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Found 7 results

  1. Kelly Minkin was the last woman remaining in the 2015 World Series of Poker Main Event, vying to become only the second woman to make the Main Event final table (Barbara Enright, 1995). She finished in 29th place for $211,000. --- Tournament Poker Edgeis the only poker training site dedicated exclusively to MTTs and features over 1,000 training videos, blogs, articles, podcasts and a dedicated strategy forum for members. Check Tournament Poker Edge out on Twitter. --- Minkin, 28, is as well-rounded of a person as you could find at that stage of the tourney, having graduated from the University of Arizona with a degree in molecular and cellular biology and then earning a law degree from Arizona Summit Law School. In 2015, she was a medical malpractice defense attorney at the law firm of Kent and Wittekind in Phoenix. Though it is (unfortunately) notable that she is the last female in the field, it is not like she has never had success at the poker tables. She has earned over half-a-million dollars in live tournaments (not counting this one) and had already cashed three times at the 2015 WSOP. Her most significant cash came in the 2015 WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open Championship, where she finished third for $262,912. If went on to win the Main Event, there would be no rumors about how much money she took home. Unlike many champs, she will pocket all of it (minus taxes). "A lot of other poker players are saying that my situation is really rare," Minkin told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. "I've never had a backer. I've kind of come up on my own and had success in tournaments and cash. It's really hard to say because I feel like each person in poker has their own journey and I'm appreciative and just feel really lucky to be in the spot that I'm in." Minkin said she was first exposed to poker by her father and brother, who held $20 tournaments. A few years later, she began playing more on her own, going to the closest casino when she was bored. It paid off and, as she tells it, her employer is more than happy to let her schedule work around poker tournaments.
  2. On Sunday, the World Series of Poker Main Event continued airing on ESPN. We checked in during the second episode, which lasted an hour. It was the end of Day 6 when 31 players remained. To start the coverage, David Peterswas all-in for his last eight big blinds with 2-2 against A-10. The poker gods smiled upon him, as he won the flip and doubled up. Then, Max Steinberg doubled up an opponent who had trip fives after calling with nines on an ace-high board. Steinberg shipped 19% of his stack to his tablemate. At the feature table, Daniel Negreanu(pictured) won a pot worth 3.1 million in chips after turning a straight. He took half of Neil Blumenfield's stack in the process. Then it was the demise of the last woman standing this year, malpractice attorney Kelly Minkin. She dropped a pot worth five million after calling with 4-4 on a board of 10-J-3-3-5. Her opponent had J-7 for a better two pair. Then, she 3bet all-in with 10-4 for trips on a flop of 6-10-10, but ran into Q-10. She was drawing dead by the turn and busted in 29th place. ESPN showed other players in the room shocked by Minkin's departure. Minkin (pictured) told ESPN, "I'll definitely be back. I'm going to still continue to play tournaments. You can't win all of them, so I'll be back." Back at the feature table, Negreanu, armed with pocket eights, raised to 275,000 before the flop and Wasim Ahmar shoved over the top with deuces. Negreanu called an extra 900,000 in chips and the better hand held, further trimming the Main Event field. Andrew Moreno, holding A-10, moved all-in before the flop and received a taker in Joseph dude904McKeehen, who had A-Q. The board ran out 5-Q-2-A-9 and Moreno was eliminated in 28th place, setting up the final 27 and Day 7. As ESPN poker commentator Norman Chad put it, "The only time 200 grand feels bad is right here." Thomas Kearneyheld the chip lead when 27 players remained at 14.4 million. You can catch Day 7 beginning this Sunday at 8:30pm ET on ESPN. Want the latest poker headlines and interviews? Follow PocketFives on Twitterand Like PocketFives on Facebook.
  3. In what felt like a flash, the 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event suddenly just has 310 players left with Barry Hutter standing on top of the entire field. Sunday's play started with 1,182 players all still hoping to become World Champ, but over 5.5 two-hour levels of play, 872 players were shown the door. Hutter managed to do some damage on Day 4 and ended up bagging nearly six million and the chip lead. Four former #1-ranked PocketFivers managed to advance to Day 5 with Shaun Deeb ending with the highest chip count at 2,175,000. Cliff Josephy (1,985,000), Paul Volpe (1,070,000) and Chris Moorman (907,000) are also still alive. Kelly Minkin Makes a Big Call For Top 10 Stack A key moment for Kelly Minkin came late in Level 19. Faced with a decision for roughly 60% of her stack, Minkin eventually managed to call her opponent's all in river bet and tabled a paired king for second pair - good enough to beat Ivan Galinec's flopped third pair. Minkin finished Day 4 with 3,459,000, good enough for the sixth-largest stack. The Demise of Phil Ivey All eyes, including those of the viewers watching at home on ESPN, were on Phil Ivey on Sunday. The 10-time bracelet winner started the day with a decent size stack and was at one of the ESPN secondary feature tables. Ultimately, Ivey was unable to navigate his way through Sunday's landmines. Ivey raised to 22,000 from middle position before Brian Altman made it 75,000 to go from late position. After the blinds folded, Ivey called. The flop came [qc][js][2s] and Ivey checked. Altman bet 60,000 and Ivey called. The [8s] turn got both players to check. The river was the [3d] and Ivey checked to Altman who bet 195,000. Ivey moved all in for 629,000 total and Altman tank-called and showed [qs][jc] for top two pair while Ivey flashed pocket nines before exiting the Amazon Room. More Than Just Ivey Though Scattered throughout the bustouts on Sunday were a number of prominent players including former World Champions, the start-of-day chip leader, European Poker Tour champion and a number of other familiar faces. 357. Mustapha Kanit - $33,305 367. Darren Elias - $33,305 379. Liv Boeree - $33,305 400. In Sun Geoum - $33,305 409. Jonathan Duhamel - $33,305 424. Frank Flowers - $29,625 428. Dominik Panka - $29,625 492. Kristen Bicknell - $26,535 541. Todd Brunson - $23,940 543. Jessica Dawley - $23,940 547. Phil Ivey - $23,940 612. Johnny Chan - $21,750 685. Eugene Katchalov - $19,900 814. Patrik Antonius - $18,340 910. Maria Konnikova - $17,025 982. Jamie Kerstetter - $15,920 Top 10 Chip Counts Barry Hutter - 5,597,000 Alexander Haro - 5,031,000 Brian Altman - 4,861,000 Andres Jeckeln - 4,506,000 Hari Bercovici - 3,510,000 Kelly Minkin - 3,459,000 Franklin Azevedo - 3,410,000 Ubaid Habib - 3,300,000 Nicholas Newport - 3,269,000 Krasimir Yankov - 3,264,000 Action resumes at 11 am PT with players expected to play another 5.5 levels.
  4. John Hesp. Michael Ruane. Mark Newhouse. Even William Kasouf. Every year during the World Series of Poker thousands of new faces enter the halls of the Rio All Suite & Casino in hopes of earning a life-changing score. Sometimes though, along with the money, a player's accomplishments and personality introduce them to poker fans around the world, helping them become the next emerging poker star. In some cases, it may be a player who has been on the scene for a number of years and their expertise was able to shine in the summertime to elevate their profile to new heights. In 2018, it was no different. Here are just some of the players who went from being a face in the crowd to one of the breakout stars of the World Series of Poker. John Cynn It should be no surprise that the Los Angeles cash game grinder turned Main Event champion is now known by just about every fan of the game of poker. John Cynn bested the second largest Main Event field in history en route to an $8.8 million payday all in front of the cameras of the Worldwide Leader in Sports, ESPN. The achievement alone puts Cynn’s name in the history books. But it was his play and personality that truly turned him into a star. As the other players hit the rail, Cynn’s visibility on camera increased. Those who tuned in to the broadcast were treated to a poker player who was enjoying every second of the journey while not sacrificing a high level of play. It remains to be seen if Cynn will expand his tournament schedule, being a cash game pro. However, if he does decide to hit the circuit he will command the attention of his fellow players and the media for many years to come. Tony Miles John Cynn's foil in the Main Event was runner-up Tony Miles. From early on during the ESPN coverage, it was clear that Miles was at ease both at the tables and in front of the camera. And it wasn’t just his play and the affable table talk of Miles that endeared him to fans. His backstory of overcoming adversity and his challenges with addiction was instantly relatable to many who watch and play the game. On the final hand of the tournament, Cynn took his time making a call for it all. Miles seemed to step out of character and snub Cynn when it all over with an accusation of a slow roll. The very next day he took to Twitter, owned the moment and made a heartfelt apology. His very human side was on display and his authenticity only drew the public more on his side. Whereas it’s less certain how often we’ll see Cynn on the circuit, there’s a high likelihood that Miles is ready to step into an ambassador-like role. In many interviews he proclaimed his love of poker and ambition to continue playing at the highest levels. Ben Yu It’s true that Ben Yu was already known by his peers as being a world class player. Prior to the 2018 WSOP, he’d already earned two gold bracelets and $2.4 million in earnings. However, even though Yu already had an amazing ten year career, he’d never had a summer like the one in 2018. Los Angeles, CA’s Yu cashed in 15 different events including picking up his third career bracelet by winning the final event of the series, Event #77: $50,000 No Limit High Roller for $1.650 million. He also had a runner-up finish in Event #42, for $866,000. Yu played everything. From the $365 Pot Limit Omaha to the online bracelet events to the Main Event, where he finished in 150th place. When the six weeks were done, Yu’s grind paid off big time. He’d more than doubled his career lifetime earnings to $5.25 million and cracking the top 200 on the All-Time Money List. Kelly Minkin One-time lawyer, Kelly Minkin was already known by those who follow poker as a fierce on-the-felt competitor. Though her poker roots began in 2013, she found greater notoriety in 2015 when she made the final table of a World Poker Tour event as well as making a super deep run in the 2015 WSOP Main Event, earning the media bestowed title of Last Woman Standing. In 2018 Minkin’s Main Event run energized a community when deep in the tournament she found herself holding the overall chip lead. This landed Minkin on the feature table, multiple times, including pulling off big-time bluffs - one of which prompted commentator Nick Schulman to label her play “gangsta”, a term for her play which quickly caught fire. Though Minkin didn’t make the final table, she finished in 50th place for over $156,000. Her score pushed her career total earnings over the $1 million mark. It was the second time in four years she was the Last Woman Standing. Scott Bohlman Three, two, one. Scott Bohlman finished in each of those places this summer. The Illinois native has been a longtime grinder who certainly stepped up his game in 2018. Bohlman, who plays all the games, picked up his first gold bracelet by taking down Event #40: $2,500 Mixed Big Bet for $122,138. He followed that up four days later finishing in sixth in Event #49: $10K PLO Championship for another $157,097. He notched two more six-figure scores late in the series. A runner-up finish in Event #64: $10,000 Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo Eight for $225,210 (a career-high cash) and Event #69: $3,000 PLO 6-Handed for $199,572. In total Bohlman earned over $739,000 over 11 summer cashes, good enough to land him in the top 5 on the WSOP Player of the Year race. To put his summer in perspective, Bohlman’s results would have been good enough to land him as the sixth most productive player in the 25k Fantasy competition. That ranks above players like Justin Bonomo, Mike Leah, and John Racener. Unfortunately for those who drafted, no one picked Bohlman. Next year, that’s likely to change.
  5. Some of the biggest names in poker will put a target on their back as the World Poker Tour returns to Jacksonville, Florida for the WPT bestbet Bounty Scramble. The WPT’s $5,000 Main Event will take place from October 19-23 at bestbet Jacksonville and feature 24 players with a $2,500 bounty on their head. The Main Event A staple of the WPT Main Tour, the bestbet Jacksonville has been a key stop for the past seven seasons. The Bounty Scramble Main Event carries a $5,000 buy-in ($4,630 + $290 entry fee + $80 staff) and a $1 million guarantee. Players have the option of two starting days beginning on October 19 with both starting days allowing players unlimited re-entry. The four-day structure has the final table playing out on a lifestream on Friday, October 23. Additionally, the WPT has incorporated the big blind ante as well as a 30-second Action clock which starts when the tournament is only one table away from the money. Capture A Bounty The standard structure of a WPT event is normally enough to get players excited to attend an event. However, the bestbet Bounty Scramble gives players an extra incentive to grab a seat and make a loose call. There will be (at least) 24 players in the field that, if they are eliminated of the tournament, will give the player that knocked them out $2,500 on the spot. This year, bestbet Jacksonville has taken a positive step in continuing to promote the game of poker to women. They have doubled the number of women invited to participate as bounties from 2017. In 2018, ten of the 24 players that have been selected as bounties are not only some of the best players on the planet but they also happen to be women. The list includes 2018 World Series of Poker Ladies Champion Jessica Dawley, 2-time WSOP bracelet winner Loni Harwood, Kitty Kuo, Jamie Kerstetter, WSOP Main Event standout Kelly Minkin and more. Joining them are some of poker’s most notable names. A sampling of those with a price tag on their backs includes 4-time WPT Champion Darren Elias, Bryan Kaverman, Martin Rettenmaier, Matt Affleck, 3-time NFL Super Bowl Champion Richard Seymour, actor Kevin Pollack and 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event runner-up Tony Miles among others. A Look Back Bounty tournaments at the highest level come with an extra level of adrenaline. The idea that after taking out an opponent, the tournament director may be giving you four-figures on the spot gives players extra incentive to get in the mix. bestbet Jacksonville has appeared on the WPT schedule since Season 10 (2011-2012). It wasn't until Season 13 that they formally changed the name to the Bounty Scramble and increased the buy-in to $5,000. In that year, Ryan Van Sanford from Colorado Springs, CO took down the field of 461 players to win a career-high cash of $421,668. Tyler Patterson, who returns again as a bounty in 2018, took down the title in 2014 besting Benjamin Zamani heads-up for $375,270. Patterson returned to the final table of the very next year in what was a stacked final table that included Noah Schwartz, Ankush Mandavia and eventual winner Sam Panzica. Panzica won over $350,000 for his first WPT title. He would go on to win a second WPT title in another bounty tournament - the 2017 Bay 101 Shooting Stars for over $1.3 million. Like Patterson before him, Panzica also made the final table the year after he won it. Just last year, Panzica finished runner-up to Paul Petraglia. Petraglia, a Florida local, defeated the 323 player field for a cash of over $315,000. Prior to his win, his largest recorded cash was for just over $3,000. What To Watch For It’s still early in WPT season 17 with WPT bestbet Bounty Scramble as only the fifth event, but the WPT Player of the Year race is in full swing. After his victory in the WPT Maryland Live! Main Event, two-time WPT Champion Tony Ruberto has taken the POY lead. If he makes the trip to Jacksonville, he will be looking separate him from the field of other Season 17 winners. Keep an eye on the core group of bounties as well. The WPT has chosen a refreshing group of young pros as well as players who have traditionally done well in this event. Minkin, Miles and Dawley will be mixing it up with players who have multiple WPT titles like Elias and Rettenmaier to vie for the title of last bounty standing. With so much talent, it’s not altogether unlikely that a bounty (maybe two) will make it to the final table of six. Finally, the industry will be watching for the number of runners bestbet Jacksonville will register in 2018. Over the past three years, entries and the prize pool have been on the decline in Jacksonville. The $1 million guarantee placed on the Main Event is the lowest guarantee on tour (WPT Choctaw also had a $1 million guarantee which was more than doubled). Even though there’s $60,000 taken out for the bounties, the hopes are that there is an uptick at the Bounty Scramble. A prize pool of over $1.5 million, exceeding 2017, should be considered a win. Follow Along Live updates for the event will be provided by the World Poker Tour on their website. Also, the final table will be broadcast on a live streamed on Tuesday, October 23. The final table will start at 4:00 pm ET on a 30-minute delay. Complete List of Bounties $2,500 Bounty Player Allison Hollander Byron Kaverman Darren Elias Ester 'Etay' Taylor James Calderaro Jamie Kerstetter Jessica Dawley Jo Kim Kelly Minkin Kevin Pollack Kitty Kuo Lacey Jones Lexy Gavin Loni Harwood Marvin Rettenmaier Matt Affleck Matt Glantz Matt Savage Nabil (Doc) Hirezi Paul Petraglia Richard Seymour Tony Miles Tristan Wade Tyler Patterson
  6. Almost everybody who has entered a poker tournament has experienced this at some point; you look down at your stack and notice you're desperately short. It feels like it's only a matter of time before you're eliminated. Earlier this week Tony Tran was in that position in the World Poker Tour bestbet Bounty Scramble. Staring at just two big blinds with the blinds fast approaching him, Tran was all but out. And then he just couldn't lose a pot. Tran completed the comeback story Monday night, beating Jake Schwartz heads-up to win the bestbet Bounty Scramble, $341,486 and a seat in the WPT Tournament of Champions. Tran started the final table fifth in chips with only Dominique Mosley behind him. Things didn't start off strong for Tran though. After picking off a Ray Qartomy bluff, Tran found himself in the middle of a hand that could have seen his tournament end relatively early. Mosley moved all in for 340,000 from the cutoff and Tran defended from the small blind. Schwartz re-raised to 850,000 from the big blind and Tran made it 1,400,000. Schwartz took his time before moving all in for 5,185,000. Tran folded, showing [poker card="ah"][poker card="kd"], and then felt relief as Schwartz tabled [poker card="ac"][poker card="as"]. Mosley flipped over [poker card="js"][poker card="ts"] and then watched the board run out [poker card="5h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="7d"] to cement his elimination in sixth place. Nine hands later, with Schwartz in control of nearly half of the chips in play, another player was sent packing. From UTG, Schwartz raised to 110,000 before Ping Liu announced he was all in for 920,000 from the cutoff. Ray Qartomy re-raised all in for 1,305,000 and Schwartz folded. Liu turned over [poker card="ac"][poker card="4c"] and needed some help after Qartomy showed [poker card="jd"][poker card="jh"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="8c"][poker card="5h"] flop changed nothing for Liu and once the [poker card="9s"] turn and [poker card="6d"] river completed the board, he was eliminated in fifth place. Qartomy's run only lasted another two hours. Down to just nine big blinds, Qartomy moved all in from the button and Tran tank-called from the big blind. Qartomy was behind with [poker card="kc"][poker card="qh"] to Tran's [poker card="ad"][poker card="7s"]. The [poker card="td"][poker card="8h"][poker card="2s"] flop left Qartomy with some hope, but the [poker card="as"] turn left him with just four outs to Broadway to stay alive. The river was the [poker card="5c"] and he was eliminated in fourth. Over the course of the next 90 minutes, Tran took over the chip lead before sending another player packing. Schwartz folded his button and Kelly Minkin completed from the small blind before Tran raised to 480,000 from the big blind. Minkin responded by moving all in for 2,260,000 and Tran snap-called, tabling [poker card="ah"][poker card="kc"] in the process. Minkin showed [poker card="ac"][poker card="3c"] and needed some help to stay in the tournament. The [poker card="as"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3s"] flop gave Minkin two pair, but the [poker card="4h"] counterfeited Minkin's hand and the [poker card="9h"] river completed her elimination in third place. Heads up began with Tran holding 59% of the chips in play and it took just 90 minutes for him to complete the comeback. Tran raised to 300,000 from the button and Schwartz moved all in for 2,305,000. Tran snap-called and again tabled [poker card="as"][poker card="kd"] which put him ahead of Schwartz who showed [poker card="ad"][poker card="5d"]. The [poker card="kh"][poker card="8h"][poker card="5s"] flop paired both players and Schwartz was unable to improve on the [poker card="4c"] turn or [poker card="3s"] river and was eliminated in second place. This year's bestbet Bounty Scramble drew 356 players, up slightly over the 323 runners it drew in 2017. Final Table Payouts Tony Tran - $341,486 Jake Schwartz - $228,590 Kelly Minkin - $146,973 Ray Qartomy - $95,684 Ping Liu - $73,734 Dominique Mosley - $60,981
  7. After a crazy Day 1C, Day 2AB of the 2019 World Series of Poker Main Event was actually uneventful and rather peaceful. The 2,383 players who managed to get through Day 1A and 1B combined into one field on Saturday and they were joined by another 100 players who decided to use the late registration option before play began. A little more than half of the players who started the day with chips were able to finish the day with chips. Timothy Su Goes From Second to First Timothy Su finished Day 1A with the second biggest stack. He improved on that position on Saturday, ending the day with 791,000 and the chip lead. The next biggest stack belongs to Tony Blanchandin with 744,500. Sitting in third is German pro Anton Morgenstern. He has been here before. In 2013, Morgenstern built up a massive chip lead heading into Day 7 only to blow up and bust out in 20th. Two years later, history basically repeated itself as Morgenstern was sent home in 22nd place. He'll return on Day 3 to a stack of 735,000. Heard 'Em Say: 100 Take Advantage of Day 2AB Late Registration For the first time in WSOP history, players can register up until the start of play on each Day 2. There were exactly 100 players who took advantage of this for Day 2AB to push the total field to 8,225 players - 548 short of the record set in 2006. Yuri Dzivielevski Leads Former #1s into Day 3 Just a handful of former #1-ranked players made it through the Day 2AB. Just weeks after winning his first bracelet, Yuri Dzivielevski continues to enjoy the run good and ended the day with 290,300. Sweden's 'lena900' isn't far behind him with 247,000. Paul Volpe, who has cashed four previous times in the Main Event, including a 142nd place last year, ended the day with 190,700. Good friend Taylor Paur bagged up 105,300. Pennsylvania Poker Players Continue to Represent Sometime later this month, regulated Pennsylvania online poker will launch, but for now a number of players from the Keystone State are hoping to make a deep run in the Main Event. Donald Dombach leads the 26 players from Pennsylvania who made it through Day 2AB. Dombach ended the day with 314,000. Not too far behind him is four-time bracelet winner Brian Hastings. He built his stack up to 274,000. He's followed by Dennis Cronin (251,300), Francis Stempin (202,200), and Volpe. Other notables from Pennsylvania who finished with chips on Saturday include Matt Brady (181,900), Matt Glantz (166,200), Seth Berger (164,900), and Aaron Overton (136,800). Top 10 Chip Counts Timothy Su - 791,000 Tony Blanchandin - 744,500 Anton Morgenstern - 735,000 Florian Duta - 731,500 Galen Hall - 705,900 Gerald Claunch - 699,600 Rachid Amamou - 688,000 Bryan Buonocore - 668,800 Anthony Spinella - 643,700 Brian Yoon - 643,400
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