker was a wild ride and not just for those players who made the trip to Las Vegas. As the schedule in the series began to wind down, the pressure ramped up for players to close out the fall with a nice score and, for many of those who chose to take the ride by picking up a piece of the action on PocketFives, there were some great gains to be made. Arieh Shares Sun Run With Supporters You don’t have to look further than newly crowed 2021 WSOP Player of the Year (and PocketFives own) Josh Arieh. Arieh was relentless on the felt and generous in offering pieces of his amazing sun run to his followers. For example, Arieh put up 5% of his $10,000 Main Event at zero markup. Clearly a favorite against the field, the 50 backers who were able to quickly snap up their .1% (just a mere $10 to get a sweat on) all saw a return of $30 - an ROI of 200% - when he finished in 411th place for $30,000. He was nowhere near finished. Arieh’s run to the POY included two more notable cashes, but the one his backers certainly appreciated was his final table finish in the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha High Roller. Arieh had crushed every PLO tournament he played in this year, including famously helping some of his backers turn $15 into $2K. Another nice return was in order for the 141 backers who supported him. Arieh sold 10%, again at no markup, and ended up finishing in seventh place for $165,452. That’s an ROI of 230.90% with $16,545 headed back to his backers. If every backer had an equal share, that would look like a $35 stake yielding more than $117. He had another 200+% ROI in the $10K Stud 8 where 43 backers picked up 10% of his action and turned every $10 increment into just over $30 as well. https://twitter.com/robcpoker/status/1463094577083019266?s=20 RELATED: Negreanu, Arieh, and Glantz Help Backers Clean Up In WSOP $50K Poker Players Championship Seidel Just Hits Home Runs Erik Seidel was also a home run hitter down the stretch. The nine-time WSOP bracelet winner jumped on PocketFives to sell for just two events late in the schedule. Both times he sold out and both times he came through. He sold 50% of his action, strictly for the fans, in the same $10K Seven Card Stud 8 where Arieh finished in ninth. Seidel made it to the final table and ended up finishing in 7th place for $46,140. His ROI - 361.40%. Collectively, his 29 backers turned the $5,600 (Seidel sold at 1.12 markup) into $23,070 and every 1% of the stake ($56) turned into $230. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1460030971340734464?s=20 It worked so well in the Stud 8, Seidel picked up more run good by running it back in the $10K Razz Championship. Again he sold 50% and. again, he made a final table. In back-to-back tournaments, Seidel finished in 7th place and this time cashed out for $39,987. If each of his 35 backers had the same share, they’d have turned $160 into more than $570. Negreanu’s Fantastic Finish Right up until the last tournament, Daniel Negreanu was challenging Josh Arieh for WSOP Player of the Year. He finished the series second in total cashes with 18 and was selling action all along the way. After his deep run in the $50K Poker Players Championship, Negreanu booked four more cashes, but for backers, his deep run in the $50K Pot Limit Omaha was the most important, and perhaps the most surprising. In it, Negreanu made the final table and, once again, came so close to winning bracelet #7. Eventually, he bowed out in 3rd place which was good for $519,764. Unfortunately, since it was on his second bullet it didn't count for those who supported him as a single event. However, for the more than 300 backers of his complete package it brought him close to being even for the series. That score set him up for his biggest score yet. While he didn’t sell action explicitly for the $50,000 NLHE High Roller, this was a critical event for the hundreds of people who were involved in his series-long package. In the event, he made another sick final table run, again nearly locking down a bracelet, but ended up in third place for more than $660,000 and turned his total series package from negative to a huge profit. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092?s=20 [Correction: an earlier version of this article indicated that Negreanu had cashed in the $50K PLO for his single event backers, however, it was on his 2nd bullet which meant it only counted for the series long investors. We apologize for the error.] With that, the 2021 WSOP and the ride for investors came to an end. But be on the lookout for more from PocketFives Staking as the end is really just the beginning.
  2. After two more tournaments closed out the 2021 World Series of Poker, there was late drama across the Rio. Michael Addamo claimed the High Roller victory that confirms 2021 as the ‘Year of Addamo’, Boris Kolev won his first-ever bracelet and there was late drama in the WSOP Player of the Year race, which was over, not over, then done for good. Addamo Claims Huge High Roller Win Australian high roller crusher Michael Addamo won his fourth WSOP bracelet after taking down the $100,000-entry Event #87 High Roller after a final table performance that confirmed his greatness in 2021. Addamo has crushed the year, winning more in the past 11 months than many great players have in their entire careers. His quest for his fourth bracelet began looking down from a great height at the top of the leaderboard. Nevertheless, Addamo would have been surprised that his closest challenger when play began, Danish player Henrik Hecklen, busted in fifth place for $434,523. Sam Soverel had chipped up in the early exchanges at the table, and his raise pre-flop saw Hecklen call off his 14 big blind stack with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jd"]. Soverel called it off with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="3d"] and managed to ride home his better hand, with the board playing out [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Js"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8d"] for a flopped top pair to almost double his stack. Soverel was on a mini heater and doubled through the chip leader Addamo to take the lead when he was all-in and at risk with top pair against the Aussie’s two pair on the turn, only for the river to give him a better two pair and stun the table. If Addamo was running bad, could it be anyone’s tournament? Sean Perry certainly hoped so when he moved all-in with [poker card="6h"][poker card="6s"] against the [poker card="8h"][poker card="8d"] belonging to Kevin Rabichow. The board of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qd"] saw Rabichow make trips and slay Perry’s chances, the result worth $590,344. Down to three players, Rabichow was still the short stack, but over an extended period of play without an elimination, Soverel first spiked as chip leader, but then plummeted in two hands as Addamo delivered him from the tournament in brutal fashion, his [poker card="As"][poker card="Jd"] dominating Soverel’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Td"] on a board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="Th"]Ks][poker card="2c"] and sending Soverel home with $830,992. Heads-up, it was that hand that propelled Addamo into a dominant position. With 28 million to Rabichow’s 5 million, the Australian needed no time at all to wrap up the event and claim his fourth WSOP bracelet of an already astounding poker career. Rabichow was all-in pre-flop for his last 12 big blinds with [poker card="As"][poker card="6h"] and although he began the final hand ahead of Addamo’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="2c"] the board of [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="7h"] saw the most successful Australian tournament player in history add yet more glory to a stunning poker CV. Kevin Rabichow won over $1.2 million for a great run to runner-up but it was Michel Addamo who lost the lead yet won it all back and more to take down Event #87 and claim a famous victory worth $1.95m WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Results: Michael Addamo - $1,958,569 Kevin Rabichow - $1,210,487 Sam Soverel - $830,992 Sean Perry - $590,344 Henrik Hecklen - $434,523 Sorel Mizzi - $331,806 Sam Grafton - $263,227 Mikita Badziakouski - $217,274 Bill Klein - $186,909 Fedor Holz - $167,869 Kolev the King as WSOP Closes Rio Events With Maiden Win In the final event of the WSOP 2021, Boris Kolev became the answer to a thousand poker quizzes of the future as he won the last physical bracelet inside the Rio. Kolev had come into play just outside the top 10 chipcounts with 30 players remaining and for some time, the day was about Ben Yu in more ways than one. Yu, who led the field heading into the final day, was actually in the running to win the WSOP Player of the Year as Justin Bonomo of all people revealed. Eventually, thanks in no small part to Shaun Deeb’s amusing asides and general great play, Yu could not prevent Josh Arieh from celebrating - again - the Player of the Year title that was re-confirmed upon Yu’s exit in 10th place, as we wrote about right here in more detail. Yu’s exit in 10th place saw the final table of eight almost there and when Justin Liberto crashed out in ninth place with [poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"] unable to beat Niko Koop’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="9h"] across a thrilling run out of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="2h"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="9d"] that gave the latter a full house on the river, the race was on to win the final bracelet of the series. Lee Markholt busted in eighth place for $49,107 when his shove with [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] was overtaken by Kolev’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3d"] as the board played out [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Qs"]Kh] to give the eventual winner trips, and George Wolff lost his stack to Huy Nguyen when [poker card="Qh"][poker card="8h"] didn’t hold against Nguyen’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3d"] as a board of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"][poker card="Jd"][poker card="Tc"] saw Wolff cash for $64,207. With six players remaining, Koop made his bow in sixth place for $85,411 as his shove with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5s"] ran into the dominating [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] belonging to Uri Reichenstein. The board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4c"][poker card="Kh"] saw Reichenstein win that important pot to climb the ranks and send the dangerous Koop to the rail. It was the turn of Z Stein to bust in fifth place as his check-call for his stack on the turn of a board showing [poker card="Jd"][poker card="9d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Qc"] doomed his [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8c"] with Reichenstein holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="9h"]. The river of [poker card="Jc"] confirmed a full house for the Israeli and sent Stein home with a result worth $115,558 his final result of the Autumn WSOP. It was some time before the next elimination, but when it came, it belonged to Ramon Colillas. The PokerStars player busted with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"] when Kolev’s [poker card="9s"][poker card="7c"] got there on a board of [poker card="Tc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6s"], Colillas cashing for $158,972. It wasn’t long before Huy Nugyen was on the rail too, his short stack of 12 big blinds going into the middle with [poker card="KS"][poker card="Ts"] unable to hold against Reichenstein’s [poker card="Jc"][poker card="8h"]. The board of [poker card="9h"][poker card="3c"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6d"][poker card="8d"] was a killer, too, rivering Nguyen’s chances of a vital double and instead condemning him to a third-place finish worth $222,310. Heads-up, Kolev had a marginal lead over Reichenstein, the Bulgarian’s stack of 13.7 million a little ahead of Israeli Reichenstein’s 12.8 million. Kolev opened up a lead, however, and on a flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="5c"][poker card="As"], check-called to the turn holding [poker card="Jc"][poker card="6c"]. The turn of [poker card="Ks"] saw the same pattern, Kolev check-calling Reichenstein, who held only [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7s"] for a total bluff. Reichenstein ran that bluff for his whole stack on the river, but it was the [poker card="4c"] that came and Kolev called it off, showed his flush and became a first-time winner in the final ever WSOP Event at the Rio, winning the $511,184 top prize and leaving Reichenstein with another consolation prize of a deep run to a final table and $315,936. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Final Table Results: Boris Kolev - $511,184 Uri Reichenstein - $315,936 Huy Nguyen - $222,310 Ramon Colillas - $158,972 Z Stein - $115,558 Niko Koop - $85,411 George Wolff - $64,207 Lee Markholt - $49,107 Justin Liberto - $38,222 With the final events playing out at the Rio, most of the players had left the building...but perhaps for some, most importantly, the car park. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1463271505911947269 Not everyone believes the Rio was the ideal place to play poker, of course, and they were nobly represented by the viral sensation of videos that has fuelled so many Twitter Poker laughs over the last years of the home of the WSOP. https://twitter.com/SrslySirius/status/1463214257772761092 Matt Glantz neatly summed up Josh Arieh’s two-time triumph in the WSOP Player of the Year race. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321 Legendary WSOP font of all knowledge Kevin Mathers, known to us all as ‘Kevmath’ signed off his look at the old venue with one last short of the Rio’s lights burning bright as the shadows took the building one last time. https://twitter.com/Kevmath/status/1463392728289406978 Finally, how could we close out the series without a glimpse into the bizarre, amazing world of Phil Hellmuth. Answer: we couldn't. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463277999353069568 It’s been an immense end to the World Series of Poker at the Rio and a WSOP never to be forgotten in 2021. The best news of all is that in six months time, the poker world will be ready to do it all over again at Bally’s and Paris... we can’t wait!
  3. For the better part of Monday night into Tuesday morning, the poker world celebrated the crowning of Josh Arieh as the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. By all accounts, Arieh clinched it when Phil Hellmuth busted out of the final event of the series, the $5K 8-Handed, leaving Hellmuth as the POY runner-up. Articles, like the one we published Tuesday morning, were written certain of Arieh’s victory. But, like in 2019 when Daniel Negreanu was usurped by Robert Campbell due to a point miscalculation, everyone was wrong. Everyone, except Justin Bonomo: https://twitter.com/JustinBonomo/status/1463258866871779328?s=20 Bonomo had it right. The results from WSOP Online Event #10 (which took place Sunday night) were not yet included in the Player of the Year calculations. So, understandably, when word got around that Arieh had won, well, it was reported he won. But in reality, with the missing point differential, Ben Yu, the chip leader headed into the final day of the $5K 8-Handed, actually had a chance to catch Arieh with an outright victory. And he looked poised to do it. So the sweat for Arieh was back on. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463275661074837505?s=20 The tournament started the day with just 30 left and with Yu in control. But Arieh had some help from the inside with his friend (and fellow POY competitor) Shaun Deeb still in the tournament. Deeb was looking for his second bracelet of the series and, maybe, an eye on not letting history repeat itself. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463272967777841152?s=20 For the better part of three hours, the updates kept coming and Yu remained in the tournament. But with just two tables in play, Deeb and Yu battled in a hand where Deeb took some very important chips off of Yu and left the four-time bracelet winner short stacked. https://twitter.com/shaundeeb/status/1463278563331772419?s=20 Eventually, Deeb busted in 12th place. But the damage was done, Yu couldn’t recover. In the end, the popular Yu ended up finishing in 10th place for $30,286 just narrowly missing out on a last-minute capturing of the POY for himself. After an amazing series with 18 in-the-money finishes and a victory in the $10K Six-Handed Championship, Yu easily earned a 2021 WSOP resume worthy of Player of the Year. But now, finally, the drama came to an end and Arieh can safely celebrate, being officially crowned the 2021 Player of the Year for the 2nd time in 24 hours. https://twitter.com/MattGlantz/status/1463307122909880321?s=20 https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463256060546879490?s=20  
  4. [Editor's Note: At the time that this article was written, it had been announced that Josh Arieh had clinched the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year title. However, an online tournament result had not yet been included, leaving open the possibility for Ben Yu to win the POY on the last day of the series. We are leaving the article as written and today's events will be reflected in tomorrow's recap.] On a dramatic final day of the race to become WSOP Player of the Year, Josh Arieh finally saw off the dogged challenge of Phil Hellmuth as Arieh, a two-time WSOP bracelet winner in 2021 and four-time bracelet holder in his career, earned the coveted title of 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. In additional action, the final high roller of the series found a familiar name at the top of the leaderboard as Michael Addamo took charge of the $100K NLHE headed into the final day of the series. Addamo Adds Up Chip Lead Once Again The final two events of the 2021 World Series of Poker are racing towards the line as Michael Addamo and Ben Yu have put themselves in pole position to win big as they take leads into the last two final tables of the WSOP in Las Vegas. The $100,000-entry Event #87 is a High Roller event that saw players able to late register up until the start of Day 2, and stars such as Brian Rast, Ole Schemion, Elio Fox, Stephen Chidwick, Dominik Nitsche, Mark Herm, Jason Koon, David Szep, Sean Perry, Jeremy Ausmus and Rok Gostisa all got involved before the first deal, with the field confirmed at 64 players in total, with just 39 remaining at the start of play. That number was reduced almost immediately, with Shaun Deeb crashing out to David Coleman and Brian Rast almost on the rail in his first hand as he shoved for 600,000 chips at blinds of 20,000/40,000 with [poker card="9d"][poker card="8d"], a hand called by Cary Katz with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kc"] which held to double up and leave Rast on fumes. Rast, a five-time WSOP bracelet winner after his win earlier this series, would later rally, but still missed out on the money places, as did Phil Hellmuth, who quickly realized that he needed to win or come second in Event #88 to win the Player of the Year race. Hellmuth wasn’t the only one on the rail without money as David Peters, David Coleman, Jason Koon and the aforementioned Cary Katz all missed the money, along with Mark Herm, who was busted on the bubble in 11th place. Arieh wisely chose to give late-regging for $100,000 a miss. Fedor Holz was the first player to make money as he was eliminated in 10th place for $167,869 when his ace-high shove couldn’t hold against Sorel Mizzi’s king-queen, a queen on the river winning the Canadian the pot and sending the German to the rail. Addamo had the lead as the nine-handed final table kicked off, with 9.5 million chips to Sam Sovrel’s closest stack of just over 6 million. Bill Klein was the first player to depart the final nine as he busted with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"] to Addamo’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"]. The money all went in on the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2h"] flop, but neither the [poker card="6c"] turn or [poker card="8h"] river could save him and he cashed for $186,909 in ninth place. He won his first-ever WSOP bracelet earlier in the week, but he busted in eighth place for $217,274 when his shove with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] ran into Addamo’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9s"] to bust on a board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Td"][poker card="Ks"]. Sam Grafton was the next player to lose his stack as he busted in seventh place for $263,227. Calling a raise from Henrik Hecklen, Grafton went to a flop of [poker card="Th"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4s"] and both players checked it. Grafton checked the [poker card="9s"] turn too, but Hecklen didn’t, firing a bet that the British player called. On the [poker card="6d"] river, Grafton check-called Hecklen’s shove after using several time extension chips, but the Brit’s time was up as he called, showed [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9d"] for a pair of nines and was shown Hecklen’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="8h"] for a rivered straight. After an extended period of play where Addamo used his stack to chip up even more, Mizzi was the player to miss out on the final day as he shoved with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7c"] and was called by Addamo with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="7s"]. The board ran out [poker card="8h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="9s"] as the unfortunate Mizzi saw his dominating hand overtaken on the turn to end play for the night and give Addamo a big lead heading into the final day, holding as many chips on his own as his four opponents do combined. WSOP 2021 Event #87 $100,000 High Roller Final Table Chipcounts: Michael Addamo - 19,620,000 Henrik Hecklen - 5,445,000 Sam Soverel - 5,165,000 Kevin Rabichow - 4,250,000 Sean Perry - 3,920,000 Ben Yu Leads Final Day in $5,000 8-Handed Event #88 The drama was palpable in the $5,000-entry NLHE 8-Handed Event #88, the final live event on this year’s WSOP schedule in Las Vegas. Phil Hellmuth, who could not reach the latter stages of the $50,000 or $100,000 events of the past couple of days, needed a deep run in the event. In fact, once Arieh crashed out, Hellmuth quickly established what he needed to do. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463030770637754368 Arieh was still in the building and as the tension built, the leader of the POY race busted, giving him a chance to join the anti-rail. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463006906285391874 Sadly for Hellmuth and his many fans, the Poker Brat fell short as he called all-in with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="5h"] on a board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="2d"] against Jason Brazeau’s [poker card="8c"][poker card="4c"] for a pair of eights. Hellmuth’s elimination saw the 16-time record WSOP bracelet winner concede defeat and congratulate Arieh on his victory. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1463061249034358784 Arieh replied, “You're always gonna be the goat [Greatest of All Time] buddy! I appreciate you more than you know.”, tweeting a picture of the title celebrations. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1463079737480253441 After Hellmuth’s departure, many big names fell, as players such as Faraz Jaka, Romain Lewis, Joao Simao, Andrew Kelsall, Dominik Nitsche, Justin Lapka, Justin Saliba, and Brandon Sheils all missed out on the final day. With just 30 players bagging up Day 2 chips from the 531 entries in total, Ben Yu (2,515,000) leads the final day field. Uri Reichenstein (2,070,000) is his closest challenger, while there are top 10 stacks for some of the best players to have sat down at the felt this World Series in Shaun Deeb (1,680,000), Ramon Colillas (1,500,000), and Alexandre Reard (1,048,000), who will shoot for his second 2021 bracelet tomorrow afternoon. WSOP 2021 Event #88 $5,000 8-Handed NLHE Top 10 Chipcounts: Ben Yu - 2,515,000 Uri Reichenstein - 2,070,000 George Wolff - 1,770,000 Shaun Deeb - 1,680,000 Matyas Kende - 1,635,000 Ramon Colillas - 1,500,000 Danny Wong - 1,330,000 Justin Liberto - 1,285,000 Clayton Maguire - 1,100,000 Alexandre Reard - 1,048,000 Daniel Negreanu’s World Series of Poker came to a close and ‘Kid Poker’ was happy to post his scores from his final rollercoaster ride at the Rio. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1463082905802969092 Owais Ahmed commented that “It's sick, almost unfathomable, how many final tables and top 3 appearances [Negreanu] has at the Rio, but never won a bracelet in the building. I'm sure he'll be happy to see a location change.” in a comment liked by Negreanu himself. Bring on Bally’s. Everyone has made the ‘walk of shame’ from the famous poker venue for the last 17 years, but for Martin Jacobson, the Swedish WSOP Main Event winner whose best result of his career came inside the Rio, it was emotional. https://twitter.com/Martin_Jacobson/status/1463073395499692039 Finally, not everyone is going to be sad to see trips to the Rio go down and the temperature go up from May next year at Bally’s and Paris. https://twitter.com/kittykuopoker/status/1462932645155782661
  5. With the World Series of Poker Main Event completed and a new World Champion in Koray Aldemir crowned, one of the last major awards of the series to be handed out this fall will be to the winner of the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year. Headed into the last weekend of the 2021 schedule, there is plenty of drama left to be had as the final WSOP events to take place at the Rio all have the potential to shake up the leaderboard and provide a potential surprise ending to this year’s tightly-run race. One person, looking for as little drama as possible is current POY frontrunner (and PocketFives’ own) Josh Arieh. After a series performance that includes two bracelet wins and a final table appearance in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship, Arieh simply needs to hold in order to have his banner hanging in the halls of the new home of the WSOP when it moves to the Strip in the summer of 2022 READ: Q&A With Josh Arieh: Enjoying Life, Seeing Success At The WSOP While a nearly 600 point lead is substantial, it’s by no means insurmountable. He understood this when, earlier in the week he announced on Twitter that he had to make his way back to Atlanta and that his WSOP was over - meaning that he wouldn’t have an opportunity to improve his position. But days later, circumstances changed for Arieh and he booked a flight back to Las Vegas in order to try and regain the heat had throughout most of the series and lock down a place in WSOP history. One of those players Arieh needs to contend with is the 16-timer Phil Hellmuth who, after an in-the-money finish in the $777 WSOP Online event and a final table appearance in the $10K Razz Championship, has vaulted right back into the race. He currently sits in second place, and has made it well-known that he’s angling to win the POY award. Although he’s sitting in a solid position right now, the remaining schedule doesn’t quite favor Hellmuth. His reputation for being “less than” at mixed games has been obliterated during the 2021 series, but unfortunately for him, there are no more small field/big point mixed game Championships for him to run deep in. Now, in order to make up the points he needs to catch Arieh, he’s going to have to get back to basics and dominate in No Limit Hold’em. Of the nine events that he can still register for while in Las Vegas, eight are NLHE with the lone stand out being the $50,000 Pot Limit Omaha. Perhaps the route for Hellmuth is to focus on grinding out a deep run in one of the larger field, smaller buy-in events like The Closer, the $1,000 Turbo, and the $5,000 8-Handed. This brings up another, and perhaps the most interesting aspect of the late POY race - the emphasis on High Rollers late in the schedule. Of those nine events, four have a buy-in of $50,000 or more. While both Hellmuth and Arieh are regular runners in the $50K PPC, playing in the NLHE shark-infested waters of the $50,000-$250,000 NLHE events is a totally different game. The fields will be replete with the biggest crushers in the game today, including the likes of Michael Addamo, Ali Imsirovic, and Justin Bonomo. Fields that some of those that are looking to close the POY race may not have a lot of experience against. There’s a lot of leaderboard points at stake in these remaining High Rollers and if someone can put together a run, as Michael Addamo did in PokerGO’s Poker Masters and Super High Roller Bowl prior to the WSOP, there’s plenty of points there to upend the POY leaderboard. That bodes well specifically for someone like Daniel Negreanu. Negreanu, sitting near the top of the Total Cashes leaderboard with 16 in the series, currently sits in 16th place on the POY leaderboard - one of the highest positions for the tight-knit crew of nosebleed MTTers. He’s 1,200 points behind Arieh and it would be a tough task to rack up that many points in such a short amount of time. However, in the $250,000 Super High Roller - in which he still has a shot to win - there are no less than 1,228 points for first place. There will likely be more than 1,100 points up for grabs for all of the High Rollers and should Negreanu keep cashing at his current pace it may just be enough to make a last-minute surge. Another player that the same scenario holds true for is Scott Ball. Ball, an NLHE specialist, has two WSOP bracelets - both won this series - and now has plenty of bonus bankroll to chase the POY. He took down the $5K Six-Max (one of the toughest tournaments of the series) for $562,667 and then best the massive field in the Little One For One Drop for another $396,445. He’s also proven he’s not afraid to fire $50Ks, scoring an 11th place finish an earlier $50,000 buy-in NLHE this series for $87,500. Ball, having a career series, is just over 700 points away from the lead and if his heater continues he could be a dark horse late in the race. Other storylines that have the potential to emerge include early POY favorite Anthony Zinno, making a deep run in the $50Ks, as we know he plans on playing them. Look to see if Aldemir, currently in fourth place, returns to the series well-rested after his marathon win in the Main Event to fire in high rollers which have been his bread and butter for years. Finally, Shaun Deeb, currently sitting in tenth place, would love nothing more than to make a deep run in the $50K PLO to upend one of his best friends in Arieh and make history for himself by becoming a two-time POY winner. The best part about this race is that it ends in Las Vegas. Despite WSOP Europe kicking off this coming week, the winner will be determined at the Rio, as it is meant to be. To view the current 2021 WSOP Player of the Year standing - click here.
  6. The 2021 World Series of Poker Main Event dominated the headlines at the series this week -and why shouldn’t it? It’s arguably the most exciting and prestigious tournament of the year and nearly every notable name in the game turns on their A-game in order to fight for the biggest prize in poker, the World Championship bracelet. Even the smallest details surrounding the Main Event turn into major headlines. Everything from who rode into the Rio to play to how much the Main Event is worth this year, all eyes in the poker world are fixed on nearly every bet, raise, and bustout. There were plenty of former World Champions in the house, plus a number of former #1-ranked PocketFivers all of which have their eye on the multi-million dollar prize. Let’s not waste any more time - here are the five biggest storylines from Week 6 of the World Series of Poker. $8 Million Up Top For 2021 Main Event Winner When all was said and done, from vaccination mandates to adding two additional starting flights the Main Event kicked off this week and the magic returned to the Rio for one last time. In total, a very respectable 6,650 players entered the $10,000 buy-in tournament. The total makes it the 10th largest field in Main Event history, a feat unto itself considering the conditions that the series has been under since Day 1. https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1458623238133596160?s=20 The prize pool topped $62 million and 1,000 players will enjoy a piece of it. A min-cash gives a return of $15,000 and everyone at the final table will earn seven figures with the top prize coming in at $8,000,000. A hefty prize for sure, with the pressure being applied to the final three where there is a $1.3 million jump between third and second, and a massive $3.7 million difference between runner-up and champion. https://twitter.com/WSOP/status/1458633558038171648?s=20 Stars Show Up For Main Event The Main Event is an event unlike any other and one of the best part for fans is to see their favorite players compete in a massive field for one of the largest prize pools of the year. Even in the current conditions, this year is no different as the Rio was flooded with big name stars who made the journey to try and become the next World Champion. Former World Champions Chris Moneymaker, Joe Hachem, Scott Blumstein, Martin Jacobson, Qui Nguyen, and Phil Hellmuth are all making their presence felt. For Hellmuth, it was more about his antics than his on the felt play. https://twitter.com/GGPoker/status/1458297842569650180?s=20 Moneymaker, who has talked about working on his game over the past few years, is off to a fast start surging into the top 20 of the chip counts after Day 2. https://twitter.com/CMONEYMAKER/status/1458655860960411650?s=20 But of course, the list of big names who took a shot in the field doesn’t stop with former champs. Daniel Negreanu hit the rail early, as did Damian Salas, former #1s Calvin Anderson and Shaun Deeb, Nick Schulman, Brian Rast, Tony Dunst, Jason Somerville, and Michael Addamo among many others. https://twitter.com/PokerNews/status/1457849351758180354?s=20 But headed into Day 3, the list of notable names in the 2,362 remain plentiful. Those sitting inside the top 100 at the start of the day include Nick Petrangelo, Matt Glantz, David Williams, Tyler Cornell, Mustapha Kanit, Greg Mueller, Brian Altman, and Victor Ramdin. Jason Koon, Chance Kornuth, Robert Mizrachi, Anthony Zinno, Ben Yu, and Faraz Jaka all have plenty to work with. On the other end former #1 Niklas Astedt, Ole Schemion, Garry Gates, Griffin Benger, and Eli Elezra are among those with some chipping up to do, all sitting under 100k headed into the day. Last Ride For Texas Dolly (at the Rio) While he didn’t advance through to Day 3, fans were thrilled to get to watch the return of Doyle Brunson to play in his final Main Event at the Rio. Brunson was featured on the PokerGO broadcasts on two occasions, both Day 1 as well as his Day 2. H accumulated a nice stack, but ran into a couple of tough spots which ultimately found him eliminated on Day 2abd. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456381655686397969?s=20 https://twitter.com/TexDolly/status/1458544793684873219?s=20 Jungleman Comes Back To Win $50K PPC, Leng Confronts Error The final table of the $50,000 Poker Players Championship turned into an extra-hour affair as Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates battled against Ryan Leng and Paul Volpe three-handed deep into the night, only to emerge with his first-ever WSOP gold bracelet, a spot on the Chip Reese Memorial Trophy, and the $954,020 first-place prize. Cates arrived with his hair dyed blue-green and in full Dragon Ball Z cosplay. That, along with his win, might have been the talk of the event but it was a critical hand in Limit Hold’em against Leng where Cates was down to his final bet, all-in with the worst hand, and on the verge of elimination. Leng, with top pair and getting incredible odds just needed to click call in order to eliminate him, but he found a fold instead and ‘Jungle’ scraped his way back and eventually took home the win. https://twitter.com/PokerGO/status/1457105513674645507?s=20 The next day, the fallout from the hand took over Poker Twitter and Ryan Leng had to deal with the fallout from, what Leng himself called a “terrible fold”. He did so head-on. Leng posted his thoughts in a lengthy Twitter thread (which you can read by clicking right here). In the end, Leng didn’t make excuses, he simply vowed to learn from it and continue to move on. For his part, despite giving Leng the needle at the table when he showed his hand, Cates came to Leng’s defense from the online critics of the fold. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1457573583341776898?s=20 Leng still sits in the top 5 on the Player of the Year Leaderboard. Josh Arieh Stays Hot, Takes Over Player of the Year Race Speaking of the Player of the Year race, the new leader is Josh Arieh who added to his point totals this week with a final table appearance in Online Event #7 ($3,200 NLHE) in which he finished in fourth for another $96,049. That makes it two bracelet wins, a final table in the aforementioned $50,000 Poker Players Championship, and the online final table. He’s having the series of his career in terms of results, something he credits to being a strong place mentally and playing free. With a healthy lead in the POY race, but a there's lot of poker left to play in the WSOP ‘post-lims’, Arieh has said he’s ready to double down, sell some action on PocketFives, and make a run at having a banner draped at all future WSOP events. https://twitter.com/jeffplatt/status/1458617115175309315?s=20 Current POY Top 5 Josh Arieh - 3,110.91 Jake Schwartz - 2,757.37 Anthony Zinno - 2,731.32 Ryan Leng - 2,684.04 Kevin Gerhart - 2,643.23
  7. Josh Arieh is having one of the best World Series of Poker runs of his two-decade-long career. In fact, perhaps there’s no hotter player on the planet over the past two weeks as Arieh picked up his third career gold bracelet in the $1,500 PLO for $204,766 and then bounced right into the $50,000 Poker Players Championship where he made the final table for the second year running, finishing in sixth place for $161,422. The moment he busted out of the PPC, he snap-registered for the $10,000 PLO and four days later he was celebrating his second bracelet of the series, fourth of his career, and another $484,791 payday - a top 5 score of his career. Additionally, Arieh is getting it done online as well, finishing in fourth place in the WSOP.com $3,200 Online High Roller for another $96,049 and enough Player of the Year points that he's expected to take the lead when it's next updated. But in addition to his poker career, Arieh recently took on a big role at PocketFives that included launching the new staking platform. He’s been a central figure to its success both off the felt and through offering pieces of his deep runs throughout the WSOP and giving fans an old-school sweat and piece of the action. Seeing as how he works for this site, it wasn’t tough to catch him on break during Day 1c of the Main Event to ask him a few questions about his past two weeks. — You’ve been in plenty of huge spots in your career: second in the $50K PPC in 2019, third in the Main Event in 2004. Where does the 2021 WSOP rank in your career so far and could you have imagined that you’d be where you are right now? I mean, we talked before we came out and I was coming out with intentions of working a lot. I was going to deal with players and getting people up on the site [PocketFives Staking] and everything. But as the fall progressed, it made more sense to play because I was playing so free. My thoughts were flowing, which is really important to me. I mean, yes, I’m surprised because there is so much variance in whether you finish in certain spots…but I’m not surprised that I’m doing well. I’m surprised that I do have two bracelets [this year]. But my life is in an amazing place, even without the bracelets. My headspace is better than it’s ever been and the results are showing it. You’ve talked about the challenges of staying mentally tough, so where is your own confidence right now and how do you maintain your own mental toughness in tournaments? Yeah, it’s really big for me. It’s really big for me to stay engaged and focused. I’m always trying to think of creative ways to win hands and I always want to have an extra out to where I don’t have to catch the cards. I’m always thinking about a lot of extra things in a hand that a lot of people aren’t thinking about because I just like to make it tough on myself. But I am as mentally here as I’ve ever been, it’s the backbone of everything. And it’s just that my life is in a good place which allows me to not think about anything other than the task at hand. I’m able to stay completely engaged and completely focused and…I’m having fun. I don't want people to think that “Oh, Josh is winning. He's having fun," because maybe everybody is...but I was having fun at the beginning when I only had three min cashes. I went home for four days and was excited to come back and play a $1,500 event. And then, I won that. But I'm enjoying my time at the table. In years past, I've always worn headphones or something would irritate me. I haven't put headphones in once. Nothing's irritating me. I'm just staying focused and it's really doing good, obviously. When you won that $1,500 you tweeted that you “knew the assignment”, is going for the 2021 WSOP Player of the Year the new “assignment?" Yea, a banner on the wall would be fucking cool, but Shaun [Deeb] comes out wanting to win Player of the Year every year and I just want to finish higher than Shaun [laughs]. That’s all, I just want to finish higher than Shaun so I can needle him. Finishing higher than him in a tournament is a really fucking good accomplishment. Player of the year would be cool but I'm going to take it day by day. As of right now, yes, I'm going to try to get some more points and win Player of the Year. But I'm not going to make myself miserable and play when I don't want to play. Because I'm having a lot of fun and this is going to be a series that I always remember for the rest of my life. I don't want to tarnish it by beating my head against the table, trying to win POY when I don't want to be playing. Switching gears a little, you are also in charge of Staking on PocketFives which has also been a huge success. How does your new role at P5s plus the successful launch of staking fit into everything that’s going on in your world? It's just everything in my life is really lining up like I never imagined. And with Daniel’s [Negreanu] help. Daniel is just one of the great people in the world. I mean, not just poker. You can call him a good guy in poker, but he's just a good human being and the things that he's done to help us succeed at PocketFives. The way that it's actually thriving and people are making money and enjoying sweating updates more than ever before. My messages are full of all my friends outside of poker: "When's the next package going up? When's the next thing going up?" It's really bringing people a lot of fun. Plus, we're capping it, so people aren't losing a lot of money that they can't afford. I've said it a million times that it's like people will enjoy a football game more because they get to bet $10 on it. Now, they get to invest at really fair rates. I don't know. I forever my tag on my Twitter was, "I'm the luckiest man alive." But I've always felt that way and somehow now it's even better. I love my job. I love the people I work with. I love playing poker. I don't know. I'm just, my relationships at home, my girlfriend, everything, life's just coming together. This is a bonus question, I wasn’t originally going to ask this but…have you ever thought about maybe letting someone you work with, maybe a content creator for the site, know a minute or two before you decide to post? You know, so maybe that person could get a piece of the current sun run? No, no…[laughs] it’s for everybody. It wouldn’t be fair…it just wouldn’t be fair. Fair enough. Seriously though, you’ve won two bracelets and a lot of money this autumn, can you flex a little and let people know what you’ve done to celebrate these wins? Ah, dude, that’s not my style. I'm so excited to be here. There are so many poker players that have contributed. I mean, my support system is full of fucking amazing players. It’s not all me. It's Shaun and Matt Glantz and Daniel Negreanu and Daniel Weinman…there are so many, I hate to leave anybody out. But they're my boys and I always bounce hands off of them. We did go to Nobu for dinner…but I haven’t even cashed out. It’s all just sitting in the thing.
  8. After a stunning final table performance, Dan Cates won the $50,000 Poker Players Championship to get his name on the Chip Reese Trophy. Elsewhere, Josh Arieh won his fourth bracelet and Georgios Sotiropoulos took his third on Day 37 of the 2021 World Series as Day 1b of the World Series of Poker Main Event also took place on a day of drama. Dan Cates Wins First-Ever Bracelet in $50K Poker Players Championship It was a packed day of action in the $50,000 Poker Players Championship, as Dan Cates rose through the ranks to win his first-ever WSOP bracelet for over $954,000. As ridiculous as it sounds, the money will hardly matter to one of the most unique poker players the game has ever produced. The first player to bust the final table in fifth place was Chris Brewer, who went in No-Limit Hold’em when he called all-in with [poker card="7s"][poker card="7c"] on a flop of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="5h"]. Brewer had currently established that the aggressor in the hand, Ryan Leng, hadn’t hit the flop, but Leng’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"] were good enough to eliminate Brewer for $211,235 after a turn of [poker card="2c"] and the [poker card="6d"] river. An extended period of play saw no-one bust for hours, overnight chip leader Eli Elezra was gone. Elezra lost a Razz pot to Paul Volpe to cash for $286,983, some way short of the top prize he was favorite to win a few hours earlier. Three-handed play lasted some time before Dan Cates offered to buy everyone on the rail some drinks to get more support to push him over the line. No, really... everyone. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456799668390662149 Spurred on, Cates then took out Paul Volpe in third place for $404,243 as Volpe lost in Limit Hold’em with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="2s"] of Cates winning against Volpe’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="6h"] on a board of [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="2h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="7s"] when all the money went in on the flop. Heads-up play began with Cates in complete control, holding 16 million chips to Leng’s 2.9 million. After early pressure from Leng, however, he chipped up and got a full double when top pair was good enough to take a vital Limit Hold’em pot as Leng vaulted to 9 million chips, almost drawing level. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456954623122567168?s=20 That quickly went in the other direction, however, as Cates grew his lead and sealed the deal in a round of Limit Hold’em as his [poker card="Qc"][poker card="3d"] won after being all-in behind on the flop of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Th"] against Leng’s [poker card="Td"][poker card="5s"]. The [poker card="Qh"] turn put Cates into the lead and Jungleman was swinging from the vines when the [poker card="3s"] gave him the title, $954,020 top prize and first-ever bracelet, with Leng’s runner-up result (his second of the series in addition to winning a bracelet) worth $589,628. "I said I was gonna win, so I won. But it was pretty important because now I have more money to help the world and to continue a career outside of poker," Cates said after his victory. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456955161566273544?s=20 WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Final Table Results: Dan Cates - $954,020 Ryan Leng - $589,628 Paul Volpe - $404,243 Eli Elezra - $286,983 Chris Brewer - $211,235 Arieh Captures Fourth Bracelet, Second in a Fortnight To say that Josh Arieh has enjoyed a purple patch at the felt is a little like saying the Rio is slightly cold. The popular professional won his third WSOP bracelet just two weeks ago, but after a stirring run to the line Event #66, Arieh captured his fourth-lifetime WSOP bracelet and second this Series to vault up the Player of the Year leaderboard and further strengthen his incredible 2021 and general poker legacy. The professional, who has played the game for quarter of a century, took down a dramatic final table as he ruled the PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship for a massive score of $484,791. The final table saw players such as British mixed game specialist Adam Owen and Jeff Gross bust before the final four, with Dan Colpoys’ elimination followed by the end of Russian player Anatolii Zyrin’s chances. With overnight leader Danny Chang to conquer heads-up, Arieh controlled the short but exciting battle as he put an almost 3:1 chips lead to perfect use. While Chang cashed for $299,627, it was Arieh who sealed yet more memories in a 2021 World Series of Poker fast becoming known for his deep runs in some of the toughest events on the poker calendar. Did someone say WSOP Player of the Year? The race for the ‘flag’ everyone wants to see hanging in the WSOP venue is up for grabs now. https://twitter.com/RemkoRinkema/status/1456880193335746564 WSOP 2021 Event #66 $10,000 PLO8 Championship Final Table Results: Josh Arieh - $484,791 Danny Chang - $299,627 Anatolii Zyrin - $207,369 Dan Colpoys - $146,817 Jeff Gross - $106,391 Adam Owen - $78,955 Aaron Kupin - $60,040 Matt Woodward - $46,813 [caption id="attachment_637053" align="aligncenter" width="1000"] Josh Arieh won his fourth WSOP bracelet on a huge day at the felt on Day 37 of the 2011 WSOP[/caption] Sotiropoulos Seals Third Bracelet Win Georgios Sotiropoulos won the Mini Main Event after outlasting his final four opponents and putting another dominant chip lead to great use to win his third WSOP bracelet. Sotiropoulos closed it out in style, winning heads-up against Japanese player Wataru Miyashita, who grabbed the $267,328 runner-up prize after running over the final table and eliminated the other three players in his bid to stop the Greek star. That didn’t happen, however, as Sotiropoulos - who started heads-up level with Miyashita - remerged as the dominant force and closed it out to win his third bracelet across a stellar poker career and the top prize of $432,575. WSOP 2021 Event #65 $1,000 Mini Main Event Final Table Results: Georgios Sotiropoulos - $432,575 Wataru Miyashita - $267,328 Jordan Meltzer - $202,695 James Patterson - $154,720 James Rubinski - $118,898 Matthew Jewett - $91,991 David Tuthill - $71,661 James Morgan - $56,208 Erkut Yilmaz - $44,394 On Day 1b of the WSOP Main Event, 845 players took to the felt in pursuit of the biggest prize in poker. With just 611 players surviving, Steve Foutty bagged up the biggest stack of the day with 287,000 chips, followed in the counts by Matthew Traylor (279,500) and Maxime Canevet (277,000). Other big names to make it included Ronnie Bardah (139,600), Stephen Chidwick (124,900), four-time bracelet winner Kevin Gerhart (112,400) and Mike Matusow (56,500), while others such as WSOP Main Event back-to-back 1987 and 1988 winner Johnny Chan, John Racener, Brian Rast, Nick Schulman and Shaun Deeb all fell on the first day. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Day 1b Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Steve Foutty - 287,000 Matthew Traylor - 279,500 Maxime Canevet - 277,000 Justin Garcia - 243,500 Kayvon Shahbaz - 238,500 Keegan Westover - 230,700 Kevin Rasor - 228,900 Aaron Earthman - 226,800 Jonathan Williams - 225,100 Jean Guillette Canada - 223,200 With the WSOP Main Event under way, popular British player Patrick Leonard speculated on exactly which player types you’ll meet if you’re playing the legendary tournament. https://twitter.com/padspoker/status/1456834567441162240 Finally, it wouldn’t be a World Series of Poker day if Phil Hellmuth wasn’t providing a window into the crazy life he leads as he mingles with the stars! https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1456805414918508544  
  9. A dramatic day at the felt saw plenty of big names make the cut on Day 1c of the WSOP Main Event as 600 players battled down to 433 survivors. As in previous days, plenty of the early action saw big names having to battle for their place in the later levels, let alone the next day. Shevlyakov Takes Big Lead after Dramatic Day 1c Russian Aleksandr Shevlyakov Grabs Overall Lead in Main Event With Day 1a - 1c having now taken place, a total of 1,968 players have now sat down in this year’s WSOP Main Event. From that number, only 1,392 remain in with a chance of scooping millions of dollars by winning the most-coveted WSOP bracelet of them all. It is Russian player Aleksandr Shevlyakov who has the chip lead not just on Day 1c but in the WSOP Main Event overall after an astonishing day at the felt saw him bag up 392,600 chips, a lead he has from players such as Dylan Nguyen (252,400), Suk-Kyu Koh (237,900), Matt Glantz (236,000) and Veselin Dimitrov (235,000), all of whom complete the top five Day 1c stacks. Surviving or Crashing Out From the start of the day of Day 1c, some of poker’s finest found themselves fighting for their lives. Niklas Astedt was down to just 10,000 chips from his 60,000 starting stack early on, but after a double-up with pocket queens when all the chips were in the middle against [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8s"] on a flop of [8c4d3s], the Swedish online superstar rallied and ended the day on 49,300 chips. Others to scrape through included Tony Miles (53,800), Sam Abernathy (40,500), Erik Seidel (38,700), and Sam Greenwood (27,200), who saw his brother Lucas Greenwood bag up close to four times that amount with 106,900). However, while those luminaries survived, others would fall. All of the following players will have to wait until 2022 and possibly a different location to become world champion, with Andrew Frankenberger, Tony Dunst, Jonathan Dimmig, Bryce Yockey, Eric Hicks, Jonathan Dokler, and Shannon Shorr all crashing out on Day 1c. Other Big Names Thriving Elsewhere in the event, some players who have already enjoyed a very strong World Series were flourishing. Josh Arieh has already got two WSOP bracelets to his name from the 2021 series and four in his lifetime, but his pivotal hand was possibly the most dramatic of all on Day 1c. When Arieh tried to put in a raise pre-flop, he was forced to call a shove worth over 25,000 chips with [poker card="Jh"][poker card="Jc"]. On the flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="Ts"], he looked in amazing shape to win the hand. However, despite being against one player who was drawing dead with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kc"], the other player held [poker card="As"][poker card="Ks"] and was one card away from what would have been a Royal Flush for the ages. Arieh faded both turn and river, however, with an eight on each street giving him a massive stack and the current second-placed player in the WSOP Player of the Year race bagged up 154,100 chips. The 2019 WSOP Main Event champion Hossein Ensan (84,000) also made Day 2, albeit not with quite as many chips as stars such as JC Tran (175,400), Qui Nguyen (143,800) or Pete Chen (99,700). With Day 1d looking like it will be the busiest day of the WSOP Main Event so far, there’s plenty more action to come across what could be a dramatic few days as three final Day 1 flights conclude the opening day, giving us an idea of exactly what will be on the line in 10 days’ time. WSOP 2021 Event #67 $10,000 Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Aleksandr Shevlyakov - 392,600 Dylan Nguyen - 252,400 Suk-Kyu Koh - 237,900 Matt Glantz - 236,000 Veselin Dimitrov - 235,000 Itay Bin Mergy - 233,100 Travis Preng - 232,800 Daniel Barry - 230,600 Andrew Gilmore - 224,600 Howard Arotsky - 215,600 Ryan Leng took time out from what have been an intense few weeks at the felt to justify his play in a curious hand from yesterday’s battle with Dan Cates for the Poker Players Championship title. Leng, who has a win and two runner-up spots this WSOP alone, still found time to be self-critical after that amazing run up the POY leaderboard. https://twitter.com/RyanLeng9/status/1457188162506088448 While finally, despite being happy with his Day 1a stack, poker legend and 10-time WSOP bracelet winner Doyle ‘Texas Dolly’ Brunson is refusing to get carried away with his chances... yet. https://twitter.com/TexDolly/status/1457032730470850560 Doyle gets the final word, too, as he responded with a very encouraging message when discussing selling action on Pocket Fives in 2022. “Get hold of me next year and let’s make a deal for the entire WSOP.” Doyle Brunson playing a near-full ticket in a World Series of Poker? We can’t wait already.
  10. Not every staking deal is going to pan out, but in the case of this year’s 2021 World Series of Poker $50,000 Poker Players Championship, if you backed a player on PocketFives, you got straight up paid. Three of the best when it comes to mixed games posted packages - Daniel Negreanu, Josh Arieh, and Matt Glantz all battled their way into money in one of the WSOP's most prestigious events. Of the 63 runners, only 10 got paid and late (very late) on Day 3 of the five-day event, all three navigated the ups and downs of the money bubble. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1455799199836999683?s=20 Negreanu, who found himself near the bottom of the chip counts multiple times as the field narrowed, put together a string of hands that sent his chip count soaring. And as the money bubble approached, Arieh was seen building a mountain of chips as he climbed into the top 3 on the leaderboard. Glantz, who sat to Arieh’s direct left for most of the night, also managed to find a bag at the end of the night. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456012324372815874?s=20 On Day 4, Negreanu could never really get anything going and made an untimely exit in ninth place for $91,595. Negreanu will take $68,696 of that to the bank but $22,898 is getting split up by his backers. That’s an 83.19% ROI for the more than 80 people who managed to get a piece of him. So, for each share of ~ $154 a return of roughly $282. After Negreanu busted, backers still had two players left to root for. Nick Schulman was the next to go, busting in eighth place and after he made his quick departure, the marathon began. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456026758638145540?s=20 He held on most of the day but six hours after the start of the 10-handed day, Glantz, who sold 22% of his action, fell in eighth place for $128,256 - an ROI of 156.51% and a handsome sum for his backers. Glantz himself will book just over $100,000 while his 69 backers will pull their percentages from the $28,216. If all 69 backers had an equal share, a $180 investment turned into a roughly $460 return. https://twitter.com/PocketFives/status/1456011019151495168?s=20 One can’t help but be impressed by Josh Arieh’s back-to-back final table runs in the Poker Players Championship. When the money bubble approached, Arieh was sitting with piles of chips which he carried into Day 4. However, his stack took a few notable hits and his tournament came to an end in sixth place for $161,422. “I’m very happy with the way I played, totally accept the result,” Arieh said after the tournament. For his backers, it was also another nice result. Earlier in the series, when Arieh won the $1,500 PLO event, his 10 backers turned $15 into more than $2,000. In this event, Arieh walked away with a healthy 222.84% ROI. He sold 30% of his action to 64 different backers bringing roughly $33,426 in profit for his investors. For each 1% (or $500) returned $1,614.20 or a $50 stake bringing back $161. Be on the lookout for more staking action, at both the 2021 WSOP and beyond… https://twitter.com/TexDolly/status/1456682550546481154?s=20
  11. A dramatic day at the felt saw Kevin Gerhart claim his fourth WSOP bracelet with his second of this World Series in Event #62, the $1,500-entry Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better. Elsewhere, the Poker Players Championship reached its final five players as Eli Elezra grabbed the chip lead heading into the final day and there were bracelet wins for both Eelis Parssinen and Cole Ferraro. Kevin Gerhart Wins Second Bracelet of the Series It was all about Kevin Gerhart in Event #62 as the popular young pro won his second bracelet of the 2021 WSOP and the fourth of his career. Heading into the final table, the chips were remarkably even, with Gerhart marginally ahead of both Matthew Kaplan and Sterling Lopez at the top of the eight-man leaderboard. The first player to bust at the official final table was Dylan Wilkerson as Kaplan, who led the field coming into the final day, vaulted back into the lead when his full house sent Wilkerson out for $18,278 in eighth place. It took no time at all for the next player to leave the action, as Michael Trivett was shot down by Gerhart almost immediately for a score of $23,891 in seventh place. That hand gave Gerhart the lead back and he further strengthened his advantage of the rest of the field when he eliminated Roman Hrabec in sixth place for $31,733 when Gerhart won his second bust-out pot in a row with two-pair. At that stage, Gerhart’s closest rival was hard to pick, with each of the other four men each sitting on roughly 60% of Gerhart’s stack, but Dustin Dirksen stepped forward as the likeliest heads-up opponent after busting Alexandr Orlov in fourth for $42,823. Orlov’s exit was enough to propel Dirksen off the bottom of the counts, but he had slipped slightly by the time he risked it all to double through Gerhart. Once Dicksen doubled, the pressure ramped up on the other remaining players, and Lopez busted in fourth place for $58,695 as a result. Lopez was followed from the felt by Kaplan, as both of Gerhart’s earlier rivals moved to the rail, Kaplan cashing for $81,696. Gerhart took on Dicksen and had a strong lead going into the heads-up battle, with 12.1 million chips playing Dicksen’s 6 million. Although Dicksen took the lead after some early pots, Gerhart grabbed a marginal advantage back by the time the final hand happened and virtually all of the chips were in the middle of the table. Gerhart’s pair of kings was good enough against Dicksen’s jacks, which saw Gerhart’s rail celebrated a fourth WSOP bracelet title, the luckless Dicksen was commiserated in second by the runner-up prize of $115,440. Gerhart had prevented him winning a first-ever bracelet with the hand and took the top prize of $186,789 in the process. WSOP 2021 Event #62 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Final Table Results: Kevin Gerhart - $186,789 Dustin Dirksen - $115,440 Matthew Kaplan - $81,696 Sterling Lopez - $58,695 Alexandr Orlov - $42,823 Roman Hrabec - $31,733 Michael Trivett - $23,891 Dylan Wilkerson - $18,278 Elezra Takes The Lead In $50K PPC After an entertaining day where 10 players dropped to five, Eli Elezra finished the action top of the leaderboard with one day to go in the Poker Players Championship. The $50,000-entry event, which will conclude on Friday, November 5th after a day’s break, began the day with ten top players, all of whom had made it into the money. Mike Wattel was the first player to be busted, exiting proceedings in 10th place for a min-cash worth $82,623 when he lost out to Paul Volpe and it wasn’t long before Daniel Negreanu busted too, leaving in ninth place for $91,595. ‘Kid Poker’ lost with pocket aces again after doing so on a dramatic Day 3, this time being shot down by Ryan Leng’s set of jacks. With eight players left, Nick Schulman, who earlier in the day had spoken out against a perceived slowroll from Negreanu, who later tweeted about how he was happy the hand played out as it did. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1456021223859650562 Schulman’s exit for $106,120 in eighth took place against Chris Brewer, who seemed to grow in power throughout the day, while Matt Glantz, who busted in seventh for $128,256, may have gone out in a split pot by Leng and Elezra, but he was trolled by Dan ‘Jungleman’ Cates on his way from the event. https://twitter.com/junglemandan/status/1456034289796141064 That left just one man to leave the party and miss out on the final five. Unfortunately for him and his many fans and investors, that was Josh Arieh, who left in sixth place another great score of $161,422 when his pocket queens in PLO were toppled by Elezra’s two-pair tens and sixes on the turn. With five men remaining, here are the payouts for the players who made it all the way to Day 4 of one of the most difficult tournaments this year’s WSOP will host. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Results: 6th - Josh Arieh - $161,422 7th - Matt Glantz - $128,256 8th - Nick Schulman - $106,120 9th - Daniel Negreanu - $91,595 10th - Mike Wattel - $82,623 Of the five remaining players, it is Elezra who has the chip lead going into Friday’s showdown for the gold. With a massive 10 WSOP bracelets already won by the five players who will compete to get their name on the Chip Reese Trophy, Elezra’s four is one ahead of Volpe and Leng, each of whom has three to their name. Neither Cates nor Brewer have won WSOP gold so far in their careers but now sit just four opponents away from doing so. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Final Table Chipcounts: Eli Elezra - 4,620,000 Paul Volpe - 4,360,000 Chris Brewer - 4,325,000 Daniel Cates - 3,875,000 Ryan Leng - 1,625,000 Ferraro Digs Deep To Win Deepstack Championship In Event #61, Cole Ferraro completed a massive comeback win to claim his first WSOP title and the top prize of over a quarter of a million dollars. Eclipsing the others at a dramatic final table, Ferraro’s victory came after the 22-year-old finished second in an event earlier this series. Heading into the final table, Ferraro had a slight chip lead, but that was overtaken by Richard Dixon very quickly as he took out Ronald Slucker in ninth for $25,359. Slucker shoved on a flop of [poker card="6s"][poker card="5d"][poker card="4h"] with [poker card="5s"][poker card="5c"] for a flopped middle set. Dixon made the call with his overpair [poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"], but that improved to a straight on 5th street as the [poker card="As"] turn was followed by a [poker card="8d"] on the river. There was a period of no eliminations, but as the blinds rose, that was followed by a number of quick bust-outs. Rubin Chappell left in eighth place for $32,169 when his pocket eights were topped by Bart Lybaert’s pocket queens, before Xiangdong Huang busted in seventh for $41,108 when his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8s"] couldn’t win a flip against Dixon’s [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"]. With six players remaining, Edgardo Rosario busted for $52,914 when he got unlucky post-flop having had the better of it before the community cards fell. Rosario’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qc"] was well ahead of Dixon’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6d"] but the board of [poker card="7c"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="6s"] managed to offer Rosario a flush draw from the flop yet instead give Dixon trips on the river. It wasn’t long, however, before Dixon himself was on the rail, busting in fifth place for $68,604. All-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"] on a queen-high flop Ferraro had found [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kc"] and held through turn and river to win with a set of kings and sneak up on Sami Rustom, who had taken the chip lead. Out in fourth for $89,587 was Bart Lybaert, the Belgian player heading home after he thought he was bluff-catching with third pair on a king-high board but saw Ferraro turn over aces in the hole to go into three-handed play with a strong lead. Play was soon heads-up, as Sean Dunleavy was done and left in third place for $117,822. Dunleavy shoved on the river of a hand against Rustom with a set of jacks, but his opponent had rivered a runner-runner flush to take the lead right back. With Rustom holding 70 million chips to Ferraro’s 47 million, it took a comeback win for the bracelet. Ferraro won a handful of important hands where he had to make tough calls before the final hand saw him taking a lead into the action at the crucial moment. Rustom shoved with [poker card="4h"][poker card="4s"], and after a long time taking consideration of all factors, Ferarro called with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"]. After the board played out [poker card="9s"][poker card="5h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="5c"][poker card="Th"], Ferraro had the win and a history-making first-ever bracelet, with the 22-year-old the youngest player to enjoy a first and second so far in the 2021 World Series of Poker. While Rustom won $156,056 for finishing as runner-up, Ferraro’s top prize of $252,491will see him in huge profit for the series and playing the Main Event later in the week. On this form, who would want to face him across the felt? WSOP 2021 Event #61 $600 Deepstack Championship Final Table Results: Cole Ferraro - $252,491 Sami Rustom - $156,056 Sean Dunleavy - $117,822 Bart Lybaert - $89,587 Richard Dixon - $68,604 Edgardo Rosario - $52,914 Xiangdong Huang - $41,108 Ruben Chappell - $32,169 Ronald Slucker - $25,359 Eelis Parssinen Wins First WSOP Bracelet Event #64 saw Finnish online crusher Eelis Parssinen claim a first-ever WSOP bracelet victory as he took the top prize at a final table including players such as Niklas Astedt and Joni Jouhkimainen. With just eight players making the final table, it wasn’t long before the first player busted, with a fast structure to the $5,000-entry event throughout. Parssinen got off to the best possible start when he made quads in a PLO pot to double through Jouhkimainen and move up the ranks, and instead of the Finn floundering, he would continue to rise up the leaderboard during the remainder of the final day. Vikranth Anga was the first player to leave the final table as he lost out with ace-king to Jouhkimainen’s pocket kings when all the chips went into the middle pre-flop. Anga’s exit was worth $53,824 and he was soon joined on the rail by Swedish online sensation Niklas Astedt in seventh place for $70,367 when his [poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"] couldn’t catch Noah Bronstein’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="6h"], a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="9d"][poker card="7h"] sending Astedt home. After Kyle Arora went out in sixth for $93,425, Jouhkimainen busted in fifth for $125,940. The Finn called off his stack from the big blind with [poker card="9d"][poker card="7s"] only for Ezra Abu Gazal’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"] to eliminate his micro stack. Soon, only three remained after the overnight chip leader, David Prociak, busted for $172,332. Gazal would bust in No Limit Hold’em, when his [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"] lost to Parssinen’s [poker card="5c"][poker card="5d"] on a nine-high board, with the American earning $239,231 for the run to the podium places. That gave Parssinen 20.6 million chips, almost three times as many as Bronstein who had 8.4 million. Heads-up was a short affair as the Finn wrapped up victory with a flopped set of sixes good enough for Parssinen to claim gold and the top prize of $545,616, while Bronstein cashed for $337,216 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #64 $5,000 NLHE/PLO Mix Final Table Results: Eelis Parssinen - $545,616 Noah Bronstein - $337,216 Ezra Abu Gazal - $239,321 David Prociak - $172,332 Joni Jouhkimainen - $125,940 Kyle Arora - $93,425 Niklas Astedt - $70,367 Vikranth Anga - $53,824 In Event #63, the $500-entry Salute to Warriors, just nine players remain from 169 combatants on the penultimate day of the event. Bradley Rogoff leads the final table with 8,800,000 chips, a fair distance ahead of Eric Zhang with 7,175,000. Elsewhere at the final table, there were stacks in bags for Chris Corbo (4,475,000) and Chulhan Choi (3,900,000) among others, but some weren’t so fortunate as to make the final day, with stars of the game such as Taylor Pollard, Lisa Roberts and Chris Bibb all going close to the final day but eventually missing out. WSOP 2021 Event #63 $500 Salute to Warriors Final Table Chipcounts: Bradley Rogoff - 8,800,000 Eric Zhang - 7,175,000 Guy Hadas - 5,500,000 Christopher Corbo - 4,475,000 Mitch Garshofsky - 4,475,000 Chulhan Choi - 3,900,000 Hlib Kovtunov - 3,475,000 Anthony Mccurdy - 3,350,000 Marty Zabib - 2,700,000 The kick-off of Event #65, the Mini Main Event, is something thousands of players were looking forward to, as evidenced by the 3,821 players who played the freezeout tournament that apes the structure and style of the WSOP Main Event, which kicks off on Thursday. After starting at 11am, the tournament enjoyed a busy opening day, with players such as the Player of the Year favorite Shaun Deeb busting out before the day was through. Others such as WSOP world champion Joe McKeehen went the same way, but some survived, with Thomas Boyden the pick of the 282 who made the cut. Others to feature in the top ten included Farid Jattin (2,240,000) and two-time WSOP winner Georgios Sotiropoulos (2,135,000), while the highest other former WSOP bracelet winner in the counts was Ismael Bojang (1,850,000). WSOP 2021 Event #65 $1,000 Mini Main Event Top 10 Chipcounts: Thomas Boyden - 3,325,000 Giorgii Skhulukhiia - 3,150,000 Nicholas Verderamo - 2,560,000 Farid Jattin - 2,240,000 Jinkwang Do - 2,150,000 Georgios Sotiropoulos - 2,135,000 Gareth Devereux - 1,995,000 John Longowa - 1,995,000 Nana Sanechika - 1,955,000 Ye Yuan - 1,925,000 Finally, in terms of poker events that is, the $10,000 PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship kicked off and saw 194 players reduced to just 101 on Day 1 of the event. Brian Hastings (447,000) leads the field, but he is in illustrious company in a top 10 that includes Chip Jett (308,500), Nick Schulman (295,000), GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos (282,500) and two-time 2021 WSOP winner Ari Engel, the Canadian sitting on 224,000 chips. Players to bust included Yueqi Zhu, David Benyamine, Bradley Ruben, Rep Porter, Chris Vitch, Robert Campbell, Randy Ohel, Daniel Zack and Joao Vieira. WSOP 2021 Event #66 $10,000 PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Brian Hastings - 447,000 Tommy Chen - 377,500 Chip Jett - 308,500 Nick Schulman - 295,000 Matt Livingston - 289,000 Felipe Ramos - 282,500 Ward Crane - 240,000 Esther Taylor-Brady - 240,000 Ari Engel - 224,000 Dan Colpoys - 223,000 Despite positive actions, not everybody’s WSOP is going to plan. Ronnie Bardah’s luck isn’t changing any time soon by the looks of it. https://twitter.com/RonnieBardah/status/1456041676414148609 Finally, is there a Player of the Year curse to legends of the past? Current combatant Ari Engel thinks so! https://twitter.com/AriEngelPoker/status/1456033927311802370  
  12. Daniel Negreanu doesn’t need to sell action. Neither does Josh Arieh. Or Felipe Ramos or Jonathan Little for that matter. However, this fall, all of them (and more) have offered to sell pieces of their 2021 World Series of Poker right here on PocketFives - most with no markup. The reason they’ve done this is to give fans of the game, those who aren’t able to play themselves, a chance to sweat the action and better enjoy the WSOP’s live streams and live updates with a little extra “something” on the line. READ: Daniel Negreanu Selling 2021 WSOP Action For Fans That Want To “Take The Ride” It’s true, in tournament poker the majority of the time even a great player is going to hit the rail before the money. However, there are times when a small investment in a favorite “horse” can go a long way. Take for instance those who grabbed a piece of Josh Arieh in Event #39 ($1,500 Pot Limit Omaha). Arieh, who finished 2nd in the 2019 $50,000 Poker Players Championship, knows a thing or two about mixed games. So, when he put a tiny piece of the PLO event up for grabs they were snapped up. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451292645750292486?s=20 Over the next three days, Arieh posted pics of his chips as they turned from a starting stack into a mountain. He went from just another player in the field to the overall chip leader. And when it was all done, Arieh claimed his third career gold bracelet and the first-place prize of $204,766. Arieh was ecstatic but so were his backers. Ten people each purchased 1% for just $15. When it was all over, they were paid out roughly $2,000 and Arieh couldn't be happier about it. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451934444831457283?s=20 While making money is the goal, entertainment value is also vital. It’s been said that watching poker can be like watching paint dry. Well, only if there’s no action at stake. Like watching a football game where you have no rooting interest, if you have a fantasy player in the game or even a small side bet with a buddy, that event becomes way more interesting. Negreanu has been paying plenty of dividends as well. He’s currently leading all players in terms of number of cashes (currently at 13). And with two final tables under his belt, Negreanu has moved into sixth place on the 2021 Player of the Year leaderboard. For eagle-eyed viewers of his vlog with good twitch reflexes, there’s been plenty of opportunities to grab a small percentage and play along with ‘Kid Poker.’ Fans who jumped in with Negreanu early on turned a $75 investment into $137 when Negreanu finished in 10th place in the $25,000 H.O.R.S.E. for a hair over $46,000. He picked up another four cashes before he hit another five-figure score. A deep run in the $5,000 Six Max helped fans more than 4x their $20 investment and bank roughly $90. Four days later, investors ate up the earnings once again. Negreanu made a deep run in the $3,000 H.O.R.S.E. In this event, spaces were limited and backers turned a 1% stake into a $175 score (over a 500% ROI) thanks to his 8th place finish for over $17,000. Negreanu previously stated that his goal is to give fans something sweat, something to enjoy while tuning in to the vlogs. Over 2,500 stakers have taken him up on it and gotten in on the action so far - and the series is only halfway done. With some of the biggest events (with the biggest paydays of the series) left to come, there’s plenty of time left to jump in. Simply sign up for an account with PocketFives, click on the Staking Menu at the top, and pick up a little action. Then follow your favorite player offering action to see when their tournament gets listed. And if it’s Negreanu you want to sweat, follow @RealKidPoker on Twitter, watch his daily YouTube WSOP Vlog, and be ready when he gives the word. https://twitter.com/RealKidPoker/status/1442897946152898560?s=20
  13. The latest day of poker action has concluded at the home of the World Series of Poker, the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. With two more bracelets won, there was also a pivotal day at the felt in the prestigious Poker Players Championship as Ryan Leng ended the third day on top of the leaderboard. Leng Leads from Arieh and Cates as 10 Remain in PPC Bracelet Hunt The third day of action in the $50,000-entry Poker Players Championship saw the remaining 35 players play down to just 10 who will return tomorrow to battle for the WSOP bracelet they all want to win and $954,020 up top. Leader of the pack with one day to close it out is Ryan Leng, who totalled 4.5 million chips by the close of play, but Leng will not have it easy with some of the best players in the world hot on his heels. Josh Arieh is closing to taking the lead from Leng, with both men having won gold already this Autumn at the Rio. Arieh has over 3 million chips, and both he and Daniel ‘Jungleman’ Cates (2.3 million) will harbor hopes of overtaking Leng before they reach the line. Elsewhere, a rollercoaster day for Daniel Negreanu ended with ‘Kid Poker’ surviving a brutal bad beat with Chris Brewer’s pocket eights getting there against the Canadian’s pocket aces when all the chips were in the middle pre-flop. Negreanu got through the money bubble and eventually ran his stack up to 700,000 by close of play. Others could not make it, and all of Adam Friedman, Alex Livingston, and Chris Vitch busted outside the money despite starting the day in the top 20% of the field. Others found the same fate, with Anthony Zinno, the current WSOP Player of the Year, busted before the money too, but some superstars of the game survived to fight another day. Eli Elezra (1,880,000) continued his great form this series, while Nick Schulman (1,280,000) and Day 2 chip leader Paul Volpe (900,000) will have designs on one of the most coveted bracelets of them all, and of course, getting their name on the Chip Reese Trophy. WSOP 2021 Event #60 $50,000 Poker Players Championship Final 10 Chipcounts: Ryan Leng - 4,500,000 Josh Arieh - 3,025,000 Dan Cates - 2,310,000 Chris Brewer - 2,025,000 Eli Elezra - 1,880,000 Matt Glantz - 1,575,000 Nick Schulman - 1,280,000 Paul Volpe - 900,000 Daniel Negreanu - 780,000 Mike Wattel - 670,000 Jean-Luc Adam Wins Super Seniors For First Bracelet The $1,000-entry Super Seniors event reached a conclusion with Frenchman Jean-Luc Adam earning his first-ever WSOP bracelet and the top prize of $255,623. With nine making the final table, Adam led from the start of that finale as overnight leader David Slaughter bust in 10th place for $18,837. Out in ninth place, just a few minutes after the final table began, was Gary Pagel, who earned $23,762 when his shove with [poker card="4s"][poker card="4h"] ran into Eugene Solomon’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9h"]. An ace on the flop doomed Pagel and he was followed from the room just a few minutes later by Reginald Powell. Powell cashed for $30,269 when his [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kc"] couldn’t come back against Alex Katsman’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"], as the board gave the latter a flush on [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="5s"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qc"]. Girish Apte departed in seventh place for $38,932 when his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"] ran into Bill Stabler’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"], with a queen-high board no help at all. Not long afterwards, Joseph Richards joined him, as his [poker card="7d"][poker card="7s"] couldn’t get anywhere against the eventual winner Adam, whose [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qh"] held to send Richards home with $50,559. Katsman went in fifth for $66,284 after his pocket eights couldn’t hold against Solomon’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9h"], a flush on the river condemning Katsman to the exit door. He only lasted a couple of hands less than Bill Stabler, who won $87,722 when his shove with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3c"] ran into Adam’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7h"] and lost to a flush on the turn. Three-handed, Scott Sukstorf was short and his laddering ended when his shove when short with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8s"] ran into Adam’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"]. A nine-high board sent Sukstorf home and gave Adam the lead into heads-up, with the Frenchman having 24 million to S0lomon’s 13 million. It was soon all over, Solomon moving all-in on a board showing [poker card="Jh"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] with [poker card="Th"][poker card="9h"] and Adam calling with [poker card="Js"][poker card="7h"]. Solomon’s bluff still had a chance to catch an eight for a straight, but the [poker card="Ac"] river gave his opponent the well-earned title of WSOP champion. WSOP 2021 Event #58 $1,000 Super Seniors Event Final Table Results: Jean-Luc Adam - $255,623 Eugene Solomon - $157,986 Scott Sukstorf - $117,181 Bill Stabler - $87,722 Alex Katsman - $66,284 Joseph Richards - $50,559 Girish Apte - $38,932 Reginald Powell - $30,269 Gary Pagel - $23,762 Tag Team Crowns Winners In Event #59, the $1,000-entry Tag Team event, Mike Ruter and Samy Dighlawi won through after an intense three-hour heads-up battle saw the pip Tomer Wolf and David Landell to the crown and $113,366 top prize. Another team to star on the final day were Amanda Botfeld and her father David, who reached third place for a score of $49,512. In an emotional post on social media before the final, the younger of the pair thanked the elder statesman of the duo for their support and guidance. https://twitter.com/amandabotfeld/status/1455571669511139328 WSOP 2021 Event #59 $1,000 Tag Team Event Final Table Results: Mike Ruter & Samy Dighlawi - $113,366 Tomer Wolf & David Landell - $70,074 Amanda Botfeld & David Botfeld - $49,512 Michael Newman & Robert Ormont - $35,542 Alfie Adam & Vidur Sethi - $25,928 Benjamin Miner & Dmitriy Uskach - $19,226 Holly Babbitt & Michael Babbitt - $14,494 Zachary Erdwurm & Steven Jones - $11,114 Scott Johnston & Bob Fisher - $8,670 $600 Deepstack Down To 40 In Event #61, the $600-entry Deepstack, Perry Ernest proved strongest as he survived a busy Day 2 with the chip lead, holding 10.5 million by the time chis went into bags at the end of the night. With Sai Ruston (7,150,000) and Marc Rangel (6,800,000) in closest pursuit, the total field of 3,916 entrants is now down to just 40 payers, with only Barry Shulman (2,425,000) and Mark Seif (950,000) having won WSOP gold before. Players to bust on the day included Brandon Sheils, Philippe Souki, Philip Tom, and Kenny Hsiung, as well as Brett Apter and Day 1 chip leader Robert Hankins. WSOP 2021 Event #61 $600 Deepstack Championship Top 10 Chipcounts: Perry Ernest - 10,500,000 Sami Ruston - 7,150,000 Marc Rangel - 6,800,000 Richard Dixon - 6,430,000 Edgardo Rosario - 5,859,000 Jean Francois Alexandre - 5,480,000 Nicolas De Bari - 5,100,000 Ronald Slucker - 5,030,000 Fernando Viana Da Costa - 5,000,000 Rubin Chappell - 4,400,000 Just 13 Left In $1,5000 PLO 8 In Event #62, the $1,500-entry PLO8 tournament, Matthew Kaplan topped the leaderboard with 3.1 million chips on a day where everything changed for the former chip leader. Day 1 ended with Japanese player Tsugunari Toma sitting on one of the biggest leads anyone has built during this World Series of Poker. Toma, however, crashed and burned as Kaplan went in the opposite direction, barely lasting half the day as others such as Kevin Gerhart (2.9 million) and Dustin Dirksen (2.4 million) both thrived. Others to make the top 10 chip counts included Sterling Lopez (1,350,000) and Michael Trivett (730,000), with Gerhart the only remaining bracelet winner of the 13 players who are left, with British player Richie Allen still hanging onto a chance of debut gold with 515,000 chips at the next big blind of 50,000. WSOP 2021 Event #62 $1,500 PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better Top 10 Chipcounts: Matthew Kaplan - 3,145,000 Kevin Gerhart - 2,900,000 Dustin Dirksen - 2,400,000 Roman Hrabec - 1,800,000 Sterling Lopez - 1,350,000 Dylan Wilkerson - 1,240,000 Tamon Nakamura - 1,145,000 Alexandr Orlov - 1,015,000 Bryant Bustamante - 805,000 Michael Trivett - 730,000 Players Turn Out For Salute To Warriors The opening day of the $500-entry Salute to Warriors event saw a great turnout, with 1,738 entrants reduced to just 169 players by the end of Day 1. Chip leader when the day closed was Andrew Moon, who was the only player to bag over a million chips with 1,274,000. He was followed in the chip counts by Taylor Pollard (866,000) and John Song (711,000), who along with Nicholas Verderamo (653,000), were the only three who amounted over half the impressive Moon’s dominant stack. With $40 from each player’s entry going towards the United Services Organization, a huge prize pool of $712,580 and a top prize of $102,465 means that plenty of money was raised for a great cause with big-name players such as Shuan Deeb donating along the way, although unfortunately for Deeb fans, the WSOP Player of the Year chaser didn’t make the Day 2 chip counts. WSOP 2021 Event #63 $500 Salute to Warriors Top 10 Chipcounts: Andrew Moon - 1,274,000 Taylor Pollard - 866,000 John Song - 711,000 Nicholas Verderamo - 653,000 Senthuran Vijayaratnam - 629,000 Terry Wheeler - 617,000 Kyle Besaw - 584,000 Alan Percal - 580,000 Marty Zabib - 557,000 Arnaldo Gordon - 536,000 Niklas Astedt Bags Big Stack In $5K NLHE/PLO Mix In the final event on the schedule, David Prociak (2,405,000) leads from Niklas Astedt (1,345,000) and Joni Jouhkimainen (1,215,000) in the $5,000-entry Event #64. With NLHE and PLO on the menu, other big names to bag top 10 chipcounts included Tommy Le (1,050,000), Uri Reichenstein (1,010,000) and Shar Levi (945,000), with players like Jason Somerville (690,000), Stefan Schillhabel (445,000) and Dan Smith (310,000) all still in with a chance of glory. WSOP 2021 Event #64 $5,000 NLHE/PLO Eight-Handed Top 10 Chipcounts: David Prociak - 2,405,000 Niklas Astedt - 1,345,000 Joni Jouhkimainen - 1,215,000 Greg Dyer - 1,175,000 Tommy Le - 1,050,000 Oliver Bosch - 1,020,000 Uri Reichenstein - 1,010,000 Shahar Levi - 945,000 Barak Wisbrod - 865,000 Corey Zedo - 785,000
  14. Ryan Hansen won his first-ever World Series of Poker title as he got the better of Japanese opponent Kosei Ichinose to claim a debut bracelet and top prize of $109,692 as the latest champion won gold at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Hansen Takes It To The Limit Event #44 was a tournament that plenty of big names battled for, with the $3,000-entry Six-Handed Limit Hold’em event seeing legends such as Joe McKeehen (23rd for $4,830), Nick Schulman (21st for $5,597), Dan Zack (19th for $5,597) and Mike Matusow (16th for $6,668) all run deep without making the final table. Terrence Chan was one player who didn’t make it that far and upon realizing that it would be his final tournament at the Rio, put out a poignant post on Twitter. https://twitter.com/tchanpoker/status/1452159434025627651 When just six players remained, Kevin Erickson led the way with a big stack of 2.3 million chips, Hansen his nearest challenger with 1.4 million and everyone else with six-figure chip stacks. It was Steve Chanthabouasy who busted first of the six, losing his last with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Tc"] against the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="8h"] of Ichinose on a board of [poker card="7s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"][poker card="As"][poker card="Jc"]. Chanthabouasy’s run to sixth place was worth $17,486. Despite starting the final day as chip leader, Kenny Hsiung would go next, drifting short before busting in fifth place for $23,688. Hsiung’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9d"] saw him commit his last chips on a flop of [poker card="Qs"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5c"], but Ichinose had [poker card="Qh"][poker card="5s"] and held through the [poker card="4c"] turn and [poker card="Ah"] river. It was the turn of Ken Deng to be eliminated in fourth place for $32,864 when he committed his stack on the turn of a board showing [poker card="8h"][poker card="7h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="Th"]. Deng held [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Jd"] for a gutshot, but Hansen had [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Js"] and when the [poker card="Jh"] landed on the river, made a flush to take the tournament into three-handed play. It was Erickson who left in third place for $46,669, with Ichinose again the benefactor from the hand. Ichinose had [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Kc"] and although he was in bad shape pre-flop against Erickson’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kh"], calling off the remainder of Erickson’s stack post-flop was easy and the [poker card="3d"] turn and [poker card="9s"] sent Ichinose into heads-up play with an exact 2:1 chip lead. That lead was not immediately vanquished - it was Limit after all - but Hansen made quad eights just five minutes into heads-up to claim a vital pot and he managed to turn around the lead before an extended period of play saw the chips see-saw wildly. Both men held the chip lead and momentum as the epic duel swung both ways before its conclusion. After getting Ichinose short, Hansen managed to close it out with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="4h"] holding against his Japanese opponent’s [poker card="Js"][poker card="Ts"], winning the top prize of $109,692 and his first WSOP bracelet, with Ichinose cashing for $67,796 as runner-up. WSOP 2021 Event #44 $3,000 Limit Hold'em Final Table Results: Ryan Hansen - $109,692 Kosei Ichinose - $67,796 Kevin Erickson - $46,669 Ken Deng - $32,864 Kenny Hsiung - $23,688 Steve Chanthabouasy - $17,486 Jeff Platt Leads $1K Double Stack In Event #43, the $1,000-entry Double Stack event, chip leader at the close of play was Jeff Platt, with the popular poker broadcaster and player bagging up a massive 3,315,000 chips. While Platt was the only player to end the day with over 3 million chips, he was followed in the top 10 by some big names and stacks, including Sylvain Naets (2,740,000), Kathy Stahl (2,485,000), and Matthew Vaughan (2,255,000) all likely to be threats on Day 3. Plenty of others made it through, with Niall Farrell (960,000), Day 1b chip leader Terry Presley (865,000), and former WSOP Main Event winner Martin Jacobson (590,000) all making it through. Others weren’t fortunate, with two-time WSOP 2021 bracelet winner Daniel Lazrus, GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos and online poker legend Chris Moorman all eliminated on Day 2. There’s no easy way to leave the table after busting a World Series of Poker event, but Shannon Shorr put his two pennies worth into the mix, with plenty of entertaining comebacks. https://twitter.com/ShannonShorr/status/1452400548024516608 WSOP 2021 Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Top 10 Chip Counts: Jeff Platt - 3,315,000 Zach Daly - 2,905,000 David Guay - 2,900,000 Sylvain Naets - 2,740,000 Avraham Azulay - 2,715,000 Gene Harrill - 2,610,000 Kathy Stahl - 2,485,000 Matthew Vaughan - 2,255,000 Sihao Zhang - 2,250,000 Josue Aguirre - 2,175,000 Witz Ends The Day Atop The $10K PLO Event #45 saw just 18 players survive the day as Jonathan Witz bagged up the biggest stack, ending the day with 2,620,000 chips. He was followed by players such as Arthur Morris (2,390,000) and Day 1 chip leader Chris Sandrock (1,900,000), with WSOP bracelet winner Daniel Zack (1,845,000) not far behind. Elsewhere, other gold-holders Tommy Le (1,000,000), Dylan Linde (780,000), Mike Matusow (715,000), Eli Elezra (650,000), and Jeremy Ausmus (600,000) will all feel confident that their experience will see them through to the final, while some big names to fall short included 2019 WSOP Player of the year Robert Campbell, Brandon Wong, and John Racener. WSOP 2021 Event #45 $10,000 PLO Championship Top 10 Chip Counts: Jonathan Witz - 2,620,000 Arthur Morris - 2,390,000 Chris Sandrock - 1,900,000 Daniel Zack - 1,845,000 Kyle Montgomery - 1,430,000 Artem Maksimov - 1,400,000 Anderson Ireland - 1,305,000 Nader Younes - 1,190,000 Tommy Le - 1,000,000 Jordan Spurlin - 960,000 Only 120 Left In $800 Deepstack In Event #46, Alejandro Andión led the remaining 120 players who survived a tumultuous Day 1 where 2,053 entries paid $800 and took their chances in pursuit of gold. Andión totaled 2,400,000 at the end of Day 1, a considerable distance ahead of Joel Orum (1,705,000) and Tomasso Briotti (1,675,000), both of whom took podium places heading into Day 2. With players such as Eric Baldwin (720,000), Anthony Marquez (250,000), and John Gorsuch (240,000) making the cut, others weren’t so fortunate, with Ryan Riess, JJ Liu, Kathy Liebert, Ari Engel, and Jesse Sylvia all busting, along with 16-time bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth. This was all after Hellmuth seemed to get the ideal preparation, too. https://twitter.com/phil_hellmuth/status/1452052614737055747 WSOP 2021 Event #46 $800 Deepstack Top 10 Chipcounts: Alejandro Andión - 2,400,000 Joel Orum - 1,705,000 Tommaso Briotti - 1,675,000 Jonas Wexler - 1,630,000 William Blais - 1,600,000 Koray Aldemir - 1,380,000 Xiao Yu - 1,345,000 Virab Zakaryan - 1,345,000 Itzhak Ashkenazi - 1,325,000 Gregory Giannokostas - 1,275,000 Daniel Negreanu Bags Top 10 Stack In $5K Freezeout In the final event of the day to conclude, there were some very big names to make the top 10 in the $5,000 Freezeout Event #47. While Jamie Sequeira (1,070,000) was the only player to ‘crack a milly’, Daniel Negreanu (617,000) and Daniel Lazrus (597,000) both had spectacular starting days at the felt, with the latter having registered immediately after busting the Double Stack event in the money. Others to thrive included Joni Jouhkimainen (559,000) and WSOP Main Event runner-up Tony Miles (429,000), while some players not to make the Day 2 draw included Chance Kornuth, Paul Newey, Thomas Boivin, Taylor Paur, Brian Yoon and Manig Loeser. WSOP 2021 Event #47 $5,000 Freezeout Top 10 Chipcounts: Jamie Sequeira - 1,070,000 Benjamin Chalot - 733,000 Daniel Rezaei - 702,000 Daniel Negreanu - 617,000 Daniel Lazrus - 597,000 Ivan Galinec - 561,000 Joni Jouhkimainen - 559,000 Johan Martinet - 450,000 Jongwook Lee - 430,000 Tony Miles - 429,000 It’s been an eventful weekend on ‘Poker Twitter’ with Ben Lamb feeling his surname entitles him to wade in on the merits of how much mustard goes with ketchup... kind of! https://twitter.com/BenbaLamb/status/1451998818912800770 Finally, is there a truer tweet from the World Series than this simple gem? We’re not saying we’d sign up to what comes next, but if ever there was a heads-up opponent you wanted to beat... https://twitter.com/sandler1860/status/1451930351194951681
  15. The Rio was buzzing on Friday for the World Series of Poker as six different events were taking place in various parts of the Amazon Room, Brasilia, and Pavilion. However, all eyes were on the final table of the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha where longtime WSOP mixed game grinder Josh Arieh, went the distance in commanding fashion, besting the final table of five and picking up $204,766 and the gold bracelet. At the same time, the $10K. H.O.R.S.E. brought back a stable full of bracelet winners to see who would make the prestigious final table and another two events kicked off to keep the action going throughout the weekend. Josh Arieh Wins Third Career Gold Bracelet The final day of Event #39 ($1,500 Pot Limit Omaha) brought back the final six players to determine who would walk away with the $204,766 first-place prize and gold bracelet. In the end, it was PocketFives own Josh Arieh who dominated the entire final table and earned the third gold bracelet of his career - his first since 2005 - and the sixth-largest WSOP cash of his career. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451684995471319042?s=20 “I mean, I don’t know, I think I’m really good, just like everybody else,” he told PokerNews. “But I haven’t won a bracelet in 15 years. I’ve come close. I think I have three or four seconds in the last six years and I ****ing dog it, like I choke, and I started feeling that pressure again right at the beginning. But I was lucky enough to hold some cards and fought through the mental weakness I guess.” Bracelet winner Tommy Le, finished in second place for $126,549 and Robert Blair took home the bronze for $89,968. “I’m a gambler at heart and I gamble at anything that I feel like I have an edge or I gamble at anything that’s close to 50-50 because I feel like I’m lucky,” Arieh continued. What's more, is that Arieh sold pieces to this bracelet victory on right here on PocketFives and 10 backers turned $15 (1%) into a $2K score. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451934444831457283?s=20 He also noted that he’s planning on trying to win bracelet #4 in the $10K Pot Limit Omaha. The new WSOP bracelet winner has routinely been selling action (and will continue to) in the new PocketFives Staking marketplace - so sign up right here. Event #39 $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Payouts Josh Arieh - $204,766 Tommy Le - $126,549 Robert Blair - $89,968 Ivan Deyra - $64,890 Gabriel Andrade - $47,492 Kevin Gerhart Leads Final Five in $10K H.O.R.S.E The final 16 players returned to play to a final table in the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. and it was packed with former bracelet winners. Eleven of the 16 returning had earned at least one bracelet in the past, making it an especially tough day to make the final table. Kevin Gerhart tops the final five returning for a shot at the $361,124 payday up top, followed closely by Eddie Blumenthal. Previous WSOP bracelet winners Marco Johnson, Bryce Yockey, and Brandon Shack-Harris round out the table which should make for exciting viewing when it's broadcast on PokerGO on Saturday. Eric Rodawig (16th, $20,272) and Max Pescatori (14th, $20,272) hit the rail early. They were eventually joined by Kevin Song (13th, $22,685), Jerry Wong (12th, $22,685), and GGPoker ambassador Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, who busted in 10th place for a $26,171. Three-time WSOP bracelet winner Benny Glaser fell in ninth place for $31,110, while David Benyamine (8th, $38,035) and Jake Schwartz (7th, $47,835) managed to ladder. Two-time bracelet winner Chris Vitch fell on the televised final table bubble in sixth place, taking home $61,819. Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Final Table Chip Counts Kevin Gerhart - 2,720,000 Eddie Blumenthal - 2,400,000 Marco Johnson - 1,840,000 Bryce Yockey - 1,445,000 Brandon Shack-Harris - 540,000 Eight Left In $2,500 Freezeout Just eight players remain in the tough field of Event #41 ($2,500 Freezeout) with Carlos Chang holding the overnight chip lead. When the final eight return they'll be battling for a $364,589 first-place prize, with the final four all hauling in no less than six figures. Brady Osterman is not far behind in second position and he'll be joined by Arthur Conan, bracelet winner Sung Joo Hyun, and Sergi Reixach. On Day 2, 135 players made it into the money and there were plenty of notable names who fell short of the final table but still managed to make the money. Sam Grafton (127th, $4,009), Kevin Martin (115th, $4,385), and Frank Marasco (105th, $4,385) were a few of the players who made an early exit. Andre Akkari (73rd, $5,306), Ali Imsirovic (45th, $7912), Daniel Lazrus (29th, $9,112), and Jeremy Ausmus (29th, $9,112) all managed to ladder as well. Event $41 $2,599 Freezeout Final Eight Chip Counts Carlos Chang - 8,140,000 Brady Osterman - 7,690,000 Arthur Conan - 4,800,000 Quang Ngo - 4,300,000 Gerald Cunniff - 2,000,000 Sung Joo Hyun - 1,815,000 Adrien Delmas - 1,400,000 Sergi Reixach - 1,190,000 Dzivielevski, David 'ODB' Baker Make $1,500 Razz FT A number of big names remain in the final seven players of Event #42 ($1,500 Razz). Charles Sinn holds the chip lead headed into the final table but he'll have to contend with the likes of Matt Grapenthien, #1-ranked Yuri Dzivielevski, Alex Livingston, a short-stacked David 'ODB' Baker among others. Just 98 players from a field of 311 returned to have a shot at the $99,188 first-place prize, but a little over half the Day 2 field would leave empty-handed. That was not the case for David 'Bakes' Baker (46th, $2,4310, four-time bracelet winner Anthony Zinno (41st, $2,431), and 2019 Player of the Year Robert Campbell (39th, $2,659) all of whom managed to sneak into the money. Ryan Reiss (27th, $3,039), Julien Martini (24th, $3,376), and Frank Kassela (23rd, $3,376) managed a pay jump or two while Perry Friedman (18th, $4,376) and Bryan Micon (13th, $4,537) managed to make their way into the top 20. Event #42 $1,500 Razz Final Table Chip Counts Charles Sinn - 2,345,000 Brett Feldman - 1,230,000 Matt Grapenthien - 1,215,000 Yuri Dzivielevski - 1,015,000 Alex Livingston - 860,000 Bradley Ruben - 855,000 David 'ODB' Baker - 180,000 $1K Double Stack Kicks Off With 1937 Runners Event #43 ($1,000 Double Stack) brought out a large field of NLHE experts and by the end of the day, it was Alexander Farahi who grabbed the chip lead, followed closely by Bay Area grinder Alex Greenblatt in second position. The field drew 1,937 runners and just 506 found a bag with plenty of notables coming back for a shot at running it up including Barry Greenstein, Ian Steinmann, Jonathan Dokler, Jeff Platt, Daniel Smiljkovic, Ryan Leng, Maria Konnikova, and Ryan Hagerty among many. Day 1B will get started on Saturday. Event #43 $1,000 Double Stack Day 1A Top 5 Chip Counts Alexander Farahi - 742,500 Alex Greenblatt - 617,500 Alexander Tafesh - 601,000 Eduardo Amaral - 596,000 Alex Kulev - 591,500
  16. Day 22 of the 2021 World Series of Poker was highlighted by the high-stakes rematch between two of poker’s elite talents. Michael Addamo and Justin Bonomo met at the final table of the $50K High Roller with Addamo to battle another major title, which ended with Addamo earning more than $1.1 million and claiming his third career gold bracelet. Additionally, the $1,500 Pot Limit Omaha played down to a final table, with Josh Arieh taking the chip lead into the final five, the $10K H.O.R.S.E. wrapped packed with big names headed to Day 3, and another spat between The Poker Brat and Anthony Zinno took place in the $1,500 Razz. Addamo Wins $50K High Roller, 3rd Career Bracelet Michael Addamo faced off against Justin Bonomo at the end of Event #38 ($50,000 High Roller) marking the second time in less than a month that these two high-stakes heavyweights battled heads up for a major title. In the end, Addamo took out all four of his final table opponents including Chris Hunichen (5th for $266,031), Erik Seidel, who was playing for his 10th career gold bracelet (4th for $358,665), Gal Yifrach ($495,305), and Bonomo who finished as the runner up for a $700,228 payday. For a full recap of the final table: Michael Addamo Bests Bonomo To Win WSOP $50K High Roller for $1.1 Million, Third Career Gold Bracelet Event #38 $50,000 High Roller Final Table Results 1.Michael Addamo - $1,132,968 2. Justin Bonomo - $700,228 3. Gal Yifrach - $495,305 4. Erik Seidel - $358,665 5.Chris Hunichen - $266,031 Josh Arieh Leads $1,500 PLO Final Five Day 2 of Event #39 ($1,500 Pot Limit Omaha) started with just 58 returning players from the original field of 821 runners and a goal to play down to the final five. PocketFives own Josh Arieh started the day as the chip leader and battled atop the chip counts for the better part of the day. It was up and down for Arieh, but in the end, he ended the day with the chip lead and will be playing for his third WSOP bracelet and more than $204,000 up top. https://twitter.com/golferjosh/status/1451445632888020992?s=20 Joining him at the final table is bracelet winner Tommy Le, Ivan Deyra, Robert Blair, and Gabriel Andrade. The final table also included Ashor Ochana who ended in 9th place for $15,842 and was followed to the rail by Charles Wilt (8th, $20,371) and Lior Abudi (7th, $26,603). When Nitesh Rawtani was felted in 6th place for $35,278, play ended for the day. Other notables to fall short of the final table included Christian Harder (27th, $5,740), 2021 WSOP bracelet winner Ryan Leng (25th, $5,740), Dan Zack (17th, $6,803), and Ari Engel who wrapped up in 15th place for $8,200. Maxx Coleman was the final table bubble, falling in 10th place for $12,715. Ben Yu was the first elimination of the day, finishing in 58th for $3,463, and was joined by Amnon Filippi (55th) and Tyler Cornell (53rd) on the rail in early action. Craig Varnell (39th) and Adam Hendrix (37th) were able to ladder a pay grade to $4,927. Event #35 Final Table Chip Counts 1. Josh Arieh - 6,330,000 2. Tommy Le - 5,300,000 3. Ivan Deyra - 5,110,000 4. Robert Blair - 2,450,000 5. Gabriel Andrade - 1,400,000 Kevin Gerhart, Benny Glaser Top $10K H.O.R.S.E. Day 2 Day 2 of the popular $10K H.O.R.S.E. brought back a total of 71 runners and nearly two-thirds of the field would have to be eliminated before the money started rolling in. By the end of the day just 16 remained with WSOP bracelet winner Kevin Gerhart holding a slim chip lead over three-time WSOP champ Benny Glaser headed into Day 3. Joining the pair in the top five are Chris Vitch, David Benyamine, and Marco Johnson. In fact, it’s a who’s who of mixed game mastery moving on to Day 3 including GGPoker ambassador and Poker Hall of Fame nominee Bertrand ‘ElkY’ Grospellier, Brandon Shack-Harris, Bryce Yockey, Jake Schwartz, and four-time bracelet holder Max Pescatori among them. The money bubble burst with just 23 players remaining which meant that Scott Seiver (22nd, $16,218), Nate Silver (21st, $16,218), former WSOP Player of the Year Mike Gorodinsky (20th, $16,218)m and newly minted bracelet winner Dylan Linde (19th, $17,738) were able to cash before hitting the rail before the end of the day. But not all of the big names in this event were able to find a bag including defending $10K H.O.R.S.E. champion Greg Mueller who was felted just outside of the money in 46th place and was joined by 2019 Player of the Year Robert Campbell, current #1-ranked Yuri Dzivielevski, Nick Schulman, and Shaun Deeb. Early eliminations included Brock Parker, Allen Kessler, and recent bracelet winners John Monnette and Adam Friedman, who just one day before completed one of the most difficult accomplishments in WSOP history by three-peating the $10K Dealers Choice. Event #40 $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. Top 5 Chip Counts Kevin Gerhart - 1,075,000 Benny Glaser - 1,045,000 Christopher Vitch - 945,000 David Benyamine - 710,000 Marco Johnson - 665,000 Nearly 900 Show Up For $2,500 Freezout A field of 896 runners on Day 1 of Event #41 ($2,500 Freezeout) played down to just 135 who will return on Day 2 with Lithuania Dominykas Mikolatitis holding the overnight chip lead having just touched 1 million in chips. Arthur Conan wrapped the day second in chips and was closely followed by Christoper Basile, Julian Milliard-Feral, and Spaniard Vicent Bosca Ramon. There are plenty of other notable names to have made Day 2 including Alan Sternberg, Sergi Reixach, Andre Akkari, Daniel Lazrus, Ali Imsirovic, Jeremy Ausmus, Sam Grafton, and Kevin Martin among them. All 135 of the remaining players have made the money with payouts starting as soon as the first player hits the rail on Day 2. Event #41 $2,500 NLHE Freezeout Top 5 Chip Counts 1. Dominykas Mikolatitis - 1,000,000 2. Arthur Conan - 787,000 3. Christopher Basile - 766,000 4. Julian Milliard-Feral - 742,000 5. Vicent Bosca Ramon - 711,000 David ‘ODB’ Baker, Frank Kassela In $1,500 Razz Top 5 How low can you go? That’s the name of the game in Event #42 ($1,500 Razz) as just 98 players from an original field of 311 remain after Day 1. Ariel Shefer will return with the chip lead on Friday but keeping it close is Todd Dakake who is second in chips, followed by David ‘ODB’ Baker, Steven Cage, and former WSOP Player of the Year Frank Kassela in fifth. Razz drew in plenty of big names including 16-time WSOP bracelet winner Phil Hellmuth who wanted to take the day off but couldn’t help but register “his best game.” In a scene we’ve seen before Hellmuth and four-time WSOP champ Anthony Zinno got wrapped up in a big hand with Zinno coming out on top, eliminating Hellmuth and Hellmuth giving his friend an earful. According to PokerNews, “That’s the worst ***ing play I’ve ever seen. I can tell you play Razz a lot,” Hellmuth said to Zinno who, once again, got the better of the Brat. While Hellmuth didn’t make Day 2, plenty of other notables return to battle for the bracelet. Among them include Bryan Micon, Perry Freidman, Julien Martini, the aforementioned Anthony Zinno, Yuri Dzivielevski, Robert Campbell, Ryan Reiss, Poker Hall of Fame nominee Ted Forrest, and Daniel Negreanu. Event #42 $1,500 Razz Top 5 Chip Counts Ariel Shefer - 254,000 Todd Drake - 231,500 David ‘ODB’ Baker - 205,000 Steven Cage - 197,000 Frank Kassela - 181,000
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.